Sample records for fleet testing fuel

  1. NREL: Transportation Research - Alternative Fuel Fleet Vehicle Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmission Planning andStudyPhoto

  2. HEV Fleet Testing - 2010 Ford Fusion VIN:4699 - Fleet Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    699 Fleet Testing Results To Date Operating Statistics Distance Driven: 73,490 Average Trip Distance: 10.8 mi Stop Time with Engine Idling: 13% Trip Type CityHighway: 86%...

  3. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit...

  4. Hoover Police Fleet Reaches Alternative Fuel Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When Tony Petelos became the mayor of Hoover in 2004, the police fleet was run down. Within the next year, Petelos, with support from the community, called for a big change: switch out the old police fleet with new, flexible-fueled vehicles.

  5. Lubricants - Pathway to Improving Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet Vehicles Reviews recent studies on potential for low-viscosity lubricants and low-friction surfaces and additives to reduce fuel consumption, and...

  6. Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fleet and Baseline Performance Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts baseline performance and fleet testing of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on seven HEV models and accumulated 1.4 million fleet testing miles on 26 HEVs. The HEV models tested or in testing include: Toyota Gen I and Gen II Prius, and Highlander; Honda Insight, Civic and Accord; Chevrolet Silverado; Ford Escape; and Lexus RX 400h. The baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed track testing to document the HEV’s fuel economy (SAE J1634) and performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model are driven to 160,000 miles per vehicle within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events, and fuel use is recorded and used to compile life-cycle costs. At the conclusion of the 160,000 miles of fleet testing, the SAE J1634 tests are rerun and each HEV battery pack is tested. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, Electric Transportation Applications, and Exponent Failure Analysis Associates. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  7. NREL: Transportation Research - Fleet Test and Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearch Cutaway image ofFleet

  8. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications 2012 Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EPAct State and...

  9. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered under the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005.

  10. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Methods (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the difference between Standard and Alternative Compliance requirements for state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act.

  11. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. ti13ohara.pdf More Documents & Publications Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets 2012 Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider...

  12. Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010 Honda...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Testing Activity Maintenance Sheet for 2010 Honda Insight LX VIN JHMZE2H59AS011748 HEV Fleet Testing Date Mileage Description Cost 842009 5,752 Changed oil and filter...

  13. Clean Cities Offers Fleets New Tool to Evaluate Benefits of Alternative Fuel Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AFLEET Tool allows fleets to calculate payback periods and emissions benefits of alternative fuel vehicles.

  14. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides answers to frequently asked questions about the EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program's State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets.

  15. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell...

  16. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012 ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012 Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012 This report is the sixth in an annual series of reports that...

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Fleets Aid in Superstorm Recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP)MassachusettsExperimentalInfrastructureFuels in Its FleetCNG

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Fleets Make Progress with Propane

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduce Operating CostsElectricMaine Fleets

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Seattle Rideshare Fleet Adds EVs, Enjoys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural GasSuccess

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro Fleet RunsTexas

  1. HEV Fleet Testing - 2010 Ford Fusion vin#4757

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    757 Fleet Testing Results To Date Operating Statistics Distance Driven: 145,595 Average Trip Distance: 11.3 mi Stop Time with Engine Idling: 11% Trip Type CityHighway:...

  2. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2008/fiscal year 2009.

  3. Correlating Dynamometer Testing to In-Use Fleet Results of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John G. Smart; Sera White; Michael Duoba

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard dynamometer test procedures are currently being developed to determine fuel and electrical energy consumption of plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV). To define a repeatable test procedure, assumptions were made about how PHEVs will be driven and charged. This study evaluates these assumptions by comparing results of PHEV dynamometer testing following proposed procedures to actual performance of PHEVs operating in the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) North American PHEV Demonstration fleet. Results show PHEVs in the fleet exhibit a wide range of energy consumption, which is not demonstrated in dynamometer testing. Sources of variation in performance are identified and examined.

  4. Fleet vehicles in the Unites States: composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miaou, S.P.; Hu, P.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Young, J.R. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As fleets become a larger proportion of the new vehicle population on the road, they have more influence on the characteristics of the total US motor vehicle population. One of the characteristics which fleets are expected to have the most influence on is the overall vehicle fuel economy. In addition, because of the relatively large market share and the high turnover rate of fleet vehicles, fleets have been considered as a useful initial market for alternative fuel vehicles. In order to analyze fleet market potential and likely market penetration of alternative fuel vehicles and to infrastructure requirements for successful operations of these vehicles in the future, information on fleet sizes and composition, fleet vehicle operating characteristics (such as daily/annual miles of travel), fuel efficiency, and refueling practices, is essential. The purpose of this report is to gather and summarize information from the latest data sources available pertaining to fleet vehicles in the US This report presents fleet vehicle data on composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices. The questions these data are intended to address include: (1) How are fleet vehicles operated (2) Where are they located and (3) What are their usual fueling practices Since a limited number of alternative fuel fleet vehicles are already in use, data on these vehicles are also included in this report. 17 refs.

  5. Fleet vehicles in the Unites States: composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miaou, S.P.; Hu, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Young, J.R. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As fleets become a larger proportion of the new vehicle population on the road, they have more influence on the characteristics of the total US motor vehicle population. One of the characteristics which fleets are expected to have the most influence on is the overall vehicle fuel economy. In addition, because of the relatively large market share and the high turnover rate of fleet vehicles, fleets have been considered as a useful initial market for alternative fuel vehicles. In order to analyze fleet market potential and likely market penetration of alternative fuel vehicles and to infrastructure requirements for successful operations of these vehicles in the future, information on fleet sizes and composition, fleet vehicle operating characteristics (such as daily/annual miles of travel), fuel efficiency, and refueling practices, is essential. The purpose of this report is to gather and summarize information from the latest data sources available pertaining to fleet vehicles in the US This report presents fleet vehicle data on composition, operating characteristics, and fueling practices. The questions these data are intended to address include: (1) How are fleet vehicles operated? (2) Where are they located? and (3) What are their usual fueling practices? Since a limited number of alternative fuel fleet vehicles are already in use, data on these vehicles are also included in this report. 17 refs.

  6. Department of Biological Engineering Fall 2012 Solar Innovations Inc. Biodiesel Fleet Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Biological Engineering Fall 2012 Solar Innovations Inc. Biodiesel Fleet work. The goal was to research and implement biodiesel into their fleet by finding the best biodiesel for the implementation of biodiesel into their fleet. This will include: · Prospective suppliers of biodiesel fuel

  7. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012 Leslie Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kevin Chandler Battelle Christina Gikakis Federal Transit...

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Fleet Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Fleet Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Report for Fiscal Year 2008. doefleetreport2008.pdf More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0896 The...

  9. Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2010/FY 2011, EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2010/fiscal year 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state and alternative fuel provider (SFP) fleets under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. For model year (MY) 2010, the compliance rate for the 2911 covered SFP fleets was 100%. Fleets used either Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. The 279 fleets that used Standard Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 acquisition requirements by 61%. The 12 covered fleets that complied using Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 petroleum-use-reduction requirements by 89%. Overall, DOE saw modest decreases from MY 2009 in biodiesel fuel use credits earned and in the number of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) acquired. Compared to years before MY 2009, these rates were far lower. Because covered fleets acquired fewer new vehicles overall in MY 2010, the requirement for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), which is proportional to new acquisitions, also dropped.

  10. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report, Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2009/FY 2010 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2009/fiscal year 2010.

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Green Fueling Station Powers Fleets in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean CitiesStationTrucks GoldenUpstate New

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Los Angeles Public Works Fleet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mixer Ozinga Adds 14 Natural Gas Concrete Mixers to Its Fleet Sept. 28, 2013 Photo of an ice resurfacer Electric Ice Resurfacers Improve Air Quality in Minnesota Sept. 14, 2013...

  13. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford CMAX Energi (a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle).

  14. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles: Resources for Fleet Managers (Clean Cities) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, A.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discussion of the tools and resources on the Clean Cities, Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center, and the FuelEconomy.gov Web sites that can help vehicle fleet managers make informed decisions about implementing strategies to reduce gasoline and diesel fuel use.

  15. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

  16. Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US); Clark, N.

    2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

  17. Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

  18. Relationship between Heavy Vehicle Speed Limit and Fleet Fuel Consumption on Minor Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, G.; Morrison, G.; Midgley, W.; Cebon, D.

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    e s/M in ) Link Data Calibrated Model 13 3. Fuel Consumption Model Figure 7 outlines the basic structure of the fuel consumption model. Figure 7: General flow diagram of the fuel consumption model. Energy Consumption Model The energy... flow rates tend to be low. As traffic approaches bound flow (at the top of the chart), vehicle interactions increase and faster fleet vehicles begin to platoon behind the slowest vehicles. The extent to which traffic is slowed depends on the speeds...

  19. HEV Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Maintenance Sheet for 2010 Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L32AR194699 Date Mileage Description Cost 1012009 5915 Changed oil and filter 28.77...

  20. Optimal Fueling Strategies for Locomotive Fleets in Railroad Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    · Fuel (diesel) price influenced by: ­ Crude oil price ­ Refining ­ Distribution and marketing ­ Others 4 Price 3 · Railroad fuel consumption remains steady · Crude oil price sharply increases in recent years · Fuel-related expenditure is one of the biggest cost items in the railroad industry #12;Fuel Price

  1. 2012 Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHE U.S.Energy19.xlsx2Energy 2012 Fuel

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Connecticut Utility Fleet Operates Vehicles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean Cities Reflects on 20on Alternative Fuels

  3. Lubricants - Pathway to Improving Fuel Efficiency of Legacy Fleet Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1| Department of Energy -

  4. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,Department ofEnergy Regulatory

  5. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,Department ofEnergy Regulatoryof

  6. Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19,Department ofEnergy Regulatoryofof

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia's Government Fleet Uses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean Cities Reflects onAFDC Printable Versiona

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduce OperatingPropane in

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Powers Fleets Across the Nation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduceNew HampshirePropaneOrleans

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Fleet Braun's Express

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulaseFuels and Vehicles MarylandCelebrates 10

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies for Fleet Managers to Conserve

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulaseFuelsConversions toSchoolAlternatives Fees

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Hampshire Fleet Revs up With Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduceNew Hampshire Fleet Revs up With Natural

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Santa Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro Fleet Runs on Natural Gas to someone

  14. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

  15. Dual-Fuel Truck Fleet: Start-Up Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NREL

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Although dual-fuel engine technology has been in development and limited use for several years, it has only recently moved toward full-scale operational capability for heavy-duty truck applications. Unlike a bifuel engine, which has two separate fuel systems that are used one at a time, a dual-fuel engine uses two fuel systems simultaneously. One of California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) current programs is a demonstration of dual-fuel engine technology in heavy-duty trucks. These trucks are being studied as part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Alternative Fuel Truck Program. This report describes the start-up experience from the program.

  16. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Fleet Experiences |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: EnergyAlten Jump to:IncOpen

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rightsizing Your Vehicle Fleet to Conserve

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About BecomeTechnologies |HydrogenPublications Printable

  18. Fueling the Navy's Great Green Fleet with Advanced Biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From transporting the oil necessary to fuel jets and vehicles to supplying battery packs to infantry, energy plays a central role in almost everything the U.S. military does. Because of this reliance, it’s imperative that the military cultivate energy sources that are not subject to the whims of outside nations. While renewables like solar are playing a large role in this effort, advanced biofuels produced domestically are rapidly becoming another choice for transportation fuel.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Federal Fleet Use of Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mindy Kirpatrick; J. E. Francfort

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Per Executive Order 13031, “Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership,” the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity provided $998,300 in incremental funding to support the deployment of 220 electric vehicles in 36 Federal fleets. The 145 electric Ford Ranger pickups and 75 electric Chrysler EPIC (Electric Powered Interurban Commuter) minivans were operated in 14 states and the District of Columbia. The 220 vehicles were driven an estimated average of 700,000 miles annually. The annual estimated use of the 220 electric vehicles contributed to 39,000 fewer gallons of petroleum being used by Federal fleets and the reduction in emissions of 1,450 pounds of smog-forming pollution. Numerous attempts were made to obtain information from all 36 fleets. Information responses were received from 25 fleets (69% response rate), as some Federal fleet personnel that were originally involved with the Incremental Funding Project were transferred, retired, or simply could not be found. In addition, many of the Department of Defense fleets indicated that they were supporting operations in Iraq and unable to provide information for the foreseeable future. It should be noted that the opinions of the 25 fleets is based on operating 179 of the 220 electric vehicles (81% response rate). The data from the 25 fleets is summarized in this report. Twenty-two of the 25 fleets reported numerous problems with the vehicles, including mechanical, traction battery, and charging problems. Some of these problems, however, may have resulted from attempting to operate the vehicles beyond their capabilities. The majority of fleets reported that most of the vehicles were driven by numerous drivers each week, with most vehicles used for numerous trips per day. The vehicles were driven on average from 4 to 50 miles per day on a single charge. However, the majority of the fleets reported needing gasoline vehicles for missions beyond the capabilities of the electric vehicles, usually because of range limitations. Twelve fleets reported experiencing at least one charge depletion while driving, whereas nine fleets reported not having this problem. Twenty-four of the 25 fleets responded that the electric vehicles were easy to use and 22 fleets indicated that the payload was adequate. Thirteen fleets reported charging problems; eleven fleets reported no charging problems. Nine fleets reported the vehicles broke down while driving; 14 fleets reported no onroad breakdowns. Some of the breakdowns while driving, however, appear to include normal flat tires and idiot lights coming on. In spite of operation and charging problems, 59% of the fleets responded that they were satisfied, very satisfied, or extremely satisfied with the performance of the electric vehicles. As of September 2003, 74 of the electric vehicles were still being used and 107 had been returned to the manufacturers because the leases had concluded.

  20. Assessment of methane-related fuels for automotive fleet vehicles: technical, supply, and economic assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of methane-related fuels, derived from a variety of sources, in highway vehicles is assessed. Methane, as used here, includes natural gas (NG) as well as synthetic natural gas (SNG). Methanol is included because it can be produced from NG or the same resources as SNG, and because it is a liquid fuel at normal ambient conditions. Technological, operational, efficiency, petroleum displacement, supply, safety, and economic issues are analyzed. In principle, both NG and methanol allow more efficient engine operation than gasoline. In practice, engines are at present rarely optimized for NG and methanol. On the basis of energy expended from resource extraction to end use, only optimized LNG vehicles are more efficient than their gasoline counterparts. By 1985, up to 16% of total petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel could be displaced by large fleets with central NG fueling depots. Excluding diesel vehicles, which need technology advances to use NG, savings of 8% are projected. Methanol use by large fleets could displace up to 8% of petroleum-based highway vehicle fuel from spark-ignition vehicles and another 9% from diesel vehicles with technology advances. The US NG supply appears adequate to accommodate fleet use. Supply projections, future price differential versus gasoline, and user economics are uncertain. In many cases, attractive paybacks can occur. Compressed NG now costs on average about $0.65 less than gasoline, per energy-equivalent gallon. Methanol supply projections, future prices, and user economics are even more uncertain. Current and projected near-term methanol supplies are far from adequate to support fleet use. Methanol presently costs more than gasoline on an equal-energy basis, but is projected to cost less if produced from coal instead of NG or petroleum.

  1. INL receives GreenGov Presidential Award for fleet fuel efficiency improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory has received a 2010 GreenGov Presidential Award for outstanding achievement in fuel efficiency in its bus and automotive fleets. The award was presented today in Washington, D.C., as part of a three-day symposium on improving sustainability and energy efficiency across the federal government. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. INL receives GreenGov Presidential Award for fleet fuel efficiency improvements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory has received a 2010 GreenGov Presidential Award for outstanding achievement in fuel efficiency in its bus and automotive fleets. The award was presented today in Washington, D.C., as part of a three-day symposium on improving sustainability and energy efficiency across the federal government. Lots more content like this is available at INL's facebook page http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. Assessing deployment strategies for ethanol and flex fuel vehicles in the U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAulay, Jeffrey L. (Jeffrey Lewis)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the next 3-7 years the US light duty fleet and fuel supply will encounter what is commonly referred to as the "blend wall". This phenomenon describes the situation when more ethanol production has been mandated than ...

  4. Evaluating the impact of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies in U.S. light duty vehicle fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandivadekar, Anup P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unrelenting increase in oil use by the U.S. light-duty vehicle (LDV) fleet presents an extremely challenging energy and environmental problem. A variety of propulsion technologies and fuels have the promise to reduce ...

  5. Reduce truck fuel bills by $353,000+ with private fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumerski, M.J. (Rohm and Haas Co., Philadelphia, PA); Powers, T.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rohm and Haas Company accomplished well over $353,000 savings in fuel costs due to vehicle engineering and driver training in 1982. It utilized the leaser's nationwide network of company-owned fuel stops resulting in more savings. An emergency response capability has reduced the average downtime per vehicle failure. Rohm and Haas leases 61 tandem axle tractors which are used in four private carriage fleets. Also included are 90 vans and 45 haultrailers that log nearly 10 million road-miles annually.

  6. Fuel Economy of the Light-Duty Vehicle Fleet (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. fleet of light-duty vehicles consists of cars and light trucks, including minivans, sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and trucks with gross vehicle weight less than 8,500 pounds. The fuel economy of light-duty vehicles is regulated by the (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) CAFE standards set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Currently, the CAFE standard is 27.5 miles per gallon (mpg) for cars and 20.7 mpg for light trucks. The most recent increase in the CAFE standard for cars was in 1990, and the most recent increase in the CAFE standard for light trucks was in 1996.

  7. Alternative fuel vehicles for the state fleets: Results of the 5-year planning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the first attempt by the Department of Energy (DOE) to work with states to prepare five-year Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) acquisition plans to identify alternative fuels and vehicles that they are planning on or would like to acquire. The DOE Regional Support Offices (RSOs) met with representatives from the states in their regions and assisted in the preparation of the plans. These plans will be used in conjunction with previously gathered Federal five-year plans to encourage Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to expand the variety of AFVs produced, reduce the incremental cost of AFVs, and to encourage fuel suppliers to expand the alternative fuel infrastructure and alternative fuel availability. By identifying the needs and requirements of state fleets, DOE can begin to describe the specific nature of the future state fleets, and establish a defined market for OEMs and fuel suppliers. DOE initiated the development and collection of the state five-year plans before the signing of the Energy Policy Act, to raise the awareness of states that they will be required by law to acquire AFVs. As a result, several states that had no AFV acquisition plan when queried have developed or are in the process of developing plans. The DOE and its RSOs are still working with the states to develop and refine acquisition plans, and this report should be treated as documentation of work in progress.

  8. Best available practices for lng fueling of fleet vehicles. Topical report, March-November 1995, tasks 85 and 86

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Midgett, D.E.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides essential information on the design and operation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) fueling stations for fleet vehicles. The report serves to evaluate current practices in LNG fleet vehicle fueling station designs, and provide fleet operators with a tool for use in discussions with permitting agencies, engineering firms, fabricators, and contractors who permit, design, or construct LNG fueling stations. Representative sites (i.e., LNG fueling stations) were evaluated for technical feasibility, customer satisfaction, economics, operating and maintenance history, problems encountered/overcome, and regulatory environment. The compiled information in this report reveals that LNG fueling stations have advanced to the point where LNG is a viable alternative to gasoline and/or diesel fuel.

  9. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA White Sands Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  10. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet reports on the City of Burbank, California's fuel cell bus demonstration project and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) involvement. Included are specifications for the fuel cell bus and information about its operation. BurbankBus, the city's mass transit entity, received a grant from the California Air Resources Board to fund its zero-emission bus demonstration and is collaborating with DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus performance. DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory will collect and analyze performance and operations data for at least one year. Researchers will use the data to better understand the technology and determine future development work. In addition, demonstration information will help fleets make informed purchase decisions.

  11. ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLE (AFV) INFORMATION Over 98% of the U-M auto passenger fleet is flex fuel vehicles (FFV). A FFV is capable of operating on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLE (AFV) INFORMATION Over 98% of the U-M auto passenger fleet is flex fuel of both. FFV's are equipped with an engine and fuel system designed specifically to be compatible with ethanol's chemical properties. FFV's qualify as alternative fuel vehicles under the Energy Policy Act

  12. NREL: Transportation Research - Fleet Test and Evaluation Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearch Cutaway image

  13. NREL: Transportation Research - Hybrid Electric Fleet Vehicle Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearch CutawayHybrid Electric

  14. NREL: Transportation Research - Hydraulic Hybrid Fleet Vehicle Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReportTransmissionResearch CutawayHybrid

  15. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  16. Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

  17. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes controlled hydrogen fleet & infrastructure analysis undertaken for the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

  18. Resources for Fleet Managers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fleet managers will benefit from the lower fuel costs, more reliable fuel prices, and lower emissions that come from using alternative fuels and advanced technologies made possible through the work...

  19. What is the GREET Fleet Footprint Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    fuels and advanced vehicles (AFVs). The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emis- sions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Fleet Foot- print Calculator can help fleets decide on...

  20. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) | Department of

  1. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's2of Energy EnergyMakingCell

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Happy Cab Fuels Taxi Fleet With CNG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean CitiesStationTrucks GoldenUpstate

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Rolls on as Reliable Fleet Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulaseFuels andConversionsAssumptionsBenefitsPropane

  4. Guidance: Requirements for Installing Renewable Fuel Pumps at Federal Fleet Fueling Centers under EISA Section 246: Federal Fleet Program, Federal Energy Management Program, U.S. Department of Energy, March 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 19, 2007, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was signed into law as Public Law 110-140. Section 246(a) of EISA directs Federal agencies to install at least one renewable fuel pump at each Federal fleet fueling center under their jurisdiction by January 1, 2010. Section 246(b) requires the President to submit an annual report to Congress on Federal agency progress in meeting this renewable fuel pump installation mandate. This guidance document provides guidelines to help agencies understand these requirements and how to comply with EISA Section 246.

  5. BurbankBus' clean fuel fleet now includes a zero-emission hydrogen-fueled bus. BurbankBus, which provides transit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bus fixed-route fleet consists of 17 compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. This fleet has been running on 100

  6. Preliminary investigation Area 12 fleet operations steam cleaning discharge area Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the characterization activities and findings of a former steam cleaning discharge area at the Nevada Test Site. The former steam cleaning site is located in Area 12 east of Fleet Operations Building 12-16. The characterization project was completed as a required condition of the ``Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit for the Discharge From Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Facility`` issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The project objective was to collect shallow soil samples in eight locations in the former surface discharge area. Based upon field observations, twelve locations were sampled on September 6, 1995 to better define the area of potential impact. Samples were collected from the surface to a depth of approximately 0.3 meters (one foot) below land surface. Discoloration of the surface soil was observed in the area of the discharge pipe and in localized areas in the natural drainage channel. The discoloration appeared to be consistent with the topographically low areas of the site. Hydrocarbon odors were noted in the areas of discoloration only. Samples collected were analyzed for bulk asbestos, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (Semi-VOCs), and gamma scan.

  7. Clean Cities Helps Fleets Go Green (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Green fleet programs, like those in Ohio and Illinois, certify vehicle fleets based on environmental and fuel-use requirements. The programs encourage the use of alternative fuels and provide a way to recognize fleets for participating.

  8. Impacts of ethanol fuel level on emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants from a fleet of gasoline light-duty vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zheng, Zhongqing; Villella, Phillip M.; Jung, Hee-Jung

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study investigated the impact of ethanol blends on criteria emissions (THC, NMHC, CO, NOx), greenhouse gas (CO2), and a suite of unregulated pollutants in a fleet of gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles. The vehicles ranged in model year from 1984 to 2007 and included one Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV). Emission and fuel consumption measurements were performed in duplicate or triplicate over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle using a chassis dynamometer for four fuels in each of seven vehicles. The test fuels included a CARB phase 2 certification fuel with 11% MTBE content, a CARB phase 3 certification fuel with a 5.7% ethanol content, and E10, E20, E50, and E85 fuels. In most cases, THC and NMHC emissions were lower with the ethanol blends, while the use of E85 resulted in increases of THC and NMHC for the FFV. CO emissions were lower with ethanol blends for all vehicles and significantly decreased for earlier model vehicles. Results for NOx emissions were mixed, with some older vehicles showing increases with increasing ethanol level, while other vehicles showed either no impact or a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease. CO2 emissions did not show any significant trends. Fuel economy showed decreasing trends with increasing ethanol content in later model vehicles. There was also a consistent trend of increasing acetaldehyde emissions with increasing ethanol level, but other carbonyls did not show strong trends. The use of E85 resulted in significantly higher formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions than the specification fuels or other ethanol blends. BTEX and 1,3-butadiene emissions were lower with ethanol blends compared to the CARB 2 fuel, and were almost undetectable from the E85 fuel. The largest contribution to total carbonyls and other toxics was during the cold-start phase of FTP.

  9. Building Out Alternative Fuel Retail Infrastructure: Government Fleet Spillovers in E85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recent years when ethanol and alternative fuel mandates andwww.eere.energy.gov/afdc/fuels/ethanol_laws.html. Appendixto renewable fuels—primarily ethanol and biodiesel—which

  10. HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet 2010 Ford Fusion vin#4757

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    insurance, fuel, and registration costs Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity 2010 Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L34AR144757 Description: This vehicle is operated throughout the valley of...

  11. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress in meeting the technological challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transportation based on current fuel cell transit bus demonstrations and plans for more fuel cell transit buses and hydrogen infrastructure.

  12. Analysis of operational, institutional and international limitations for alternative fuel vehicles and technologies: Means/methods for implementing changes. [Public fleet groups--information needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused upon the development of an approach to assist public fleet managers in evaluating the characteristics and availability of alternative fuels (AF's) and alternative fuel vehicles (AFV's) that will serve as possible replacements for vehicles currently serving the needs of various public entities. Also of concern were the institutional/international limitations for alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Detroit and other public agencies in the Detroit area were the particular focus for the activities. As the development and initial stages of use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles proceeds, there will be an increasing need to provide information and guidance to decision-makers regarding differences in requirements and features of these fuels and vehicles. There wig be true differences in requirements for servicing, managing, and regulating. There will also be misunderstanding and misperception. There have been volumes of data collected on AFV'S, and as technology is improved, new data is constantly added. There are not, however, condensed and effective sources of information for public vehicle fleet managers on vehicle and equipment sources, characteristics, performance, costs, and environmental benefits. While theoretical modeling of public fleet requirements has been done, there do not seem to be readily available practical''. There is a need to provide the best possible information and means to minimize the problems for introducing the effective use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

  13. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Summary of Experiences...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    report reviews past and present fuel cell bus technology development and implementation in the United States. 41967.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit...

  14. Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-B:...

  15. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities' National Clean Fleets Partnership establishes strategic alliances with large fleets to help them explore and adopt alternative fuels and fuel economy measures to cut petroleum use. The initiative leverages the strength of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions, nearly 18,000 stakeholders, and more than 20 years of experience. It provides fleets with top-level support, technical assistance, robust tools and resources, and public acknowledgement to help meet and celebrate fleets' petroleum-use reductions.

  16. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2014

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onConversions toE15 and Infrastructure K. MoriartyFuel

  17. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2013

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValley of theEthanol8 F l e eFuel

  18. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) |Energy 12 Fuel Cell

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: City of Hoover Fleet Boasts 200-Plus Flex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP)MassachusettsExperimentalInfrastructureFuelsDisplacement andFuel

  20. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This status report, fifth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), discusses the achievements and challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transit and summarizes the introduction of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. Progress this year includes an increase in the number of fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs), from 15 to 25, operating at eight transit agencies, as well as increased diversity of the fuel cell design options for transit buses. The report also provides an analysis of the combined results from fuel cell transit bus demonstrations evaluated by NREL with a focus on the most recent data through July 2011 including fuel cell power system reliability and durability; fuel economy; roadcall; and hydrogen fueling results. These evaluations cover 22 of the 25 FCEBs currently operating.

  1. Economic costs and environmental impacts of alternative fuel vehicle fleets in local government: An interim assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    ; Environmental policy 1. Introduction High crude oil prices and increasing public awareness of the environmental to be attractive first markets for alternative fuel technologies given their scale, fuel consumption, and high

  2. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Summary of Experiences and Current Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews past and present fuel cell bus technology development and implementation in the United States.

  3. Building Out Alternative Fuel Retail Infrastructure: Government Fleet Spillovers in E85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corts, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biodiesel, hydrogen, and plug-in electric vehicles and their fueling infrastructure would be useful. Each technology

  4. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection RadiationRecord-SettingHead5 Idle Operating TotalRefiners

  5. Fuel Cell-Powered Lift Truck Fleet Deployment Projects Final Technical Report May 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingler, James J [GENCO Infrastructure Solutions, Inc.] [GENCO Infrastructure Solutions, Inc.

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of this project were to evaluate the performance, operability and safety of fork lift trucks powered by fuel cells in large distribution centers. This was accomplished by replacing the batteries in over 350 lift trucks with fuel cells at five distribution centers operated by GENCO. The annual cost savings of lift trucks powered by fuel cell power units was between $2,400 and $5,300 per truck compared to battery powered lift trucks, excluding DOE contributions. The greatest savings were in fueling labor costs where a fuel cell powered lift truck could be fueled in a few minutes per day compared to over an hour for battery powered lift trucks which required removal and replacement of batteries. Lift truck operators where generally very satisfied with the performance of the fuel cell power units, primarily because there was no reduction in power over the duration of a shift as experienced with battery powered lift trucks. The operators also appreciated the fast and easy fueling compared to the effort and potential risk of injury associated with switching heavy batteries in and out of lift trucks. There were no safety issues with the fueling or operation of the fuel cells. Although maintenance costs for the fuel cells were higher than for batteries, these costs are expected to decrease significantly in the next generation of fuel cells, making them even more cost effective.

  6. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) |

  7. Operability and Emissions from a Medium-Duty Fleet Operating with GTL Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment ofOil's Impact onDepartmentDepartment ofDepartmentand

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Car2Go Launches Electric Carsharing Fleet in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP)MassachusettsExperimentalInfrastructureFuels inDune Buggy

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Corporate Fleets Set the Pace for a Green

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean Cities Reflects on 20on AlternativeDriving

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: County Fleet Goes Big on Idle Reduction,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean Cities Reflects on 20on

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Frito-Lay Delivers With Electric Truck Fleet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels Clean CitiesStation LocationsFrito-Lay Delivers

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas City Greens Its Fleet With Natural

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduce Operating Costs andGas and

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Los Angeles Public Works Fleet Converts to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduce Operating Costs

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland County Fleet Uses Wide Variety of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduce Operating

  15. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from fuel cell bus evaluations at Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District, SunLine Transit Agency, and Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

  16. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the Burbank Bus Fleet

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This fact sheet reports on the City of Burbank, California's fuel cell bus demonstration project and the U.S. Department of Energy's involvement.

  17. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides results from fuel cell bus evaluations at Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District, SunLine Transit Agency, and Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

  18. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Summary of Experiences and Current

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil Energy FYWednesday, December 03,Status |

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Fleet Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation& Forum |December 11, 2008for Fiscal Year

  20. Federal Express CleanFleet Final Report Volume 4: Fuel Economy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruary 17, 2015 - SEAB8 AnDepartmentPolicy4 F u

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: AT&T Fleet Reaches Milestone of 8,000 CNG

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP)MassachusettsExperimental VehicleNatural GasVehicleTexas

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alpha Baking Company Augments Its Fleet With

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP)MassachusettsExperimental VehicleNaturalPropane Delivery Trucks

  3. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Gikakis, C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the seventh in an annual series of reports that summarize the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discuss the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. The report also provides a snapshot of current FCEB performance results from August 2012 through July 2013 for five FCEB demonstrations at four transit agencies.

  4. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report is the sixth in an annual series of reports that summarize the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discuss the achievements and challenges of int

  5. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gigakis, C.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This status report, fourth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, summarizes progress and accomplishments from demonstrations of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. This year's assessment report provides the results from the fifth year of operation of five Van Hool, ISE, and UTC Power fuel cell buses operating at AC Transit, SunLine, and CTTRANSIT. The achievements and challenges of this bus design, implementation, and operating are presented, with a focus on the next steps for implementing larger numbers and new and different designs of fuel cell buses. The major positive result from nearly five years of operation is the dramatic increase in reliability experienced for the fuel cell power system.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: California Fleets and Workplace Alternative Fuels Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Bay Area Air Quality Management District at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  7. Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chander, K.; Gikakis, C.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the sixth in an annual series of reports that summarize the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discuss the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. The report also provides a snapshot of current FCEB performance results over the last year. There are 25 active FCEBs in demonstrations this year at eight locations.

  8. Fuel Cell Bus Takes a Starring Role in the BurbankBus Fleet, Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) | Department

  9. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides an overview of Clean Cities National Clean Fleets Partnership (NCFP). The NCFP is open to large private-sector companies that have fleet operations in multiple states. Companies that join the partnership receive customized assistance to reduce petroleum use through increased efficiency and use of alternative fuels. This initiative provides fleets with specialized resources, expertise, and support to successfully incorporate alternative fuels and fuel-saving measures into their operations. The National Clean Fleets Partnership builds on the established success of DOE's Clean Cities program, which reduces petroleum consumption at the community level through a nationwide network of coalitions that work with local stakeholders. Developed with input from fleet managers, industry representatives, and Clean Cities coordinators, the National Clean Fleets Partnership goes one step further by working with large private-sector fleets.

  10. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  11. Hybrid Taxis Give Fuel Economy a Lift, Clean Cities, Fleet Experiences, April 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities helped Boston, San Antonio, and Cambridge create hybrid taxi programs. The hybrid taxis are able to achieve about twice the gas mileage of a conventional taxi while helping cut gasoline use and fuel costs. Tax credits and other incentives are helping both company owners and drivers make the switch to hybrids. Program leaders have learned some important lessons other cities can benefit from including learning a city's taxi structure, relaying benefits to drivers, and understanding the needs of owners.

  12. Federal Fleet Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet overview of FEMP services and assistance available to Federal fleet managers to implement alternative fuel and advanced vehicle strategies in compliance with Federal goals and requirements.

  13. FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER TEST SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the modeling of a PWR fuel assembly under dynamic shock loading in support of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) shaker test campaign. The focus of the test campaign is on evaluating the response of used fuel to shock and vibration loads that a can occur during highway transport. Modeling began in 2012 using an LS-DYNA fuel assembly model that was first created for modeling impact scenarios. SNL’s proposed test scenario was simulated through analysis and the calculated results helped guide the instrumentation and other aspects of the testing. During FY 2013, the fuel assembly model was refined to better represent the test surrogate. Analysis of the proposed loads suggested the frequency band needed to be lowered to attempt to excite the lower natural frequencies of the fuel assembly. Despite SNL’s expansion of lower frequency components in their five shock realizations, pretest predictions suggested a very mild dynamic response to the test loading. After testing was completed, one specific shock case was modeled, using recorded accelerometer data to excite the model. Direct comparison of predicted strain in the cladding was made to the recorded strain gauge data. The magnitude of both sets of strain (calculated and recorded) are very low, compared to the expected yield strength of the Zircaloy-4 material. The model was accurate enough to predict that no yielding of the cladding was expected, but its precision at predicting micro strains is questionable. The SNL test data offers some opportunity for validation of the finite element model, but the specific loading conditions of the testing only excite the fuel assembly to respond in a limited manner. For example, the test accelerations were not strong enough to substantially drive the fuel assembly out of contact with the basket. Under this test scenario, the fuel assembly model does a reasonable job of approximating actual fuel assembly response, a claim that can be verified through direct comparison of model results to recorded test results. This does not offer validation for the fuel assembly model in all conceivable cases, such as high kinetic energy shock cases where the fuel assembly might lift off the basket floor to strike to basket ceiling. This type of nonlinear behavior was not witnessed in testing, so the model does not have test data to be validated against.a basis for validation in cases that substantially alter the fuel assembly response range. This leads to a gap in knowledge that is identified through this modeling study. The SNL shaker testing loaded a surrogate fuel assembly with a certain set of artificially-generated time histories. One thing all the shock cases had in common was an elimination of low frequency components, which reduces the rigid body dynamic response of the system. It is not known if the SNL test cases effectively bound all highway transportation scenarios, or if significantly greater rigid body motion than was tested is credible. This knowledge gap could be filled through modeling the vehicle dynamics of a used fuel conveyance, or by collecting acceleration time history data from an actual conveyance under highway conditions.

  14. Frequently Asked Questions: About Federal Fleet Management (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Answers to frequently asked questions about Federal fleet management, Federal requirements, reporting, advanced vehicles, and alternative fuels.

  15. Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Maheras, Steven J.; Jensen, Philip J.; England, Jeffery L.; LeDuc, Dan

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

  16. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 8, fleet economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The costs that face a fleet operator in implementing alternative motor fuels into fleet operations are examined. Five alternatives studied in the CleanFleet project are considered for choice of fuel: compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline, M-85, and electricity. The cost assessment is built upon a list of thirteen cost factors grouped into the three categories: infrastructure costs, vehicle owning costs, and operating costs. Applicable taxes are included. A commonly used spreadsheet was adapted as a cost assessment tool. This tool was used in a case study to estimate potential costs to a typical fleet operator in package delivery service in the 1996 time frame. In addition, because electric cargo vans are unlikely to be available for the 1996 model year from original equipment manufacturers, the case study was extended to the 1998 time frame for the electric vans. Results of the case study are presented in cents per mile of vehicle travel for the fleet. Several options available to the fleet for implementing the fuels are examined.

  17. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  18. Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Data Report. Advanced Technology Vehicle Evaluation: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2AprilBigto Lithium

  19. Fleet DNA Project (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet DNA Project - designed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory - aims to accelerate the evolution of advanced vehicle development and support the strategic deployment of market-ready technologies that reduce costs, fuel consumption, and emissions. At the heart of the Fleet DNA Project is a clearinghouse of medium- and heavy-duty commercial fleet transportation data for optimizing the design of advanced vehicle technologies or for selecting a given technology to invest in. An easy-to-access online database will help vehicle manufacturers and fleets understand the broad operational range for many of today's commercial vehicle vocations.

  20. Goodyear Testing Self-Inflating Tire Systems in U.S. Trucking Fleets |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of a downholeReactorsgoalGoodman

  1. Argonne National Laboratory puts alternative-fuel vehicles to the test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the participation in the alternative-fueled vehicles (AFV) program at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne maintains a fleet of 300 vehicles, including AFV`s.

  2. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    help fleets make informed purchasing decisions and help researchers assess whether fuel cell vehicles can meet commercialization requirements. This evaluation is one of several DOE...

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: California Fleets...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fleets and Workplace Alternative Fuels Project Presentation given by Bay Area Air Quality Management District at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  4. CleanFleet. Volume 2, Project Design and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CleanFleet alternative fuels demonstration project evaluated five alternative motorfuels in commercial fleet service over a two-year period. The five fuels were compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), M-85 (85 percent methanol and 15 percent RFG), and electric vans. Eight-four vans were operated on the alternative fuels and 27 vans were operated on gasoline as baseline controls. Throughout the demonstration information was collected on fleet operations, vehicle emissions, and fleet economics. In this volume of the CleanFleet findings, the design and implementation of the project are summarized.

  5. Cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  6. Fuel Efficiency Automobile Test Quality Assurance Narrative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Fuel Efficiency Automobile Test Quality Assurance Narrative Standard Operating Procedures Help ........................................................................................................... 3 FEAT Standard Operating Procedures...................................................................................................................24 Maintenance Items

  7. Elastomer Compatibility Testing of Renewable Diesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frame, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the integrity and performance of six elastomers were tested with ethanol-diesel and biodiesel fuel blends.

  8. EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG evolution, vehicle ownership, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), climate change policy, stated preference, opinion survey, microsimulation ABSTRACT In todays world of volatile fuel prices and climate

  9. Strategies for Decreasing Petroleum Consumption in the Federal Fleet (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putsche, V.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation offers strategies federal agency fleets can use to reduce petroleum consumption and build or gain access to alternative fuel infrastructure.

  10. Clean Cities Launches Improved Tool to Help Fleets Evaluate CNG...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model helps fleet managers evaluate the financial soundness of investments in compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles andor fueling infrastructure. The new version is applicable to...

  11. Applying the Energy Service Company Model to Advance Deployment of Fleet Natural Gas Vehicles and Fueling Infrastructure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3ApplianceApplying the Energy Service Company

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Fleet Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Report for Fiscal year 2008.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|IndustrialCenterMarchC. U.S. Department ofEarth DayMayDepartment of

  13. The generation fleet in MISO is being affected by time, fuel prices and multiple phases of environmental regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnology PerformanceDepartmentfor Improving Short September 8,

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fleet Technical Assistance The Colorado Energy Office and the Regional Air Quality Council administer Refuel Colorado Fleets, a free energy coaching...

  15. Fleet Evaluation and Factory Installation of Aerodynamic Heavy Duty Truck Trailers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, Jason; Salari, Kambiz; Ortega, Jason; Brown, Andrea

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of DE-EE0001552 was to develop and deploy a combination of trailer aerodynamic devices and low rolling resistance tires that reduce fuel consumption of a class 8 heavy duty tractor-trailer combination vehicle by 15%. There were 3 phases of the project: Phase 1 – Perform SAE Typed 2 track tests with multiple device combinations. Phase 2 – Conduct a fleet evaluation with selected device combination. Phase 3 – Develop the devices required to manufacture the aerodynamic trailer. All 3 phases have been completed. There is an abundance of available trailer devices on the market, and fleets and owner operators have awareness of them and are purchasing them. The products developed in conjunction with this project are at least in their second round of refinement. The fleet test undertaken showed an improvement of 5.5 – 7.8% fuel economy with the devices (This does not include tire contribution).

  16. GREET Fleet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFifeGEXA Corp. (New Jersey) JumpGREET Fleet Jump to:

  17. Size and transportation capabilities of the existing US cask fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danese, F.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)); Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the current spent nuclear fuel cask fleet capability in the United States. In addition, it assesses the degree to which the current fleet would be available, as a contingency, until proposed Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management casks become operational. A limited fleet of ten spent fuel transportation casks is found to be readily available for use in Federal waste management efforts over the next decade.

  18. A cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the cask fleet currently available to transport spent nuclear fuels. The report describes the proposed operational procedures for these casks and the vehicles intended to transport them. Included are techniques for loading the cask, lifting it onto the transport vehicle, preparing the invoices, and unloading the cask at the destination. The document concludes with a discussion on the maintenance and repair of the casks. (tem) 29 figs.

  19. Fleet Management | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fleet management includes commercial and agency owned motor vehicles such as cars, vans, trucks, and buses. Fleet (vehicle) management at the headquarters level includes a range of...

  20. Fleet Management | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Fleet Management Contact your Fleet manager for access to these systems Federal Automotive Statistical Tool (FAST): Supports EPAct of 1992 requirements , the Energy...

  1. 2012 Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets 2012 Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  2. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 1, summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Coast Alternative Fuels Demonstration, called CleanFleet, was conducted in the Los Angeles area from April 1992 through September 1994. The demonstration consisted of 111 package delivery vans operating on five alternative fuels and the control fuel, unleaded gasoline. The alternative fuels were propane gas, compressed natural gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol with 15 percent RFG (called M-85), and electricity. This volume of the eight volume CleanFleet final report is a summary of the project design and results of the analysis of data collected during the demonstration on vehicle maintenance and durability, fuel economy, employee attitudes, safety and occupational hygiene, emissions, and fleet economics.

  3. Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat ŕ l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the refurbishment and restart of TREAT. •TREAT is an absolute necessity in the suite of reactor fuel test capabilities •TREAT yields valuable information on reactivity effects, margins to failure, fuel dispersal, and failure propagation •Most importantly, interpretation of TREAT experiment results is a stringent test of the integrated understanding of fuel performance.

  4. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  5. Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

  6. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  7. Executive Fleet Vehicles Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 24, 2011, the President issued a Presidential Memorandum on Federal Fleet Performance.  In accordance with Section 1 (b) of the Presidential Memorandum and pursuant to Federal Management...

  8. Fleet DNA (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkokwicz, K.; Duran, A.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet DNA project objectives include capturing and quantifying drive cycle and technology variation for the multitude of medium- and heavy-duty vocations; providing a common data storage warehouse for medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleet data across DOE activities and laboratories; and integrating existing DOE tools, models, and analyses to provide data-driven decision making capabilities. Fleet DNA advantages include: for Government - providing in-use data for standard drive cycle development, R&D, tech targets, and rule making; for OEMs - real-world usage datasets provide concrete examples of customer use profiles; for fleets - vocational datasets help illustrate how to maximize return on technology investments; for Funding Agencies - ways are revealed to optimize the impact of financial incentive offers; and for researchers -a data source is provided for modeling and simulation.

  9. FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER AND TRUCK TEST SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This study continues the modeling support of the SNL shaker table task from 2013 and includes analysis of the SNL 2014 truck test campaign. Detailed finite element models of the fuel assembly surrogate used by SNL during testing form the basis of the modeling effort. Additional analysis was performed to characterize and filter the accelerometer data collected during the SNL testing. The detailed fuel assembly finite element model was modified to improve the performance and accuracy of the original surrogate fuel assembly model in an attempt to achieve a closer agreement with the low strains measured during testing. The revised model was used to recalculate the shaker table load response from the 2013 test campaign. As it happened, the results remained comparable to the values calculated with the original fuel assembly model. From this it is concluded that the original model was suitable for the task and the improvements to the model were not able to bring the calculated strain values down to the extremely low level recorded during testing. The model needs more precision to calculate strains that are so close to zero. The truck test load case had an even lower magnitude than the shaker table case. Strain gage data from the test was compared directly to locations on the model. Truck test strains were lower than the shaker table case, but the model achieved a better relative agreement of 100-200 microstrains (or 0.0001-0.0002 mm/mm). The truck test data included a number of accelerometers at various locations on the truck bed, surrogate basket, and surrogate fuel assembly. This set of accelerometers allowed an evaluation of the dynamics of the conveyance system used in testing. It was discovered that the dynamic load transference through the conveyance has a strong frequency-range dependency. This suggests that different conveyance configurations could behave differently and transmit different magnitudes of loads to the fuel even when travelling down the same road at the same speed. It is recommended that the SNL conveyance system used in testing be characterized through modal analysis and frequency response analysis to provide context and assist in the interpretation of the strain data that was collected during the truck test campaign.

  10. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 7, vehicle emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions from Clean Fleet vans running on M-85, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), propane gas, and a control gasoline (RF-A) are presented. Three vans from each combination of vehicle manufacturer and fuel were tested at the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as they accumulated mileage in the demonstration. Data are presented on regulated emissions, ozone precursors, air toxics, and greenhouse gases. The emissions tests provide information on in-use emissions. That is, the vans were taken directly from daily commercial service and tested at the ARB. The differences in alternative fuel technology provide the basis for a range of technology options. The emissions data reflect these differences, with classes of vehicle/fuels producing either more or less emissions for various compounds relative to the control gasoline.

  11. US Department of Energy Hybrid Vehicle Battery and Fuel Economy Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner; J.E. Francfort

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, has conducted testing of advanced technology vehicles since August, 1995 in support of the AVTA goal to provide benchmark data for technology modeling, and research and development programs. The AVTA has tested over 200 advanced technology vehicles including full size electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, and hydrogen internal combustion engine powered vehicles. Currently, the AVTA is conducting significant tests of hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). This testing has included all HEVs produced by major automotive manufacturers and spans over 1.3 million miles. The results of all testing are posted on the AVTA web page maintained by the Idaho National Laboratory. Through the course of this testing, the fuel economy of HEV fleets has been monitored and analyzed to determine the "real world" performance of their hybrid energy systems, particularly the battery. While the initial "real world" fuel economy of these vehicles has typically been less than that evaluated by the manufacturer and varies significantly with environmental conditions, the fuel economy and, therefore, battery performance, has remained stable over vehicle life (160,000 miles).

  12. The effect of fuel type in unsaturated spent fuel tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, P.A.; Gong, M.; Bates, J.K.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were tested under simulated unsaturated conditions with simulated groundwater at 90{degree}C. The actinides present in the leachate were measured after periods of approximately 60, 120, and 275 days. The vessels were acid stripped after 120 and 275 days. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. Alpha spectroscopy studies of filtered and unfiltered leachates showed that large amounts of actinides may be bound in colloids. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. The actinide release behavior of the two fuels appears to be different. The ATM-106 fuel began to release actinides later than the ATM-103 fuel, but after 275 days, it had released more. The amount of americium released from the two fuels was a higher percentage of the maximum amount of americium present than was the percentage of the simultaneous amount of uranium released.

  13. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory may include: * Fuel cell and fuel cell component manufacturers * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other...

  14. The OSU Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility: Standard Fuel Element Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wade R. Marcum; Brian G. Woods; Ann Marie Phillips; Richard G. Ambrosek; James D. Wiest; Daniel M. Wachs

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or standard fuel element (SFE), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates due to hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the fuel development program and will take place at OSU in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Discussion of a preliminary test matrix, SFE design, measurement and instrumentation techniques, and facility description are detailed in this paper.

  15. Deriving In-Use PHEV Fuel Economy Predictions from Standardized Test Cycle Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Richard "Barney" Carlson; Jeff Gonder; Aaron Brooker

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have potential to reduce or eliminate the U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Quantifying the amount of petroleum each uses, however, is challenging. To estimate in-use fuel economy for conventional vehicles the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducts chassis dynamometer tests on standard historic drive cycles and then adjusts the resulting “raw” fuel economy measurements downward. Various publications, such as the forthcoming update to the SAE J1711 recommended practice for PHEV fuel economy testing, address the challenges of applying standard test procedures to PHEVs. This paper explores the issue of how to apply an adjustment method to such “raw” PHEV dynamometer test results in order to more closely estimate the in-use fuel and electricity consumption characteristics of these vehicles. The paper discusses two possible adjustment methods, and evaluates one method by applying it to dynamometer data and comparing the result to in-use fleet data (on an aftermarket conversion PHEV). The paper will also present the methodologies used to collect the data needed for this comparison.

  16. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. T. Urbon

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]); Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs; and Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  17. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  18. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.; Duran, A.; Burton, E.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes graphical data summaries that highlight statistical trends for medium- and heavy-duty commercial fleet vehicles operating in a variety of vocations. It offers insight for the development of vehicle technologies that reduce costs, fuel consumption, and emission.

  19. Report on fuel pool water loss tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalenski, R.F. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To resolve potential concerns on the integrity of the fuel storage pool at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a highly accurate testing technique was developed to quantify water losses from the pool. The fuel pool is an unlined, single wall, reinforced concrete structure containing approximately 818,000 gallons of water. Since an initial test indicated that water losses could possibly be attributed solely to evaporation, a cover was suspended and sealed over the pool to block evaporation losses. High accuracy water level and temperature instrumentation was procured and installed. The conclusions of this report indicate that unaccounted-for water losses from the pool are insignificant and there is no detectable leakage within the range of test accuracy.

  20. Iowa Central Quality Fuel Testing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heach, Don; Bidieman, Julaine

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to finalize the creation of an independent quality fuel testing laboratory on the campus of Iowa Central Community College in Fort Dodge, Iowa that shall provide the exploding biofuels industry a timely and cost-effective centrally located laboratory to complete all state and federal fuel and related tests that are required. The recipient shall work with various state regulatory agencies, biofuel companies and state and national industry associations to ensure that training and testing needs of their members and American consumers are met. The recipient shall work with the Iowa Department of Ag and Land Stewardship on the development of an Iowa Biofuel Quality Standard along with the Development of a standard that can be used throughout industry.

  1. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Solicitation Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project...

  2. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project 2009 DOE...

  3. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes Clean Cities' National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative that helps large private fleets reduce petroleum use.

  4. Progress and Challenges for PEM Transit Fleet Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voltage(V) Time (Hrs) Golden Gate Transit Cycle Avg_CellVoltage CP_KWDC Failed field diagnostic for fuel air. #12;· Brief company history in area of fuel cell buses · Current fuel cell bus deployments commercialization of fuel cell buses · Fuel cell bus R&D needs · Future plans Agenda 2 #12;UTC Fleet history · 14

  5. New National Clean Fleets Partners Build New Roads to Sustainability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of E85 (a blend of up to 85% ethanol with gasoline) in the country. It is also a major propane wholesaler, providing propane to stations and fleets. With about 1,400 retail fueling...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2013: Fleet DNA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a tool for analyzing fleet characteristics.

  7. Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2011/FY 2012 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2011/fiscal year 2012.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fleet DNA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fleet DNA.

  9. Fueling Robot Automates Hydrogen Hose Reliability Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated robot mimics fueling action to test hydrogen hoses for durability in real-world conditions.

  10. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 11 - October 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    October 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  11. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 4 - September 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    September 2009 issue of the monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  12. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 12 - November 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  13. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 8 - June 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    June 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  14. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 7 - May 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  15. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 4 - January 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  16. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 3 - July 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2009 issue of the monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fleet DNA Phase 1 Refinement & Phase 2 Implementation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Fleet...

  18. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 1 - May 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  19. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 2 - November 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2009 issue of monthly news from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  20. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 10 - September 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    September 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  1. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 13 - December 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to federal agencies.

  2. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 9 - July 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    July 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives The Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (Program) will provide loans for up to 80% of the cost to convert fleet vehicles...

  4. Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May...

  5. A guide to surveys of motor vehicle fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to directives in Section 407 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) developed a data collection program designed to provide information useful to persons interested in the alternative fuels market. The target audience includes those seeking to manufacture, convert, sell, own, or operate alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) or alternative fueling facilities. Among the various projects EIA conducted as part of this data collection program were two fleet surveys conducted in Department of Energy-designated Clean Cities. The Clean Cities program is a locally-based government/industry partnership coordinated by the Department of Energy to expand the use of alternative transportation fuels. These surveys were designed to collect a broad range of information regarding the fleets and fleet vehicles in operation in the Atlanta, Georgia and Denver, Colorado areas. One of the objectives of these surveys was to attempt to identify and describe the market for AFVs. Due to inherent limitations associated with AFVs and limited alternative-fuel infrastructure, it`s believed that the first practical applications for AFVs will be within private and government fleets. Another objective in conducting the Clean Cities Fleet surveys was to develop a useful methodology for accessing and surveying private and municipal fleets that would aid other interested parties in conducting similar surveys. This report is intended to provide a description of how EIA gathered information on private and municipal fleets, but the basic survey design could be used to design surveys of other difficult-to-access populations. There are 3 basic steps to any survey: define the target population, constructing the survey frame, and implementing the survey. The procedures outlined in this report are, for the most part, the procedures used for the fleet survey conducted in Denver. The major changes between the two surveys are described in Appendix A.

  6. Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02 TUEValidation of& Systems Simulation &

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Test Your Alternative Fuel IQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulaseFuelsConversionsTelework to someone

  8. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 3, vehicle maintenance and durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CleanFleet is a demonstration of panel vans operating on five alternative motorfuels in commercial package delivery operations in the South Coast Air Basin of California. The five alternative fuels are propane gas, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol (M-85 with 15 percent RFG), and electricity. Data were gathered on in-use emissions, operations, and fleet economics. This volume of the final report summarizes the maintenance required on these vans from the time they were introduced into the demonstration (April through early November 1992) until the end of the demonstration in September 1994. The vans were used successfully in FedEx operations; but, to varying degrees, the alternative fuel vehicles required more maintenance than the unleaded gasoline control vehicles. The maintenance required was generally associated with the development state of the fuel-related systems. During the demonstration, no non-preventive maintenance was required on the highly developed fuel-related systems in any of the unleaded gasoline production vehicles used either as controls or as RFG test vehicles. The maintenance problems encountered with the less developed systems used in this demonstration may persist in the short term with vehicles featuring the same or similar systems. This means that fleet operators planning near-term acquisitions of vehicles incorporating such systems should consider the potential for similar problems when (1) selecting vendors and warranty provisions and (2) planning maintenance programs.

  9. Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Bergin

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

  10. Evaluation and Adaptation of 5-Cycle Fuel Economy Testing and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adaptation of 5-Cycle Fuel Economy Testing and Calculations for HEVs and PHEVs Evaluation and Adaptation of 5-Cycle Fuel Economy Testing and Calculations for HEVs and PHEVs 2012...

  11. Legacy Vehicle Fuel System Testing with Intermediate Ethanol Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, G. W.; Hoff, C. J.; Borton, Z.; Ratcliff, M. A.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of E10 and E17 on legacy fuel system components from three common mid-1990s vintage vehicle models (Ford, GM, and Toyota) were studied. The fuel systems comprised a fuel sending unit with pump, a fuel rail and integrated pressure regulator, and the fuel injectors. The fuel system components were characterized and then installed and tested in sample aging test rigs to simulate the exposure and operation of the fuel system components in an operating vehicle. The fuel injectors were cycled with varying pulse widths during pump operation. Operational performance, such as fuel flow and pressure, was monitored during the aging tests. Both of the Toyota fuel pumps demonstrated some degradation in performance during testing. Six injectors were tested in each aging rig. The Ford and GM injectors showed little change over the aging tests. Overall, based on the results of both the fuel pump testing and the fuel injector testing, no major failures were observed that could be attributed to E17 exposure. The unknown fuel component histories add a large uncertainty to the aging tests. Acquiring fuel system components from operational legacy vehicles would reduce the uncertainty.

  12. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

  13. Fuel Retrieval Sub Project (FRS) Stuck Fuel Station Performance Test Data Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the test data report for Stuck Fuel Station Performance Testing in support of the Fuel Retrieval Sub-Project. The stuck fuel station was designed to provide a means of cutting open a canister barrel to release fuel elements, etc.

  14. Cell fleet planning : an industry case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Armando C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to demonstrate the practical use of the Cell Fleet Planning Model in planning the fleet for the U.S. airline industry. The Cell Model is a cell theory, linear programming approach to fleet ...

  15. TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

  16. Vehicle Mass and Fuel Efficiency Impact Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements A state agency that operates a vehicle fleet consisting of 15 vehicles or more must ensure that at...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Government fleets may finance the lease or purchase cost of alternative fuel vehicles and alternative fueling infrastructure through energy performance contracts where vehicle...

  19. Alternative Fuel Transportation Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets "Alternative Fuel Transportation Program" Dana O'Hara, DOE Ted Sears, NREL Vehicle Technologies Program June 20,...

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and emissions by using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fleet fuel efficiency. State agencies and other affected entities may substitute the use of 450 gallons of...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    college, and local government fleets must select the vehicles with the greatest fuel efficiency available for a given use class, when fuel economy data is available. Exceptions may...

  2. Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seven vehicles were tested by Consumer Reports recently to determine the fuel economy of the vehicles at a given speed. For these vehicles, the decline in fuel economy from a speed...

  3. Test reports for K Basins vertical fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meling, T.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vertical fuel handling tools, for moving N Reactor fuel elements, were tested in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility (CTF) in the 300 Area. After fabrication was complete, the tools were functionally tested in the CTF using simulated N Reactor fuel rods (inner and outer elements). The tools were successful in picking up the simulated N Reactor fuel rods. These tools were also load tested using a 62 pound dummy to test the structural integrity of each assembly. The tools passed each of these tests, based on the performance objectives. Finally, the tools were subjected to an operations acceptance test where K Basins Operations personnel operated the tool to determine its durability and usefulness. Operations personnel were satisfied with the tools. Identified open items included the absence of a float during testing, and documentation required prior to actual use of the tools in the 100 K fuel storage basin.

  4. Major Corporate Fleets Align to Reduce Oil Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama launches the National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative that helps large companies reduce with fuel usage by incorporating electric vehicles, alternative fuels and conservation techniques into their operations. Charter partners include AT&T, FedEx, Pepsi-Co, UPS and Verizon.

  5. National Federal Fleet Loaner Program, Interim Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, James Edward

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Loaner Program is to increase the awareness, deployment, and use of electric vehicles (EVs) in Federal fleets. The Loaner Program accomplishes this by providing free EVs to Federal fleets on a loaner basis, generally for 1 or 2 months. The Program partners DOE with six electric utilities, with DOE providing financial support and some leads on Federal fleets interested in obtaining EVs. The utilities obtain the vehicles, identify candidate loaner fleets, loan the vehicles, provide temporary charging infrastructure, provide overall support to participating Federal fleets, and support fleets with their leasing decisions. While the utilities have not had the success initially envisioned by themselves, DOE, the Edison Electric Institute, and the Electric Vehicle Association of the Americas, the utilities can not be faulted for their efforts, as they are not the entity that makes the ultimate lease or no-lease decision. Some external groups have suggested to DOE that they direct other federal agencies to change their processes to make loaning vehicles easier; this is simply not within the power of DOE. By law, a certain percentage of all new vehicle acquisitions are supposed to be alternative fuel vehicles (AFV); however, with no enforcement, the federal agencies are not compelled to lease AFVs such as electric vehicles.

  6. Test plan for K-Basin fuel handling tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridges, A.E.

    1995-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the test plan and procedures for the acceptance testing of the handling tools enveloped for the removal of an N-Reactor fuel element from its storage canister in the K-Basins storage pool and insertion into the Single fuel Element Can for subsequent shipment to a Hot Cell for examination. Examination of these N-Reactor fuel elements is part of the overall characterization effort. New hand tools were required since previous fuel movement has involved grasping the fuel in a horizontal position. The 305 Building Cold Test Facility will be used to conduct the acceptance testing of the Fuel Handling Tools. Upon completion of this acceptance testing and any subsequent training of operators, the tools will be transferred to the 105 KW Basin for installation and use.

  7. Interim report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.; Potter, J.D.; Smalley, J.T.; Baker, C.P.; Jaquish, W.R.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project at the Hanford Site. The project will retrieve spent nuclear fuel, clean and remove fuel from canisters, repackage fuel into baskets, and load fuel into a multi-canister overpack (MCO) for vacuum drying and interim dry storage. The FRS is required to retrieve basin fuel canisters, clean fuel elements sufficiently of uranium corrosion products (or sludge), empty fuel from canisters, sort debris and scrap from whole elements, and repackage fuel in baskets in preparation for MCO loading. The purpose of fuel handling development testing was to examine the systems ability to accomplish mission activities, optimization of equipment layouts for initial process definition, identification of special needs/tools, verification of required design changes to support performance specification development, and validation of estimated activity times/throughput. The test program was set up to accomplish this purpose through cold development testing using simulated and prototype equipment; cold demonstration testing using vendor expertise and systems; and graphical computer modeling to confirm feasibility and throughput. To test the fuel handling process, a test mockup that represented the process table was fabricated and installed. The test mockup included a Schilling HV series manipulator that was prototypic of the Schilling Hydra manipulator. The process table mockup included the tipping station, sorting area, disassembly and inspection zones, fuel staging areas, and basket loading stations. The test results clearly indicate that the Schilling Hydra arm cannot effectively perform the fuel handling tasks required unless it is attached to some device that can impart vertical translation, azimuth rotation, and X-Y translation. Other test results indicate the importance of camera locations and capabilities, and of the jaw and end effector tool design. 5 refs., 35 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stottler, Gary

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    General Motors, LLC and energy partner Shell Hydrogen, LLC, deployed a system of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles integrated with a hydrogen fueling station infrastructure to operate under real world conditions as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Validation and Demonstration Project. This technical report documents the performance and describes the learnings from progressive generations of vehicle fuel cell system technology and multiple approaches to hydrogen generation and delivery for vehicle fueling.

  9. Perspectives on AFVs: 1996 Federal Fleet Manager Survey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalmsthePersonnel Management Federal Fleet

  10. Design package test weights for fuel retrieval system (OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a design package that documents the development of test weights used in the Spent Nuclear Fuels subproject Fuel Retrieval System. The K Basins Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project consists of the safe retrieval, preparation, and repackaging of the spent fuel stored at the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins for interim safe storage in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) scrap baskets and fuel baskets will be loaded and weighed under water. The equipment used to weigh the loaded fuel baskets requires daily calibration checks, using test weights traceable to National Institute of Standards Testing (NIST) standards. The test weights have been designated as OCRWM related in accordance with HNF-SD-SNF-RF'T-007 (McCormack).

  11. Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

  12. Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

  13. Spent nuclear fuel retrieval system fuel handling development testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.R.; Meeuwsen, P.V.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel handling development testing was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin, clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge), remove the contents from the canisters and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. This report describes fuel handling development testing performed from May 1, 1997 through the end of August 1997. Testing during this period was mainly focused on performance of a Schilling Robotic Systems` Conan manipulator used to simulate a custom designed version, labeled Konan, being fabricated for K-Basin deployment. In addition to the manipulator, the camera viewing system, process table layout, and fuel handling processes were evaluated. The Conan test manipulator was installed and fully functional for testing in early 1997. Formal testing began May 1. The purposes of fuel handling development testing were to provide proof of concept and criteria, optimize equipment layout, initialize the process definition, and identify special needs/tools and required design changes to support development of the performance specification. The test program was set up to accomplish these objectives through cold (non-radiological) development testing using simulated and prototype equipment.

  14. Legacy Fleet Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  15. Fuel and Fuel Additive Registration Testing of Ethanol-Diesel Blend for O2Diesel, Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fanick, E. R.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O2 Diesel Inc. (formerly AAE Technologies Inc.) tested a heavy duty engine with O2Diesel (diesel fuel with 7.7% ethanol and additives) for regulated emissions and speciation of vapor-phase and semi-volatile hydrocarbon compounds. This testing was performed in support of EPA requirements for registering designated fuels and fuel additives as stipulated by sections 211(b) and 211(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  16. Julie Crenshaw Van Fleet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report: I11IG002RTC3 |Julian Wong About Us JulianJulie

  17. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects Fact Sheet. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel...

  18. FINAL CONTENT SUBJECT TO CHANGE CONTROLLED HYDROGEN FLEET AND INFRASTRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT FINAL CONTENT SUBJECT TO CHANGE CONTROLLED HYDROGEN FLEET AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEMONSTRATION that complements FreedomCAR to develop both a low-cost hydrogen infrastructure and advanced hydrogen fuel cell a strategy to develop a hydrogen economy that emphasizes co-developing hydrogen infrastructure in parallel

  19. Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) Furnace for Post-Irradiation Heating Tests of VHTR Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A Demkowicz; Paul Demkowicz; David V Laug

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract –Fuel irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination are currently in progress as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Fuels Development and Qualification Program. The PIE campaign will include extensive accident testing of irradiated very high temperature reactor fuel compacts to verify fission product retention characteristics at high temperatures. This work will be carried out at both the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, beginning with accident tests on irradiated fuel from the AGR-1 experiment in 2010. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested at INL to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000°C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, Eu, and I) and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  20. Vehicle Fleet Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vehicle Fleet Policy Responsible Administrative Unit: Finance & Administration Policy Contact, and established campus vehicle fleet service under Facilities Management operations. The purpose of the fleet vehicles. This policy is applicable to the entire Mines fleet, which includes department vehicles. 2

  1. Clean Fleet Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S. Competitiveness2 P r o j e c t D

  2. Clean Fleet Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S. Competitiveness2 P r o j e c t D3

  3. Clean Fleet Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S. Competitiveness2 P r o j e c t

  4. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity's Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies' fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. GGNRA identified 182 vehicles in its fleet, which are under the management of the U.S. General Services Administration. Fleet vehicle mission categories are defined in Section 4, and while the GGNRA vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and law enforcement missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The selected vehicles included sedans, trucks, and sport-utility vehicles. This report will show that battery electric vehicles and/or PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for support vehicles and PHEVs provide the same for law enforcement, because each has a sufficient range for individual trips and time is available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle home base, high-use work areas, or intermediately along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in the emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The San Francisco Bay Area is a leader in the adoption of PEVs in the United States. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the GGNRA facility would be a benefit for both GGNRA fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned PEVs benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the GGNRA site to identify the optimal placement of the electric vehicle supply equipment station. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and GGNRA for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and GGNRA personnel.

  5. Test plan for thermogravimetric analyses of BWR spent fuel oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary studies indicated the need for additional low-temperature spent fuel oxidation data to determine the behavior of spent fuel as a waste form for a tuffy repository. Short-term thermogravimetric analysis tests were recommended in a comprehensive technical approach as the method for providing scoping data that could be used to (1) evaluate the effects of variables such as moisture and burnup on the oxidation rate, (2) determine operative mechanisms, and (3) guide long-term, low-temperature oxidation testing. The initial test series studied the temperature and moisture effects on pressurized water reactor fuel as a function of particle and grain size. This document presents the test matrix for studying the oxidation behavior of boiling water reactor fuel in the temperature range of 140 to 225{degree}C. 17 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Phase I Ring Compression Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the technical basis for extended storage and transportation of high-burnup fuel. This report highlights the results of completed Phase I testing of high-burnup M5...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Retailer Tax Credit Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption Biofuels Tax Exemption Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Low-Interest Loans Idle Reduction Weight...

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Grants Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fleet Technical Assistance added 252015 Biofuels Research Grants Ethanol Infrastructure Grants Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Sales Tax...

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Acquisition Requirements All school and government fleets may convert their vehicles to operate on alternative fuels, and all school districts should consider purchasing only...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel School Bus Conversion Research The School Transportation Task Force (Task Force) must investigate the costs and benefits of converting school buses and bus fleets...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Public Access to State Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations The Utah Department of Administrative Services Division of Fleet Services (Division) may allow a private...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Voucher Program The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) administers the Maryland Freedom Fleet Voucher (FFV) Program, which provides vouchers for...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Infrastructure Grants The Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources' Clean Vehicle Project offers grant funding for public and private fleets to...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    their fleets' petroleum consumption by increasing vehicle fuel economy and operating efficiency and reducing the number of miles driven by each employee. Agencies must also give...

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    operating flexible fuel or diesel vehicles as part of the state fleet must use E85 or biodiesel blends whenever reasonably available. Additionally, the Nebraska Transportation...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Use in School Buses The South Carolina Department of Education must fuel state school bus fleets with biodiesel when feasible. (Reference South Carolina Code of Laws...

  17. Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

  18. Pyroprocessing of Fast Flux Test Facility Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.R. Westphal; G.L. Fredrickson; G.G. Galbreth; D. Vaden; M.D. Elliott; J.C. Price; E.M. Honeyfield; M.N. Patterson; L. A. Wurth

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electrorefined uranium products exceeded 99%.

  19. Pyroprocessing of fast flux test facility nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westphal, B.R.; Wurth, L.A.; Fredrickson, G.L.; Galbreth, G.G.; Vaden, D.; Elliott, M.D.; Price, J.C.; Honeyfield, E.M.; Patterson, M.N. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electro-refined uranium products exceeded 99%. (authors)

  20. Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

  1. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  2. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garetson, Thomas

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy?s (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations. Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing. Testing and evaluations were conducted in the following phases: ? Development of test procedures, which established testing procedures; ? Baseline performance testing, which established a performance baseline; ? Accelerated reliability testing, which determined vehicle reliability; ? Fleet testing, used to evaluate vehicle economics in fleet operation, and ? End of test performance evaluation. Test results are reported by two means and posted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to their website: quarterly progress reports, used to document work in progress; and final test reports. This final report documents work conducted for the entirety of the contract by the Clarity Group, Inc., doing business as ECOtality North America (ECOtality). The contract was performed from 1 October 2005 through 31 March 2013. There were 113 light-duty on-road (95), off-road (3) and low speed (15) vehicles tested.

  3. Laboratory characterization tests for antimisting fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.J.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have shown that FM-9 antimisting fuel had the potential for precluding the fine mist and associated fireball generation in aircraft post-crash situations while allowing for the restoration of the filtration and antomizing characteristics required for aircraft operation. The Federal Aviation Administration, the Aircraft Establishment, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, and Pratt and Whitney Aircraft developed many specialized laboratory characterization tests throughout the antimisting fuel program to evaluate the antimisting properties, the degradability, the composition, and rheological properties of FM-9 antimisting fuel and the physical properties of FM-9 slurry used in the inline blending process for anitmisting fuel. This report documents all the laboratory characterization tests that were successfully developed and used as a standardized test method during the program.

  4. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material--ATM-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material 104 (ATM-104), which is spent fuel from Assembly DO47 of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Unit 1), a pressurized-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-104 consists of 128 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 42 MWd/kgM and expected fission gas release of about 1%. A variety of analyses were performed to investigate cladding characteristics, radionuclide inventory, and redistribution of fission products. Characterization data include (1) fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling history; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM) and electron probe microanalyses (EPMA); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding.

  5. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  6. Spent nuclear fuel storage -- Performance tests and demonstrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, M.A.; DeLoach, V.A.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of heat transfer and shielding performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1992 by or in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loadings, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. A description of the test plan, spent fuel load patterns, results from temperature and dose rate measurements, and fuel integrity evaluations are contained within the report.

  7. FINAL REPORT UNALASKA FLEET COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Cooperative, consisting of factory trawlers, a group of seven catcher vessels with history cooperative and the inshore sector formed a total of seven. Quotas are distributed to coops by the NMFS as per-1997 as set in the AFA. The Unalaska Fleet Cooperative is one of seven inshore cooperatives formed in December

  8. FINAL REPORT UNALASKA FLEET COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trawlers, a group of seven catcher vessels with history of delivering offshore to factory trawlers of seven. Quotas are distributed to coops by the NMFS as per a formula based on the catch percentages by vessels in the qualifying years as set in the AFA. The Unalaska Fleet Cooperative is one of seven inshore

  9. FINAL REPORT UNALASKA FLEET COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    formed the Pollock Conservation Cooperative, consisting of factory trawlers, a group of seven catcher Sector formed one cooperative and the inshore sector formed a total of seven. Quotas are distributed qualifying years, 1995-1997 as set in the AFA. The Unalaska Fleet Cooperative is one of seven inshore

  10. Test burning of tire-derived fuel in solid fuel combustors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, D.C. [Monsanto Copany, Sauget, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was commissioned to determine the overall viability of utilizing scrap tire chips, known as tire-derived fuel (TDF), as a supplemental fuel in conventional coal-fired boilers. The study involved actual tests at Monsanto Company`s W.G. Krummrich Plant in Sauget, Illinois, as well as general extrapolations as to the feasibility of using TDF at other sites. This report will show that TDF can be an excellent supplemental fuel supply, providing a cost-effective fuel source while helping to alleviate the dilemma of scrap tire disposal.

  11. Sustainable Federal Fleets Catalog of Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment ofEnergy State andBuildingsSustainable Federal Fleets

  12. California Fleets and Workplace Alternative Fuels Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    information. 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Review Presentation Damian Breen Deputy Air Pollution Control Officer Bay Area Air Quality Management District Project ID: TI035...

  13. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the use of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (FVNHS) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of electric vehicles (EVs) into the agencies’ fleet. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to EV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles) could fulfill the mission requirements. FVNHS identified three vehicles in its fleet for consideration. While the FVNHS vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and pool missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The logged vehicles included a pickup truck and a minivan. This report will show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for both mission categories, because each has sufficient range for individual trips and time available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle’s home base, high-use work areas, or in intermediate areas along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

  14. Municipal solid waste combustion: Fuel testing and characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushnell, D.J.; Canova, J.H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, A.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

  15. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 5, employee attitude assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experiences of couriers, operations managers, vehicle handlers (refuelers), and mechanics who drove and/or worked with alternative fuel vehicles, and the attitudes and perceptions of people with these experiences, are examined. Five alternative fuels studied in the CleanFleet project are considers& compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline, M-85, and electricity. The three major areas of interest include comparative analysis of issues such as health, safety and vehicle performance, business issues encompassing several facets of station operations, and personal commentary and opinions about the CleanFleet project and the alterative fuels. Results of the employee attitude assessment are presented as both statistical and qualitative analysis.

  16. Degradation mechanisms and accelerated testing in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Although there has been recent progress in improving durability, further improvements are needed to meet the commercialization targets. Past improvements have largely been made possible because of the fundamental understanding of the underlying degradation mechanisms. By investigating component and cell degradation modes; defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions new materials can be designed to improve durability. Various factors have been shown to affect the useful life of PEM fuel cells. Other issues arise from component optimization. Operational conditions (such as impurities in either the fuel and oxidant stream), cell environment, temperature (including subfreezing exposure), pressure, current, voltage, etc.; or transient versus continuous operation, including start-up and shutdown procedures, represent other factors that can affect cell performance and durability. The need for Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs) can be quickly understood given the target lives for fuel cell systems: 5000 hours ({approx} 7 months) for automotive, and 40,000 hrs ({approx} 4.6 years) for stationary systems. Thus testing methods that enable more rapid screening of individual components to determine their durability characteristics, such as off-line environmental testing, are needed for evaluating new component durability in a reasonable turn-around time. This allows proposed improvements in a component to be evaluated rapidly and independently, subsequently allowing rapid advancement in PEM fuel cell durability. These tests are also crucial to developers in order to make sure that they do not sacrifice durability while making improvements in costs (e.g. lower platinum group metal [PGM] loading) and performance (e.g. thinner membrane or a GDL with better water management properties). To achieve a deeper understanding and improve PEM fuel cell durability LANL is conducting research to better define fuel cell component degradation mechanisms and correlate AST measurements to component in 'real-world' situations.

  17. Machine Vision Tests for Spent Fuel Scrap Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERGER, W.W.

    2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to perform a feasibility test of a Machine Vision system for potential use at the Hanford K basins during spent nuclear fuel (SNF) operations. This report documents the testing performed to establish functionality of the system including quantitative assessment of results. Fauske and Associates, Inc., which has been intimately involved in development of the SNF safety basis, has teamed with Agris-Schoen Vision Systems, experts in robotics, tele-robotics, and Machine Vision, for this work.

  18. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Bucket Trucks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet

  19. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for City Transit Buses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet25 18 17

  20. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Class 8 Tractors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet25 18 1726

  1. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Delivery Trucks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet25 18

  2. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Delivery Vans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet25

  3. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Refuse Trucks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet2562 16 30

  4. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for School Buses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet2562 16

  5. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Service Vans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet2562 1635

  6. Fleet DNA Project Â… Data Dictionary for Public Download Files

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet2562

  7. Fleet Tools (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof ofofDownloadsNewFlat-PlateFleet2562and

  8. Elements present in leach solutions from unsaturated spent fuel tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results for the composition of the leachate from unsaturated tests at 90{degrees}C with spent fuel for 55--134 days with J-13 groundwater are reported. The pH of the leachate solutions was found to be acidic, ranging from 4 to 7. The actinide concentrations were 10{sup 5} greater than those reported for saturated spent fuel tests in which the leachate pH was 8. We also found that most species in the leachate were present as colloids containing both americium and curium. The presence of actinides in a form not currently included in repository radionuclide transport models provides information that can be used in spent fuel reaction modeling, the performance assessment of the repository and the design of the engineering barrier system. This report was prepared as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

  9. Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

  10. Study of fueling requirements for the Engineering Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, S.K.; Perkins, L.J.

    1987-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the fueling requirement for the TIBER Engineering Test Reactor is studied. The neutral shielding pellet ablation model with the inclusion of the effects of the alpha particles is used for our study. The high electron temperature in a reactor-grade plasma makes pellet penetration very difficult. The launch length has to be very large (several tens of meters) in order to avoid pellet breakage due to the low inertial strength of DT ''ice.'' The minimum repetition rate corresponding to the largest allowable pellet, is found to be about 1 Hz. A brief survey is done on the various operational and conceptual pellet injection schemes for plasma fueling. The underlying conclusion is that an alternative fueling scheme of coaxial compact-toroid plasma gun is very likely needed for effective central fueling of reactor-grade plasmas. 16 refs.

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arizona Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    (PEV) Charging Rate - APS Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation Federal Fleet Operation Regulations School District Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition Requirements To...

  12. USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a cask’s internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

  13. LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

  14. Thermomechanical modeling of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butkovich, T.R.; Patrick, W.C.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable deep geologic storage of commercially generated spent nuclear-reactor fuel assemblies. One of the primary aspects of the test was to measure the thermomechanical response of the rock mass to the extensive heating of a large volume of rock. Instrumentation was emplaced to measure stress changes, relative motion of the rock mass, and tunnel closures during three years of heating from thermally decaying heat sources, followed by a six-month cooldown period. The calculations reported here were performed using the best available input parameters, thermal and mechanical properties, and power levels which were directly measured or inferred from measurements made during the test. This report documents the results of these calculations and compares the results with selected measurements made during heating and cooling of the SFT-C.

  15. Mitsubishi iMiEV: An Electric Mini-Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet highlights the Mitsubishi iMiEV, an electric mini-car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's fast-charging research efforts, NREL engineers are conducting charge and discharge performance testing on the vehicle. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  16. NUHOMS modular spent-fuel storage system: Performance testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strope, L.A.; McKinnon, M.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Dyksterhouse, D.J.; McLean, J.C. (Carolina Power and Light Co., Raleigh, NC (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of a heat transfer and shielding performance evaluation of the NUTECH HOrizontal MOdular Storage (NUHOMS{reg sign}) System utilized by the Carolina Power and Light Co. (CP L) in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The ISFSI is located at CP L's H. B. Robinson Nuclear Plant (HBR) near Hartsville, South Carolina. The demonstration included testing of three modules, first with electric heaters and then with spent fuel. The results indicated that the system was conservatively designed, with all heat transfer and shielding design criteria easily met. 5 refs., 45 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation by Keith Wipke at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis Project.

  18. Improved Accelerated Stress Tests Based on Fuel Cell Vehicle Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Timothy [Research Engineer] [Research Engineer; Motupally, Sathya [Research Engineer] [Research Engineer

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UTC will led a top-tier team of industry and national laboratory participants to update and improve DOE’s Accelerated Stress Tests (AST’s) for hydrogen fuel cells. This in-depth investigation will focused on critical fuel cell components (e.g. membrane electrode assemblies - MEA) whose durability represented barriers for widespread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technology. UTC had access to MEA materials that had accrued significant load time under real-world conditions in PureMotion® 120 power plant used in transit buses. These materials are referred to as end-of-life (EOL) components in the rest of this document. Advanced characterization techniques were used to evaluate degradation mode progress using these critical cell components extracted from both bus power plants and corresponding materials tested using the DOE AST’s. These techniques were applied to samples at beginning-of-life (BOL) to serve as a baseline. These comparisons advised the progress of the various failure modes that these critical components were subjected to, such as membrane degradation, catalyst support corrosion, platinum group metal dissolution, and others. Gaps in the existing ASTs predicted the degradation observed in the field in terms of these modes were outlined. Using the gaps, new AST’s were recommended and tested to better reflect the degradation modes seen in field operation. Also, BOL components were degraded in a test vehicle at UTC designed to accelerate the bus field operation.

  19. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years there has been an unstable supply of the critical diagnostic medical isotope 99Tc. Several concepts and designs have been proposed to produce 99Mo the parent nuclide of 99Tc, at a commercial scale sufficient to stabilize the world supply. This work lays out a testing and experiment plan for a proposed 2 MW open pool reactor fueled by Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) 99Mo targets. The experiments and tests necessary to support licensing of the reactor design are described and how these experiments and tests will help establish the safe operating envelop for a medical isotope production reactor is discussed. The experiments and tests will facilitate a focused and efficient licensing process in order to bring on line a needed production reactor dedicated to supplying medical isotopes. The Target Fuel Isotope Reactor (TFIR) design calls for an active core region that is approximately 40 cm in diameter and 40 cm in fuel height. It contains up to 150 cylindrical, 1-cm diameter, LEU oxide fuel pins clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy), in an annular hexagonal array on a {approx}2.0 cm pitch surrounded, radially, by a graphite or a Be reflector. The reactor is similar to U.S. university reactors in power, hardware, and safety/control systems. Fuel/target pin fabrication is based on existing light water reactor fuel fabrication processes. However, as part of licensing process, experiments must be conducted to confirm analytical predictions of steady-state power and accident conditions. The experiment and test plan will be conducted in phases and will utilize existing facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories. The first phase is to validate the predicted reactor core neutronics at delayed critical, zero power and very low power. This will be accomplished by using the Sandia Critical Experiment (CX) platform. A full scale TFIR core will be built in the CX and delayed critical measurements will be taken. For low power experiments, fuel pins can be removed after the experiment and using Sandia's metrology lab, relative power profiles (radially and axially) can be determined. In addition to validating neutronic analyses, confirming heat transfer properties of the target/fuel pins and core will be conducted. Fuel/target pin power limits can be verified with out-of-pile (electrical heating) thermal-hydraulic experiments. This will yield data on the heat flux across the Zircaloy clad and establish safety margin and operating limits. Using Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) a 4 MW TRIGA type research reactor, target/fuel pins can be driven to desired fission power levels for long durations. Post experiment inspection of the pins can be conducted in the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility to observe changes in the mechanical properties of the LEU matrix and burn-up effects. Transient tests can also be conducted at the ACRR to observe target/fuel pin performance during accident conditions. Target/fuel pins will be placed in double experiment containment and driven by pulsing the ACRR until target/fuel failure is observed. This will allow for extrapolation of analytical work to confirm safety margins.

  20. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol test program :FY 2005-06 testing and aerosol data summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Nolte, O. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Loiseau, O. (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, W. (Fraunhofer institut fur toxikologie und experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno (Institut de radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Billone, M. C. (Argonne National Laboratory, USA); Lucero, Daniel A.; Burtseva, T. (Argonne National Laboratory, USA); Brucher, W (Gesellschaft fur anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. This document focuses on an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, primarily during FY 2005 and about the first two-thirds of FY 2006. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of May 2006. We provide details on the significant findings on aerosol results and observations from the recently completed Phase 2 surrogate material tests using cerium oxide ceramic pellets in test rodlets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants. Results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR (the ratio of respirable particles from real spent fuel/respirables from surrogate spent fuel, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber); and, measurements of enhanced volatile fission product species sorption onto respirable particles. We discuss progress and results for the first three, recently performed Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide, DUO{sub 2}, test rodlets. We will also review the status of preparations and the final Phase 4 tests in this program, using short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. These data plus testing results and design are tailored to support and guide, follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program, performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, had significant inputs from, and is strongly supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and the U.K., as part of the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC.

  1. First interim report of the Federal Fleet Conversion Task Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Fleet Conversion Task Force was created by Executive Order 12844, signed by President Clinton on April 21, 1993. In the Order, the President directed that purchases of alternative fueled vehicles by the Federal Government be substantially increased beyond the levels required by current law. The President charged the Task Force with developing recommendations for carrying out the Executive Order, with special emphasis on setting a course that will lead to the widespread use of alternative fueled vehicles by Federal, State, and local government fleets, by private fleets and, ultimately, by individuals. The chief recommendation of the Task Force is the establishment of a Presidential Clean Cities Initiative. To support creation of the Presidential Initiative, the Task Force identified 38 cities and regions, prioritized into three tiers, for concentrating the Initiative`s efforts in Fiscal Years 1994 through 1996. This concentration of effort is key to the effectiveness of the Initiative. The 38 cities and regions would receive priority funding for Federal vehicle purchases and for infrastructure development. In addition, the Task Force has made specific recommendations for overcoming numerous regulatory, economic, and technical barriers that have slowed the introduction of alternative fueled vehicles into general use.

  2. Drop-in capsule testing of plutonium-based fuels in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Terry, W.K.; Ambrosek, R.G.; Palmer, A.J.; Roesener, R.A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most attractive way to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) is to use it as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PuO[sub 2]) mixed with urania (UO[sub 2]). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. The proposed weapons-grade MOX fuel is unusual, even relative to ongoing foreign experience with reactor-grade MOX power reactor fuel. Some demonstration of the in- reactor thermal, mechanical, and fission gas release behavior of the prototype fuel will most likely be required in a limited number of test reactor irradiations. The application to license operation with MOX fuel must be amply supported by experimental data. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is capable of playing a key role in the irradiation, development, and licensing of these new fuel types. The ATR is a 250- MW (thermal) LWR designed to study the effects of intense radiation on reactor fuels and materials. For 25 years, the primary role of the ATR has been to serve in experimental investigations for the development of advanced nuclear fuels. Both large- and small-volume test positions in the ATR could be used for MOX fuel irradiation. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. Furthermore, these data can be obtained more quickly by using ATR instead of testing in a commercial LWR. Our previous work in this area has demonstrated that it is technically feasible to perform MOX fuel testing in the ATR. This report documents our analyses of sealed drop-in capsules containing plutonium-based test specimens placed in various ATR positions.

  3. Hydrogen Fuel Pilot Plant and Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort (INEEL)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) teamed with Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Arizona Public Service (APS) to develop the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant that produces and compresses hydrogen on site through an electrolysis process by operating a PEM fuel cell in reverse; natural gas is also compressed onsite. The Pilot Plant dispenses 100% hydrogen, 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG), and 100% CNG via a credit card billing system at pressures up to 5,000 psi. Thirty internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles (including Daimler Chrysler, Ford and General Motors vehicles) are operating on 100% hydrogen and 15 to 50% H/CNG blends. Since the Pilot Plant started operating in June 2002, they hydrogen and H/CNG ICE vehicels have accumulated 250,000 test miles.

  4. Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruary 17, 2015 -Products &FederalTest

  5. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration and Evaluation Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration and Evaluation 2011 DOE...

  6. Business Case for CNG in Municipal Fleets (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation about compressed natural gas in municipal fleets, assessing investment profitability, the VICE model, base-case scenarios, and pressing questions for fleet owners.

  7. Vehicle Technologies and Bus Fleet Replacement Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    1 Vehicle Technologies and Bus Fleet Replacement Optimization: problem properties and sensitivity: R41 #12;2 Abstract This research presents a bus fleet replacement optimization model to analyze hybrid and conventional diesel vehicles, are studied. Key variables affecting optimal bus type

  8. Tests of prototype salt stripper system for IFR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carls, E.L.; Blaskovitz, R.J.; Johnson, T.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ogata, T. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the waste treatment steps for the on-site reprocessing of spent fuel from the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycles is stripping of the electrolyte salt used in the electrorefining process. This involves the chemical reduction of the actinides and rare earth chlorides forming metals which then dissolve in a cadmium pool. To develop the equipment for this step, a prototype salt stripper system has been installed in an engineering scale argon-filled glovebox. Pumping trails were successful in transferring 90 kg of LiCl-KCl salt containing uranium and rare earth metal chlorides at 500{degree}C from an electrorefiner to the stripper vessel at a pumping rate of about 5 L/min. The freeze seal solder connectors which were used to join sections of the pump and transfer line performed well. Stripping tests have commenced employing an inverted cup charging device to introduce a Cd-15 wt % Li alloy reductant to the stripper vessel.

  9. SunLine Begins Extended Testing of Hybrid Fuel Cell Bus; DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to environmentally friendly alternative power systems by testing a prototype hybrid fuel cell bus. SunLine's experience with gaseous fuels began in 1994, when a concern for...

  10. Extended Durability Testing of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula; Mark Scotto

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Durability testing was performed on an external fuel processor (EFP) for a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power plant. The EFP enables the SOFC to reach high system efficiency (electrical efficiency up to 60%) using pipeline natural gas and eliminates the need for large quantities of bottled gases. LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (LGFCS) is developing natural gas-fired SOFC power plants for stationary power applications. These power plants will greatly benefit the public by reducing the cost of electricity while reducing the amount of gaseous emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides compared to conventional power plants. The EFP uses pipeline natural gas and air to provide all the gas streams required by the SOFC power plant; specifically those needed for start-up, normal operation, and shutdown. It includes a natural gas desulfurizer, a synthesis-gas generator and a start-gas generator. The research in this project demonstrated that the EFP could meet its performance and durability targets. The data generated helped assess the impact of long-term operation on system performance and system hardware. The research also showed the negative impact of ambient weather (both hot and cold conditions) on system operation and performance.

  11. Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two subjects are covered in this section. They are: (1) Health effects of possible contamination at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to be studied; and (2) DOE agrees on test of MOX fuel in Canada.

  12. Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus 2010 DOE Vehicle...

  13. How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? November 12, 2009 - 8:36am...

  14. Stochastic ship fleet routing with inventory limits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a stochastic ship routing problem with inventory management. The problem involves finding a set of least costs routes for a fleet of ships transporting a single commodity when the demand for ...

  15. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  16. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  17. Assessment of a hot hydrogen nuclear propulsion fuel test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, H.H.; Howe, S.D.; Wantuck, P.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsequent to the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), several studies and review groups have identified nuclear thermal propulsion as a high priority technology for development. To achieve the goals of SEI to place man on Mars, a nuclear rocket will operate at near 2700K and in a hydrogen environment at near 60 atmospheres. Under these conditions, the operational lifetime of the rocket will be limited by the corrosion rate at the hydrogen/fuel interface. Consequently, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been evaluating requirements and design issues for a test facility. The facility will be able to directly heat fuel samples by electrical resistance, microwave deposition, or radio frequency induction heating to temperatures near 3000K. Hydrogen gas at variable pressure and temperatures will flow through the samples. The thermal gradients, power density, and operating times envisioned for nuclear rockets will be duplicated as close as reasonable. The post-sample flow stream will then be scrubbed and cooled before reprocessing. The baseline design and timetable for the facility will be discussed. 7 refs.

  18. Testing of Gas Reactor Fuel and Materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent growth in interest for high temperature gas reactors has resulted in an increased need for materials and fuel testing for this type of reactor. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, has long been involved in testing gas reactor fuel and materials, and has facilities and capabilities to provide the right environment for gas reactor irradiation experiments. These capabilities include both passive sealed capsule experiments, and instrumented/actively controlled experiments. The instrumented/actively controlled experiments typically contain thermocouples and control the irradiation temperature, but on-line measurements and controls for pressure and gas environment have also been performed in past irradiations. The ATR has an existing automated gas temperature control system that can maintain temperature in an irradiation experiment within very tight bounds, and has developed an on-line fission product monitoring system that is especially well suited for testing gas reactor particle fuel. The ATR’s control system, which consists primarily of vertical cylinders used to rotate neutron poisons/reflectors toward or away from the reactor core, provides a constant vertical flux profile over the duration of each operating cycle. This constant chopped cosine shaped axial flux profile, with a relatively flat peak at the vertical centre of the core, is more desirable for experiments than a constantly moving axial flux peak resulting from a control system of axially positioned control components which are vertically withdrawn from the core.

  19. NREL: Transportation Research - Fleet DNA: Commercial Fleet Vehicle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit

  20. Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

  1. Toyota Prius Plug-In HEV: A Plug-In Hybrid Electric Car in NREL's Advanced Technology Vehicle Fleet (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet highlights the Toyota Prius plug-in HEV, a plug-in hybrid electric car in the advanced technology vehicle fleet at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). In partnership with the University of Colorado, NREL uses the vehicle for grid-integration studies and for testing new hardware and charge-management algorithms. NREL's advanced technology vehicle fleet features promising technologies to increase efficiency and reduce emissions without sacrificing safety or comfort. The fleet serves as a technology showcase, helping visitors learn about innovative vehicles that are available today or are in development. Vehicles in the fleet are representative of current, advanced, prototype, and emerging technologies.

  2. Storage of LWR spent fuel in air: Volume 1: Design and operation of a spent fuel oxidation test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornhill, C.K.; Campbell, T.K.; Thornhill, R.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.

  3. Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration: Study of Factors Affecting Fuel Cell Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference paper prepared for the FuelCell2008 conference describing the results of the DOE Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project.

  4. Contributing Data to the Fleet DNA Project (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fleet DNA clearinghouse of commercial fleet transportation data helps vehicle manufacturers and developers optimize vehicle designs and helps fleet managers choose advanced technologies for their fleets. This online tool - available at www.nrel.gov/fleetdna - provides data summaries and visualizations similar to real-world 'genetics' for medium- and heavy-duty commercial fleet vehicles operating within a variety of vocations. To contribute your fleet data, please contact Adam Duran of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at adam.duran@nrel.gov or 303-275-4586.

  5. Biodiesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    publication 442-880 There are broad and increasing interests across the nation in using domestic, renewable bioenergy. Virginia farmers and transportation fleets use considerable amounts of diesel fuel in their operations. Biodiesel is an excellent alternative fuel for the diesel engines. Biodiesel can be produced from crops commonly grown in Virginia, such as soybean and canola, and has almost the same performance as petrodiesel. The purpose of this publication is to introduce the basics of biodiesel fuel and address some myths and answer some questions about biodiesel fuel before farmers and fleet owners use this type of fuel. ASTM standard for biodiesel (ASTM D6751) Biodiesel fuel, hereafter referred to as simply biodiesel,

  6. Fuel Tank Manufacturing, Testing, Field Performance, and Certification |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)OverviewgreenLifeDepartment of

  7. Fueling Components Testing and Certification | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies ProgramOutfitted with SCR |Altering

  8. Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy`s implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

  9. Spent-fuel dry-storage testing at E-MAD (March 1978-March 1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unterzuber, R.; Milnes, R.D.; Marinkovich, B.A.; Kubancsek, G.M.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From March 1978 through March 1982, spent fuel dry storage tests were conducted at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site to confirm that commercial reactor spent fuel could be encapsulated and passively stored in one or more interim dry storage cell concepts. These tests were: electrically heated drywell, isolated and adjacent drywell, concrete silo, fuel assembly internal temperature measurement, and air-cooled vault. This document presents the test data and results as well as results from supporting test operations (spent fuel calorimetry and canister gas sampling).

  10. Fleet Briefings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy: Thomas P. D'Agostino, Undersecretary forCITI Briefing.pdf DOE - Agency

  11. Fleet Biodiesel | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdfInactive JumpFirst WindWater Wind Farm Jump

  12. Fleet Management | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome| Department of EnergyEnergy Years

  13. Fleet Vehicles | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProof

  14. Thin fuel film reactor testing for characterization of diesel fuel deposit formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welling, Orian (Orian Z.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for specialized diesel fuel injectors is growing with increased efficiency and emissions regulation. These specialized fuel injectors have nozzle diameters of 150-200[mu]m which are susceptible to clogging from ...

  15. NREL UL Fuel Dispensing Infrastructure Intermediate Blends Performance Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.; Clark, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation provides an overview of NREL's project to determine compatibility and safe performance of installed fuel dispensing infrastructure with E15.

  16. Hanford spent nuclear fuel hot conditioning system test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleveland, K.J.

    1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the test procedures for cold testing of the prototype Hot Conditioning System (HCS) at the 306E Facility. The primary objective of this testing is to confirm design choices and provide data for the detailed design package prior to procurement of the process equipment. The current scope of testing in this document includes a fabricability study of the HCS, equipment performance testing of the HCS components, heat-up and cool-down cycle simulation, and robotic arm testing.

  17. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

  18. Ground test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, G.C.; Beck, D.F.; Harmon, C.D.; Shipers, L.R.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and design issues of a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. 2 refs.

  19. Chronological History of Federal Fleet Actions and Mandates (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chronological history of Federal fleet actions and mandates provides a year-by-year timeline of the acts, amendments, executive orders, and other regulations that affect Federal fleets. The fleet actions and mandates included in the timeline span from 1988 to 2009.

  20. LMFBR fuel-design environment for endurance testing, primarily of oxide fuel elements with local faults

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warinner, D.K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy LMFBR Lines-of-Assurance are briefly stated and local faults are given perspective with an historical review and definition to help define the constraints of LMFBR fuel-element designs. Local-fault-propagation (fuel-element failure-propagation and blockage propagation) perceptions are reviewed. Fuel pin designs and major LMFBR parameters affecting pin performance are summarized. The interpretation of failed-fuel data is aided by a discussion of the effects of nonprototypicalities. The fuel-pin endurance expected in the US, USSR, France, UK, Japan, and West Germany is outlined. Finally, fuel-failure detection and location by delayed-neutron and gaseous-fission-product monitors are briefly discussed to better realize the operational limits.

  1. Imminent: Irradiation Testing of (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} Fuel - 13560

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Julian F. [Thor Energy AS, Sommerrogaten 13-15, Oslo 0255 (Norway)] [Thor Energy AS, Sommerrogaten 13-15, Oslo 0255 (Norway); Franceschini, Fausto [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)] [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial-prototype thorium-plutonium oxide (Th-MOX) fuel pellets have been loaded into the material test reactor in Halden, Norway. The fuel is being operated at full power - with instrumentation - in simulated LWR / PHWR conditions and its behaviour is measured 'on-line' as it operates to high burn-up. This is a vital test on the commercialization pathway for this robust new thoria-based fuel. The performance data that is collected will support a fuel modeling effort to support its safety qualification. Several different samples of Th-MOX fuel will be tested, thereby collecting information on ceramic behaviours and their microstructure dependency. The fuel-cycle reasoning underpinning the test campaign is that commercial Th- MOX fuels are an achievable intermediate / near-term SNF management strategy that integrates well with a fast reactor future. (authors)

  2. Guidelines for the Establishment of a Model Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberta Brayer; Donald Karner; Kevin Morrow; James Francfort

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity tests neighborhood electric vehicles (NEVs) in both track and fleet testing environments. NEVs, which are also known as low speed vehicles, are light-duty vehicles with top speeds of between 20 and 25 mph, and total gross vehicle weights of approximately 2,000 pounds or less. NEVs have been found to be very viable alternatives to internal combustion engine vehicles based on their low operating costs. However, special charging infrastructure is usually necessary for successful NEV fleet deployment. Maintenance requirements are also unique to NEVs, especially if flooded lead acid batteries are used as they have watering requirements that require training, personnel protection equipment, and adherence to maintenance schedules. This report provides guidelines for fleet managers to follow in order to successfully introduce and operate NEVs in fleet environments. This report is based on the NEV testing and operational experience of personnel from the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Electric Transportation Applications, and the Idaho National Laboratory.

  3. Waste Management's LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (US); Clark, N. [West Virginia University (US)

    2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Management, Inc., began operating a fleet of heavy-duty LNG refuse trucks at its Washington, Pennsylvania, facility. The objective of the project was to provide transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational, and emissions characteristics of LNG as one alternative to conventional diesel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

  4. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypcial converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests.

  5. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA Glenn Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s study seeks to collect and evaluate data to validate the utilization of advanced plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) transportation. This report focuses on the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively referred to as PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  6. Results from Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Series 3 spent fuel dissolution tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), formerly the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Specimens prepared from pressurized water reactor fuel rod segments were tested in sealed stainless steel vessels in Nevada Test Site J-13 well water at 85{degree}C and 25{degree}C. The test matrix included three specimens of bare-fuel particles plus cladding hulls, two fuel rod segments with artificially defected cladding and water-tight end fittings, and an undefected fuel rod section with watertight end fittings. Periodic solution samples were taken during test cycles with the sample volumes replenished with fresh J-13 water. Test cycles were periodically terminated and the specimens restarted in fresh J-13 water. The specimens were run for three cycles for a total test duration of 15 months. 22 refs., 32 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. Exploration of Novel Fuels for Gas Turbine (ENV-406) Modeling of T60 Test Rig with Diesel & Biodiesel Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Biodiesel Fuels Mémoire Mina Youssef Maîtrise en génie mécanique Maître ès sciences (M.Sc.) Québec, Canada de biodiesel B20. La matrice de test numérique constitue de quatre cas d'écoulement réactifs c to simulate the liquid combustion of conventional and non- conventional biodiesel fuels, in particularly the B

  8. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  9. Test plan for reactions between spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating the long-term performance of a high-level nuclear waste form, spent fuel from commercial reactors. Permanent disposal of the spent fuel is possible in a potential repository to be located in the volcanic tuff beds near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. During the post-containment period the spent fuel could be exposed to water condensation since of the cladding is assumed to fail during this time. Spent fuel leach (SFL) tests are designed to simulate and monitor the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel under this condition. This Test Plan addresses the anticipated conditions whereby spent fuel is contacted by small amounts of water that trickle through the spent fuel container. Two complentary test plans are presented, one to examine the reaction of spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions and the second to examine the reaction of unirradiated UO{sub 2} pellets and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions. The former test plan examines the importance of the water content, the oxygen content as affected by radiolysis, the fuel burnup, fuel surface area, and temperature. The latter test plant examines the effect of the non-presence of Teflon in the test vessel.

  10. RIS-M-2185 CALCULATION OF HEAT RATING AND BURN-UP FOR TEST FUEL PINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISŘ-M-2185 CALCULATION OF HEAT RATING AND BURN-UP FOR TEST FUEL PINS IRRADIATED IN DR3 C. Bagger of fuel pins irradiated in HP1 rigs. The calculations are carried out rather detailed, especially of the data. INIS Descriptors . BURN-UP, CALORIMETRY, COMPUTER CALCULATIONS, DR-3, FISSION, FUEL ASSEMBLIES

  11. Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff MeetingWater Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design fuel cell design and operation; Demonstrate improvements in water management resulting in improved

  12. Testing Synthetic Fuels for Use in U.S. Army Ground Vehicles | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment ofTankTest Site SwedenEnergyTesting

  13. Testing and analyses of the TN-24P PWR spent-fuel dry storage cask loaded with consolidated fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, M A; Michener, T E; Jensen, M F; Rodman, G R

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A performance test of a Transnuclear, Inc. TN-24P storage cask configured for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel was performed. The work was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and the Electric Power Research Institute. The performance test consisted of loading the TN-24P cask with 24 canisters of consolidated PWR spent fuel from Virginia Power's Surry and Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point reactors. Cask surface and fuel canister guide tube temperatures were measured, as were cask surface gamma and neutron dose rates. Testing was performed with vacuum, nitrogen, and helium backfill environments in both vertical and horizontal cask orientations. Transnuclear, Inc., arranged to have a partially insulated run added to the end of the test to simulate impact limiters. Limited spent fuel integrity data were also obtained. From both heat transfer and shielding perspectives, the TN-24P cask with minor refinements can be effectively implemented at reactor sites and central storage facilities for safe storage of unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel. 35 refs., 93 figs., 17 tabs.

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel FuelAlternativeFleet Vehicle

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel FuelAlternativeFleet

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center (Fact Sheet), Clean Cities, Vehicle...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    by geographic location, fuel or technology, application, and fleet type (afdc.energy.govcase). These case studies, offered in both written and video formats, serve as...

  17. SunLine Begins Extended Testing of Hybrid Fuel Cell Bus | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety GoalsEnergy Begins Extended Testing of Hybrid Fuel Cell

  18. Fabrication, inspection, and test plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel irradiation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, G.W.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of MOX fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the ATR to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. In addition, the test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the data base required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues (ORNL/MD/LTR-76). This Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan (FITP) is a level 2 document as defined in the FMDP LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-78).

  19. Spent nuclear fuel integrity during dry storage - performance tests and demonstrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doherty, A.L.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of fuel integrity surveillance determined from gas sampling during and after performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1996 by or in cooperation with the US DOE Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The cask performance tests were conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) between 1984 and 1991 and included visual observation and ultrasonic examination of the condition of the cladding, fuel rods, and fuel assembly hardware before dry storage and consolidation of fuel, and a qualitative determination of the effects of dry storage and fuel consolidation on fission gas release from the spent fuel rods. The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loading, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. The nitrogen and helium backfills were sampled and analyzed to detect leaking spent fuel rods. At the end of each performance test, periodic gas sampling was conducted on each cask. A spent fuel behavior project (i.e., enhanced surveillance, monitoring, and gas sampling activities) was initiated by DOE in 1994 for intact fuel in a CASTOR V/21 cask and for consolidated fuel in a VSC-17 cask. The results of the gas sampling activities are included in this report. Information on spent fuel integrity is of interest in evaluating the impact of long-term dry storage on the behavior of spent fuel rods. Spent fuel used during cask performance tests at INEL offers significant opportunities for confirmation of the benign nature of long-term dry storage. Supporting cask demonstration included licensing and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) at the Virginia Power (VP) Surry reactor site. A CASTOR V/21, an MC-10, and a Nuclear Assurance NAC-I28 have been loaded and placed at the VP ISFSI as part of the demonstration program. 13 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. agr fuel testing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants (AGR 6442C - 4 Credits): Spring 2013 and abiotic stress in the production environment. It will also provide practical Watson, Craig A. 11 Development of a test facility...

  1. Improving the AGR Fuel Testing Power Density Profile Versus Irradiation-Time in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray S. Chang; David A. Petti; John T. Maki; Misti A. Lillo

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250°C throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235U in the graphite fuel compacts versus EFPD, the P/T ratio was calculated to be 5.3, which is unacceptable given the fuel compact temperature control requirement. To flatten the FPD profile versus EFPDs, two proposed options are – (a) add fertile (232Th) particles to the fuel compact and (b) add burnable absorber (B4C) to the graphite holder. The effectiveness of these two proposed options to flatten the FPD profile versus EFPDs were investigated and the results are compared in this study.

  2. DOE Railcar Fleet Asset Planning & Lessons Learned | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOEDepartment| DepartmentRailcar Fleet

  3. Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdle Reduction Weight Exemption AFuel-Efficient TireFleet Grants

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdle Reduction Weight Exemption AFuel-Efficient TireFleet

  6. Fuel Retrieval Sub (FRS) Project Decapping Station Performance Test Data Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to provide the test data report for Decapping Station Performance Testing. These performance tests were full scale and viewed as a continuation of development testing performed earlier (SNF-2710). A prototype decapping station confinement box was tested, along with some special tools required for the process, providing assurance that the fuel handling equipment will operate as designed, allowing for release of the FRS equipment for installation.

  7. LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A. [Mobil Shipping and Transportation, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

  8. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

  9. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety GoalsEnergy Begins Extended Testing of Hybrid

  10. Short Term Irradiation Test of Fuel Containing Minor Actinides Using the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekine, Takashi; Soga, Tomonori; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Aoyama, Takafumi [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency. 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Wootan, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratoy, M/S K8-34, P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed oxide containing minor actinides (MA-MOX) fuel irradiation program is being conducted using the experimental fast rector Joyo of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency to research early thermal behavior of MA-MOX fuel. Two irradiation experiments were conducted as part of the short-term phase of this program in May and August 2006. Six prepared fuel pins included MOX fuel containing 3% or 5% americium (Am-MOX), and MOX fuel containing 2% americium and 2% neptunium (Np/Am-MOX). The first test was conducted with high linear heat rates of approximately 430 W/cm maintained during only 10 minutes. After 10 minutes irradiation test, the test subassembly was transferred to the hot cell facility and an Am-MOX pin and a Np/Am-MOX pin were replaced with dummy pins with neutron dosimeters. The test subassembly loaded with the remaining four fuel pins was re-irradiated in Joyo for 24-hours in August 2006 at nearly the same linear power to obtain re-distribution data on MA-MOX fuel. The linear heat rate for each MA-MOX test fuel pin was calculated using the Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP. The calculated fission rates were compared with the measured data based on the Nd-148 method. The maximum linear heat rate was approximately 444{+-}19 W/cm at the actual reactor power of 119.6 MWt. Post irradiation examination of these pins to confirm the absence of fuel melting and the local concentration under irradiation of NpO{sub 2-x} or AmO{sub 2-x}, in the (U,Pu)0{sub 2-x}, fuel are underway. The test results are expected to reduce uncertainties on the margin in the thermal design for MA-MOX fuel. (authors)

  11. Integrated Field Testing of Fuel Cells and Micro-Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerome R. Temchin; Stephen J. Steffel

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical and economic evaluation of the prospects for the deployment of distributed generation on Long Beach Island, New Jersey concluded that properly sited DG would defer upgrading of the electric power grid for 10 years. This included the deployment of fuel cells or microturbines as well as reciprocating engines. The implementation phase of this project focused on the installation of a 120 kW CHP microturbine system at the Harvey Cedars Bible Conference in Harvey Cedars, NJ. A 1.1 MW generator powered by a gas-fired reciprocating engine for additional grid support was also installed at a local substation. This report contains installation and operation issues as well as the utility perspective on DG deployment.

  12. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D purposes.

  13. TEST SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL BENDING STIFFNESS AND VIBRATION INTEGRITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL] [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL] [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL; Flanagan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements specified by federal regulations. For normal conditions of transport, vibration loads incident to transport must be considered. This is particularly relevant for high-burnup fuel (>45 GWd/MTU). As the burnup of the fuel increases, a number of changes occur that may affect the performance of the fuel and cladding in storage and during transportation. The mechanical properties of high-burnup de-fueled cladding have been previously studied by subjecting defueled cladding tubes to longitudinal (axial) tensile tests, ring-stretch tests, ring-compression tests, and biaxial tube burst tests. The objective of this study is to investigate the mechanical properties and behavior of both the cladding and the fuel in it under vibration/cyclic loads similar to the sustained vibration loads experienced during normal transport. The vibration loads to SNF rods during transportation can be characterized by dynamic, cyclic, bending loads. The transient vibration signals in a specified transport environment can be analyzed, and frequency, amplitude and phase components can be identified. The methodology being implemented is a novel approach to study the vibration integrity of actual SNF rod segments through testing and evaluating the fatigue performance of SNF rods at defined frequencies. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a bending fatigue system to evaluate the response of the SNF rods to vibration loads. A three-point deflection measurement technique using linear variable differential transformers is used to characterize the bending rod curvature, and electromagnetic force linear motors are used as the driving system for mechanical loading. ORNL plans to use the test system in a hot cell for SNF vibration testing on high burnup, irradiated fuel to evaluate the pellet-clad interaction and bonding on the effective lifetime of fuel-clad structure bending fatigue performance. Technical challenges include pure bending implementation, remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, test specimen deformation measurement, and identification of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. Surrogate test specimens have been used to calibrate the test setup and conduct systematic cyclic tests. The calibration and systematic cyclic tests have been used to identify test protocol issues prior to implementation in the hot cell. In addition, cyclic hardening in unidirectional bending and softening in reverse bending were observed in the surrogate test specimens. The interface bonding between the surrogate clad and pellets was found to impact the bending response of the surrogate rods; confirming this behavior in the actual spent fuel segments will be an important aspect of the hot cell test implementation,

  14. Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC) and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

  15. AVTA: Transit Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity transit projects follow a rigorous data collection and analysis protocol. Refer to "General Evaluation Plan: Fleet Test and Evaluation Projects" for...

  16. A nautical archaeological study of Kublai Khan's fleets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inoue, Takahiko

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and Korea, as well as secondary sources, have been consulted. Chinese ships were the most advanced seagoing vessels in the world at the end of 13th century. However, little is known about Kublai Khan's fleets. Although many general works on the history... of Kublai's invasions of Japan are available in the literature, there are no detailed studies of Kublai's fleets that combine data from both historical and artistic representations. Discovery and excavation of one or more ships from Kublai Khan's fleets...

  17. Deriving In-Use PHEV Fuel Economy Predictions from Standardized Test Cycle Results: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Carlson, R.; Smart, J.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Explores the issue of how to apply an adjustment method to raw plug-in hybrid vehicle dynamometer test results to better estimate PHEVs' in-use fuel and electricity consumption.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

  19. Virginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakha, Hesham A.

    The transportation sector consumes approximately 30% of the total energy in the United States, which is mostlyVirginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing, Moran, Saerens, and Van den Bulck 2 ABSTRACT Existing fuel consumption and emission models suffer from

  20. Aluminum hydroxide coating thickness measurements and brushing tests on K West Basin fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum hydroxide coating thicknesses were measured on fuel elements stored in aluminum canisters in K West Basin using specially developed eddy current probes . The results were used to estimate coating inventories for MCO fuel,loading. Brushing tests successfully demonstrated the ability to remove the coating if deemed necessary prior to MCO loading.

  1. HEV Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DU5A0006063 Date Mileage Description Cost 8192009 5,090 Changed oil and filter and rotated tires 39.28 9162009 14,484 Changed oil and filter and replaced flat tire 152.58 10...

  2. RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) RECOVERY ACT -- CLEAN ENERGY COALITION MICHIGAN GREEN FLEETS...

  3. Fleet DNA Project - Data Dictionary for Public Download Files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duran, A.; Burton, E.; Kelly, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reference document for the Fleet DNA results data shared on the NREL public website. The document includes variable definitions and descriptions to assist users in understanding data.

  4. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis (2008 Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation by Keith Wipke at the 2008 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Analysis Project.

  5. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    arravt068vssmiyasato2011o .pdf More Documents & Publications SCAQMD:Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium-Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration and Evaluation Plug-In Hybrid...

  6. Building a Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Fleet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Vehicle Infrastructure and Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) model to help businesses and fleets evaluate the financial soundness of CNG...

  7. Large Fleets Lead in Petroleum Reduction (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proc, H.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes Clean Cities' National Petroleum Reduction Partnership, an initiative through which large private fleets can receive support from Clean Cities to reduce petroleum consumption.

  8. Status of the Norwegian thorium light water reactor (LWR) fuel development and irradiation test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drera, S.S.; Bjork, K.I.; Kelly, J.F.; Asphjell, O. [Thor Energy AS: Sommerrogaten 13-15, Oslo, NO255 (Norway)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thorium based fuels offer several benefits compared to uranium based fuels and should thus be an attractive alternative to conventional fuel types. In order for thorium based fuel to be licensed for use in current LWRs, material properties must be well known for fresh as well as irradiated fuel, and accurate prediction of fuel behavior must be possible to make for both normal operation and transient scenarios. Important parameters are known for fresh material but the behaviour of the fuel under irradiation is unknown particularly for low Th content. The irradiation campaign aims to widen the experience base to irradiated (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel and (Th,U)O{sub 2} with low Th content and to confirm existing data for fresh fuel. The assumptions with respect to improved in-core fuel performance are confirmed by our preliminary irradiation test results, and our fuel manufacture trials so far indicate that both (Th,U)O{sub 2} and (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuels can be fabricated with existing technologies, which are possible to upscale to commercial volumes.

  9. Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.R. Jackson; G.R. Kiebel

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training.

  10. Recent Accomplishments in the Irradiation Testing of Engineering-Scale Monolithic Fuel Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; D.M. Wachs; M.K. Meyer; H.W. Glunz; R.B. Nielson

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US fuel development team is focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel including irradiation testing of engineering-scale specimens. The team has recently accomplished the successful irradiation of the first monolithic multi-plate fuel element assembly within the AFIP-7 campaign. The AFIP-6 MKII campaign, while somewhat truncated by hardware challenges, exhibited successful irradiation of a large-scale monolithic specimen under extreme irradiation conditions. The channel gap and ultrasonic data are presented for AFIP-7 and AFIP-6 MKII, respectively. Finally, design concepts are summarized for future irradiations such as the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiment campaigns.

  11. FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederal ColumbiaASCR2FORFROM THEFTP Emissions Test

  12. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: North Carolina City Expands Alternative Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative Fuels CleanReduceNew Hampshire Fleet RevsFleet North

  14. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred [Black Mountain Research, Henderson, NV 81012 (United States); Halstead, Robert J. [State of Nevada Agency for Nuclear Projects Carson City, NV 80906 (United States); Ballard, James D. [Department of Sociology, California State University, Northridge Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's regulatory and demonstration testing of MAGNOX fuel flasks in the United Kingdom (the CEGB 'Operation Smash Hit' tests), and the 1980's regulatory drop and fire tests conducted on the TRUPACT II containers used for transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The primary focus of the paper is a detailed evaluation of the cask testing programs proposed by the NRC in its decision implementing staff recommendations based on the Package Performance Study, and by the State of Nevada recommendations based on previous work by Audin, Resnikoff, Dilger, Halstead, and Greiner. The NRC approach is based on demonstration impact testing (locomotive strike) of a large rail cask, either the TAD cask proposed by DOE for spent fuel shipments to Yucca Mountain, or a similar currently licensed dual-purpose cask. The NRC program might also be expanded to include fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask. The Nevada approach calls for a minimum of two tests: regulatory testing (impact, fire, puncture, immersion) of a rail cask, and extra-regulatory fire testing of a legal-weight truck cask, based on the cask performance modeling work by Greiner. The paper concludes with a discussion of key procedural elements - test costs and funding sources, development of testing protocols, selection of testing facilities, and test peer review - and various methods of communicating the test results to a broad range of stakeholder audiences. (authors)

  15. Final report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system primary cleaning development testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developmental testing of the primary cleaning station for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and canisters is reported. A primary clean machine will be used to remove the gross sludge from canisters and fuel while maintaining water quality in the downstream process area. To facilitate SNF separation from canisters and minimize the impact to water quality, all canisters will be subjected to mechanical agitation and flushing with the Primary Clean Station. The Primary Clean Station consists of an outer containment box with an internally mounted, perforated wash basket. A single canister containing up to 14 fuel assemblies will be loaded into the wash basket, the confinement box lid closed, and the wash basket rotated for a fixed cycle time. During this cycle, basin water will be flushed through the wash basket and containment box to remove and entrain the sludge and carry it out of the box. Primary cleaning tests were performed to provide information concerning the removal of sludge from the fuel assemblies while in the basin canisters. The testing was also used to determine if additional fuel cleaning is required outside of the fuel canisters. Hydraulic performance and water demand requirements of the cleaning station were also evaluated. Thirty tests are reported in this document. Tests demonstrated that sludge can be dislodged and suspended sufficiently to remove it from the canister. Examination of fuel elements after cleaning suggested that more than 95% of the exposed fuel surfaces were cleaned so that no visual evidence of remained. As a result of testing, recommendations are made for the cleaning cycle. 3 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-92MC28065, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test (PDT) during the period of October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. Information is presented on stack design, manufacturing, stack assembly, procurement, site preparation, and test plan.

  17. Test plan for long-term, low-temperature oxidation of BWR spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary studies indicated the need for more spent fuel oxidation data in order to determine the probable behavior of spent fuel in a tuff repository. Long-term, low-temperature testing was recommended in a comprehensive technical approach to (1) confirm the findings of the short-term thermogravimetric analysis tests; (2) evaluate the effects of variables such as burnup, atmospheric moisture,and fuel type on the oxidation rate; and (3) extend the oxidation data base to representative repository temperatures and better define the temperature dependence of the operative oxidation mechanisms. This document presents the test plan to study the effects of atmospheric moisture and temperature on oxidation rate and phase formation using a large number of boiling-water reactor fuel samples. Tests will run for up to two years, use characterized fragmented and pulverized fuel samples, cover a temperature range of 110{degree}C to 175{degree}C, and be conducted with an atmospheric moisture content ranging from <{minus}55{degree}C to {approximately}80{degree}C dew point. After testing, the samples will be examined and made available for leaching testing. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are entering the automobile market and are viable alternatives to conventional vehicles. This guide for fleet managers describes the basics of PEV technology, PEV benefits for fleets, how to select the right PEV, charging a PEV, and PEV maintenance.

  19. Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleet Managers #12;Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook Infrastructure Successfully deploying plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) and charging infrastructure requires at www.cleancities.energy.gov. #12;Plug-In Electric Vehicle Handbook for Fleets 3 You've heard the buzz

  20. The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Randall James

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1281 C.E., under the rule of Kublai Khan, the Mongols sent a fleet of more than 4000 vessels to subjugate the island nation of Japan. A powerful typhoon, called kamikaze, dashed the invading fleet into pieces on the shores of Japan and thus saved...

  1. Biofuels, Climate Policy, and the European Vehicle Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels, Climate Policy, and the European Vehicle Fleet Xavier Gitiaux, Sebastian Rausch, Sergey on the Science and Policy of Global Change. Abstract We examine the effect of biofuels mandates and climate incorporates current generation biofuels, accounts for stock turnover of the vehicle fleets, disaggregates

  2. Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

  3. Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guihua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. Fuel economy of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. JournalSwitching to a U.S. hydrogen fuel cell vehicle fleet: TheImproving Health with Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles. SCIENCE

  4. Cadmium Depletion Impacts on Hardening Neutron6 Spectrum for Advanced Fuel Testing in ATR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray S. Chang

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products effectively is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast spectrum test reactor in the United States of America (USA), initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. A test region is achieved with a Cadmium (Cd) filter which can harden the neutron spectrum to a spectrum similar (although still somewhat softer) to that of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). A fuel test loop with a Cd-filter has been installed within the East Flux Trap (EFT) of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A detailed comparison analyses between the cadmium (Cd) filter hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum have been performed using MCWO. MCWO is a set of scripting tools that are used to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2.2. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the Cd-filter can effectively flatten the Rim-Effect and reduce the linear heat rate (LHGR) to meet the advanced fuel testing project requirements at the beginning of irradiation (BOI). However, the filtering characteristics of Cd as a strong absorber quickly depletes over time, and the Cd-filter must be replaced for every two typical operating cycles within the EFT of the ATR. The designed Cd-filter can effectively depress the LHGR in experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum enough to adequately flatten the Rim Effect in the test region.

  5. Design and Test of a Carbon-Tolerant Alkaline Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquidi-Macdonald, M; Grimes, P; Tewari, A; Sambhy, V; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Sen, Ayusman; Grimes, Patrick; Tewari, Ashutosh; Sambhy, Varun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new results which may constitute a breakthrough in the effort to develop fuel cells truly suitable for use in cars and trucks. For decades, researchers have known that the alkaline fuel cell (AFC) is much cheaper to make, more efficient and more durable than the more popular PEM fuel cell; however, "carbon poisoning" (either from CO2 in air or from contaminants in reformed methanol) causes big problems in the kind of oxygen-hydrogen AFC commonly used in space. This paper reports successful tests of a technique for coating the electrodes with polystyrene which, in conjunction with older common-sense techniques, appears to solve the problem. This kind of design is applicable to cars run on hydrogen fuel, on reformed methanol or even direct methanol. Developing a test methodology was a major part of the work. A foreword by one of the sponsors at NSF discusses the larger importance of this work for energy security and the environment.

  6. Some evidence on determinants of fuel economy as a function of driving cycle and test type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical methods are used with 107 vehicles whose fuel economy was presented and reported for five test types in a single publication by Consumers Union (CU) for 1986--1988 vehicles. Standard loglinear statistical formulations (i.e., multiplicative models of interactions) are used with data from this and supplementary sources to develop coefficients estimating the percent fuel economy gain per percent change in engine/vehicle design characteristic. The coefficients are developed for the five different test conditions evaluated by CU and are compared with each other on the basis of attributes of the tests. The insights of engineering models are used to develop expectations regarding the shift in size of coefficients as driving cycles change. In both the engineering models and the statistical model, the effect of weight is estimated to be higher in urban driving than in highway driving. For two test categories -- field tests and dynamometer tests -- the benefits of weight reduction are statistically estimated to be greatest in urban driving conditions. The effect on idle fuel flow rate of designing vehicles to hold performance roughly constant by maintaining power per kilogram and/or displacement per kilogram is examined, and its implication for the size of the weight effect is simply approximated from Sovran`s 1983 engineering model results. The fuel-economy-decreasing effect of the desire for performance is estimated to be somewhat larger in the statistical analysis than in the NAS study, when engine technology is held constant.

  7. Gras Dowr joins world`s FPSO fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gras Dowr, a floating production, storage, and offloading vessel (FPSD) for Amerada Hess Ltd.`s North Sea Durward and Dauntless fields, is one of the latest additions to the world`s growing FPSO fleet. The Gras Dowr, anchored in about 90 m of water, lies between the Durward (U.K. Block 21/16) and Dauntless (U.K. Block 21/11) fields, about 3.5 km from the subsea wellhead locations. The Gras Dowr`s main functions, according to Bluewater Offshore Production Systems Ltd., are to: receive fluids from well risers; process incoming fluids to separate the fluid into crude, water, and gas; store dry crude oil and maintain the required temperature; treat effluent to allow for water discharge to the sea; compress gas for gas lift as a future option; provide chemical injection skid for process chemical injection; use a part of the produced gas for fuel gas, and flare excess gas; inject treated seawater into the injection wells; house power generation for process and offloading operation and utilities; offload to a tandem moored shuttle tanker including receiving liquid fuel from the same tanker; provide accommodations for operating and maintenance crews; allow helicopters landings and takeoffs; allow handling and storage of goods transported by supply vessels; moor a shuttle tanker; and control the subsea wells.

  8. Fabrication and Testing of Full-Length Single-Cell Externally Fueled Converters for Thermionic Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preceding paper described designs and analyses of thermionic reactors employing full-core-length single-cell converters with their heated emitters located on the outside of their internally cooled collectors, and it presented results of detailed parametric analyses which illustrate the benefits of this unconventional design. The present paper describes the fabrication and testing of full-length prototypical converters, both unfueled and fueled, and presents parametric results of electrically heated tests. The unfueled converter tests demonstrated the practicality of operating such long converters without shorting across a 0.3-mm interelectrode gap. They produced a measured peak output of 751 watts(e) from a single diode and a peak efficiency of 15.4%. The fueled converter tests measured the parametric performance of prototypic UO(subscript 2)-fueled converters designed for subsequent in-pile testing. They employed revolver-shaped tungsten elements with a central emitter hole surrounded by six fuel chambers. The full-length converters were heated by a water-cooled RF-induction coil inside an ion-pumped vacuum chamber. This required development of high-vacuum coaxial RF feedthroughs. In-pile test rules required multiple containment of the UO (subscript 2)-fuel, which complicated the fabrication of the test article and required successful development of techniques for welding tungsten and other refractory components. The test measured a peak power output of 530 watts(e) or 7.1 watts/cm (superscript 2) at an efficiency of 11.5%. There are three copies in the file. Cross-Reference a copy FSC-ESD-217-94-529 in the ESD files with a CID #8574.

  9. Spent fuel test - Climax: technical measurements. Interim report, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.; Ballou, L.B.; Butkovich, T.R.

    1982-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is located 420 m below surface in the Climax granite stock on the Nevada Test Site. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized from April to May 1980, initiating the 3- to 5-year-duration test. The SFT-C operational objective of demonstrating the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner has been met. Technical objectives of the test led to development of a technical measurements program, which is the subject of this report. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data have been recorded on a continuing basis for the first 1-1/2 years of the test on more than 900 channels. Much of the acquired data are now available for analysis and are presented here. Highlights of activities this year include completion of site characterization field work, major modifications to the data acquisition and the management systems, and the addition of instrument evaluation as an explicit objective of the test.

  10. Planning and Installation Guide: North Carolina Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Planning and Installation Guide: North Carolina Compressed Natural Gas Fueling Stations Introduction Are you considering installing a compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling station for your fleet to provide your fleet with fuel. One resource for locating and identifying public compressed natural gas

  11. Toyota Gen III Prius Hybrid Electric Vehicle Accelerated Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HEV Accelerated Testing - September 2011 Two model year 2010 Toyota Generation III Prius hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in a fleet in...

  12. Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength.

  13. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  14. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  15. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  16. Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)] [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina)] [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Novara, Oscar E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

  17. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test environmental assessment/protection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunton, Jack; Furukawa, Vance; Frost, Grant; Danna, Mike; Figueroa, Al; Scroppo, Joseph

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of proposed action is to conduct a 250-kW product development test of M-C Power Corporation's molten carbonate fuel cell concept, at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. Review of environmental impacts of this test indicate the following: no impact on solid waste disposal, water quality, noise levels, floodplains, wetlands, ecology, historic areas, or socioeconomic resources. Impact on air quality are expected to be positive.

  18. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test environmental assessment/protection plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of proposed action is to conduct a 250-kW product development test of M-C Power Corporation`s molten carbonate fuel cell concept, at the Kaiser Permanente San Diego Medical Center. Review of environmental impacts of this test indicate the following: no impact on solid waste disposal, water quality, noise levels, floodplains, wetlands, ecology, historic areas, or socioeconomic resources. Impact on air quality are expected to be positive.

  19. AVTA: 2013 Chevrolet Malibu HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Chevy Malibu HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  20. AVTA: 2013 Honda Civic HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Honda Civic HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  1. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2012/fiscal year 2013.

  2. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : technical review and analysis supplement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project seeks to provide vital data required to assess the consequences of a terrorist attack on a spent fuel transportation cask. One such attack scenario involves the use of conical shaped charges (CSC), which are capable of damaging a spent fuel transportation cask. In the event of such an attack, the amount of radioactivity that may be released as respirable aerosols is not known with great certainty. Research to date has focused on measuring the aerosol release from single short surrogate fuel rodlets subjected to attack by a small CSC device in various aerosol chamber designs. The last series of three experiments tested surrogate fuel rodlets made with depleted uranium oxide ceramic pellets in a specially designed double chamber aerosol containment apparatus. This robust testing apparatus was designed to prevent any radioactive release and allow high level radioactive waste disposal of the entire apparatus following testing of actual spent fuel rodlets as proposed. DOE and Sandia reviews of the project to date identified a number of issues. The purpose of this supplemental report is to address and document the DOE review comments and to resolve the issues identified in the Sandia technical review.

  3. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems: Subscale combustion testing. Topical report, Task 3.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report on the Subscale Combustor Testing performed at Textron Defense Systems` (TDS) Haverhill Combustion Laboratories for the Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. This program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1986 as an R&D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular staged, rich-lean-quench, Toroidal Vortex Slogging Combustor (TVC) concept. Fuel-rich conditions in the first stage inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen; molten coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed, tapped and quenched from the combustion gases by inertial separation in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The primary objective of this work was to verify the feasibility of a direct coal-fueled combustion system for combustion turbine applications. This has been accomplished by the design, fabrication, testing and operation of a subscale development-type coal-fired combustor. Because this was a complete departure from present-day turbine combustors and fuels, it was considered necessary to make a thorough evaluation of this design, and its operation in subscale, before applying it in commercial combustion turbine power systems.

  4. Global nuclear energy partnership fuels transient testing at the Sandia National Laboratories nuclear facilities : planning and facility infrastructure options.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, John E.; Wright, Steven Alan; Tikare, Veena; MacLean, Heather J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Peters, Curtis D.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership fuels development program is currently developing metallic, oxide, and nitride fuel forms as candidate fuels for an Advanced Burner Reactor. The Advance Burner Reactor is being designed to fission actinides efficiently, thereby reducing the long-term storage requirements for spent fuel repositories. Small fuel samples are being fabricated and evaluated with different transuranic loadings and with extensive burnup using the Advanced Test Reactor. During the next several years, numerous fuel samples will be fabricated, evaluated, and tested, with the eventual goal of developing a transmuter fuel database that supports the down selection to the most suitable fuel type. To provide a comparative database of safety margins for the range of potential transmuter fuels, this report describes a plan to conduct a set of early transient tests in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. The Annular Core Research Reactor is uniquely qualified to perform these types of tests because of its wide range of operating capabilities and large dry central cavity which extents through the center of the core. The goal of the fuels testing program is to demonstrate that the design and fabrication processes are of sufficient quality that the fuel will not fail at its design limit--up to a specified burnup, power density, and operating temperature. Transient testing is required to determine the fuel pin failure thresholds and to demonstrate that adequate fuel failure margins exist during the postulated design basis accidents.

  5. Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Tools (AFAVT), AFDC (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Web site offers a collection of calculators, interactive maps, and informational tools to assist fleets, fuel providers, and others looking to reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector.

  6. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer (''blanket'') on the uranium metal corrosion rates were also evaluated.

  7. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and others, as part of the International Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC).

  8. Status of RBCB testing of LMR oxide fuel in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strain, R.V.; Bottcher, J.H.; Gross, K.C.; Lambert, J.D.B. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Ukai, S.; Nomura, S.; Shikakura, S.; Katsuragawa, M. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status is given of the the American-Japanese collaborative program in Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 to determine the run-beyond-cladding-breach performance of (UPu)O{sub 2} fuel pins for liquid-metal cooled reactors. Phase 1 of the collaboration involved eighteen irradiation tests over 1981--86 with 5.84-mm pins in 316 or D9 stainless steel. Emphasis in Phase 2 tests from 1989 onwards is with larger diameter (7.5mm) pins in advanced claddings. Results include delayed neutron and fission gas release data from breached pins, the impact of fuel-sodium reaction product formation on pin performance, and fuel and fission product contamination from failures. 13 refs, 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Successfully Powers Truck Cab and Sleeper in DOE-Sponsored Test

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, a Delphi auxiliary power unit employing a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) successfully operated the electrical system and air conditioning of a Peterbilt Model 386 truck under conditions simulating idling conditions for 10 hours.

  10. Using polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in a hybrid surface ship propulsion plant to increase fuel efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Douglas M. (Douglas Michael)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasingly mobile US Navy surface fleet and oil price uncertainty contrast with the Navy's desire to lower the amount of money spent purchasing fuel. Operational restrictions limiting fuel use are temporary and cannot ...

  11. Development of High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 25812 (United States); Dixon, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Kapernick, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity thermal simulators that not only match the static power profile that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor, but also match the dynamic fuel pin performance during feasible transients. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being developed are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. Static and dynamic fuel pin performances for a proposed reactor design have been determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and initial comparison has been made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analysis, a conceptual high fidelity design will be developed, followed by engineering design, fabrication, and testing to validate the overall design process. Although the resulting thermal simulator will be designed for a specific reactor concept, establishing this rigorous design process will assist in streamlining the thermal simulator development for other reactor concepts. This paper presents the current status of high fidelity thermal simulator design relative to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power.

  12. Fuel economy testing of six 40-foot transit buses. Final report Aug 82-Mar 83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, G.A.; Nelson, S.R.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of life-cycle cost analyses in transit bus procurement is recognized by the industry and has been a Congressional requirement for grantees. This report documents a program of fuel economy testing of six standard 40-foot buses. The main purpose of this series of tests is to assist transit authorities and bus suppliers by providing accurate comparable fuel consumption data on transit buses produced by different manufacturers. Six buses were selected by the manufacturers and supplied for testing by six transit properties directly from revenue service. This report makes the data available to the industry for discretionary use in estimating life-cycle costs. A list of bus manufacturers and the supplying transit system is provided.

  13. Electrifying the BC Vehicle Fleet Opportunities and Challenges for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Electrifying the BC Vehicle Fleet Opportunities and Challenges for Plug-in Hybrid, Extended Range & Pure Electric Vehicles Liam Kelly, Trevor Williams, Brett Kerrigan and Curran Crawford Institute ................................................................................. 13 3.1 BC Hydro and Vehicle

  14. activity federal fleet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to dictate the time at which they are replaced. This additional information 110 2003 REPORT TO THE FLEET OCTOBER 2003 PAGE 37 Annual Report: IFQ Fee (Cost Recovery) Program...

  15. Business Case for Compressed Natural Gas in Municipal Fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how NREL used the CNG Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) model to establish guidance for fleets making decisions about using compressed natural gas.

  16. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington D.C. vssarravt068miyasato2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Plug-In Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Commercial Fleet Demonstration and Evaluation SCAQMD:Plug-In...

  17. Biofuels, Climate Policy and the European Vehicle Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    We examine the effect of biofuels mandates and climate policy on the European vehicle fleet, considering the prospects for diesel and gasoline vehicles. We use the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, ...

  18. Dynamic incentive scheme for rental vehicle fleet management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, SiZhi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobility on Demand is a new transportation paradigm aimed to provide sustainable transportation in urban settings with a fleet of electric vehicles. Usage scenarios prpopsed by Mobility on Demand systems must allow one-way ...

  19. Your Role as a Jefferson Lab Fleet Vehicle Driver | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Your Role as a Jefferson Lab Fleet Vehicle Driver Responsibility Number One - Safe Driving As a vehicle operator, it is up to you to drive safely and sensibly to avoid crashes. The...

  20. Network design and fleet allocation model for vessel operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaojing, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Containership operators in the U.S. are confronted with a number of problems in the way they make critical fleet allocation decisions to meet the increase of shippers' demands. Instead of the empirical approach, this ...

  1. The effect of carburetor refurbishing on emissions, performance, and fuel economy in a classic pickup tested using real-world tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Jacklyn (Jacklyn A.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project investigated how refurbishing the carburetor of a 1952 Chevrolet Pickup would affect emissions, performance, and fuel economy. The test used were real-world tests that anyone, with or without access to a ...

  2. 95 Production and Testing of Coconut Oil Biodiesel Fuel and its Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oguntola J Alamu; Opeoluwa Dehinbo; Adedoyin M Sulaiman; Oguntola J. Alamu; Opeoluwa Dehinbo; Adedoyin M. Sulaiman

    Many researchers have successfully worked on generating energy from different alternative sources including solar and biological sources such as the conversion of trapped energy from sunlight to electricity and conversion of some renewable agricultural products to fuel. This work considers the use of coconut oil for the production of alternative renewable and environmental friendly biodiesel fuel as an alternative to conventional diesel fuel. Test quantities of coconut oil biodiesel were produced through transesterification reaction using 100g coconut oil, 20.0 % ethanol (wt % coconut oil), 0.8% potassium hydroxide catalyst at 65°C reaction temperature and 120 min. reaction time. The experiment was carried out three times and average results evaluated. Low yield of the biodiesel (10.4%) was obtained. The coconut oil biodiesel produced was subsequently blended with petroleum diesel and characterized as alternative diesel fuel through some ASTM standard fuel tests. The products were further evaluated by comparing specific gravity and viscosity of the biodiesel blend, the raw coconut oil and conventional petroleum diesel.

  3. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  4. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

  5. FY 2014 Status Report: of Vibration Testing of Clad Fuel (M4FT-14OR0805033)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) tasked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate the behavior of light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel cladding material performance related to extended storage and transportation of UNF. ORNL has been tasked to perform a systematic study on UNF integrity under simulated normal conditions of transportation (NCT) by using the recently developed hot-cell testing equipment, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT). To support the testing on actual high-burnup UNF, fast-neutron irradiation of pre-hydrided zirconium-alloy cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at elevated temperatures will be used to simulate the effects of high-burnup on fuel cladding for help in understanding the cladding materials properties relevant to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The irradiated pre-hydrided metallic materials testing will generate baseline data to benchmark hot-cell testing of the actual high-burnup UNF cladding. More importantly, the HFIR-irradiated samples will be free of alpha contamination and can be provided to researchers who do not have hot cell facilities to handle highly contaminated high-burnup UNF cladding to support their research projects for the UFDC.

  6. REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The report also identified additional components and actions in Section 3.0 and Table 3 that require further evaluation. The purpose of this report is to evaluate another portion of the remaining inventory (i.e., delayed neutron signal fuel, blanket assemblies, highly enriched assemblies, newly loaded Ident-69 pin containers, and returned fuel) to ensure it can be safely off loaded to the FFTF spent fuel storage system.

  7. Testing of a Catalytic Partial Oxidation Diesel Reformer with a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyman Frost; Bob Carrington; Rodger McKain; Dennis Witmer

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural Alaska currently uses diesel generator sets to produce much of its power. The high energy content of diesel (i.e. ~140,000 BTU per gallon) makes it the fuel of choice because this reduces the volume of fuel that must be transported, stored, and consumed in generating the power. There is an existing investment in infrastructure for the distribution and use of diesel fuel. Problems do exist, however, in that diesel generators are not very efficient in their use of diesel, maintenance levels can be rather high as systems age, and the environmental issues related to present diesel generators are of concern. The Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory at the University of Alaska -- Fairbanks is sponsoring a project to address the issues mentioned above. The project takes two successful systems, a diesel reformer and a tubular solid oxide fuel cell unit, and jointly tests those systems with the objective of producing a for-purpose diesel fueled solid oxide fuel cell system that can be deployed in rural Alaska. The reformer will convert the diesel to a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used as a fuel by the fuel cell. The high temperature nature of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is capable of using this mixture to generate electricity and provide usable heat with higher efficiency and lower emissions. The high temperature nature of the SOFC is more compatible with the arctic climate than are low temperature technologies such as the proton exchange membrane fuel cells. This paper will look at the interaction of a SOFC system that is designed to internally reform methane and a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) diesel reformer. The diesel reformer produces a reformate that is approximately 140 BTU per scf (after removal of much of the reformate water) as compared to a methane based reformate that is over twice that value in BTU content. The project also considers the effect of altitude since the test location will be at 4800 feet with the consequential drop in oxygen content and necessary increases in flow rates.

  8. Sustainable Federal Fleets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September

  9. Hydrogen loops in existing reactors for testing fuel elements for nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.; Welland, H.; Abraschoff, J. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho Inc., P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 (United States)); Thoms, K. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8087 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has revitalized interest in adapting nuclear energy for power and propulsion. Prior to the selection of a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system, extensive testing of the various proposed concepts will be required. In today's environmental, safety and health culture, full size rocket engine tests as were done under the Rover/NERVA program will be extremely difficult and expensive to perform and meet NASA's schedules. A different test strategy uses a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor to test a wide variety of single elements or clusters of elements for fuel qualification. This approach is expected to reduce operating and capital costs and expedite the testing schedule. This paper examines the potential of performing subscale tests in a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The HFIR is expected to achieve power densities comparable to those achieved in ATR because of the 85 MWt power level and the high thermal and fast flux levels. The available length and diameter of the test region of FHIR are 60 cm and 10 cm whereas the available length and diameter of the test region of ATR are 120 cm and 12 cm respectively.

  10. Fission product behavior during the PBF (Power Burst Facility) Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, J K; Petti, D A; Hagrman, D L; Jensen, S M; Cronenberg, A W

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) initiated a series of Severe Fuel Damage tests that were performed in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to obtain data necessary to understand (a) fission product release, transport, and deposition; (b) hydrogen generation; and (c) fuel/cladding material behavior during degraded core accidents. Data are presented about fission product behavior noted during the second experiment of this series, the Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-1, with an in-depth analysis of the fission product release, transport, and deposition phenomena that were observed. Real-time release and transport data of certain fission products were obtained from on-line gamma spectroscopy measurements. Liquid and gas effluent grab samples were collected at selected periods during the test transient. Additional information was obtained from steamline deposition analysis. From these and other data, fission product release rates and total release fractions are estimated and compared with predicted release behavior using current models. Fission product distributions and a mass balance are also summarized, and certain probable chemical forms are predicted for iodine, cesium, and tellurium. An in-depth evaluation of phenomena affecting the behavior of the high-volatility fission products - xenon, krypton, iodine, cesium, and tellurium - is presented. Analysis indicates that volatile release from fuel is strongly influenced by parameters other than fuel temperature. Fission product behavior during transport through the Power Burst Facility effluent line to the fission product monitoring system is assessed. Tellurium release behavior is also examined relatve to the extent of Zircaloy cladding oxidation. 81 fig., 53 tabs.

  11. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  12. Standard test method for atom percent fission in uranium and plutonium fuel (Neodymium-148 Method)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of stable fission product 148Nd in irradiated uranium (U) fuel (with initial plutonium (Pu) content from 0 to 50 %) as a measure of fuel burnup (1-3). 1.2 It is possible to obtain additional information about the uranium and plutonium concentrations and isotopic abundances on the same sample taken for burnup analysis. If this additional information is desired, it can be obtained by precisely measuring the spike and sample volumes and following the instructions in Test Method E267. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are extremely similar. The design of the experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

  14. Spent Fuel Test-Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C. (comp.)

    1986-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site, eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized. When test data indicated that the test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase, the spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized. The project demonstrated the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel assemblies between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. The test led to development of a technical measurements program. To meet these objectives, nearly 1000 instruments and a computer-based data acquisition system were deployed. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on a continuing basis for the three-year storage phase and six-month monitored cool-down of the test. This report summarizes the engineering and scientific endeavors which led to successful design and execution of the test. The design, fabrication, and construction of all facilities and handling systems are discussed, in the context of test objectives and a safety assessment. The discussion progresses from site characterization and experiment design through data acquisition and analysis of test data in the context of design calculations. 117 refs., 52 figs., 81 tabs.

  15. Comparative Emissions Testing of Vehicles Aged on E0, E15 and E20 Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vertin, K.; Glinsky, G.; Reek, A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Independence and Security Act passed into law in December 2007 has mandated the use of 36 billion ethanol equivalent gallons per year of renewable fuel by 2022. A primary pathway to achieve this national goal is to increase the amount of ethanol blended into gasoline. This study is part of a multi-laboratory test program coordinated by DOE to evaluate the effect of higher ethanol blends on vehicle exhaust emissions over the lifetime of the vehicle.

  16. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop Refueling Infrastructure for...

  17. Spent Fuel Test-Climax: technical measurements data management system description and data presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.C.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was located 420 m below surface in the Climax Stock granite on the Nevada Test Site. The test was conducted under the technical direction of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) for the US Department of Energy. Eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, along with six electrical simulators, in April-May 1980. The spent fuel canisters were retrieved and the electrical simulators de-energized in March-April 1983. During the test, just over 1000 MW-hr of thermal energy was deposited in the site, causing temperature changes 100{sup 0}C near the canisters, and about 5{sup 0} in the tunnels. More than 900 channels of geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on nearly continuous basis for about 3-1/2 years, ending in September 1983. Most geotechnical instrumentation was known to be temperature sensitive, and thus would require temperature compensation before interpretation. Accordingly, a 10-in. reel of digital tape was off-loaded and shipped to Livermore every 4 to 8 weeks, where the data were verified, organized into 45 one-million-word files, and temperature corrected. The purpose of this report is to document the receipt and processing of the data by LLNL Livermore personnel, present facts about the history of the instruments which may be important to the interpretation of the data, present the data themselves in graphical form for each instrument over its operating lifetime, document the forms and locations in which the data will be archived, and offer the data to the geotechnical community for future use in understanding and predicting the effects of the storage of heat-generating waste in hard rocks such as granite.

  18. Containment and Analysis Capability Insights Gained from Drop Testing Representative Spent Nuclear Fuel Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, Dana Keith; Snow, Spencer David; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), operating from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), developed the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister. This canister is designed to be loaded with DOE SNF (including other radioactive materials) and then be used during interim storage, during transportation to the nation’s repository, and for final disposal at the repository without having to be reopened. The canister has been fully designed and has completed significant testing that clearly demonstrates that it can safely achieve its intended design goals. During 1999, nine 457-mm diameter test canisters were fabricated at the INEEL to represent the standardized DOE SNF canister design. Various "worst case" internals were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 4.57 m long and weighed approximately 2721 kg, while two were 3.00 m long and weighed approximately 1360 kg and 1725 kg. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from 9 m onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 1 m onto a 15-cm diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 61 cm onto a 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then fell over to impact another 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test represented a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container or waste package. The 1999 drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing). Four heavily damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight via helium leak testing. Pre- and post-drop finite element (FE) analyses were also performed. The results clearly indicated that accurate predictions of canister responses to the drop tests were achieved. The results achieved for the standardized canister can also be applicable to other well-constructed containers (canisters, casks, cans, vessels, etc.) subjected to similar loads. Properly designed containers can maintain a containment system after being subjected to dynamically induced high strains and FE computer analyses can accurately predict the resulting responses.

  19. Texas Propane Fleet Pilot Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment ofTankTest Site2009 DOETechnology Showcase

  20. Clean Fleets Announcement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSSDepartmentDepartment ofCity andClean|Clean

  1. Sustainable Federal Fleets Catalog of Services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment ofEnergy State andBuildings

  2. Instrumentation Report No. 3: performance and reliability of instrumentation deployed for the Spent Fuel Test - Climax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.; Rector, N.L.; Scarafiotti, J.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A demonstration of the short-term storage and subsequent retrieval of spent nuclear fuel assemblies was successfully completed at the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site. Nearly 1000 instruments were deployed to monitor the temperature of rock, air, and metallic components of the test; displacements and stress changes within the rock mass; radiation dosage to personnel and to the rock; thermal energy input; characteristics of the ventilation airstream; and the operational status of the test. Careful selection, installation, calibration, and maintenance of these instruments ensured the acquisition of about 15.3 x 10{sup 6} high-quality data points. With few exceptions, the performance and reliability of the instrumentation and associated data acquisition system (DAS) were within specified acceptable limits. Details of the performance and reliability of the instrumentation are discussed in this report. 42 figs., 32 tabs.

  3. Results from NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] Series 2 bare fuel dissolution tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissolution and radionuclide release behavior of spent fuel in groundwater is being studied by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project. Two bare spent fuel specimens plus the empty cladding hulls were tested in NNWSI J-13 well water in unsealed fused silica vessels under ambient hot cell air conditions (25{degree}C) in the currently reported tests. One of the specimens was prepared from a rod irradiated in the H. B. Robinson Unit 2 reactor and the other from a rod irradiated in the Turkey Point Unit 3 reactor. Results indicate that most radionuclides of interest fall into three groups for release modeling. The first group principally includes the actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm), all of which reached solubility-limited concentrations that were orders of magnitude below those necessary to meet the NRC 10 CFR 60.113 release limits for any realistic water flux predicted for the Yucca Mountain repository site. The second group is nuclides of soluble elements such as Cs, Tc, and I, for which release rates do not appear to be solubility-limited and may depend on the dissolution rate of fuel. In later test cycles, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 129}I were continuously released at rates between about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} of inventory per year. The third group is radionuclides that may be transported in the vapor phase, of which {sup 14}C is of primary concern. Detailed test results are presented and discussed. 17 refs., 15 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Bergin

    2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Syntroleum plant is mechanically complete and currently undergoing start-up. The fuel production and demonstration plan is near completion. The study on the impact of small footprint plant (SFP) fuel on engine performance is about half-completed. Cold start testing has been completed. Preparations have been completed for testing the fuel in diesel electric generators in Alaska. Preparations are in progress for testing the fuel in bus fleets at Denali National Park and the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority. The experiments and analyses conducted during this project show that Fischer-Tropsch (FT) gas-to-liquid diesel fuel can easily be used in a diesel engine with little to no modifications. Additionally, based on the results and discussion presented, further improvements in performance and emissions can be realized by configuring the engine to take advantage of FT diesel fuel's properties. The FT fuel also shows excellent cold start properties and enabled the engine tested to start at more the ten degrees than traditional fuels would allow. This plant produced through this project will produce large amounts of FT fuel. This will allow the fuel to be tested extensively, in current, prototype, and advanced diesel engines. The fuel may also contribute to the nation's energy security. The military has expressed interest in testing the fuel in aircraft and ground vehicles.

  5. In-pile testing on thermionic space nuclear power fuel using a TRIGA reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razvi, J.; Whittemore, W.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a thermionic technology development program at General Atomics (GA) to address the feasibility issues associated with the use of thermionic fuel elements (TFE) for space based nuclear power systems. The technology program being carried out at GA during the 1980s is aimed at investigating lifetime issues of the fuelled emitter and insulator materials proposed for use in thermionic reactor based space power systems, both experimentally and analytically, with a goal towards developing a TFE with a lifetime of at least seven years. The experimental investigations of TFE lifetime issues consist of performing in-pile irradiations on prototype units using the 1.5 Mw TRIGA Mark F research reactor to validate TFE emitter deformation models and to measure the amount of emitter deformation as a function of fuel burnup, temperature and emitter thickness. To this end, nine thermionic emitters, fueled with uranium oxide and contained in three irradiation capsules, have been designed and fabricated to date, and are being tested in-core in the Mark F to study emitter materials integrity under irradiation conditions. In addition, a capsule consisting of only insulator test articles has also been irradiated in the Mark F to study insulator materials integrity under irradiation and applied voltage.

  6. Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  7. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford C-MAX HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  8. AVTA: 2013-2014 Volkswagen Jetta HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Volkswagen Jetta HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  9. FleetAtlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park atFisia Babcock Environment

  10. Sustainable Federal Fleets | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -BlueprintThis documentEnergy LocalDepartment

  11. UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram | Department HomeDialoguetANSWERUPF: Safety in®

  12. HyFLEET:CUTE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9 Corporation Jump to:

  13. Case Study - Compressed Natural Gas Refuse Fleets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C lKieling , ActingOrficePENNELCNG

  14. Case Study Â… Propane School Bus Fleets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C lKieling , ActingOrficePENNELCNGPropane

  15. Assessment of institutional barriers to the use of natural gas in automotive vehicle fleets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jablonski, J.; Lent, L.; Lawrence, M.; White, L.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Institutional barriers to the use of natural gas as a fuel for motor vehicle fleets were identified and assessed. Recommendations for barrier removal were then developed. The research technique was a combination of literature review and interviews of knowledgeable persons in government and industry, including fleet operators and marketers of natural gas vehicles and systems. Eight types of institutional barriers were identified and assessed. The most important were two safety-related barriers: (1) lack of a national standard for the safety design and certification of natural gas vehicles and refueling stations; and (2) excessively conservative or misapplied state and local regulations, including bridge and tunnel restrictions, restrictions on types of vehicles that may be fueled by natural gas, zoning regulations that prohibit operation of refueling stations, parking restrictions, application of LPG standards to LNG vehicles, and unintentionally unsafe vehicle or refueling station requirements. Other barriers addressed include: (3) need for clarification of EPA's tampering enforcement policy; (4) the US hydrocarbon standard; (5) uncertainty concerning state utility commission jurisdiction; (6) sale-for-resale prohibitions imposed by natural gas utility companies or state utility commissions; (7) uncertainty of the effects of conversions to natural gas on vehicle manufacturers warranties; and (8) need for a natural gas to gasoline-equivalent-units conversion factor for use in calculation of state road use taxes. Insurance on natural gas vehicles, and state emissions and anti-tampering regulations were also investigated as part of the research but were not found to be barriers.

  16. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Scott Staley

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

  17. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points and clad configurations. The 2-ply sleeve samples show a higher bend momentum compared to those of the 1-ply sleeve samples. This is applicable to both the hybrid mock-up and bare SiC-CMC sleeve samples. Comparatively both the 1- and 2-ply hybrid mock-up samples showed a higher bend stiffness and strength compared with the standard Zr-4 mock-up sample. The characterization of the hybrid mock-up samples showed signs of distress and preliminary signs of fraying at the protective Zr-4 sleeve areas for the 1-ply SiC-CMC sleeve. In addition, the microstructure of the SiC matrix near the cracks at the region of highest compressive bending strain shows significant cracking and flaking. The 2-ply SiC-CMC sleeve samples showed a more bonded, cohesive SiC matrix structure. This cracking and fraying causes concern for increased fretting during the actual use of the design. Tomography was proven as a successful tool to identify open porosity during pre-test characterization. Although there is currently insufficient data to make conclusive statements regarding the overall merit of the hybrid cladding design, preliminary characterization of this novel design has been demonstrated.

  18. REPORT on the TRUCK BRAKE LINING WORKSHOP and FLEET OPERATORS' SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.

    2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The report summarizes what transpired during brake linings-related workshop held at the Fall 2003 meeting of the Technology and Maintenance Council (TMC) in Charlotte, NC. The title of the workshop was ''Developing a Useful Friction Material Rating System''. It was organized by a team consisting of Peter Blau (Oak Ridge National Laboratory), Jim Britell (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), and Jim Lawrence (Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association). The workshop was held under the auspices of TMC Task Force S6 (Chassis), chaired by Joseph Stianche (Sanderson Farms, Inc.). Six invited speakers during the morning session provided varied perspectives on testing and rating aftermarket automotive and truck brake linings. They were: James R. Clark, Chief Engineer, Foundation Brakes and Wheel Equipment, Dana Corporation, Spicer Heavy Axle and Brake Division; Charles W. Greening, Jr, President, Greening Test Labs; Tim Duncan, General Manager, Link Testing Services;Dennis J. McNichol, President, Dennis NationaLease; Jim Fajerski, Business Manager, OE Sales and Applications Engineering, Federal Mogul Corporation; and Peter J. Blau, Senior Materials Development Engineer, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The afternoon break-out sessions addressed nine questions concerning such issues as: ''Should the federal government regulate aftermarket lining quality?''; ''How many operators use RP 628, and if so, what's good or bad about it?''; and ''Would there be any value to you of a vocation-specific rating system?'' The opinions of each discussion group, consisting of 7-9 participants, were reported and consolidated in summary findings on each question. Some questions produced a greater degree of agreement than others. In general, the industry seems eager for more information that would allow those who are responsible for maintaining truck brakes to make better, more informed choices on aftermarket linings. A written fleet operator survey was also conducted during the TMC meeting. Twenty-one responses were received, spanning fleet sizes between 12 and 170,000 vehicles. Responses are summarized in a series of tables separated into responses from small (100 or fewer powered vehicles), medium (101-1000 vehicles), and large fleets (>1000 vehicles). The vast majority of fleets do their own brake maintenance, relying primarily on experience and lining manufactures to select aftermarket linings. At least half of the responders are familiar to some extent with TMC Recommended Practice 628 on brake linings, but most do not use this source of test data as the sole criterion to select linings. Significant shortfalls in the applicability of TMC RP 628 to certain types of brake systems were noted.

  19. Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

  20. Integration of Behind-the-Meter PV Fleet Forecasts into Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration of Behind-the-Meter PV Fleet Forecasts into Utility Grid System Operations Integration of Behind-the-Meter PV Fleet Forecasts into Utility Grid System Operations Clean...

  1. Clean Cities Coordinators and Stakeholders Awarded at the Green Fleet Conference and Expo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the 2013 Green Fleet Conference and Expo, a number of Clean Cities coordinators and stakeholders received awards for their dedication to increasing the environmental sustainability of vehicle fleets.

  2. Jefferson Lab Vehicle Fleet Do's and Don'ts | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Vehicle Fleet Do's and Don'ts In addition to safe driving, Jefferson Lab Fleet vehicle drivers are responsible for the proper use, maintenance and protection of their...

  3. EA-1954: Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with its proposal to resume testing of nuclear fuels and materials under transient high-power test conditions at the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. The State of Idaho and Shoshone-Bannock Tribes are cooperating agencies.

  4. HEV Fleet Testing - Summary Fact Sheet for 2010 Ford Fusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L32AR194699 Vehicle Specifications Engine: 2.5 L 4-cylinder Electric Motor: 60 kW Battery: NiMH Seatbelt Positions: Five Payload: 850 lbs Features:...

  5. Results of Stoker testing on CONSOL fuels CRADA PC90-003. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion and emissions data are reported for a Pittsburgh fuel from the Bailey Mine and a Fuel from the Buchanan Mine, a Pocahontas No. 3 fuel. A description is given of the fuels.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Electric Vehicle Community and Fleet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartmentDepartment ofConstruction|(EVSE) Testing Data

  8. Molten carbonate fuel cell product development test. Final report, September 30, 1992--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed for manufacturing and demonstrating the performance of its 250-kW molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) stack in an integrated system at the Naval Air Station Miramar (NAS Miramar) located in San Diego, California. The stack constructed for the demonstration test at the NAS Miramar consisted of 250 cells. It was manufactured using M-C Power`s patented Internally Manifolded Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) stack design. The demonstration test at NAS Miramar was designed to operate the 250-kW MCFC stack in a cogeneration mode. This test represented the first attempt to thermally integrate an MCFC stack in a cogeneration system. The test was started on January 10, 1997, and voluntarily terminated on May 12, 1997, after 2,350 hours of operation at temperatures above 1,100 F and at a pressure of three atmospheres. It produced 160 MWh of d.c. power and 346,000 lbs of 110 psig steam for export during 1,566 hours of on-load operations. The test demonstrated a d.c. power output of 206 kW. Most of the balance of the plant (BOP) equipment operated satisfactorily. However, the off-the-shelf automotive turbocharger used for supplying air to the plant failed on numerous occasions and the hot gas blower developed seal leakage problems which impacted continuous plant operations. Overall the demonstration test at NAS Miramar was successful in demonstrating many critical features of the IMHEX technology. Lessons learned from this test will be very useful for improving designs and operations for future MCFC power plants.

  9. Testing hybrid electric vehicle emissions and fuel economy at the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duoba, M.; Quong, S.; LeBlanc, N.; Larsen, R.P.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From June 12--20, 1994, an engineering design competition called the 1994 Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Challenge was held in Southfield, Michigan. This collegiate-level competition, which involved 36 colleges and universities from across North America, challenged the teams to build a superior HEV. One component of this comprehensive competition was the emissions event. Special HEV testing procedures were developed for the competition to find vehicle emissions and correct for battery state-of-charge while fitting into event time constraints. Although there were some problems with a newly-developed data acquisition system, they were able to get a full profile of the best performing vehicles as well as other vehicles that represent typical levels of performance from the rest of the field. This paper will explain the novel test procedures, present the emissions and fuel economy results, and provide analysis of second-by-second data for several vehicles.

  10. EPAct Requirements and Clean Cities Resources for Fleets (Fact Sheet) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet explains resources provided by the Clean Cities program to help fleet managers meet EPAct requirements.

  11. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project: Fall 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphs of composite data products produced by DOE's Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation project through September 2008.

  12. BWR spent fuel storage cask performance test. Volume 1. Cask handling experience and decay heat, heat transfer, and shielding data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, M.A.; Doman, J.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Guenther, R.J.; Creer, J.M.; King, C.E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a heat transfer and shielding performance test conducted on a Ridihalgh, Eggers and Associates REA 2023 boiling water reactor (BWR) spent fuel storage cask. The testing effort consisted of three parts: pretest preparations, performance testing, and post-test activities. Pretest preparations included conducting cask handling dry runs and characterizing BWR spent fuel assemblies from Nebraska Public Power District's Cooper Nuclear Station. The performance test matrix included 14 runs consisting of two loadings, two cask orientations, and three backfill environments. Post-test activities included calorimetry and axial radiation scans of selected fuel assemblies, in-basin sipping of each assembly, crud collection, video and photographic scans, and decontamination of the cask interior and exterior.

  13. Nuclear fuels technologies Fiscal Year 1996 research and development test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beard, C.A.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Farish, T.J.; Hanrahan, R.J.; Ramsey, K.B.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1996, the Department of Energy`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) funded Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to investigate issues associated with the fabrication of plutonium from dismantled weapons into mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel for disposition in nuclear power reactors. These issues can be divided into two main categories: issues associated with the fact that the plutonium from dismantled weapons contains gallium, and issues associated with the unique characteristics of the PuO[sub 2] produced by the dry conversion process that OFMD is proposing to convert the weapons material. Initial descriptions of the experimental work performed in fiscal year 1996 to address these issues can be found in Nuclear Fuels Technologies Fiscal Year 1996 Research and Development Test Matrices. However, in some instances the change in programmatic emphasis towards the Parallex program either altered the manner in which some of these experiments were performed (i.e., the work was done as part of the Parallex fabrication development and not as individual separate-effects tests as originally envisioned) or delayed the experiments into Fiscal Year 1997. This report reviews the experiments that were conducted and presents the results.

  14. A micro hot test of the Chalmers-GANEX extraction system on used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauhn, L.; Hedberg, M.; Aneheim, E.; Ekberg, C.; Loefstroem-Engdahl, E.; Skarnemark, G. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Nuclear Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivaegen 4, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, a 'micro hot test' has been performed using the Chalmers-GANEX (Group Actinide Extraction) system for partitioning of used nuclear fuel. The test included a pre-extraction step using N,N-di-2- ethylhexyl-butyramide (DEHBA) in n-octanol to remove the bulk part of the uranium. This pre-extraction was followed by a group extraction of actinides using the mixture of TBP and CyMe{sub 4}-BTBP in cyclohexanone as suggested in the Chalmers-GANEX process, and a three stage stripping of the extracted actinides. Distribution ratios for the extractions and stripping were determined based on a combination of ?- and ?-spectrometry, as well as ICP-MS measurements. Successful extraction of uranium, plutonium and the minor actinides neptunium, americium and curium was achieved. However, measurements also indicated that co-extraction of europium occurs to some extent during the separation. These results were expected based on previous experiments using trace concentrations of actinides and lanthanides. Since this test was only performed in one stage with respect to the group actinide extraction, it is expected that multi stage tests will give even better results. (authors)

  15. 2014 Annual Merit Review, Vehicle Technologies Office - 05 Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    offered that this could save more petroleum in one year than electric vehicles (EV) or fuel-cell vehicles will in decades, or ever. A 2% increase across the entire fleet is a huge...

  16. AGR-2: The first irradiation of French HTR fuel in Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Lambert; B. Grover; P. Guillermier; D. Moulinier; F. Imbault Huart

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGR-2, the second irradiation of the US program for qualification of the NGNP fuel, is open to international participation within the scope of the Generation IV International Forum. In this frame, it includes in its multi-capsule irradiation rig an irradiation of French HTR fuel manufactured in the CAPRI line (GAIA facility at CEA/Cadarache and AREVA/CERCA compacting line at Romans). The AGR-2 irradiation is designed to place our first fabrications of HTR particles under operating conditions that are representative of ANTARES project while keeping close to the test range of the German fuel as much as possible, which is the reference in terms of irradiation behavior. A few batches of particles and 12 fuel compacts were produced and characterized in 2009 by CEA and CERCA. The fuel main characteristics are in conformity with our specifications and in compliance with INL requirements. The AGR-2 experiment is based on the design and devices used in the first experiment of the AGR program. The design makes it possible to monitor the irradiation conditions and in particular, the temperature, the power and the fission products released from fuel particles. The in pile equipment consists of a multi-capsule device designed to simultaneously irradiate six independent capsules with temperature control. The out-of-core part consists of the equipment for actively controlling temperature and measuring the fission products release on-line. The target conditions for the irradiation experiment were defined with the aim of comparing the results obtained under irradiation with German particles along with the objectives of reaching burn-up and fluence targets to validate the behavior of our fuel in a significant range (15% FIMA – 5 × 1025 n/m2 at 600 EFPD with centerline fuel temperature about 1100 degrees C). These conditions have to be representative of ANTARES project characteristics. These target conditions were compared with final results from neutron and thermal design studies performed by INL team, and preliminary thermal mechanical ATLAS calculations were carried out by CEA from this pre-design. Despite the mean burn-up achieved in approximately 600 EFPD being a little high (16.3% FIMA max. associated with a low fluence up to 2.85 × 1025 n/m2), this irradiation will nevertheless encompass the range of irradiation effects covered in our experimental objectives (maximum stress peak at start of irradiation then sign inversion of the stress in the SiC layer). In addition, the fluence and burn-up acceleration factors are very similar to those of the German reference experiments. This experimental irradiation began in July 2010 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and first results have been acquired.

  17. TRB 05-1336 The Effect of Fuel Economy on Automobile Safety: A Reexamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRB 05-1336 The Effect of Fuel Economy on Automobile Safety: A Reexamination November 16, 2004 Word of 1975. The program requires automobile producers to meet fleet average fuel economy standards set

  18. CONFIDENTIAL Wits University RFI -Fleet Management 1 November 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    played a major role in founding industries in South Africa, including sectors such as mining, financial a comprehensive fleet management service. This essentially includes vehicle purchasing, maintenance and licensing. In order to understand what types of services are available in the marketplace, the University is releasing

  19. Cartesian k-means Mohammad Norouzi David J. Fleet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jepson, Allan D.

    Cartesian k-means Mohammad Norouzi David J. Fleet Department of Computer Science University the k-means clustering algorithm is the storage and run- time cost associated with the large numbers of centers. We formulate two such models, Orthogonal k-means and Cartesian k-means. They are closely related

  20. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.