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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Habitat Niche Modeling in the Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum): Applications to Planned Translocation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I studied translocation of Texas horned lizards on Tinker Air Force Base, Midwest City, Oklahoma, using correlative and mechanistic habitat suitability models. My goals wereÖ (more)

Bogosian III, Victor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Health assessment for Richardson Flat Tailings, Park City, Summit County, Utah, Region 8. CERCLIS No. UTD980952840. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Richardson Flat Tailings, an Update 7 site proposed for the National Priorities List, is located 3.5 miles northeast of Park City, Summit County, Utah. From 1975 to 1981, the 160-acre site was used for disposing mine tailing wastes from the Keetly Ontario Mine and other mines owned by United Park City Mines. Currently no tailings are dumped at the site; however, soil from the site is being excavated and used to cover the tailings piles. Several metal contaminants, including arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, and zinc, have been detected in on-site and off-site areas. Contaminants may migrate from the site to off-site areas through surface water, groundwater, and airborne-associated pathways. Human exposure to site contaminants may occur through the ingestion of contaminated groundwater, food-chain entities, and soil; through dermal contact with contaminants; and through the inhalation of airborne dusts. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the high levels of on-site contaminants.

Not Available

1990-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

3

Porpoises on Horns Reef -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbines 5 1.1.3 Noise from maintenance activities 5 1.2 Activity levels in the wind farm in 2003 6 1.1 Effects to be expected from a wind farm in operation 5 1.1.1 Changes in habitat 5 1.1.2 Noise from windHarbour Porpoises on Horns Reef - Effects of the Horns Reef Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003

4

Harbour Porpoises on Horns Reef -Effects of the Horns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operation 7 1.3.1 Changes in habitat 7 1.3.2 Noise from operating wind turbines 8 1.3.3 Noise from serviceHarbour Porpoises on Horns Reef - Effects of the Horns Reef Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2004 6 1.2 Effects of construction of the wind farm 7 1.3 Expected effects from a wind farm in normal

5

Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm #12;Prepared for: ELSAM A/S, Overgade 45 prior to the construction of an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, situated approximately 15 km off

6

Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 13 May 2004 Prepared: Michael Bech

7

Protecting Cattle from Horn Flies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

months). Horn flies can also reduce milk production in dairy cows by up to 20 percent. To control horn flies effectively and economically, it is helpful to know how to distinguish them from other flies, what control methods to use for different stages... will not provide an economic return, and the unnecessary use of insecticides can speed the development of resistant fly populations. ? Read the label of the treatment to make sure it is suitable for use on beef or lactating dairy cows. ? Be careful when applying...

Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ecomorphology of Lizards in the Genus Dicrodon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the herpetofauna of Suriname. IV. The lizards and amphisbaenians of Suriname. W. Junk, The Hague, The Netherlands. Iverson, J. B. 1982. Adaptations to herbivory in iguanine lizards, In Iguanas of the World: 60-76. Burghardt, G.M. and A.S. Rand (Eds.) Noyes...

Hardeman, Donald W

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2004 Published: 21 April-2004................................................. 48 Wind farm area (Turbine), Reference area (Ref

10

Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm #12;Prepared for: ELSAM A/S, Overgade 45 to establish an offshore wind farm with an output of 150 MW in the waters of Horns Rev, approximately 15 km off to some environmental guidelines for offshore wind farms prepared by the Dani

11

Horn Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi GtelHomer, Alaska:Horace, North Dakota:Hormann Energie undHorn

12

Genetic analyses of the Texas horned lizard, Phrynosoma cornutum: implications for conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency differences between Texas and New Mexico/Arizona, with Rsr values ranging from 0.613 to 0.966. The divergence seen among P. cornutum populations may be the result of an early Pleistocene pluvial lake, Cabeza de Vaca, that separated populations...

Guerra, Trina Marie

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 14 May 2004

14

SIR JULIAN HORN-SMITH Pro-Chancellor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIR JULIAN HORN-SMITH Pro-Chancellor S ir Julian Horn-Smith, aged 62, was one of the founding (Telecoms and Media) and Etisalat (the leading telecommunications company in UAE, Egypt and Saudia Arabia

Burton, Geoffrey R.

15

Effects of the Horns Reef Wind Farm on har-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitoring program of harbour porpoises in and around Horns Reef offshore wind farm. Due to substantial tilstedevśrelsen af marsvin inde i mÝlleparken. #12;5 1 Introduction Horns Reef offshore wind farm was established1 Effects of the Horns Reef Wind Farm on har- bour porpoises. - Interim report to Elsam Engineering

16

WHITE DWARFS H. M. Van Horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHITE DWARFS H. M. Van Horn Department of Physios and Astronomy £ §.£.Kenneth Mees Observatory of matter in the dense, degenerate cores of white dwarfs, together with efficient heat transport through the high-density envelopes of these stars, affect the theoretical white dwarf lu- minosity function

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

17

Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment of Sea Bottom and Marine Biology #12 Design ApS 01.03.2000 #12;Bio/consult A/S Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1........................................................................................................................................................... 36 #12;Bio/consult A/S ELSAM Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1 Page 4

18

Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard Alex R temperatures (Tb) of the tropical Caribbean lizard Anolis cristatellus at nine sites representing two habitat

Leal, Manuel S.

19

At the Lower Size Limit in Amniote Vertebrates: A New Diminutive Lizard from the West Indies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species of gekkonid lizard is described from Isla Beata and adjacent areas of Hispaniola, West Indies species of tetrapod (Estrada and Hedges, 1996). We describe herein a new lizard from Hispaniola

Hedges, Blair

20

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN STUDY OF HORN POWER SUPPLY.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 250 kA pulsed power supply is required for the focusing horn of the proposed Brookhaven AGS Super Neutrino Beam Facility for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It is expected to pulse at 2.5 Hz repetition rate. A preliminary study is being conducted to explore the key issues associated with the power supply system design. Advanced technologies used in similar systems as well as new ideas are being examined, simulated and evaluated. This power supply will be a very high stored energy, high average power, and high peak power system.

ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; WENG,W.T.

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Big Horn 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon: EnergyBiofuelsBig BendCreekBig Horn

22

Investigation of noninertial cavitation produced by an ultrasonic horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigation of noninertial cavitation produced by an ultrasonic horn Peter R. Birkin,a) Douglas G; accepted 22 September 2011) This paper reports on noninertial cavitation that occurs beyond the zone close to the horn tip to which the inertial cavitation is confined. The noninertial cavitation is characterized

Sóbester, András

23

Costs of reproduction and the evolution of sexual dimorphism in a `ying lizard' Draco melanopogon (Agamidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costs of reproduction and the evolution of sexual dimorphism in a `¬Įying lizard' Draco melanopogon dimorphism, but empirical data on this effect are scarce. We tested the idea using `¬Įying lizards' (Asian selection on the ability to glide while encumbered with eggs. Comparisons with non-¬Įying lizards suggest

Keogh, Scott

24

anterior horn cells: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a good candidate for the underlying cause of the sharp thresholds and poor algorithm performance near Franco, John 30 Shape optimization of an acoustic horn CiteSeer Summary: Shape...

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - african wall lizards Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

affect estimated HR sizes of lizards. We com- piled a database of nearly 500 published sex... area to body mass, using recently published allometric equations for field metabolic...

26

E-Print Network 3.0 - african lacertid lizards Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

affect estimated HR sizes of lizards. We com- piled a database of nearly 500 published sex Source: Garland Jr., Theodore - Department of Biology, University of California at...

27

E-Print Network 3.0 - anolis lizard populations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 2 MICHELE A. JOHNSON Trinity University, Department of Biology Summary: across nine Anolis lizard species:...

28

Transverse electromagnetic horn antenna with resistively-loaded exterior surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn antenna comprises a resistive loading material on the exterior surfaces of the antenna plates. The resistive loading material attenuates or inhibits currents on the exterior surfaces of the TEM horn antenna. The exterior electromagnetic fields are of opposite polarity in comparison to the primary and desired interior electromagnetic field, thus inherently cause partial cancellation of the interior wave upon radiation or upon reception. Reducing the exterior fields increases the radiation efficiency of the antenna by reducing the cancellation of the primary interior field (supported by the interior surface currents). This increases the transmit gain and receive sensitivity of the TEM horn antenna, as well as improving the transient (time-domain) response.

Aurand, John F. (Edgewood, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Investigations of migratory birds during operation of Horns rev offshore wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigations of migratory birds during operation of Horns rev offshore wind farm: Preliminary analyses of bird studies conducted during spring 2004 in relation to the offshore wind farm at Horns Rev of the Horns Rev offshore wind farm - preliminary note on the issue of potential habitat loss. Christensen, T

30

Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact assessment NERI Report Environmental Research Institute Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact assessment Authors: Henning Noer, Thomas Kjær

31

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10710 Tail-assisted pitch control in lizards, robots and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10710 Tail-assisted pitch control in lizards, robots and dinosaurs Thomas in performance14,15 . Application of a control-theoretic framework could advance our general understanding angular momentum. To examine a known con- trolled tail response, we built a lizard-sized robot

32

Fermilab, Indiana University Horn Optimization for nuSTORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab, Indiana University Horn Optimization for nuSTORM HPTW 05/21/2014 Fermilab, Indiana University Ao Liu* A. Bross, D. Neuffer Fermilab, Indiana University *www.frankliuao.com/research.html #12;Fermilab, Indiana University WHO WE ARE, WHAT WE DO nuSTORM Overview 5/23/2014 Ao Liu 1 #12;Fermilab

McDonald, Kirk

33

Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

protection and at the wind turbine towers at six turbine sites. Video recordings were planned at different of the scour protection close to the turbine tower. Samples of fouling communities were collected at six turbine sites at the Horns Rev Wind Farm by SCUBA divers. The co-ordinates of the six turbine positions

34

Belief Revision in Horn Theories$ James P. Delgrandea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Belief Revision in Horn Theories$ James P. Delgrandea , Pavlos Peppasb,c a School of Computing Science, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada V5A 1S6 b Centre for Quantum Computation Administration, University of Patras, Patras 265 00, Greece Abstract This paper investigates belief revision

Delgrande, James P.

35

EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOEís Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

36

Adaptation, Speciation, and Convergence: A Hierarchical Analysis of Adaptive Radiation in Caribbean Anolis Lizards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caribbean Anolis lizards are a classic case of adaptive radiation, repeated four times across islands of the Greater Antilles. On each island, very similar patterns of evolutionary divergence have occurred, resulting in the evolution of the same set...

Losos, Jonathan B.; Glor, Richard E.; Kolbe, Jason J.; Nicholson, Kirsten

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evidence for a sex pheromone of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World and from North Africa to Lapland in the Old World (McLintock and Depner 1954). Economic losses due to horn fly parasitism in the United States have been estimated at $300 million annually (Anon. 1976). The horn fly r. akes several small blood... Africa to Lapland in the Old World (McLintock and Depner 1954). Economic losses due to horn fly parasitism in the United States have been estimated at $300 mill'on annually (Anon. 1976). The horn fly takes several small blood meals daily; females have...

Scofield, Michael Lynn

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measuring Program for Wind, Waves and Current for Horns Rev and Ls; Documentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT Measuring Program for Wind, Waves and Current for Horns Rev and LśsÝ; Documentation Documentation of wind sensors, data logs, etc. for Horns Rev is described in folder 2CF/EB001 supplied by ED is described in folder 2 CF/EB003 supplied by ED service centre and TW. Documentation of 3D Sonic Wind

39

Evolutionary Diversification of Caribbean Anolis Lizards. In: Adaptive Speciation, eds. Dieckmann U, Doebeli M, Metz JAJ & Tautz D, pp. 322344. Cambridge University Press 2004. c International Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evolutionary Diversification of Caribbean Anolis Lizards. In: Adaptive Speciation, eds. Dieckmann U for Applied Systems Analysis 16 Evolutionary Diversification of Caribbean Anolis Lizards 16.1 Introduction Jonathan B. Losos and Roger S. Thorpe The diversification of the lizard genus Anolis on Caribbean islands

Losos, Jonathan B.

40

Development and operational experience of magnetic horn system for T2K experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A magnetic horn system to be operated at a pulsed current of 320 kA and to survive high-power proton beam operation at 750 kW was developed for the T2K experiment. The first set of T2K magnetic horns was operated for over 12 million pulses during the four years of operation from 2010 to 2013, under a maximum beam power of 230 kW, and $6.63\\times10^{20}$ protons were exposed to the production target. No significant damage was observed throughout this period. This successful operation of the T2K magnetic horns led to the discovery of the $\

Sekiguchi, T; Fujii, Y; Hagiwara, M; Hasegawa, T; Hayashi, K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, H; Kobayashi, T; Koike, S; Koseki, K; Maruyama, T; Matsumoto, H; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayoshi, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Shibata, M; Suzuki, Y; Tada, M; Takahashi, K; Tsukamoto, T; Yamada, Y; Yamanoi, Y; Yamaoka, H; Ichikawa, A K; Kubo, H; Butcher, Z; Coleman, S; Missert, A; Spitz, J; Zimmerman, E D; Tzanov, M; Bartoszek, L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waterfront developments in the Middle East case study : the Golden Horn Project, Istanbul, Turkey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines waterfront developments in the Middle East . It concentrates on the Golden Horn project in Istanbul as it raises a number of issues that are central to any such development in that region. In order for ...

Alamuddin, Hana S. (Hana Slieman)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Phylogeography of Caribbean lizard malaria: tracing the history of vector-borne parasites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phylogeography of Caribbean lizard malaria: tracing the history of vector-borne parasites S. L of either closely Keywords: Anolis; Caribbean; cytochrome b; island biogeography; malaria; nested clade of the eastern Caribbean islands are parasitized by several species of malaria parasites (Plasmodium). Here I

Schall, Joseph J.

44

Running on water: Three-dimensional force generation by basilisk lizards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-averaged force produced by juvenile plumed basilisk lizards (Basiliscus plu- mifrons) while running across water into the water; they also produce large transverse reaction forces that change from medial (79% body weight that the initial water contact impulse is small. When combined with impulses theoretically produced during

Lauder, George V.

45

Long-distance colonization and radiation in gekkonid lizards, Tarentola (Reptilia: Gekkonidae), revealed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-distance colonization and radiation in gekkonid lizards, Tarentola (Reptilia: Gekkonidae-volant animal groups have undergone extensive transmarine dispersal with subsequent radiation in new, often many of the warmer islands in the North Atlantic Ocean. There were four main invasions of archipelagos

Carranza, Salvador

46

The behavioral ecology of sleep: Natural sleeping site choice in three Anolis lizard species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide access to necessary diurnal resources and/or protection from predation or natural elements sleeping in open, vulnerable areas than in more protected areas unless they slept in groups (GauthierThe behavioral ecology of sleep: Natural sleeping site choice in three Anolis lizard species Sonal

Johnson, Michele A.

47

Population enumeration and the effects of oil and gas development on dune-dwelling lizards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

abundances of dune-dwelling lizards among sites that varied in oil and gas development. I conducted distance line transects and compared those density estimates to densities obtained from total removal plots. I quantified the amount of oil and gas development...

Smolensky, Nicole Limunga

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Wall lizards display conspicuous signals to conspecifics and reduce detection by avian predators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were conducted in 497 relation to our predictions. 498 499 Among-island variation in avian predator vs. conspecific perception of P. erhardii 500 conspicuousness 501 Page 22 of 52Behavioral Ecology 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19... For Review Only Wall lizards display conspicuous signals to conspecifics and reduce detection by avian predators Journal: Behavioral Ecology Manuscript ID: BEHECO-2014-0135.R2 Manuscript Type: Original article Keywords...

Marshall, Kate L. A.; Stevens, Martin

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Tree-based delimitation of morphologically ambiguous taxa: A study of the lizard malaria parasites on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola q Bryan G. Falk a, , D. Luke Mahler b , Susan L. Perkins a a Richard Gilder from the Caribbean island of Hispaniola. All six infect lizards in the genus Anolis, but only two Hispaniola. Fifty-five of these lizards were infected with Plasmodium spp., representing several new host

Mahler, D. Luke

50

Multi-step quantum secure direct communication using multi-particle Green-Horne-Zeilinger state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multi-step quantum secure direct communication protocol using blocks of multi-particle maximally entangled state is proposed. In this protocol, the particles in a Green-Horne-Zeilinger state are sent from Alice to Bob in batches in several steps. It has the advantage of high efficiency and high source capacity.

Chuan Wang; Fu Guo Deng; Gui Lu Long

2006-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

Multi-step quantum secure direct communication using multi-particle Green-Horne-Zeilinger state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multi-step quantum secure direct communication protocol using blocks of multi-particle maximally entangled state is proposed. In this protocol, the particles in a Green-Horne-Zeilinger state are sent from Alice to Bob in batches in several steps. It has the advantage of high efficiency and high source capacity.

Wang, C; Long, G L; Wang, Chuan; Deng, Fu Guo; Long, Gui Lu

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Unpublished Technical Note A First-Order Horn-Clause Abductive System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unpublished Technical Note A First-Order Horn-Clause Abductive System and Its Use in Plan to construct explanations for observed phenomena. In this paper, we view explanation as abduction, where an abductive explanation is a consistent set of assumptions which, together with background knowledge

Mooney, Raymond J.

53

Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt violation and the entropy-concurrence plane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We characterize violation of Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequalities for mixed two-qubit states by their mixedness and entanglement. The class of states that have maximum degree of CHSH violation for a given linear entropy is also constructed.

Derkacz, Lukasz; Jakobczyk, Lech [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, M. Born Place 9, 50-204 Wroclaw (Poland)

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Horn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the eigen- values of H, which we list in decreasing order, and repeat each value according to itsHorn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei#25; 1 by Derksen and Weyman [2] using properties of semi-invariants for representations of a certain quiver

Gei√?, Christof

55

Horn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Given a Hermitian n n matrix H, we write Eig(H) = f 1; 2;:::; ng for the eigen- values of H, whichHorn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei 1 we list in decreasing order, and repeat each value according to its multiplicity. We are interested

Crawley-Boevey, William

56

Vertical distribution of larval stages of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.), in relation to manure pat temperature gradients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VERTICAL DISTRISUTION OF LARVAL STAGES OF THE HORN FLY, HAEMATOBIA IRRITANS IRRITANS (L. ), IN RELATION TO MANURE PAT TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS A Thesis by PHILIP ANDERSON MARCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AijM University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Entomology VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION OF LARVAL STAGES OF THE HORN FLY, HAEMATOBIA IRRITANS IRRITANS (L. ), IN RELATION TO MANURE PAT TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS...

March, Philip Anderson

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Emergence of the adult pecan weevil Curculio caryae (Horn) in relation to soil mechanical impedance and moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCE OF THE ADULT PECAN NEEVIL urculio ~car ae (Horn) IN RELATION TO SOIL MECHANICAL IMPEDANCE AND MOISTURE A Thesis by CALVIN EARL BLANCHARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AKIM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Entomology EMERGENCE OF THE ADULT PECAN WEEVIL Curculio c~ar ae (Horn) IN RELATION TO SOIL MECHANICAL IMPEDANCE AND MOISTURE A Thesis by CALVIN EARL BLANCHARD Approved as to style...

Blanchard, Calvin Earl

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Population genetics of the pecan weevil, Curculio caryae Horn (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), inferred from mitochondrial nucleotide data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Anthony I. Cognato Marvin K. Harris Committee Member, John W. Bickham Head of Department, Kevin M. Heinz August 2006 Major Subject: Entomology iii.... Anthony I. Cognato Dr. Marvin K. Harris The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae Horn, is an obligate nut feeder of all North American hickory (Carya) and a key pest of the pecan, C. illinoinensis Koch. This study...

Mynhardt, Glene

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

Noncommuting local common causes for correlations violating the Clauser-Horne inequality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the paper, the EPR-Bohm scenario will be reproduced in an algebraic quantum field theoretical setting with locally finite degrees of freedom. It will be shown that for a set of spatially separated correlating events (projections) maximally violating the Clauser-Horne inequality there can be given a common causal explanation if commutativity is abandoned between the common cause and the correlating events. Moreover, the noncommuting common cause will be local and supported in the common past of the correlating events.

Hofer-Szabo, Gabor [Research Center for the Humanities, Budapest (Hungary); Vecsernyes, Peter [Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Expression of Candidate Genes for Horn Growth in Early Bovine Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Co-hairs of Committee, Clare A. Gill Penny K. Riggs Committee Member James O. Sanders Head of Department,Gary Acuff December... EXPRESSION OF CANDIDATE GENES FOR HORN GROWTH IN EARLY BOVINE DEVELOPMENT A Thesis by SARAH M. VITANZA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Vitanza, Sarah M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

369 Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard Josabel Belliure* Luis M. Carrascal Department of Evolutionary Ecology¬ī Gutie¬īrrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid, Spain Accepted 6/6/02 ABSTRACT Heliothermy (heat gain by radiation

Carrascal, Luis M.

62

A Translocated Population of the St. Croix Ground Lizard: Analyzing Its Detection Probability and Investigating its Impacts on the Local Prey Base  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The St. Croix ground lizard, Ameiva polops, is a United States endangered species endemic to St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. It was extirpated from St. Croix Proper by invasive mongooses, and remaining populations are on small, nearby cays...

Treglia, Michael Louis

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

A study of electromagnetic fields in horn antennas containing two eielectrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constant The waves inside a sectoral metal horn are propagated in the radial direction and the Hankel function specifies the variation with r In the case of exponentially propagated wave, the propagation constant f is defined as the logarithmic rate... if the area of the shaded portion is a minimum. Here, 13 ? Plot of (13 c((M) )- to J. 0 2 + s a+i% r Io (~ )" Fig, 3(a)- Attenuation constant (o( 0 ) versus radial distance in wave- lengths ( +' " p) 'I / / I / s Fig. 3(b) ? Phase constant ~ (3...

Quddus, Mohammad Abdul

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

Kuwahara, D., E-mail: dkuwahar@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ito, N. [Department of Intelligent System Engineering, Ube National College of Technology, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8555 (Japan); Nagayama, Y. [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshinaga, T. [Department of Applied Physics, National Defense Academy, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-0811 (Japan); Yamaguchi, S. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Sugito, S. [Equipment Development Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyusyu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Preprint submitted to the Proceedings of the European Wind Energy Conference EWEC in Madrid, Spain June 2003 PREVIENTO meets HORNS REV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of future offshore wind farms. Surprisingly, in all possible thermal conditions measured speeds of westerly Horns Rev offshore wind farm has to be considered as a step to new dimensions in wind power production June 2003 1 PREVIENTO meets HORNS REV Short-Term Wind-Power Prediction ­ adaptation to Offshore Sites

Heinemann, Detlev

66

Project Title Mobile Device Management. Team Pam Horne, Jolene King, Jim Lehman, Marcus Lill, Terry Schroeder, David Shaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Title Mobile Device Management. Team Pam Horne, Jolene King, Jim Lehman, Marcus Lill, Terry and supporting mobile devices that access Purdue data and information. Hypothesis We anticipate there would be several advantages from providing a model of supporting mobile devices. These advantages would be in areas

67

QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Denmark. At this site a large offshore wind farm (80 2MW-turbines) is in operation. The study includes statistics based on offshore meteorological observations collected near the wind farm. Focus of the caseQUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B

68

Comparison of horn fly parasitism by the hymenopterous parasites, Spalangia endius and Mucidifurax raptor (Chalciodoidea; Pteromalidae) in the presence of the dung beetle, Onthophagus gazella  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pupal parasites. Morgan et al, ( 1975a) have controlled house fly and stable fly populations using such parasites. Field surveys (Thomas and Moroan l97Z, Peck 1974, Watts and Combs 1977) were conducted to ascertain species of parasites attacking horn... specimen of Spalangia haematobiae Ashmead from a horn fly larvae (Ashmead 1894). Thomas and Morgan (1972), work)ng in Missouri, collected 10 species of Hymenoptera and 1 species of Coleoptera that were parasitic to the fly. However, even though numerous...

Stodgel, Thomas Oliver

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR HUSBANDRY OF ANOLIS LIZARDS In accord with standardized institutional protocols for the care of Anolis, adults will be housed in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR HUSBANDRY OF ANOLIS LIZARDS Rich Glor Nov. 4th , 2007 Housing In accord with standardized institutional protocols for the care of Anolis, adults will be housed in groups of four animals (one male, three females). The standard enclosure will be a commercially available reptile

Glor, Rich

70

A Robust Mathematical Model for Clauser-Horne Experiments, With Implications for Rigorous Statistical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experiments have reached detection efficiencies sufficient to close the detection loophole, testing the Clauser-Horne (CH) version of Bell's inequality. For a similar future experiment to be completely loophole-free, it will be important to have discrete experimental trials with randomized measurement settings for each trial, and the statistical analysis should not overlook the possibility of a local state varying over time with possible dependence on earlier trials (the "memory loophole"). In this paper, a mathematical model for such a CH experiment is presented, and a method for statistical analysis that is robust to memory effects is introduced. Additionally, a new method for calculating exact p-values for martingale-based statistics is described; previously, only non-sharp upper bounds derived from the Azuma-Hoeffding inequality have been available for such statistics. This improvement decreases the required number of experimental trials to demonstrate non-locality. The statistical techniques are applied to the data of recent experiments and found to perform well.

Peter Bierhorst

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Note on XMM-Newton observations of the first unidentified TeV gamma-ray source TeV J2032+4130 by Horns et al. astro-ph/0705.0009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I comment on the -- apparent -- diffuse X-ray emission reported by Horns et al. in their XMM observations of TeV J2032+4130

Yousaf Butt

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Analysis of the Christensen et al. Clauser-Horne (CH)-Inequality-Based Test of Local Realism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Clauser-Horne (CH) inequality can validly test aspects of locality when properly applied. This paper analyzes a recent CH-based EPRB experiment, the Christensen et al. experiment. Full details of the data analysis applied to the experiment are given. It is shown that the experiment confirms locality and disconfirms the quantum joint prediction. Additionally, the paper contributes to promulgation of robust and correct data analysis by describing the important degrees of freedom that affect the analysis, and that must be addressed in the analysis of any experiment.

Donald A. Graft

2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect of age of adult horn flies, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), on choice of feeding and resting sites on cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Dsnsh. Baturf. For. Eobenhavn. 103t 141 393. Hargett, L. T. , snd R. L. Ceulding. 1963a. Studies on the behavior of the horn flF ~ H. ~rritaSR (L. ). Tech. Hull. 61, Oregon agr. Esp. Ste. Iicb. sea los gabe ho c1y, H. ~~kca (L. ). J. Lea. I ee l...

Blume, Richard Rockwell

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT/CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 527: HORN SILVER MINE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADDKR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996). Corrective Action Unit 527 is located within Area 26 of the NTS and consists of CAS 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. This CADDKR refers to the site as CAU 527 or the Horn Silver Mine (HSM). This CADDKR provides or references the specific information necessary to support the closure of this CAU. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from November 12,2003 through January 21,2004. Additional sampling of liquid obtained from HSM-3 was conducted on May 3,2004. Corrective action investigation activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527 (NNSAiNV, 2002a). Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities identified the explosive nitrobenzene as a contaminant of concern (COC) on the floor of the 500-foot drift (HSM No.2). No other COCs were identified in the rock samples collected during the investigation activities. The air samples collected from borings HSM-1, HSM-2, and HSM-3 showed volatile organic compounds (primarily gasoline-related contaminants) to be present above the acceptable residential exposure criteria in the boreholes. A conservative modeling effort demonstrated that these concentrations would not migrate to the surface at concentrations that will present an unacceptable risk to future land users. However, other COCs are assumed to exist based on historical documentation on the types of waste placed in the shaft; therefore, the mine including the 300- and 500-foot drifts is considered to be contaminated above action levels. Current results of the field investigation show there are no active transport mechanisms or exposure routes for the contaminants identified in the 500-foot drift. The analytical data did not show the migration of COCs beyond the floor of the 500-foot drift or from the air within the drift. On a conservative basis, the subsurface volume of the zone of contamination is limited to a depth from 150 ft to a maximum of 670 feet below ground surface extending to a radius of 300 feet from the mineshaft. Based on these data, a use restriction will be established for this volume of soil. In addition, the security of the mineshaft is maintained and does not allow unauthorized personnel to enter the vicinity of the mineshaft. Since the removal of the contaminants is not feasible, the close in place with administrative controls corrective action alternative is appropriate because it will prevent inadvertent contact with the subsurface COCs and meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site. Post-closure monitoring will be conducted for one year. This monitoring will include using the lysimeter at HSM-3 and the data logger to measure precipitation-induced vadose zone moisture flow through the rock beneath the waste shaft at the Horn Silver Mine. Results of the monitoring will be documented in a letter report at the end of one year, anticipated in June 2005. A copy of this report will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. After one year of monitoring, a determination will be made by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office if future monitoring is needed or if use restriction boundaries need to be adjusted. If a large enough pulse of water moves into the lysimeter, a sample will he collected for laboratory analysis. If there is not sufficient volume of liquid collected for a sample or if no COCs are detected in collected samples at the end of this time period, it is recommended that the monitoring wells at the HSM be sealed in accordance with the State of Nevada regulations.

NONE

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Study of the pulse power supply unit for the four-horn system of the CERN to Frťjus neutrino super beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The power supply studies for the four-horn system for the CERN to Frťjus neutrino Super Beam oscillation experiment are discussed here. The power supply is being studied to meet the physics potential and the mega-watt (MW) power requirements of the proton driver of the Super Beam. A one-half sinusoid current waveform with a 350 kA maximum current and pulse length of 100 \\mu s at 50 Hz frequency is generated and distributed to four-horns. In order to provide the necessary current needed to focus the charged mesons producing the neutrino beam, a bench of capacitors is charged at 50 Hz frequency to a +12 kV reference voltage and then discharged through a large switch to each horn via a set of strip-lines at the same rate. A current recovery stage allows to invert rapidly the negative voltage of the capacitor after the discharging stage in order to recuperate large part of the injected energy and thus to limit the power consuption. The energy recovery efficiency of that system is very high at 97%. For feasibilit...

Baussan, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Interview of Gabriel Horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; in those years of enlightenment for me when I had decided to read medicine, my mind was opened by Huxley and Wells 'A Science of Life' and I began to read, particularly philosophy; remember reading C.E.M Joad's 'Guide to Philosophy' and that brought a huge... and they have been reviewing the risk factors for the later addictive behaviour; I am sure it will have implications right the way through Government policy; I have already submitted an interim report and I gave a talk to a cross Government meeting last December...

Horn, Gabriel

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1 (Including Records of Technical Change No.1, 2, 3, and 4)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527, Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 527 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. The site is located in an abandoned mine site in Area 26 (which is the most arid part of the NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Historical documents may refer to this site as CAU 168, CWD-1, the Wingfield mine (or shaft), and the Wahmonie mine (or shaft). Historical documentation indicates that between 1959 and the 1970s, nonliquid classified material and unclassified waste was placed in the Horn Silver Mine's shaft. Some of the waste is known to be radioactive. Documentation indicates that the waste is present from 150 feet to the bottom of the mine (500 ft below ground surface). This CAU is being investigated because hazardous constituents migrating from materials and/or wastes disposed of in the Horn Silver Mine may pose a threat to human health and the environment as well as to assess the potential impacts associated with any potential releases from the waste. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fin-line horn antenna  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fin line circuit card containing a fin line slot feeds a dipole antenna ich extends a quarterwave outside the waveguide and provides an energy beam focal point at or near the open end of the waveguide. The dipole antenna thus maintains a wide and nearly constant beamwidth, low VSWR and a circular symmetric radiation pattern for use in electronic warfare direction finding and surveillance applications.

Reindel, John (San Diego, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Oogenesis in Unisexual Whiptail Lizards (genus Aspidoscelis)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

you for two years of guidance. From running gels to running marathons, you have shown unrivaled patience in answering my questions, and your interest in my well-being is greatly appreciated. Xiaorong, you are really sweet and I thank you for your... Ė that between the oocyte with its polar body from the second division Ė will result in high levels of homozygosity (Fig. 7). The snake Epicrates maurus and the termite Reticulitermes virginicus have been observed to undergo such fusion, and this mechanism may...

Lutes, Aracely

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Big Horn County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Heart Attack) 4.6% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 510.8 (Region 3) 455.5 543.2 1 Community Health Data Johnson Foundation (2012) Leading Causes of Death County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3

Maxwell, Bruce D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

OFFICE OF ENROLLMENT PAMELA T. HORNE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Maintain prospective student database · Mail (print and e) appropriate central recruitment publications guidance counselors · E and print · Boiler Steam (the T is intentionally capitalized) DIRECT MARKETING

Ginzel, Matthew

82

COMPUTATIONAL IMAGING Berthold K.P. Horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ziock, and Lorenzo Fabris. #12;Coded Aperture Imaging ¬∑ Can't refract or reflect gamma rays ¬∑ Pinhole Principle #12;Decoding Method Rationale #12;Coded Aperture Imaging ¬∑ Can't refract or reflect gamma rays Squares Match in FT #12;Polystyrene Micro Beads (1¬Ķm) #12;#12;(2) CODED APERTURE IMAGING ¬∑ Can't refract

Treuille, Adrien

83

Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

de- nocratic revolution in Ethiopia, the synpathy and whole-ETHIOPIA PND THE ffl~ OF JlfRICA~ by Fassil Demissie 'Ibe>lens of revolution in Ethiopia, the specific fonns it would

Demissie, Fassil

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

acrodont lizards timing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Customer satisfaction 12;Heijunka Leveling cycle time Leveling g lean (waste) 12;LEVELING (Heijunka)LEVELING (Heijunka) Leveling in healthcare l b lab ...

85

Monitoring and managing the harvest of tegu lizards in Paraguay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

species. The sex ratio (M: F) of harvested black-and-white tegus and red tegus varied in different years, but was generally biased toward more males. Corresponding to the general increase in skin size, the proportion of subadults in the harvest decreased...

Mieres Romero, Maria Margarita

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Numerical simulation of the truss spar 'Horn Mountain' using COUPLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using an integrated marine monitoring system attached to the truss spar. In this study, dynamic analysis of the truss spar interacting with its mooring and riser system was performed using a time-domain numerical code, known as ¬?COUPLE¬?. The simulated...

Theckum Purath, Basil

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development Challenges and Mitigation Pathways in the Horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Obeid Juba Hargeysa Bahir Dar Garoowe Wadi Halfa Mekele Awash Nyala Port Sudan Kismaayo BerberaDire Dawa Kassala Juba El Obeid Masawa Aseb Hargeysa Bahir Dar Garoowe Wadi Halfa Mekele Awash Nyala Khartoum Addis

Richner, Heinz

88

Big Horn County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey: EnergyBerthoud,Biodiesel Place:Forge07.Daddy

89

Big Horn County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey: EnergyBerthoud,Biodiesel Place:Forge07.DaddyWyoming:

90

Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon: EnergyBiofuelsBig BendCreekBig

91

Big Horn Rural Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon: EnergyBiofuelsBig BendCreekBigBig

92

Big Horn Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon: EnergyBiofuelsBig

93

EVOLUTION OF FOOD FORAGING STRATEGIES FOR THE CARIBBEAN ANOLIS LIZARD USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory 701 Welch Road Palo Alto, California 94304 USA Rice@Sumex-Aim.Stanford.Edu 415-723-8405 Jonathan programming paradigm which genetically breeds a population of computer programs to solve problems. The paper, natural selection caused the population to accumulate genes whose expression led to the observed optimal

Fernandez, Thomas

94

HABITAT BUT NOT BODY SHAPE AFFECTS PREDATOR ATTACK FREQUENCY ON LIZARD MODELS IN THE BRAZILIAN CERRADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERRADO DONALD B. SHEPARD 1,2 1 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and Department of Zoology such as pattern and shape in forming search images of prey, thereby influencing the evolution of prey morphology's ability to detect prey (Endler, 1986, 1991; Ruxton et al., 2004). Predators form search images of cryptic

Shepard, Don

95

From Microevolutionary Processes to Macroevolutionary Patterns: Investigating Diversification at Multiple Scales in Southeast Asian Lizards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comprehensive understanding of the evolutionary processes responsible for generating biodiversity is best obtained using integrative approaches at multiple scales. In doing so, these investigations can provide complex ...

Barley, Anthony John

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

The relationship between morphology, escape behaviour and microhabitat occupation in the lizard clade Liolaemus (Iguanidae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insights into the process of adaptation and evolutionary diversi- fication (Wainwright & Reilly, 1994 capabilities (Losos, 1990a). As one might predict, Correspondence: James A. Schulte II, Division of Amphibians.: 202 357 4594; fax: 202 786 2979; e-mail: schulte.james@nmnh.si.edu 408 J . E V O L . B I O L . 1 7 ( 2

Schulte, Jim

97

Systematics of the Palaearctic and Oriental lizard tribe Lacertini (Squamata: Lacertidae: Lacertinae),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Lacertinae), with descriptions of eight new genera E. NICHOLAS ARNOLD, OSCAR ARRIBAS& SALVADOR CARRANZA Lacertini E. NICHOLAS ARNOLD, OSCAR ARRIBAS & SALVADOR CARRANZA (Squamata: Lacertidae: Lacertinae. NICHOLAS ARNOLD1 , OSCAR ARRIBAS2 & SALVADOR CARRANZA3* 1.--Department of Zoology, The Natural History

Carranza, Salvador

98

Genetic drift or natural selection? Hybridization and asymmetric mitochondrial introgression in two Caribbean lizards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mostly or completely replaced the native mtDNA of A. pulchellus on this part of the island. We proposed of the five major mtDNA clades of A. krugi. Further, the spatial distribution of k-mtDNA clades in the two) hybridize with heterospecifics. The generation and maintenance of a hybrid zone requires mismatings

Rodríguez, Javier A.

99

Aspects of the ecology and systematics of the lizards Coleonyx brevis and Coleonyx reticulatus (Lacertilia: Gekkonidae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edward Dial, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James R. Dixon N 1 hi y d' f ~C1 1* ' ' 1 d ly- sis of the reproductive and thermal ecology, diet composition, and behavior of the species. Data on the thermal ecology, diet... and mensural data from each species were recorded and geographic variation in C. brevis was analyzed. The reproductive cycle of C. brevis involves cyclic gonadal development in males and females. Males emerge from hibernation with enlarged testes...

Dial, Benjamin Edward

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Molecular Phylogeny and Biogeography of West Indian Teiid Lizards of the Genus Ameiva  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. HOWER AND S. BLAIR HEDGES* *Department of Biology and Institute of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics, 208

Hedges, Blair

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ecological Consequences of Landscape Fragmentation on the Lizard Community in the Mescalero-Monahans Shinnery Sands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1984). Areas of vegetated (inactive) dunes exist in greater extent ecosystem-wide. Other dune types observed in the MMSS include barchanoid, parabolic, coppice, blowouts, akle, and transverse ridges. Both vegetated parabolic and coppice dunes...

Leavitt, Daniel 1979-

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

102

The genome of the green anole lizard and a comparative analysis with birds and mammals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolution of the amniotic egg was one of the great evolutionary innovations in the history of life, freeing vertebrates from an obligatory connection to water and thus permitting the conquest of terrestrial environments. ...

Lander, Eric S.

103

Osteology of the lizard Gonatodes humeralis (Guichenot) and other representative species of the genus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that adequately express my wife's help and con- cern for my graduate studies. Her contribution is far beyond my capa- bilities for expressing gratitude. Our children have shared such efforts with her through the experience of a sudden exposure to a different.... Lat- erally, the prefrontal is composed of the pars maxillaris and a long process projecting posteriorly from its dorsal portion. Under this projection, the bone has a flattened concave surface which forms the anterior wall of the orbit. The lower...

Rivero-Blanco, Carlos

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Performing Lena: Race, Representation, and the Postwar Autobiographical Performances of Lena Horne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a hypervisible black woman, whose overdetermined image was evoked by blacks and whites to represent racialized political interests on both sides of the color line throughout the long civil rights era, singerĖactress ...

Williams, Megan E.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Tertiary igneous rocks of the Eagle Mountains, Van Horn, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alkaline Ign ~ ~ cons ~ ~ ~ Rocks 21 42 D I S CUSS I QN e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Petrogenesis 50 50 Source magma. Fractionation . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 50 52 Origin of West Texas Nagmas... of Permian and Cretaceous age. The only Permian rocks in the area are represented by the Hueco Limestone Formation. The Cretaceous System, however, is represented by the entire Comanche and Gulf Series (Fig. 2). The Hueco Formation is of marine origin...

Nelson, Ronald Alan

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Curriculum vitae Frank Lehmann-Horn, geb. 22.06.48  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Verbrennungsmotor-Konstruktion zur Emissionsreduktion 1967-72 Maschinenbau-Studium an der TU M√ľnchen (TUM

Ulm, Universität

107

ONLINE ANOMALY DETECTION WITH EXPERT SYSTEM FEEDBACK IN SOCIAL Corinne Horn and Rebecca Willett  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the focus of political party is shifting with the develop- ment of new factions, ∑ who within a financial

Willett, Rebecca

108

The Paleoindian skeletal material from Horn Shelter, Number 2, in central Texas: an analysis and perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Thanks for time and technical assistance go to Dr. C. B. Goswick and Tina Orozco at the TAMU student health center who provided x-rays; to Paul Storch of the Materials Conservation Laboratory, Texas Memorial Museum, and Carolyn Rose of the Smithsonian... dentition. . . . Occlusal view of Burial One's mandibular dentition. . . Lateral view of Burial One's maxillary dentition. . . Lateral view of Burial One's mandibular dentition. . Page . . 58 . . 61 . . 61 3. 12A 8 C X-ray of Burial One's clavicles...

Young, Diane Elizabeth

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Phyton(Horn, Austria) 29. 8. 2008 Ein Nachtrag zur Zieralgenflora (Desmidiales, Zygne-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(LENZENWEGER2003)-nicht erwahnte] Desmidiaceentaxa gefunden werden konnten; Die Beweggriinde flir diese

110

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_BRIAN_HORN_NRC and DOE recognition...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and - Inventory reconciled within 30 days of receipt - 170 RIS's * 65 reactors * 7 Fuel cycle * 98 Licensees primarily possessing < 350 grams of fissile "Outstanding" in...

111

HRENSEMBLEHR High Resolution Ensemble for Horns Rev: A project overview Mhrlen, C.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits of offshore wind power is a smoothing effect on the energy price, because it has it's own an optimised model system. The objective of this project is to combine an ocean model with an ensemble predicting the most likely production of the wind farm, but also the expected ramping and variability

112

Olfactory sensilla of the antennal flagellum of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans, (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Muscidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of curved hairs which vary greatly in length. The longest thick-walled multiporous sensilla, 150 to 370 um in length, are reported from the male saturniid moth, Antheraea ~em i, (Ernst Table l. Electron microscopy studies of the sensilla of insect...); Slifer (1969) Richerson et al. (1972) and Steinbrecht, unpubl. quoted by Schneider and Steinbrecht, 1968); among the shortest are the uniporous thick-walled receptors, 14 to 21 um in length, from the antennae of 4 species of Simuiiidae (Mercer and Mc...

White, Sandy Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_BRIAN_HORN_NMMSS Overrview-May 12 2014...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NMMSS History * 1940's & 50's: data was hand written into ledgers * 1960's: Mainframe computer & punch cards * Early 1990's: Personal Computer system, using DOS & FoxPro * 2009: PC...

114

RAL/ISS meeting, April 24-28 2006 Marcos Dracos Collection system, horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Francis Osswald) · goals and perspectives · suppliers and collaborations · the pulsed power supply · perform qualification and endurance tests · develop a simulation tool · target integration #12;RAL · power supply design : looking for suppliers, collaborations and financing · infrastructure and team

McDonald, Kirk

115

To grab the stroma by the horns: from biology to cancer therapy with mesenchymal stem cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

angiogenesis through elevated SDF-1/CXCL12 secretion. Cell.may enhance metastasis of neuroblastoma via SDF-1/CXCR4and SDF-1/CXCR7 signaling. Cancer letters. 2011;312:1Ė10.

Droujinine, Ilia A; Eckert, Mark A; Zhao, Weian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Women's Voices in Italian Postcolonial Literature from the Horn of Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vita per forza fra Dakar, Parigi e Milano Milano: Garzanti,vita per forza fra Dakar, Parigi e Milano. Milano: Garzanti,vita per forza fra Dakar, Parigi e Milano (published in 2010

Lavagnino, Claire Genevieve

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Enrofloxacin and amikacin pharmacokinetics in Scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah) following a single intravenous dose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-compartment model with maximum serum concentration after distribution of 1.887+0.632btg/ml and mean elimination half-life of 41.2+27.5min. Model-independent parameters for amikacin were AUC, 5478+2828Ag/min/ml, volume of distribution, 0.152+0.02L/kg, clearance, 1.2+0.4...

Gamble, Kathryn Christine

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Visualizing Biodiversity with Voronoi Treemaps Michael S. Horn, Matthew Tobiasz, and Chia Shen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Voronoi treemap algorithm that employs force-directed graph drawing techniques both to guide visualization; multi-touch tabletop displays; interaction design; biodiversity I. INTRODUCTION In this paper, we found it useful to integrate phylogenetic information (i.e. in- formation about the evolutionary history

119

FY_2010_REPORTING_INSTRUCTIONS_TRANSMITTAL_8-26-10-Horn.pdf | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 2011 Report toAnnuAl Progress rePort

120

Interspecic scaling of the hindlimb skeleton in lizards, crocodilians, felids and canids: does limb bone shape correlate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limb bone shape correlate with limb posture? Richard W. Blob* Committee on Evolutionary Biology-phylogenetic statistical methods and phylogenetically independent contrasts. Comparisons with theoretical models indicate to such an extent that for the femur and tibia safety factors in shear are approximately half as great as safety

Blob, Richard W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recent studies have demonstrated that limitations to oxygen transport in lizards occur within both the respiratory and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

both the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. The lateral flexions of the trunk that occur during this constraint by employing an accessory ventilatory mechanism called the gular pump, thus maintaining oxygen of the main veins in the abdominal compartment. Systemic venous return and ventricular preload are major

Bennett, Albert F.

122

Simone GilardoniNufact03 7/06/2003 Horn R&D for 2002-2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-like: ¬≠ Normally 1-2 interaction lengths ¬∑ Order 20-30 cm for heavy targets (Hg) ¬∑ Particle produced with large ¬∑ Power supply for Test One: 30 kA and 1 Hz, pulse 100 ¬Ķs long First mechanical measurements Test and water connections #12;Simone GilardoniNufact03 7/06/2003 Inside the neck 5.6 cm #12;Simone Gilardoni

McDonald, Kirk

123

Review: War & the Politics of Identity in Ethiopia: the making of enemies & allies in the Horn of Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

War and the Politics of Identity in Ethiopia: the Making ofISBN 978 1 84701 612 6. In War and the Politics of Identityin explaining the latest war with their friendly-neighbor-

Kidane, Saba T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Bio/consult as Horns Rev. Summary of baseline surveys Dok. nr. 2041-02-03-004, rev. 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

87 88 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 1 2 3 4 5 ##51 ##73 ##58 ##95 ##55 ##26 # Study areas Reference area ..............................................................................................................................2 2. Survey area the stomach content of fish. 2. Survey area In June 2001 at a total of 18 stations at 6 wind turbine locations

125

Execution and Proof in a HornClause Temporal Logic Clare Dixon 1 , Michael Fisher 1 and Mark Reynolds 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] and resolution [Aba87, Fis91]. Here we consider the resolution based method given in [Fis91]. This clausal Normal Form (SNF). Whilst SNF has been defined for both propositional [Fis91] and first­order [Fis97

Dixon, Clare

126

Tasks for tests and A-levels using CAS Heidi Metzger-Schuhker, Mag. Commercial Highschool HORN, Austria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Austria ACDCA (Austrian Center for Didactics of Computer Algebra) heidi.metzger@hakhorn.ac.at Abstract://www.acdca.ac.at (Website of the Austrian Center for Didactics of Computer Algebra) 1. Initial situation If mathematics (Austrian Center for Didactics of Computer Algebra). For the vocational school system ­ especially

Spagnolo, Filippo

127

Review: War & the Politics of Identity in Ethiopia: the making of enemies & allies in the Horn of Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Politics of Identity in Ethiopia: the Making of Enemies &Politics of Identity in Ethiopia, Kjetil Tronvoll takes onpolitics of the Eritrean-Ethiopia war. Neither does it

Kidane, Saba T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The cow creek anticline: an example of disharmonic folding along the front of the Big Horn Mountains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Cretaceous rocks, overlain by Tertiary terrace gravely Topography is structurally controlled here, therefore mazy of the mountainsides are actually dip slopes of the Mississippian Madison Formation. Steep canyons which transect mountain i'lank folds... Mountain, just beyond the northern and eastern peripheries of the study area, resoectively. y3 44 hta ntana WZOInina 44 F' a. Spr;ad STUDY AREA~ Shandaa 45 MESOZOIC !L csftozala PALEOZOIC Shall ~ EIE 0& C ~~ 0 IP ~ Etary Suffala 45' P...

Dransfield, Betsy Jo

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_BRIAN_HORN_NRC and DOE recognition May 13 2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational NuclearhasAdministration77NuclearSecurityAdministratorInteractiveRecent3

130

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_BRIAN_HORN_NMMSS Overrview-May 12 2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational

131

Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Pete_Deessaules_Brain_Horn_NMMSS_2014_screensaver.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of the Yucca Mountain License Application NMMSSWelcome

132

Don-Hyung Ha > Postdoc - MIT (Shao-Horn Group) > Center Alumni > The Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates8. U.S. uraniumDomesticAna Moore

133

Adhesion Recovery and Passive Peeling in a Wall Climbing Robot using Adhesives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adhesion Recovery and Passive Peeling in a Wall Climbing Robot using Adhesives Casey Kute, Michael results illustrate that a passive peeling mechanism is successful in reducing the required power to peel vertical surfaces are capable of sensing how well they are adhered to the surface. The flat-tailed house

Wood, Robert

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - activates atrophin-1-interacting protein...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material Summary: the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - adapter-related protein complex Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material Summary: the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - acyl-coa-binding protein acyl-coa-binding...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material Summary: the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - assigning large proteins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material Summary: the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - acquiring regulatory proteins Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material Summary: the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - apiap2 protein pfsip2 Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material Summary: the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiophidic proteins dm43 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material Summary: the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE Annual NEPA Planning Summary report templates 2011  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

State:" ,,,"EA Approval:" ,,,"FONSI:" "Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana,...

142

Bibliographia Nudibranchia, second edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screening study for offshore wind farm developments - marinemonitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm 2004. Survey Reportmonitoring Horns Rev offshore wind farm, annual status

McDonald, Gary R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Journal of Herpetology, Vol. 37, No. 3, pp. 293298, 2004 Copyright 2004 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Carrera 1 # 18A-10, Universidad de los Andes, Bogota, Colombia 2 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary.--Toe-clipping is a simple and widely used method for permanently marking small lizards. Although some studies have shown applying toe-clipping as a marking technique to pad-bearing lizards. The ability of arboreal lizards

Irschick, Duncan J.

144

16 Evolutionary Diversification of Caribbean Anolis Lizards 335 To what extent does this interisland study of size offer evidence for the role  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diversification, focusing primarily on the anoles of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto of Speciation Bahamas Cuba Jamaica Hispaniola Puerto Rico Lesser Antilles 500 km C arib b ean Sea A tlan tic O cean Jamaica (6)* Mainland Cuba (15) Hispaniola (1) Cuba (4) Cuba (4)* Cuba(4) Cuba (14) Hispaniola (8

Losos, Jonathan B.

145

A preliminary analysis of geographic variation in the neotropical teiid lizard, Cnemidophorus lemniscatus (Sauria: Teiidae), from Mainland Central and South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= Puerto Cortes, Honduras; g4 = Surinam; T";5 = i~laturin, Venezuela; 66 Falcon, Venezuela; g7 = Bolivar, Venezuela; g8 = Camatagua, Venezuela; P9 = Guyana; $1G Baranquilla, Colombia; $11 = Yaviza, Panama; 514 = Apure, Venezuela; f16 = Villavicencio... from all others. This grouping differs from the UPG:IA where the sexes were lumped because samples 4 and 9, from Guyana and Surinam, respectively, are coupled together. These are subgrouped with sample 16, and then with sample 18. The s cond split...

McCrystal, Hugh Kreyer

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Scoring and mapping bovine anchor loci and screening polymorphic markers for horns and coat color in a Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chromosomes or syntenic groups, 12 markers are assigned to linkage groups, and 19 are unassigned and unlinked markers. In order to more efficiently assign the markers under development to chromosomes, additional anchor loci were scored and tested...

Brenneman, Rick Alan

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effects of cropping-system, irrigation method, and soil properties on soil nitrogen and organic matter dynamics in the Big Horn Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concerns interact to create a need for better understanding of production efficiency and ecological impacts and maintenance of the resource base; and 2) evaluating long-term impacts of farming systems on the resource baseEffects of cropping-system, irrigation method, and soil properties on soil nitrogen and organic

Norton, Jay B.

148

Elimination of self-absorption in fluorescence hard-x-ray absorption spectra P. Pfalzer, J.-P. Urbach, M. Klemm, and S. Horn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elimination of self-absorption in fluorescence hard-x-ray absorption spectra P. Pfalzer, J-ray absorption spectra in situations where samples cannot be made in the required configuration. However, self-absorption-ray absorption coefficients. This procedure is used to obtain the vanadium K-edge spectrum of single crystal V2O3

Frenkel, Anatoly

149

Switching studies for the Horns Rev 2 wind farm C.F. Jensen, F. Faria da Silva , C.L. Bak, and W. Wiechowski  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Wiechowski is with WTW Power Solutions (e-mail of corresponding author: wtw@wtwps.com) add to the total, Overvoltages, PSCAD. I. INTRODUCTION IN order to reduce visual pollution, the Danish government has decided to replace the existing 132/150 kV overhead line system with HVAC power cables [4]. This introduces new

Silva, Filipe Faria Da

150

C C f C C f C C 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compositional conditional narrowing success assumed to be axiomatized as an equational Horn theory, which

Alpuente, María

151

Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to† supply† mainland. Ē† Windpower† Monthly,† October† 14 †Horns† Reef† repairs. Ē† Windpower† Monthly. † November,†

Lewis, Joanna I.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoles anolis carolinensis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 8 The Burden of Motherhood: The Effect of Reproductive Load on Female Lizard Locomotor, Foraging, and Social Behavior Summary: ) in green anole...

153

Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Environmental Responsibili...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Programs Environment, Safety & Health Policy Calendar Publications SandiaCalifornia Pollution Prevention About SandiaNew Mexico Environmental Management Lizard SandiaNew Mexico...

154

anaerobic carbon metabolism: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

METABOLISM IN A LIZARD (ANOLIS BONAIRENSIS) UNDER NATURAL CONDITIONS1 ALBERT F. BENNETT, California 92717 (Accepted 101380) Lactate contents of Anolis bonairensis (Sauria:...

155

anaerobic laboratory conditions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

METABOLISM IN A LIZARD (ANOLIS BONAIRENSIS) UNDER NATURAL CONDITIONS1 ALBERT F. BENNETT, California 92717 (Accepted 101380) Lactate contents of Anolis bonairensis (Sauria:...

156

animal behaviour: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND FORAGING BEHAWOUR OF KALAHARI LACERTIQ LIZARDS BY RAYMOND B. HUEY*, ALBERT F. BENNETT?, HENRY desert differ in patterns of foraging behaviour. Some species are relatively...

157

anaerobic central metabolic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

METABOLISM IN A LIZARD (ANOLIS BONAIRENSIS) UNDER NATURAL CONDITIONS1 ALBERT F. BENNETT, California 92717 (Accepted 101380) Lactate contents of Anolis bonairensis (Sauria:...

158

Chemical Signals Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= 16) + hydrogen (H20) Large compounds can persist. - proteins and lipids No size restriction, faster secretion #12;Vertebrate glands Reindeer Salamander Iguanid lizard Ground squirrel #12;Scent

Wilkinson, Gerald S.

159

PERSISTENT REDISTRIBUTION OF POLY-ADENYLATED mRNAs CORRELATES WITH TRANSLATION ARREST AND CELL DEATH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the selective vulnerability of post-ischemic hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (Ammon's horn) (CA1) neurons, the mech. Hippocampal cornu ammonis (Ammon's horn) (CA) 1 py- ramidal neurons are selectively vulnerable to global isch

DeGracia, Donald J.

160

Characterization and field trials of a bioluminescent bacterial reporter of iron bioavailability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Bruland, 1998) and some large lakes (Wurtsbaugh and Horne, 1983; Twiss et al., 2000). Although Fe

Wilhelm, Steven W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

128/08/2006 1 Ans PARDONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

128/08/2006 1 Ans PARDONS CNGS HornsCNGS Horns CNGS Horns ¬∑ Introduction ¬∑ Design ¬∑ ¬ę Remote Heat load horn: 15 kW (Joule) + 6 kW (beam) Cooling through top sprayers, 1.2 bar Magnetic field: Max.1, Paris #12;528/08/2006 5 Ans PARDONS Designed for remote handlingDesigned for remote handling Pre

McDonald, Kirk

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic force ultrasonic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

laboratories, you must attend the safety orientation. Summary: W ultrasonic horn Atomic absorption spectrophotometer UVVIS spectrophotometer Centrifuge p... ,...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic force spectroscopy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Langmuir trough Atomic force microscope Optical microscope... W ultrasonic horn Atomic absorption spectrophotometer UVVIS spectrophotometer Centrifuge p......

164

Probabilistic Evaluation of Counterfactual Queries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. 1993. Probabilistic Horn abduction and Bayesian networks.two essential compo- nents: abduction (to abduce plausible

Alexander Balke; Judea Pearl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Modern History of Ethiopia and the Horn of Africa: A Select and Annotated Bibliography. By Harold G. Marcus. Hoover Institution Bibliographical Series, Volume 56, Stanford, California: Hoover Institution Press, 1972.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Model'YI History of Ethiopia and the Hol'YI of Africa: Athe extensive activi- ties in Ethiopia since the 1860s of

Amatruda, William T.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horns Rev Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment on Water Quality #12;Prepared with a planned 150 MW offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, an assessment was made of the effects the wind farm would for the preparation of EIA studies for offshore wind farms." Horns Rev is situated off Blåvands Huk, which is Denmark

167

NERI Report Commissioned by Tech-wise A/S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev: results and conclusions 2000/2001 #12;National Environmental Research-line investigations of birds in relation to an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev: results and conclusions 2000 Title: Base-line investigations of birds in relation to an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev: results

168

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and distri- butions in the Horns Rev offshore wind farm area Annual status report 2004 NERI Report Ministry of the Environment . Denmark Bird numbers and distri- butions in the Horns Rev offshore wind farm #12;Data Sheet Title: Bird numbers and distributions in the Horns Rev offshore wind farm area Subtitle

169

Revised July 21, 1992 for the Simulation of Adaptive Behavior journal. EVOLUTION OF FOOD FORAGING STRATEGIES FOR THE CARIBBEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRATEGIES FOR THE CARIBBEAN ANOLIS LIZARD USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING John R. Koza Computer Science Department versions of the problem of finding an optimal food foraging strategy for the Caribbean Anolis lizard of the genus Anolis in the Caribbean islands occupy the ecological niche occupied in North America and Europe

Fernandez, Thomas

170

Suspected viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) in a juvenile blackbar triggerfish,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aculeatus, from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia angela j. davies1,2 , lynda curtis3 , alexandra s. grutter3 and nico j. smit2 1 School of Life Sciences, Kingston University, Kingston upon Thames triggerfish, Rhinecanthus aculeatus, captured on a patch reef at Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef in November

Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

171

acta ethologica ISSN 0873-9749  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

height, time in residence and distance from opponent on aggressive display in male lizards Louise Osborne lizards Louise Osborne & Kate D. L. Umbers & J. Scott Keogh Received: 7 June 2012 /Revised: 13 September male sand gobies (Pomatoschistus min- utus), for example, increases with nest size, because a larger

Keogh, Scott

172

Out of Africa & into the Sunshine State : tracking an exotic invader  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the story of an invasive species and one man's quest to eradicate it. The Nile monitor lizard (Varanus niloticus), smaller cousin of the famed Komodo dragon, grows into six feet of carnivorous, ill-tempered muscle. ...

Weeks, Erin Maureen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

L1: Intro to Computer Systems: Frans Kaashoek and Robert Morris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with DDT · Wiped out mosquitoes, but .... · Roaches collected DDT in tissue · Lizards ate roaches and became slower · Easy target for cats · Cats didn't deal with DDT well and died · Forest rats moved

174

This information is provided by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Outreach and SPARC. For more information, call (803) 725-0156.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This information is provided by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Outreach and SPARC. For more National Park, I took a trip to Miami to catch iguanas, the "big game" of the lizard species, inhabiting

Georgia, University of

175

ORIGINAL PAPER The bioinvasion of Guam: inferring geographic origin, pace,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Northern Marianas, and Palau. This lizard is of major impor- tance as its introduction is thought to have Treesnake √Ā Marianas √Ā Micronesia √Ā New Guinea √Ā Palau √Ā World War II Introduction Invasive species affect

Austin, Christopher C.

176

Pacific Science (1996), vol. 50, no. 3: 274-284 1996 by University of Hawai'i Press. All rights reserved  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atrocostata (Lesson) was documented for the first time on Saipan, with a population found on a small offshore altered its lizard popula- tions. Native plant communities currently cover less than 8% of the island

Dever, Jennifer A.

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase enzyme levels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

enzyme levels Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: is unlikely (12, 13). Males...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase inhibitor treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inhibitor treatment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in...

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase gene defines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gene defines Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: to previous work using Nissl-stained...

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-induced aromatase activation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aromatase activation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: activity and mRNA expression in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: aromatase Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in...

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase mrna expression Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mrna expression Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: activity and mRNA expression in...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase gene expression Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gene expression Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: of testosterone to oestradiol (E2)...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase inhibitor studies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inhibitor studies Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: and seasons mediate local synthesis...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatase cytochrome p-450 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cytochrome p-450 Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Aromatase mRNA in the Brain of Adult Green Anole Lizards: Effects of Summary: of cytochrome P450 aromatase in the...

186

ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR SERIES*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION SEMINAR SERIES* WINTER 2013 ECL 296 (CRN 50337) / PBG 292 (CRN 64677 24 The Modern Ecology of Ice-Covered Lakes in Antarctica: A Journey Back JANUARY 31 Lizards in an Evolutionary Tree: Ecology and Adaptive Radiation

Ishida, Yuko

187

Musum national d'Histoire naturelle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Aboveground biomass and productivity in a rain forest of eastern South America. Journal of Tropic., HoussayE a. & BŲhmE W. - 2008. Bone vascular supply in monitor lizards (Squamata: Varanidae): influence

188

National Environmental Research Institute Department of Coastal Zone Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev 51 4.2.2 Seabird use of the Horns Rev area 52 4.3 Effects of construction activities 53 4 period 13 2.2 Study area 13 2.3 Aerial surveys of birds 14 2.3.1 Construction activities during aerial.2 Exploitation of the Horns Rev area during the base-line 43 3.3 Exploitation of the Horns Rev area during

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated hyperfractionated thoracic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanocladius. (i) base of thoracic horn, Chironomus. Abbreviations: al... - anal lobe, ash - anal macrosetae sheath, c - corona, cb - thoracic comb, ct - cephalic tubule, d...

190

E-Print Network 3.0 - action potential clamp Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

numerical solution at high temporal resolu- tion... . Figure 5 (- - -) shows that the MATLAB ... Source: Horn, John P. - Department of Neurobiology, University of Pittsburgh...

191

ASSESSMENT OF MICRO HYDRO POWER POTENTIAL OF SELECTED ETHIOPIAN RIVERS- A CASE STUDY IN THE NORTH-WEST PART OF THE COUNTRY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ethiopia is a country situated in the horn of Africa with a total population of 80 million of which 85% is living in rural areasÖ (more)

Abebe, Tilahun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electoral Competition, Political Uncertainty and Policy Insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncertainty and Policy Insulation Horn, Murray. 1995. TheUncertainty and Policy Insulation United States Congress.UNCERTAINTY AND POLICY INSULATION Rui J. P. de Figueiredo,

de Figueiredo, Rui J. P. Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

E-Print Network 3.0 - active core protein Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

protein with extension pc0741 conserved hypothetical protein pc0743... the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha-rod protein repeats Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

defense Cell envelope Mobile elements, phage proteins Leu-rich repeat... the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

195

E-Print Network 3.0 - arabidopsis ear-motif-containing protein...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thaliana) pc0486 hypothetical protein pc0489 conserved hypothetical... the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

196

E-Print Network 3.0 - arabidopsis acyl-coa-binding protein Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thaliana) pc0486 hypothetical protein pc0489 conserved hypothetical... the Evolutionary History of Chlamydiae" (Horn et al.) Supporting Online Material 2 protein sequence...

197

Cathodes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Y. Shao-Horn, C. Carlton (MIT) - M. Balasubramanian (APS- ANL) - V. Battaglia (LBNL), Jose M. Calderon- Moreno (Romanian Academy) 3 Objectives Design high capacity,...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal production systems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Anderson and Urquhart, 1986 12;Animal Weight Telemetry System, i.e. Cow Boots Horn, F.P. 1981. Direct... foster low stress animal handling. - Use tools ... Source:...

199

In The Name Of The Father, The Governor, And "A-1 Good Men": Performing Gender and Statehood In Territorial New Mexico, 1880 - 1912  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1985. Armitage,Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979. Bederman, Gail.Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2012. Horn, Calvin.

Sanchez, Sabrina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - azimuthally corrugated application Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND MICRO GENETIC ALGORITHM OPTIMIZATION OF PROFILED CORRUGATED HORN ANTENNAS Seelig Sinton, Jacob Source: Durrani, Salman - Department of Engineering, Australian National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Data Fitting in Partial Differential Algebraic Equations: Some Academic and Industrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamics of hydro systems, · MCFC fuel cells, · horn radiators for satellite communication. The dynamical engineering. Key words: parameter estimation, data fitting, least squares optimization, partial differential

Schittkowski, Klaus

202

Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 4.6.4 Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis Presentation Number: 031 Investigator: Horne, Roland (Stanford University)...

203

Protecting Wildlife  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bees as Indicators of Radionuclide Contamination (pdf) Great Horned Owls at the Los Alamos Environmental Research Park: Population Survey, Nesting Biology, and Management...

204

D T D T D T D T D T D T D T D T D T Abril, Jamila Jamila A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Horn, Jimmy x Jimmy H. 4.5 42.0 2.0 18.0 Houchens, Austin Austin H. Hughes, Cathy Cathy H. Hulsing

Baltisberger, Jay H.

205

ASSESSMENT OF MICRO HYDRO POWER POTENTIAL OF SELECTED ETHIOPIAN RIVERS- A CASE STUDY IN THE NORTH NORTHWEST.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ethiopia is a country situated in the horn of Africa with a total population of 80 million of which 85% is living in rural areasÖ (more)

Abebe, Tilahun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - af vandfugle vinteren Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 74 Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental Summary: undersgelser af offshore...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - ace activity radio Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ACE GLASS Sonochemistry... the horn to be held in an Ace-Thred without affecting sonic output and enables easy adaptation Source: Suslick, Kenneth S. - Department of...

208

EIS-0259 Final Environmental Impact Statement On The Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

fiquid horn each package under consideration. For packages considered, the total radiation dose wotid be greater than 6,800 rem (approximately 3 additiond latent cancer...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - anholt denmark resolved Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Mathematics 38 Ris-R-Report Power fluctuations from large wind farms - Summary: in Denmark: Horns Rev shows that the power from the wind farm is...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - akustisk mengdemling av Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Information Sciences 24 Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms Summary: ved Horn Rev havmllepark. Den nye akustiske metode kombinerer brugen...

211

areas gestao ambiental: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

learning about habitat distributions and interdependencies in an outdoor woodland environment. Children use the horn to listen to non-speech audio sounds that represent...

212

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA ATTITUDE ESTIMATION FOR A LOW-COST UAV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ ATTITUDE ESTIMATION FOR A LOW-COST UAV A thesis submitted of Physics #12;Copyright c by Gregory M. Horn 2009 #12;Abstract Attitude Estimation for a Low-Cost UAV by Gregory M. Horn Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Micro Aerial Vehicles (MAVs) are a rapidly growing

Belanger, David P.

213

Mapping of offshore wind resources C. B. Hasager, P. Astrup, M. B. Christiansen, M. Nielsen, A. Pea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping of offshore wind resources C. B. Hasager, P. Astrup, M. B. Christiansen, M. Nielsen, A offshore Synthetic Aperture Radar: Envisat #12;From Danish Energy Agency report Horns Rev (Denmark) Wakes U ? #12;Wind Horns Rev Wind speed map from ERS Courtesy: Merete Bruun Christiansen #12;Mapping offshore

214

Neutrinos from Stored Muons STORM Target Station Conceptualg p  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of quadrupole magnets and related power supplies/utilities - Water cooled collimators for quad protection horn stripline bus and power supply- Focusing horn, stripline bus, and power supply - Pair morgue for device cool-down ∑ Functional civil construction enclosure consistent with providing thep g

McDonald, Kirk

215

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as shown in Figure L The feed is constructed with the 307 cm horn centered in the 11 cm horn. Di- electric-band and S-band sweep signal generators are provided to measure paramp gain, The model numbers, manufacturers. The local oscillator system minimizes the phase changes due to cable temperature variations and maintains

Groppi, Christopher

216

Diurnal and Seasonal Variations of Ultrafine Particle Formation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ultrafine particles observed in the plumes from the Horne smelter: one in the summer and the other cases, showing that particle formation in the Horne smelter plumes is dominated by binary homogeneous in this parameterization. Sulfur emission from power plants and smelters is a dominant anthropogenic sulfur source

Yu, Fangqun

217

Through-the-wall Imaging Radar Students: Thang Bui and Joseph Rabig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radar (SAR) to image objects behind a wall, using a pair of horn antennas and a vector network analyser was used to calibrate out unknown cable and system delays · Objects are resolved at correct locations close to the SAR Focusing delay geometry Theory ­ Image Processing Electromagnetic distance between horn

Ghahramani, Zoubin

218

Logic Programming, Abduction and Probability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logic Programming, Abduction and Probability: a top-down anytime algorithm for estimating prior, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z2 poole@cs.ubc.ca March 17, 1993 Abstract Probabilistic Horn abduction logically. The relationship be- tween probabilistic Horn abduction and logic programming is at two levels

Poole, David

219

Logic Programming, Abduction and Probability David Poole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Logic Programming, Abduction and Probability David Poole Department of Computer Science, University 5485 Abstract Probabilistic Horn abduction is a simple frame­ work to combine probabilistic and logical abduction and logic pro­ gramming is at two levels. At the first level probabilistic Horn abduction

Poole, David

220

Using satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(no wind) Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Blaavandshuk Met. mast N #12;Wind Horns Rev Wind speed map from · Wake near large offshore wind farms is quantified in space and time · Software for usersUsing satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Characterizing, predicting and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can increase. Offshore wind farms. Increase of power : Horns RevI : 190MW , Horns RevII : 210MW production from a single multi-megawatt wind farm. Variability of wind power depends on the time and spatial-megawatt wind farm. Variability of wind power depends on the time and spatial scale. R. Girard (Mines

222

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and distribution in the Horns Rev offshore wind farm area Annual status report 2003 Report commissioned by Elsam of the Environment . Denmark Bird numbers and distribution in the Horns Rev offshore wind farm area Annual status reports for 2003, concerning bird studies in relation to the offshore wind farms at Nysted in the Baltic

223

Replace Report 02-771 October 29, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Offshore Wind Farm. Horns Rev Annual Status Report for the Environmental Monitoring Programme 1st January.................................................................................................................3 1.1 Description of the Wind Farm Project at Horns Rev ........................................3 1 .............................................................................................6 1.3 Cables in the Wind Farm and to the Shore

224

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of migratory birds during operation of Horns Rev offshore wind farm Annual status report 2004 Report of the Environment . Denmark Investigations of migratory birds during operation of Horns Rev offshore wind farm offshore wind farm 2004 Subtitle: Annual status report 2004 Authors: Thomas Kjśr Christensen & Jens Peter

225

National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observations of birds in relation to collision risk at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm Annual status report to collision risk at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm Annual status report 2003 Report commissioned by Elsam offshore wind farm Authors: Thomas Kjśr Christensen, Jens Peter Hounisen, Ib Clausager & Ib Krag Petersen

226

IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL MAPPING OF TOTAL AND PHOSPHORYLATED EUKARYOTIC INITIATION FACTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reperfusion in the rat. In cornu ammonis (Am- mon's horn; CA) 1 at 90 min and 4 h reperfusion, eIF4G staining in selec- tively vulnerable populations of hippocampal neurons. Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons

DeGracia, Donald J.

227

2006 NMMSS Users Training Meeting | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

532.45 KB Reduced Closing Times (John Ballard) 20.56 KB SRS - Reconciliation (Fay G. Armstrong) 50.93 KB NMMSS Data Quality (Brian Horn) 35.6 KB Reconciliation (John Ballard)...

228

Spotlight, October 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is June 2014. Transportation: Our Transit system uses hybrid buses along its busiest routes, and weíre piloting a compressed natural gas vehicle to By Eileen Horn, Lawrence/Douglas County Sustainability Coordinator learn more about this alternative...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The effect of cattle grazing on the abundance and distribution of selected macroinvertebrates in west Galveston Island salt marshes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of cattle grazing on the abundance and distribution of vegetation, burrowing crabs (Uca rapax, Uca pugnax, and Sesarma cinereum), marsh periwinkles (Littoraria irrorata), horn snails (Cerithidea pliculosa), and salt marsh snails (Melampus...

Martin, Jennifer Lynn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustic telemetry system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Anderson and Urquhart, 1986 12;Animal Weight Telemetry System, i.e. Cow Boots Horn, F.P. 1981. Direct... . JER 12;Acoustic Telemetry Nelson et al. 2005. Wildlife...

231

Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

232

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These include steam- water flow (Li and Horne, 2001 and 2004), gas- condensate flow (App and Burger, 2009; Kumar out from reservoirs and bringing it to the surface, and it is almost impossible either to obtain

Stanford University

233

Concurrent Constraint Programming and NonCommutative Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concurrent Constraint Programming and Non¬≠Commutative Logic Paul Ruet ? , Fran¬łcois Fages LIENS as formula, computation¬≠as¬≠proof¬≠search paradigm. This paradigm, first introduced for the Horn clause

Ruet, Paul

234

transitions annual report of the librarian yale university library 200910  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as it was:Writing the Life of Samuel Johnson The Book Remembers Everything:The Work of Erica Van Horn. Pforzheimer, Esq. Mr. William R. Reid James J. Ross, Esq. Samuel H Kress Foundation Dr. Maxine F. Singer Mr

235

Communicating@theWheel.pub  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is essential to making sure that you are seen. Preoccupied, or momentarily distracted drivers or pedestrians can be totally unaware of your presence. Gently tap on the horn to get...

236

Dalhousie University Community Committee 1.) Membership changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

five floors will be residence rooms. There will be four houses removed prior to construction, we 1000. The charity face-off (Trojan's and Big Horns) raised $23,000. The event went to the IWK

Brownstone, Rob

237

1 Real-time Sign Language Letter and Word Recognition from Depth Data -Supplemental Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

broken brother brown brush bucket building bulb burn burst business but butter button by cake camera can higher history hold hole hollow hook hope horn horse hospital hour house how humour I ice idea if ill

Gall, Juergen

238

Free will and quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple example is provided showing that violation of free will allows to reproduce the quantum mechanical predictions, and that the Clauser-Horne parameter can take the maximum value 4 for a proper choice.

Antonio Di Lorenzo

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Context of Lithium Batteries. J. Power Sources 2006,Horn, Y. High-Power Lithium Batteries from FunctionalizedVanadium Oxides for Lithium Batteries. J. Mater. Chem. 18

Chen, Zheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Sensations: a fabric of natural alcoves to provide relief from city life and stimulate the five senses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cities have always been, and will likely always be, hectic. With every new technological advance this characteristic becomes amplified, and today city life offers little relief from cell phone chatter, honking car horns, ...

Brown, Megan (Megan Francesca)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

catalystnewsletter of the UCSF Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Work with Underserved Children $250K Tilden Gift Funds Pediatric Dental Care Center Donor Bolsters Me by the Horns Physician Names Reasons to Give to Radiology UCSF Celebrates Grand Opening of the Helen Diller

Soloveichik, David

242

FINNIGAN WAY EAST BOULEVARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storage (Future Home of think[box]) Horsburg Wood Sears Tower Robbins Pytte Van Horn Field Wind Turbine Mt Tower Open Fall, 2015 New Residence Hall Storrs Pierce Cutler Hitchcock House 7 House 6 House 5 House 4

Rollins, Andrew M.

243

FINNIGAN WAY EAST BOULEVARD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tower Robbins Pytte Van Horn Field Wind Turbine Mt. Sinai Skills and Simulation Center Jack, Joseph Smith Taft Taplin Clarke Tower Storrs Pierce Cutler Hitchcock House 7 House 6 House 5 House 4 House 3

Rollins, Andrew M.

244

Developing Africa's economy Doing the sums on Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Governments in countries such as Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda are co-operating closely with America almost 2,000 troops in the Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa, based in Panos Page 1 of 6Economist

245

2-21-13http://www.ca.uky.edu/administration/admin_documents.php ORGANIZATIONAL CHART  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sparrow Ms.DebbieDunn DISTRICT 7 Mr. Matt Fulkerson Ms.MargieGeorge-Horning FIELD STAFF DISTRICT 6 Mr ANDTOURISM MANAGEMENT Dr. Kwaku Addo (Interim) Ms.LindaMarshall DIETETICS AND HUMAN NUTRITION Dr. Sandra

Hayes, Jane E.

246

EPR, Bell, GHZ, and Hardy theorems, and quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the theorems of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR), Bell, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ), and Hardy, and present arguments supporting the idea that quantum mechanics is a complete, causal, non local, and non separable theory.

Miguel Socolovsky

2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

247

Canadian Rockies Carnivore Monitoring Project: Examining Trends in Carnivore Populations and their Prey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horne, Al McKeeman, Jen Wasyslyk, Patti Walker, Terry Winkler (Jasper); Harold Abbott, Will Devlin: Cliff White, John Wilmshurst (Parks Canada); Paul Lukacs, Winsor Lowe, Mike Mitchel (U Montana); Marco

Hebblewhite, Mark

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - aythya marila wintering Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 61 Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental Summary: major staging and wintering...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic terns sterna Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hawai'i at Manoa Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 49 Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental Summary: , Pomarine, and Long-tailed Skua,...

250

Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical Modeling Synthesis Update Julius O. Smith III Center for Computer Research in Music. They model wave propagation in distributed media such as strings, bores, horns, plates, and acoustic spaces

Smith III, Julius Orion

251

News & Notes October 8, 2007 Phillip Freeman, BM, 1998, very recently  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lerner, clarinet, Nancy Goodearl, * French horn, Jeffrey Robinson, bassoon with Timothy Hester, piano marks or characters, a photo of the instrument and case, name of your insurance company and type

Azevedo, Ricardo

252

Wasted Wind  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

why turbulent airflows are causing power losses and turbine failures in America's wind farms-and what to do about it April 1, 2014 Wasted Wind This aerial photo of Denmark's Horns...

253

Student Name Advisor Abdellah-El-Hadj, Amine Feng Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hernandez Gaitan, Franz Hugolino Roger Rangel Horne, Jeremy Ryan Hosford, Kyle Scott Samuelsen Hovakimyan Mease Marti Duran, Ferran Derek Dunn-Rankin Mayoral, Salvador Dimitri Papamoschou #12;Mclarty, Dustin

Mease, Kenneth D.

254

Development of High-Capacity Cathode Materials with Integrated...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Shao-Horn, MIT FY10 Technical Accomplishments and Progress Structural Study - X-ray absorption spectroscopy* Oxidation state of Mn is close to +4. Lithium ions in TM layer...

255

Chapter 9 -Forklift Operations Forklift Operations Safety Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or hazardous locations. 19. Operators should not put their fingers, arms, or legs between the uprights that horn, lights, brakes, tires, gas supply, hydraulic lines, etc. are in safe working condition. Employees

256

Coverable functions Petr Kucera,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of clauses needed to represent f by a CNF. ess(f) - maximum number of pairwise disjoint essential sets of implicates of f. A function f is coverable, if cnf(f)=ess(f). #12;Talk outline We already know from Horn functions. X E ess(f) = ess(X) + k #12;CNF Graph For a Horn CNF let be the digraph defined as: N

257

Caribbean Herpetology 50:1-2 www.caribbeanherpetology.orgISSN 2333-2468 caribbean herpetology note  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Caribbean Herpetology 50:1-2 www.caribbeanherpetology.orgISSN 2333-2468 caribbean herpetology carinatus). Caribbean Herpetology 50:1­2. Leiocephalus carinatus (Northern curly-tailed lizard) of the Beach Morning Glory (Ipomoea pescaprae). A B #12;Caribbean Herpetology 50:1-2 www

Johnson, Michele A.

258

A RESISTIVE FORCE MODEL FOR LEGGED LOCOMOTION ON GRANULAR MEDIA*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on granular surfaces like sand and gravel. Understanding the mechanics of legged locomotion on granular media and kinematics, e.g., a bio-inspired robot L-leg rotated through uniform granular media (loosely packed ~ 1 mm including insects, lizards, and mammals encounter granular surfaces like sand and gravel in their natural

Goodisman, Michael

259

Zoology 110 (2007) 28 Microhabitat use, diet, and performance data on the Hispaniolan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hispaniola. Few observations have previously been made of this species in its natural habitat, and few; Dewlap; Hispaniola; West Indies Introduction Anolis lizards of the Caribbean are often cited of Hispaniola, few or no quantitative data are available (Lenart et al., 1997; Cast et al., 2000; Schneider et

Irschick, Duncan J.

260

Ecology 62(3). 1981, pp. 515-521 ( 1981 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR ALTITUDINAL CHANGES IN THE THERMAL ENVIRONMENT BY SOME ANOLIS LIZARDS ON HISPANIOLA' PAUL E. HERTZ2 Abstract. Populations of the Anolis cybotes species group on Hispaniola behaviorally compen- sate shift; Hispaniola. INTRODUCTION Thermal environments change dramatically with al- titude (Mc

Huey, Raymond B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches: Information and Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this insect is pri- marily a food source for larger animals such as lemurs, birds, and lizards. Worldwide mature. Similar to other cockroaches, the MHC is nega- tively phototactic (moves away from light) and hierarchy. Males will establish and defend a territory on a rock or other similar struc- ture for several

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

262

IBM NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER Location: Campus of IBM Research -Zurich in Rschlikon, Switzerland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; photonics; and simulation and theory. #12;SUSTAINABILITY IN THE USE OF NATURAL RESOURCES The new: · Photovoltaic power system · Geothermal heat exchange system · Heat recovery windows and cutting-edge HVAC, sand and earth which will provide a new habitat for a variety of native plants, lizards and insects

263

You have to hand it to the pygmy bluetongue to date,it has quietly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a translocation." Charles Gent A computer model designed to simulate the varying densities of water,and water flow,are particularly important when ASR - which involves injecting excess fresh water,such as storm water of its habitat on the Adelaide Plains by the pressure of urban development, the lizard pulled off

264

MICHELE A. JOHNSON Trinity University, Department of Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MICHELE A. JOHNSON Trinity University, Department of Biology One Trinity Place, San Antonio, Texas 78212 michele.johnson@trinity.edu http://www.trinity.edu/mjohnso9/ EDUCATION 2001-2007 Washington.D. Robinson*, and M.A. Johnson. In press. Leiocephalus carinatus (Northern curly- tailed lizard). Herbivory

Johnson, Michele A.

265

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Phase I study of OM-174, a lipid A analogue, with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Phase I study of OM-174, a lipid A analogue, with assessment Lizard3,5 , Jean-François Jeannin1,4,5 and Marc Bardou1,3,5,7 Abstract Background: Lipids A in turn stimulates secretion of cytokines, and activates the inducible nitric oxide synthase, as well

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

266

Department ID Conversion Chart -Boise State University -Revised 7/01 NEW Dept. ID OLD Dept. ID Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department ID Conversion Chart - Boise State University - Revised 7/01 NEW Dept. ID OLD Dept. ID;Department ID Conversion Chart - Boise State University - Revised 7/01 NEW Dept. ID OLD Dept. ID Description - Cheatgrss 006G106041 00066041 Stat Analysis Grn Strip Mod #9 006G106044 00066044 Threats To Collared Lizards

Barrash, Warren

267

Oecologia (1994) 97:326-332 ORIGINAL PAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone of Africa; P. agamae is sometimes found as a soli- tary malaria species in populations of the rainbow lizard, Agama agama, in West Africa were studied to determine the nature of any interspecific. Mixed infections occurred 2-5 times more often than expected by chance. Parasite density within

Schall, Joseph J.

268

Biodiversity and Conservation 10: 711723, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity and Conservation 10: 711­723, 2001. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed 2000 Abstract. Understanding the impact of agriculture on biodiversity is critical for effective conservation management. Our goal was to determine the impact of agricultural disturbance on the lizard fauna

Glor, Rich

269

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). III. Sexual Segment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrastructure of the Reproductive System of the Black Swamp Snake (Seminatrix pygaea). III. Sexual, Indiana ABSTRACT In mature male snakes and lizards, a distal portion of the nephron is hypertrophied segment of the kidney of a squa- mate, the natricine snake Seminatrix pygaea. Previous workers have

Sever, David M.

270

Supplement 15, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Arthropoda, Mesozoa, Coelenterata, Mollusca, And Annelida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Jean, I962 a, 31, 32 Rennell Island, British Solomon Islands Nel1zina, E. ?.; Danilova, G. M.; and Chernova, N. I., I963 a, k6 Astrakan region Aponomma gervaisi (Lucas) monitor lizard python Aponoflma laeve Neumann ? obra Aquanirmus sp...

Humphrey, Judith M.; Segal, Dorothy B.; Beard, Mary I.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Kirby, Margie D.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Actively controlled vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Passively damped vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

The development of microstrip to dielectric waveguide transitions and beam steering techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dielectric waveguide tapered in y dimension. . 8 Dielectric waveguide tapered in x and y dimensions. 20 9 Transition loss for 521 mm of dielectric waveguide and two standard horn transitions. 22 10 Two new transitions connected simultaneously. 11 Time.... 56 GHz for one transition, one horn, and 521 mm of dielectric waveguide 25 14 Diamond shaped 1'oil. 26 15 Foil shapes derived from narrowing width D. 27 16 Transition loss for two transitions and 521 mm of waveguide with foil widths: a) 15. 88 mm...

Miller, Jeffrey Allen

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Passive millimeter wave differential interference contrast polarimetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Differential polarization imaging systems include an axicon configured to provide a displacement of ray bundles associated with different image patches. The displaced ray bundles are directed to antenna horns and orthomode transducers so as to provide outputs correspond to orthogonal linear states of polarization (SOPs). The outputs are directed to a differential radiometer so that Stokes parameter differences between image patches can be obtained. The ray bundle displacements can be selected to correspond to a mechanical spacing of antenna horns. In some examples, ray bundle displacement corresponds to a displacement less than the diffraction limit.

Bernacki, Bruce E; Kelly, James F; Sheen, David M; Tedeschi, Jonathan R; Hall, Thomas E; Hatchell, Brian K; Valdez, Patrick; McMakin, Douglas L

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

275

NuSTORM {\\mu} Ring -- Design and Injection Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of the NuSTORM muon production beam line and storage ring is discussed. The facility includes a pion production target station with a pion collection horn and transport into a straight section of a storage ring. {\\pi} decay within that straight section provides {\\mu}'s that are stored within the ring for subsequent decay providing precision electron and muon neutrino beams. The ring and transport designs are described and optimized. Genetic Algorithm optimization of the horn and transport into the ring has been performed, providing a significant increase in intensity

Neuffer, David; Bross, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Computational power of correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the intrinsic computational power of correlations exploited in measurement-based quantum computation. By defining a general framework the meaning of the computational power of correlations is made precise. This leads to a notion of resource states for measurement-based \\textit{classical} computation. Surprisingly, the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt problems emerge as optimal examples. Our work exposes an intriguing relationship between the violation of local realistic models and the computational power of entangled resource states.

Janet Anders; Dan E. Browne

2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reproductive strategies and natural history of the arboreal Neotropical vesper mouse, Nyctomys sumichrasti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, based on mass, is variable but most females are parous by 60 g. Litter size is small with a mode of 2 and embryos are not evenly distributed across the uterine horns. Vesper mice exhibit striking morphological differences in terms of tooth-wear...

Romero, Andrea; Timm, Robert M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ann. Geophys., 25, 801814, 2007 www.ann-geophys.net/25/801/2007/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany 6Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse, France 7Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland 8Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA an energy-dispersed and a disper- sionless injection were observed by Cluster crossing the plasma sheet horn

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

279

275-2 Determination of loud, disturbing and unnecessary noise. [Added 8-15-1968; amended 2-2-1984  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the vicinity. F. Exhausts. The discharge into the open air of the exhaust of any stationary internal combustion; the use of any horn, whistle or other device operated by engine exhaust; and the use of any such signaling engine or motor vehicle except through a muffler or other device which will effectively prevent loud

Marsh, David

280

Detecting odorous compounds emitted from building and consumer products within the European Project SysPAQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detecting odorous compounds emitted from building and consumer products within the European Project.horn@bam.de Keywords: Olfactory detection port, VOC analysis, Thermal extraction, Building material, Consumer products Introduction In 2006 the European research project Innovative Sensor System for Measuring Perceived Air Quality

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

*** In Press at Cognition 1/16/2011 *** The Paradox of Moral Focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phillips3 1 Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2 Department * Young and Phillips contributed equally to this manuscript. Address correspondence to Liane Young, Van Horn, Grafton, & Sinnott-Armstrong, 2006; Cushman, 2008; Malle, 2006; Mikhail, 2007; Young

Knobe, Joshua

282

Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit WTS Transportation YOU CTS Research Conference May 21, 2014 Lisa Rasmussen, WTS / Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc #12;Transportation YOU 2013 DC Youth SummitTransportation YOU 2013 DC Youth Summit Agenda What is Transportation YOU? Transportation YOU ­ WTS Local Chapter

Minnesota, University of

283

Water Vapor Radiometry : Outline of Goals and Tasks for the Spring Semester 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that can accu­ rately measure the spectrum of the water vapor emis­ sion. The current receivers follow, as in a conventional re­ ceiver, the correlation receiver splits the rf signal into two with a splitter that follows the feed horn. Both branches are mixed with a carefully controlled ther­ mal load. A 180 ffi phase shift

Backer, Don

284

Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Lifetime Limitations: The Role of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions, load profiles, and type of electrocatalyst on the performance degradation, and ­ Determine-Horn ­ Massachusetts Institute of Technology Paulo Ferreira ­ University of Texas at Austin Dane Morgan ­ University systems to achieve the DOE lifetime targets. Technical Targets ­ Durability with cycling 5,000 hours (

285

Project: Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Horn Massachusetts Institute of Technology Rachel O'Malley, David Thompsett, Sarah Ball, Graham Hard Johnson Matthey metal loading: 0.2 mgPGM /cm2 (cathode) ( 0.3 mgPGM /cm2 both electrodes) Activity (PGM catalysts): 0 - Method for depositing smooth, uniform Pt MLs Intensity profiles from the scan lines in (a) and (b) (open

286

Trinity (for Expanded Orchestra)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F Pno. (roll-off Gtr. 1 Gtr. 2 mi jiji u. volume) "f f" " JJ J J (P) j L p 4j Bs. lU-g mi J pizz. J , J J (P) p.81/260y r? y F Horns ? R LJ TO/ "MIó _ j y BB Tpts. y Tbns. y Tba.

Winokur, Robert Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Summary report: The shadow effect of large wind farms: measurements,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary report: The shadow effect of large wind farms: measurements, data analysis and modelling of large wind farms Department: Wind Energy RisÝ-R-1615(EN) July 2007 ISSN 0106-2840 ISBN 978 of the project ≠ by means of data from the demonstration wind farms Horns Rev and Nysted, analyses of these data

288

Review report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Review report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm Demonstration Project: Horns Rev and Nysted Offshore Wind Farms Environmental impact assessment and monitoring Prepared for The Environmental Group By Elsam Engineering and ENERGI E2 October 2005 #12;- 2 - Review Report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm

289

LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights Alfredo Pe√Īa1 , Sven at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm. The influence of atmospheric stability on the surface layer wind shear: Charnock, LiDAR, Marine boundary layer, Offshore, Surface layer, Wind profile. 1 Introduction There is

290

Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying Offshore Wind Resources from Satellite Wind Maps: Study Area the North Sea C. B National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Offshore wind resources are quantified from satellite synthetic site at Horns Rev is given based on satellite SAR observa- tions.The comparison of offshore satellite

Pryor, Sara C.

291

Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms Annual Report 2004 Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Published: May 2005 Prepared by: Christian B. Hvidt Lars Br√ľnner Frank Reier without clear reference to the source. #12;Hydroacoustic monitoring of fish communities in offshore wind

292

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HISTORIES AT MAHIAO AND MAHANAGDONG SECTOR OF LEYTE GEOTHERMAL PRODUCTION FIELD, PHILIPPINES J.D. Villacorte1 , R.C.M. Malate1 and R. N. Horne2 1 Energy Development Corporation, Energy Center, Merritt Road function for measuring well-to-well connectivity index is defined as: = = n j jiii txf n I 1 ))(( 1 (2

Stanford University

293

Experimental Evidence for Quark-Hadron Duality in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REGIONS Bloom & Gilman, PRL 25 (1970) 1140; PR D4 (1971) 290 The smooth scaling curve measured in DIS; jR A jR (s; t) Dolen, Horn & Schmid, PRL 19 (1967) 402; PR 166 (1968) 1768 Veneziano, Nuovo Cimento resonant contributions to cross section Harari, PRL 20 (1968) 1395 In inclusive electron scattering

294

Quark-Hadron Duality and Q 2 evolution of the GDH integral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DUALITY = RELATION BETWEEN DIS AND RESONANCE REGIONS Bloom & Gilman, PRL 25 (1970) 1140; PR D4 (1971) 290 t #6; res A res (s; t) #25; #6; jR A jR (s; t) Dolen, Horn & Schmid, PRL 19 (1967) 402; PR 166 (1968, including both resonant and non resonant contributions to cross section Harari, PRL 20 (1968) 1395

295

ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton GIT 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2011 3 Ultrasonic Welding Plastic Metal Anvil Horn Materials being welded and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2011 27 Brazing Uses · Join dissimilar materials ­ repairing metal parts;ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2011 2 Overview · Welding

Colton, Jonathan S.

296

Lynette Adams Stephanie Bushey Georgiana Adkisson Hannah Butcher  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Christopher Clark Margaret Beson Lauren Cocco Alexandra Beswerchij John Collins Randolph Blitchok Katherine Buitrago Meredith Dobbs Brandon Burbank John Domol Rachel Burgess Megan Drabant FALL 2012 DEAN'S LIST #12;E Shelby Frendscho Samuel Horning Jessica Frey Philip Howell Shanna Fry Joshuel Frye I Maria Idunate G

Cinabro, David

297

FALL 2011 DEAN'S LIST A Nicole Butler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duvall #12;FALL 2011 DEAN'S LIST E H John Eickhoff Michael Haas Nicole Eley Christopher Hall Kierstin Fountain Jordan Holland April Fox Timothy Holmer Jessica Frey Wilson Holoweski Samuel Horning G Shannon Guerrero Ian Gulland #12;FALL 2011 DEAN'S LIST K Lejdi Malo Keri Kahn Heather Marks John Kalogerakos

Berdichevsky, Victor

298

Power-Aware Routing in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Suesh Singh and Mke Woo C. S. Mghavendra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in energy con- sumption obtained by using PAMAS, our MAC layer pr- tocol). Furthermore, using these new) or Wow insurance companies to tie claims horn the field. Building such ad hoc networks poses to be energy conserving so that battery fife is maximized. Several technologies are being developed to achieve

Han, Richard Y.

299

MINUTES OF THE CIVIL ENGINEERING ACADEMY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINUTES OF THE CIVIL ENGINEERING ACADEMY April 8, 2006 Present: Lauren D. GarduŮo, Civil Engineering Academy Chair, Jayaraman Sivakumar, R. Panneer Selvam, Burton Clifton, Jim Brewer, Rick Horn Engineering Academy convened Saturday, April 8, 2006. Lauren GarduŮo, chair, called the meeting to order at 8

Gelfond, Michael

300

The Road Map For Regional Coordinated Public Transportation West Texas/El Paso Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; leaving the majority of the remote communities without any public transportation. There is more frequent Greyhound service along the I-10 corridor in the northern part of the region, but that service is limited to Van Horn, leaving even the I-10...

West Texas/El Paso Regional Coordinated Transportation Planning Coalition

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

TARGET STATION INFRASTRUCTURE THE CNGS EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aluminum Water cooled Current: 150kA (horn) ­ 180 kA (reflector) Pulse duration 7ms #12;Key elements Remote handling Remote station for radiation survey in the target chamber #12;CNGS Target Area I per cooling circuit 2007 run radiation effects on ventilation system electronics broken flexible stripline

McDonald, Kirk

302

2007NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemethods Higher-energy C-trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be efficiently fragmented by high-accuracy and full-mass-range tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) via higher-energy©2007NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemethods Higher-energy C-trap dissociation Horning2 & Matthias Mann1 Peptide sequencing is the basis of mass spectrometry­driven proteomics. Here we

Cai, Long

303

July 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 7 BioScience 651 The profusion of fruit sizes, shapes, colors, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by wind.Such ques- tions can still be iterated for tens of thousands of plant species from Cape Horn of magnitude greater, but still minuscule. Processes of survival and mortality determine plant fate in space with immense mortality is to calculate the likelihood of transitions among life stages,from seed to seedling

Howe, Henry F.

304

Report to ELSAM August 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the wind turbines on sandeel predation mortality was not evaluated in this report, due to a lackReport to ELSAM August 2004 Final report Sandeels in the wind farm area at Horns Reef Compiled designed to analyse the effect, if any, of the construction of a wind farm on sandeels in the area

305

Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction Lukasz Hubert Kocewiak, Jesper Hjerrild, Claus Leth Bak ABSTRACT HE impact of a wind farm's internal structures on harmonic in this paper. The largest wind farms in the world, Horns Rev 2 Offshore Wind Farm and Polish Karnice Onshore

Bak, Claus Leth

306

Psychological Review Copyright 1991 by the American Psychological Assoeiation~ Inc. 199I, Vol.98, No. 4, 569-603 0033-295X/91/$3.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, No. 4, 569-603 0033-295X/91/$3.00 The How and Why of What Went Where in Apparent Motion: Modeling as the construction of useful representations about the world (e.g.,Horn, 1986; Marr, 1976,1982; Ullman, 1979

Dawson, Michael

307

An early date for cattle from Namaqualand, South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An early date for cattle from Namaqualand, South Africa: implications for the origins of herding did cattle come to South Africa? Radiocarbon dates on a newly found cow horn indicates a time, the authors favour immigrants moving along a western route through Namibia. Keywords: South Africa

308

HonorsConvocation TexasTechUniversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Engineering Dr. Sindee Simon Horn Professor Chemical Engineering Dr. Al Sacco Jr. Todd Knowlton Tech University International Cultural Center Auditorium Edward E.WhitacreJr. College of Engineering Dr. Al Sacco Jr. Dean,Whitacre College of Engineering RECOGNITION OF SCHOLARS Honorary Engineering

Gelfond, Michael

309

1 Edoardo Airoldi Harvard University 2 Mark Alber University of Notre Dame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University 31 Rong Chen Rutgers University 32 Duan Chen Michigan State University 33 Zhan Chen Michigan state Mary Ann Horn National Science Foundation 75 Langhua Hu Michigan state university 76 He Huang Purdue1 Edoardo Airoldi Harvard University 2 Mark Alber University of Notre Dame 3 Edward Allen Wake

Levy, Doron

310

UNCORRECTEDPROOF CACE 3222 19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vertical cylinder where gas23 continuously enters at the bottom, raises upward, and exits the24 cylinder average 48 net velocities. Then, such an equilibrium state is described by 49 chemical concentrations of equilibria in models of flue gas washer plants3 Wolfgang Desch, Karin Horn, Georg Propst4 Institut f

Propst, Georg

311

Use of Low-Frequency Sonic Devices for Control of Deposits in Boilers and Precipitators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evaluated at more than 50 sites in the U.S., and at many more in Europe, where the technology originated. This paper describes five industrial applications of the horns to solve operating problems in varied industries. The applications discussed include...

Baker, D. A.; Schwartz, J. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Complexity and Expressive Power of Logic Programming EVGENY DANTSIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, IL, USA THOMAS EITER, GEORG GOTTLOB Vienna University of Technology, Austria AND ANDREI VORONKOV with function symbols. Next to classical results on plain logic programming (pure Horn clause programs), more of Computer Science and Telecommunica- tions, 430 South Michigan Ave, Chicago, IL 60605, USA; email: edantsin

Dantsin, Evgeny

313

Tower Society LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 William S. Cortright  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charles W. Parkhurst 1894 Lawrence C. Brink John Jacob Frank 1895 Franklin Baker C. Kemble Baldwin Mary 1898 Frank Breckenridge Bell Natt M. Emery, Sr. E. D. Hillmann Harold J. Horn L. S. Horner Jacob B. Krause Victor C. Records Benjamin Dewitt Riegel 1899 Eugene G. Grace Charles R. Hinchman Roy R. Hornor

Napier, Terrence

314

Tower Society LEHIGH UNIVERSITY 1 William S. Cortright  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breckenridge Bell Natt M. Emery, Sr. E. D. Hillmann Harold J. Horn L. S. Horner Jacob B. Krause Victor C. Records Benjamin Dewitt Riegel 1899 Eugene G. Grace Charles R. Hinchman Roy R. Hornor 1900 George C and Wheaton Douglass Grace and Burton Hartley Elizabeth and Walter Nevius 1913 Harold R. Blackman Jacob

Gilchrist, James F.

315

William S. Cortright Annie and Robert Mitchell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Brink John Jacob Frank James E. Hughes 1895 Franklin Baker, Jr. C. Kemble Baldwin Mary and Robert Okeson 1898 Edward D. Hillman Harold J. Horn Leonard S. Horner Jacob B. Krause Victor C. Records Benjamin Dewitt Riegel 1899 Eugene G. Grace Charles R. Hinchman Roy R. Hornor 1900 George C. Coutant Alan C

Napier, Terrence

316

William S. Cortright Annie and Robert Mitchell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Parkhurst 1894 Lawrence C. Brink John Jacob Frank James E. Hughes 1895 Franklin Baker, Jr. C. Kemble Baldwin Breckenridge Bell John A. Fisher 1898 Edward D. Hillman Harold J. Horn Leonard S. Horner Jacob B. Krause Victor C. Records Benjamin Dewitt Riegel 1899 Eugene G. Grace Charles R. Hinchman Roy R. Hornor 1900 George

Napier, Terrence

317

Artful Adventures Arts of Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of daily life and moved around with people. For this reason, most African art is three figure made by an Igbo sculptor. Ikenga figures represent power and the accomplishments of an individual on his head? Ikenga figures are always shown with horns, symbols of power and aggression. This artist has

318

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplment au n" 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-142 Magnetic neutron scattering on intermetallic uranium compounds (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutron scattering on intermetallic uranium compounds (*) M. Loewenhaupt (f ), S. Horn (**), F. Steglich.- Abstract. -- We report on inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed in the temperature range 5 K quasielastic line. Using thermal neutrons, no inelastic contributions to the magnetic scattering could

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

319

BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY ORIGINAL RESEARCH Testing the role of patch openness as a causal mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords Habitat fragmentation √Ā Grassland bird √Ā Stress √Ā Tipping point √Ā Wind energy Introduction Area for predicting effects of habitat management or development, such as adding wind turbines, in open habitat' territory (Robbins et al. 1989; Horn and Koford 2006). Despite a long history of documenting area

Reed, Michael

320

Current Fire Extinguisher Colour Codes (UK) Fire extinguishers meeting BS EN3 are manufactured with a red body and have a band of a second colour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Straw, Textiles, Coal etc. Class B Fires Flammable Liquids i.e.: Petrol, Diesel, Oils, Paraffin etc identification easier for the user. DO NOT HOLD THE HORN WHEN OPERATING Use on: wood, paper, textiles, liquid and electrical fires. Powder Use on: wood, paper, textiles and liquid fires. Foam Use on: liquid and electrical

Guo, Zaoyang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Bryan H. Wood Assistant Deputy Commandant of the Marine Corps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stations throughout the world and for the operating forces across the U.S. Marine Corps. Mr. Wood advisor to the Commander, Combined Joint Task Force- Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) in Djibouti, Africa. Mr as the Environmental Law Section Head and Senior Associate Counsel (Environment/ Safety), Naval Sea Systems Command

322

HOW TO REACH THE URI NARRAGANSETT BAY CAMPUS From Connecticut, New York,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA/NMFS/Northeast Fisheries 19 Ocean Technology Center/RI Seagrant/ Equipment Development Laboratory/Central Receiving 10 Horn Laboratory 11 Maintenance Building 12 Marine Ecosystems Research Laboratory (MERL) 13 a left onto South Ferry Rd. Once on South Ferry Road: Continue past South Ferry Industrial Park

Rhode Island, University of

323

5/10/10 7:27 AMExtreme caution required in Gulf Oil-spill clean up: Berkeley expert Page 1 of 8http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/world-news/extreme-caution-required-in-gulf-oil-spill-clean-up-berkeley-expert_100358851.html  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.bayrestorators.com Hazardous Waste Transportation and Disposal 24/7 Spill Response 800.988.4424 www.HCIENV.com Wonder-required-in-gulf-oil-spill-clean-up-berkeley-expert_100358851.html Monday Legendary singer Lena Horne dies aged 92 Angela Kaye Mason Prince Harry Earns Wings

Hazen, Terry

324

Evaporation/ Solution Droplet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Nano-Catalysts · Fine Powders · Spray Drying MoO3 As prepared initially. After thermal annealing at 350oC. Hollow Spheres and Crystals 1st Hollow Crystals! Cooling bath Titanium Horn Collar & O-Rings Gas Production of Nano-Materials microporous shell internal macropores Hierarchically Porous Carbons Brandon Ito

Suslick, Kenneth S.

325

Control of a wind park with doubly fed induction generators in support of power system stability in case of grid faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and is already applied in large wind parks as e.g. the Danish offshore wind park Horns Rev. The attractivenessControl of a wind park with doubly fed induction generators in support of power system stability@re.tu-darmstadt.de Abstract The paper presents a control strategy for wind parks based on the doubly fed induction generator

326

TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

327

20 y 50 y 500 y Geological characterization of the TEEP study area is based on the examination of two deep wells,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological characterization of the TEEP study area is based on the examination of two deep by 360 km2) structural basin, bounded by the Big Horn Mountains and Casper Arch on the west, Miles City to the south, located in northeast Wyoming and eastern The Two Elk Energy Park (TEEP) is a commercialscale

Stanford University

328

A study on the air permeability as affected by compression of three French soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by changing the soil structure and the physical properties of soils. It changes the mechanical strength, water of the changes in soil mechanical strength, aeration and hydraulic properties (Horn et al., 1995; Kozlowski, 19991 A study on the air permeability as affected by compression of three French soils Anh Minh Tang 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

The tribe Acanthocinini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) of America north of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, p. 6,9; Syst. Ceramb., l861j., p. 3!?!?. Lacordaire, Gen. Col., IX, 1872, p. 7!?9, 762. Leng and Hamilton, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., XXIII, 1896, p. ll?. Lagochirus Erichson. LeConte, Smiths. Misc. Coll., XI (265) 1873, p. 337. Horn, Trans. Amer..., ....................... ....... .......................It Characteristics of the Tribe................ .............. .....? Morphological Features.......... ........................... . . . . 6 Phraseology.................................................... 9 Summary...

Dillon, Lawrence S.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 #12 Evaluation of Cavitation Resistance of Type 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Using a Vibratory Horn," J. Nucl Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source," Oak Ridge National

McDonald, Kirk

331

Material Irradiation Damage Studies at BNL BLIP N. Simos and H. Kirk, BNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e., various graphite grades, carbon composites, low-Z composites such as AlBeMet, super-alloys) · mechanical-Up addressing Oxidation/Volumetric Change (i.e., tantalum) 1100 deg. C 625 deg. C 20 deg. C #12;Irradiation, temperature and aggressively corrosive environment effect on Ni film with aluminum substrate (NuMI horn

McDonald, Kirk

332

JOBS? Raising Expectations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Carl Van Horn at the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, J. Bloustein School of Planning Services & Workforce Division NGA Center for Best Practices MARCH 2011 #12;ii NGA CENTER | DEgREES fOR Wha, Human Services & Workforce Division of the NGA Center for Best Practices (NGA Center); Maria Heidkamp

Thaxton, Christopher S.

333

Ark-Tex Area Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KFH GROUP, INC. ARK-TEX AREA REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for: ARK-TEX COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS By: KFH Group, Incorporated In Association with: Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc.................................................................................................................................1 PLAN PROCESS .............................................................................................................................2 REVIEW OF EXISTING SERVICES...

Ark-Tex Council of Governments

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

News & Notes Marcus Maroney won first prize in the inaugural  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Association (CODA) Composition Competition. Maroney's orchestral work, The Ever-Fixed Mark, was selected from Rian Craypo, guest bassoon Colin Gatwood, guest English horn Timothy Hester, piano Works by Gaubert director Jeremy Justeson, guest alto saxophone Andrzej Grabiec, violin Tim Hester, piano Jeffrey Lerner

Azevedo, Ricardo

335

CX-012356: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lovell-Yellowtail No. 1 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Culvert Replacement Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/01/2014 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

336

Dr. Yoram Tal Color Blindness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A females likes them dark. If she mates with one and finds another with a darker breast, she'll bolt. "For bigger horns or giant tusks -- serves to indicate overall suitability for reproduction. The dark red on Keeping Control of Web New 'Biological' Robots Build Themselves People Respond to Computer's Flattery

Turkel, Eli

337

Report on the University of Kansas PRISM Research Group Activities at the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and collected data on sensor and control system performance for autonomous rover operation on the ice sheet-surface layer mapping radar was installed in one of the NGRIP tracked vehicles and connected to two horn antennas mounted on either side of the vehicle. We collected data while at a few selected spots

Kansas, University of

338

Publications on Population Peer-Reviewed Articles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- population nexus in the East African Horn: emerging degradation trends in rangeland and pastoral livelihood zones. Global Environmental Change 23 (6), 1525-1541. Davis J., López-Carr D. (2014) Migration) initiatives work? Evidence from WWF-sponsored projects in Africa and Asia.Proceedings of the International

Lopez-Carr, David

339

Large and Small (Far and Near) Liquid Argon Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutrino experiments Rich follow-up physics at accelerators and reactors. Parameter Atmos. Solar Accel;The Neutrino Horn Issue for Superbeams · 2-4 MW proton beams are achieved in BNL, CERN and FNAL). · = 1.4 g/cm3 , T = 89K at 1 atm., X0 = 14 cm, int = 80 cm. · A minimum ionizing particle yields 50

McDonald, Kirk

340

Oxford University Press 2005 1 Text Mining and Information Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Oxford University Press 2005 1 Text Mining and Information Extraction Novel Unsupervised Feature Filtering of Biological Data Roy Varshavsky1,* , Assaf Gottlieb2 , Michal Linial3 and David Horn2 1 School developed for selecting small informative feature subsets in large noisy data. However, unsuper- vised

Horn, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Comparing the Use of Tangible and Graphical Programming Languages for Informal Science Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Michael S. Horn, Erin T. Solovey, R. Jordan Crouser, Robert J.K. Jacob 161 College Ave. Tufts University.crouser}@tufts.edu, jacob@cs.tufts.edu ABSTRACT Much of the work done in the field of tangible interaction has focused are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full

Jacob, Robert J.K.

342

Annual status report 2003 to Elsam Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rev and Nysted Offshore Wind Farms In the Local Communities Compiled by Susanne Kuehn ECON Analyse of the socio-economic project on the local communities' reception of the Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm, west of Blaavands Huk in Jutland, and the Nysted Offshore Wind Farm, south of Lolland. The project is part

343

Memo 2005-044 Annual report 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

report 2004 Sociological Investigation of the Reception of Nysted Offshore Wind Farm Table of Contents: 1 Offshore Wind Farm 1 Introduction This annual report presents the work related to the sociological part wind farms: Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm, west of Blaavands Huk in Jutland, and Nysted Offshore Wind

344

Ris Energy Report 5 Technical challenges to energy systems' operation and markets 55 A future energy system that includes a high propor-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wind power plants Large wind farms such as the 160 MW Horns Rev and the 165 MW Nysted offshore wind farms in Denmark are connected to the transmission system, in that sense these wind farms are comparable power in the wind. since there are no fuel savings the cost reduction of a wind farm is very limited

345

Wind direction Charlotte Bay Hasager, Morten Nielsen and Merete Bruun Christiansen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. At this site a large offshore wind farm (80 2MW-turbines) is in operation. The study includes spatial analysis offshore meteorological observations collected within the wind farm. Focus of the case study.hasager@risoe.dk Quantitative remote sensing: Horns Rev wind farm case study Abstract Observations from ERS-2 SAR

346

Ris-R-Report 12MW: final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm deploying a lidar and a sodar on the transformer platform. The observed the scientific basis relevant for the next generation of huge 12 MW wind turbines operating offshore. The project data were successfully compared to offshore mast data and the wind profile was extended 100 m above

347

Status of the flora and fauna on the Nevada Test Site, 1988. Results of continuing basic environmental monitoring, January--December 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1987 the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program to monitor the health of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) plants and animals in support of the National Environmental Protection Act. The program, part of DOE`s Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program (BECAMP), monitors perennial and ephemeral plants, the more common species of rodents and lizards, and the horses, deer, raptors and other large animals on the NTS. This is a report of data collected on these flora and fauna for the year 1988, the second year of monitoring.

Hunter, R.B. [comp.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Efficient multiparty quantum secret sharing of secure direct communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we present an (n, n) threshold quantum secret sharing scheme of secure direct communication using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The present scheme is efficient in that all the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states used in the quantum secret sharing scheme are used to generate shared secret messages except those chosen for checking eavesdropper. In our scheme, the measuring basis of communication parties is invariable and the classical information used to check eavesdropping needs only the results of measurements of the communication parties. Another nice feature of our scheme is that the sender transmit her secret messages to the receivers directly and the receivers recover the sender's secret by combining their results, different from the QSS scheme whose object is essentially to allow a sender to establish a shared key with the receivers. This feature of our scheme is similar to that of quantum secret direct communication.

Jian Wang; Quan Zhang; Chao-jing Tang

2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Vibration welding system with thin film sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

350

Suite for Wind Ensemble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flugelhorn Horns 1 & 2 Horns 3 & 4 Trombones 1 & 2 Trombone 3 Bass Trombone Euphoniums 1 & 2 Tubas String Bass Timpani Percussion 1 Percussion 2 Percussion 3 Percussion 4 mf Andante misterioso q = 84 8 11 p pp mf p pp mf mf pp mf pp mf p pp mf p pp mf mf pp... mf pp mf p mf pesante pp p mf pesante pp pp mf mf pp mf mf pesante pp mf pesante pp mf mp pesante pp mp pesante pp mp p mp Andante misterioso q = 84 8 11 pp mp p mp pp 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4...

Oliver, Theodore

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Community College Student First Year Fall to Fall Persistence: Experiences of Successful First-Time-In-College Hispanics at a Predominately Hispanic Student Community College in the South Texas/Mexico Border Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In addition, I would like to thank Angie for your encouragement and willingness to listen when I needed a vii friendly ear. Special thanks also go to Lenny for serving as a recorder during the focus group sessions. The acknowledgements would... such that it is increasingly dependent on college- educated workers? (Gandara, Horn, & Orfield, 2005, p. 255). This fact was reinforced with President Obama?s (2009) announcement of The American Graduation Initiative. On July 14, 2009, President Obama announced his goal...

Canales, Luzelma

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

352

Session: Reservoir Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

FYI: January 7, 1982 - June 24, 1982  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the operation of the Art Library where two Research Assistant positions are currently filled from shrinkage but which were, by previous agreement, to be permanent. Another was concerned with the possibility of filling or not filling a vacant position... the building is closed, because it involves shutting off all power, checking emergency lighting, sirens, buzzers, blinkers, horns, door-closers, brakes, ejection seats and parachutes. If you think of that as another normal day in the Circulation Department...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Original article Uterine blood flow in sows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and severing of the left oviduct (LIG), and a group undergoing right hysteroovariectomy (HHO). They were (4.8, 8.3 and 16.9 in the LIG, CTR and HHO groups, respectively), variation of litter size in the CTR and HHO sows (1.22 to 2.84 and 1.09 to 2.63 L.min≠1.horn≠1, respectively). It was more closely

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

355

Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

Michael Wilson 5400 words 16 Colchester Avenue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-framed spec- tacles, and the lenses drooped onto his broad cheekbones. At his side he carried a small, 1 #12 settled the black case into a hollow next to Alan's French horn. He did this so gently, it might have been to fall at the end, as if what he'd said were a wonder. My son Alan is seventeen. He's played the French

Wilson, J. Michael

357

Soil Fumigation for Plant Disease Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satisfactory results were secured wikh xylene, ethylene dichloride, sodium cyanide and formaldehyde. Paper impregnated wit11 hoof-and-horn glue, casein glue, or vegetttble paste, and adequately sealed at the edges, was most satisfactory for con- fining... of a system of electrically heated units in the plant bed or soil box has been developed. Liquid soil drenches with disinfecting chemicals such as mercuric chlo- ride, formaldehyde, various organic mercury compounds, cyanide compounds, sulphuric...

Young, P. A. (Paul Allen); Godfrey, G. H. (George Harold)

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Comparative feeding biomechanics and behavioral performance of feeding in the family kogiidae and tursiops truncatus (odontoceti, cetacea)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with mammalian suction feeding (Thexton et al. 1998, Werth 2000b). Fishes exploit their dense environment to draw prey into the mouth by rapid hyoid depression, cranial 10 elevation and/or opercular expansion (e.g., Lauder 1985, Edmonds et al... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Christopher D. Marshall Committee Members, Daniel F. Cowan Markus Horning Jane M. Packard Raymond J. Tarpley Head of Department, Robert D. Brown May 2006...

Bloodworth, Brian Edward

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell. 5 figs.

Nelson, R.T.; Middleton, M.G.

1983-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

360

Newsfront 26 March - 1 April 2007, Issue 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-horned rhinoceros; wild water buffalo, tiger, as well as several large birds such as vultures, storks and hornbills, Ang Phuri Sherpa , country coordinator of the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund (CEPF) told newsfront. The Eastern Himalayas, one of the 34 global... , the UN General Assembly adopted principles and guidelines on discrimination against people affected by leprosy and their families. Eleven top leading personalities of the world including former US President Jimmy Carter, Nobel Peace prize laureate Dalai...

Ghimire, Yubaraj

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Kitkahahki Chipped Stone Technologies: A Comparative Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the countless hours spent at the site or in the lab. Special thanks go to Richard Gould, Site Curator, Pawnee Indian Village Museum, for his never-ending hospitality, encouragement, and enthusiasm. Also, Nick Kessler and Andrew Gottsfield both provided me.... Emily Williams, Jordan Jennings, and Mark Volmut have all donated their time and suggestions towards this project. To all of you, I am grateful. Special thanks go to Jimmy Horn and the Pawnee Nation. His interactions, oral histories...

Asher, Brendon Patrick

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Announcement The editorial staff of Fishery Bulletin would like to thank the following referees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Patricia M. Clay Dr. V. G. Cockcroft Dr. Mark R. Collins Dr. Steven H. Coombs Dr. James H. Cowan Dr. J. R. H. Hesslein Dr. F. Hester Dr. Michael H. Horn Dr. Gene R. Huntsman Mr. S. E. Hutchinson Dr. James. Guy Martel Dr. John C. McGovern Dr. Alasdair D. McIntyre Dr. Mark E. McMaster Dr. Robert H. Mc

363

West Texas Rain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Water Commission, Culberson County Underground Water District and county officials to install a 2,500-gallon rainwater harvesting tank at the Culberson County Courthouse. West Texas Rain Rainwater harvesting demonstration sites save water and money... (Above Left) One of the three rainwater harvesting demonstrations is located at the Culberson County Courthouse in Van Horn. This 2,500-gallon tank has been installed to catch and store the rainwater. (Above Right) Landscape irrigation using...

Supercinski, Danielle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins -1 and -3, and Hydroxysteroid (11-Beta) Dehydrogenase One: Potential Roles in Ruminant Conceptus Development and Endometrial Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

illustration of the pre-attachment, apposition, and adhesion stages of superficial implantation in sheep ........................ 10 2.4 Interferon tau (IFNT) signaling in the ovine endometrium............... 15 2.5 Hypothesis on the roles... to elongate to a filamentous form that can reach 25 cm or more in length within a few days (Wales & Cuneo 1989). The entire uterine horn ipsilateral to the CL is occupied by Days 16 to 18 in sheep and Days 19 to 21 in cattle. 6 Fig...

Simmons, Rebecca M.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

Plotkin, M.

1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

366

Sequence and batch language programs and alarm-related ``C`` programs for the 242-A MCS. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, ``242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades``. This control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme which uses special programs, annunciator keys, and process graphics. The special programs are written in two languages; Sequence and Batch Language (SABL), and ``C`` language. The WTSE-developed alarm scheme works as described below: SABL relates signals and alarms to the annunciator keys, called SKID keys. When an alarm occurs, a SABL program causes a SKID key to flash, and if the alarm is of yellow or white priority then a ``C`` program turns on an audible horn (the D/3 system uses a different audible horn for the red priority alarms). The horn and flashing key draws the attention of the operator.

Berger, J.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS FOR PRECISE MEASURMENTS OF OSCILLATION PARAMETERS AND SEARCH FOR N MU YIELDS N EPSILON.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators started a neutrino working group to identify new opportunities in the field of neutrino oscillations and explore how our laboratory facilities can be used to explore this field of research. The memo to the working group and the charge are included in Appendix I. This report is the result of the deliberations of the working group. Previously, we wrote a letter of intent to build a new high intensity neutrino beam at BNL. A new intense proton beam will be used to produce a conventional horn focused neutrino beam directed at a detector located in either the Homestake mine in Lead, South Dakota at 2540 km or the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM at 2880 km. As a continuation of the study that produced the letter of intent, this report examines several items in more detail. We mainly concentrate on the use of water Cherenltov detectors because of their size, resolution, and background rejection capability, and cost. We examine the prospects of building such a detector in the Homestake mine. The accelerator upgrade will be carried out in phases. We expect the first phase to yield a 0.4 MW proton beam and the second phase to result in a 1.0 MW beam. The details of this upgrade will be reported in a companion report. In this report we assume accelerator intensity of 1 MW for calculating event rates and spectra. We also assume a total experimental duration of 5 years with running time of 10{sup 7} seconds per year. We examine the target station and the horn produced neutrino beam with focus on two topics: target and horn design for a 1 MW beam and the broad band spectrum of neutrinos from a 28 GeV proton beam.

DIWAN,M.; MARCIANO,W.; WENG,W.; BEAVIS,D.; BRENNAN,M.; CHEN,M.C.; FERNOW,R.; ET AL

2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

An Entangled Web of Crime: Bell's Theorem as a Short Story  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-locality of the type first elucidated by Bell in 1964 is a difficult concept to explain to non-specialists and undergraduates. Here we attempt this by showing how such non-locality can be used to solve a problem in which someone might find themselves as the result of a collection of normal, even if somewhat unlikely, events. Our story is told in the style of a Sherlock Holmes mystery, and is based on Mermin's formulation of the "paradoxical" illustration of quantum non-locality discovered by Greenberger, Horne and Zeilinger.

Kurt Jacobs; Howard Wiseman

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Newsfront 19-25 November 2007, Issue 41  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

major investment by mandating UNMIN out of their concern to see sustained peace in Nepal want to make sure that UNMIN is as effective as possible in supporting the peace process. This Martin locks horn with PM Tussle is why I have been frank in my... that proved that their coalition and consen- sus was only a facade. What do Nepali people want now? Conflict among parties, unrest and selfish leaders? The answer is a big no. Nepali people want the politics of consensus and a favourable environ- ment for CA...

Ghimire, Yubaraj

370

Facies analyses and environment of deposition for the Jurassic "A" zone of the "Mulussa" (Dolaa) Group, in the Homs block, Syria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Figure 2). The first well, Salamieh ?1, was drilled to a depth of 3759. 8 meters and penetrated 1493 meters of Jurassic rocks, encountering untested oil shows in both the Triassic and Jurassic sections. The second well, Cheriffe ?2, was drilled to a... R D A N H JURASSIC OUTCROP 0 200 km l20 mi Figure 2- Location map of the Horns block, with wells and Jurassic outcrops (shaded pattern) . meters of Jurassic rocks, encountering a condensate discovery from an 81 meter interval within...

Quintana, Miguel Alfredo

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Skid-Steer Loader Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in either direction [29 CFR 1926.602(a)(9)(i)]. ? Scissor points on all front-end loaders, which constitute a hazard to the operator during normal operation, shall be guarded [29 CFR 1926.602(a)(10)]. ? End-loader buckets and similar equipment shall... Belts for Construction Equipment (J386-1969) [29 CFR* 1926.602(a)(2)]. ? All bidirectional machines shall be equipped with a horn, distinguishable from the surround- ing noise level, which shall be operated as needed when the machine is moving...

Smith, David

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ultrasonic drilling apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

373

Ultrasonic drilling apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation.

Duran, Edward L. (Santa Fe, NM); Lundin, Ralph L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Overview of the recent operation of the AAC and LEAR for the low-energy antiproton physics programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reviews the recent performance of the AAC and LEAR. Activities on the AAC include the successful exploitation of a magnetic horn as an antiproton collector lens and an energy-saving mode of operation, which has been possible since 1992, when LEAR became the only client of the AAC. LEAR worked in its full momentum range between 100 MeV/c and 2 GeV/c, with perform-ance (intensities, ejection modes and spill length) exceeding the design specifications. Improvements are described, which contributed to the quality of the beam delivered to experiments. The reliability and availability of the antiproton machines are also discussed.

Baird, S A; Caspers, Friedhelm; Chanel, M; Chohan, V; Eriksson, T; Ley, R; Maury, S; Metzger, C; MŲhl, D; Mulder, H; Pedersen, F; Tranquille, G

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Inheritance of the maroon color in Brasilia-derived carrots (Daucus carota L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that in some way helped me with my research, and my thanks goes to every one of them for helping me clean every carrot, make every cross, and the many other small tasks involved in managing two generations of carrots. Roger Horn and Travis Faske, both... research associates, helped me manage my carrot breeding lines from planting to harvest, and their guidance, help, and suggestions were of incalculable value. My appreciation for help rendered also goes to Dr. Kil Sun Yoo, who provided guidance...

Mes, Peter Jack

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Maximal tripartite entanglement between singlet-triplet qubits in quantum dots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Singlet-triplet states in double quantum dots are promising realizations of qubits, and capacitive coupling can be used to create entanglement between these qubits. We propose an entangling three-qubit gate of singlet-triplet qubits in a triangular setup. Our simulations using a realistic microscopic model show that a maximally entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state can be generated as the qubits are evolved under exchange. Furthermore, our analysis for the gate operation can be used to extract the actual experimental pulse sequence needed to realize this.

Tuukka Hiltunen; Ari Harju

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

377

Erection of a New Onchobothriid Genus (Cestoda: Tetraphyllidea) and the Description of Five New Species from Whaler Sharks (Carcharhinidae)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), collected with hook and line near oil rig MO-990 (29u58958.200N, 88u36916.800W), Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico, in June 2006; 1 male specimen (174 cm TL) of C. brevipinna, collected with hook and line off the southwest end of Horn Island (30u13920.720N, 88u47913..., the remainder of the worm was prepared as a whole-mount, as described above. Sections were prepared as follows: terminal proglottids or tissue were embedded in paraffin and sectioned at 5Ė8 mm intervals using an Olympus CUT4060 retracting rotary micro- tome...

Caira, J.N.; Jensen, Kirsten

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Large scale EPR correlations and cosmic gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how quantum correlations survive at large scales in spite of their exposition to stochastic backgrounds of gravitational waves. We consider Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) correlations built up on the polarizations of photon pairs and evaluate how they are affected by the cosmic gravitational wave background (CGWB). We evaluate the quantum decoherence of the EPR correlations in terms of a reduction of the violation of the Bell inequality as written by Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt (CHSH). We show that this decoherence remains small and that EPR correlations can in principle survive up to the largest cosmic scales.

B. Lamine; R. Hervť; M. -T. Jaekel; A. Lambrecht; S. Reynaud

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Smith plan, Texas frontier defense in the 1850's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, " consisted of Forts Brown, Ringgold, McIntosh, Duncan, and Bliss. The primary mission of these posts was to protect the international border and, as a secondary mission, do whatever possible to interdict Indians and 7 renegades moving between Texas... companies of the Third Infantry Regiment under the command of Brevet Major Jefferson Van Horn. The post at El Paso was named Fort Bliss in March, 1854, in honor of Brevet Major William W. Bliss, who died the 16 preceeding year. Fort Bliss was the second...

Frysinger, Victor Francis

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Quantum and classical separability of spin-orbit laser modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we investigate the quantum noise properties of polarization vortices in connection with an intensity based Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality for their spin-orbit separability. We evaluate the inequality for different input quantum states and the corresponding intensity fluctuations. The roles played by coherence and photon number squeezing provide a suitable framework for characterizing pure state spin-orbit entanglement. Structural inseparability of the spin-orbit mode requires coherence, an issue concerning either classical or quantum descriptions. In both cases, it can be witnessed by violation of this intensity based CHSH inequality. However, in the quantum domain, entanglement requires both coherence and reduced photon number fluctuations.

L. J. Pereira; A. Z. Khoury; K. Dechoum

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

KT Monograph Black and White Photos 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D5:2 - 672: neck and handle of Red Lustrous Wheel-made ware pilgrim flask D6:1 - 693-698: Pilgrim flasks and other storage vessels from Rm 20 destruc- tion debris D5:3 - Interiors of libation arm fragments from unit 4211, to show manu- facturing... and 1595 E2:12 - 1532: perforated clay disc E2:14 -1596: decorated clay ball E2:15 - 1623: re-used sherd with incised design E2:17 - 1625: horned clay support E2:16 - 1624: Ottoman pipe bowl E2:18 - 1627: clay spit support E2:19 - clay crescents 1634...

Douglas, B; Densham, M; Thomas, D C; Postgate, J N

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Monogamy inequality in terms of negativity for three-qubit states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose an entanglement measure to quantify three-qubit entanglement in terms of negativity. A monogamy inequality analogous to the Coffman-Kundu-Wootters inequality is established. This consequently leads to a definition of residual entanglement, which is referred to as the three-{pi} in order to distinguish it from the three-tangle. The three-{pi} is proved to be a natural entanglement measure. By contrast to the three-tangle, it is shown that the three-{pi} always gives greater than zero values for pure states belonging to the W and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger classes, implying that three-way entanglement always exists for them; the three-tangle generally underestimates the three-way entanglement of a given system. This investigation will offer an alternative tool to understand genuine multipartite entanglement.

Ou, Y.-C.; Fan Heng [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Semi-analytical methods for the analysis and interpretation of well test data distorted by wellbore storage and skin effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the sandface, p, o(to), as follows: Model Psn(to) Description I a (Constant) Constant Model ato ap + aitp Linear Model-Zero Intercept Linear Model-General 4 apexp(attn) Exponential Model ap+ a, to+ a', to' Quadratic Model The advantage of our approach...~D(tD) for a Homogeneous Reservoir (tD/(CDp D(tD)) Format). p~D(tD) Computed Using 2 PD(tD) 0 i D 2D Type Curve Plot of p~D(tD) for a Homogeneous Reservoir. p~D(tD) Computed Using the Fenske-Horne Model Type Curve Plot of p cD'(tD) for a Homogeneous...

Prachumchon, Sompong

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Te (R,t) Measurements using Electron Bernstein Wave Thermal Emission on NSTX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) routinely studies overdense plasmas with ne of (1Ė5) X 1019 m-3 and total magnetic field of <0.6 T, so that the first several electron cyclotron harmonics are overdense. The electrostatic electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in overdense plasmas, exhibits strong absorption, and is thermally emitted at electron cyclotron harmonics. These properties allow thermal EBW emission to be used for local Te measurement. A significant upgrade to the previous NSTX EBW emission diagnostic to measure thermal EBW emission via the oblique B-X-O mode conversion process has been completed. The new EBW diagnostic consists of two remotely steerable, quad-ridged horn antennas, each of which is coupled to a dual channel radiometer. Fundamental (8Ė18 GHz) and second and third harmonic (18Ė40 GHz) thermal EBW emission and polarization measurements can be obtained simultaneously.

Diem, S J; Efthimion, P C; LeBlanc, B P; Carter, M; Caughman, J; Wilgen, J B; Harvey, R W; Preinhaelter, J; Urban, J

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

Forcey, Greg, M.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast. Final report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an extension of its efforts in the development of the geopressured resources of the Gulf Coast, the Division of Geothermal Energy of the US Department of Energy is interested in determining the extent and characteristics of geopressured occurrences in areas outside the Gulf Coast. The work undertaken involved a literature search of available information documenting such occurrences. Geopressured reservoirs have been reported from various types of sedimentary lithologies representing virtually all geologic ages and in a host of geologic environments, many of which are unlike those of the Gulf Coast. These include many Rocky Mountain basins (Green River, Big Horn, Powder River, Wind River, Uinta, Piceance, Denver, San Juan), Mid-Continent basins (Delaware, Anadorko, Interior Salt, Williston, Appalachian), California basins (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura, Coast Ranges), Alaskan onshore and offshore basins, Pacific Coast offshore basins, and other isolated occurrences, both onshore and offshore.

Strongin, O.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system -- all with corresponding radiation shielding -- was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

Rakhno, Igor L; Tropin, Igor S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Design of a Doppler reflectometer for KSTAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Doppler reflectometer has been designed to measure the poloidal propagation velocity on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It has the operating frequency range of V-band (50-75 GHz) and the monostatic antenna configuration with extraordinary mode (X-mode). The single sideband modulation with an intermediate frequency of 50 MHz is used for the heterodyne measurement with the 200 MHz in-phase and quadrature (I/Q) phase detector. The corrugated conical horn antenna is used to approximate the Gaussian beam propagation and it is installed together with the oversized rectangular waveguides in the vacuum vessel. The first commissioning test of the Doppler reflectometer system on the KSTAR tokamak is planned in the 2014 KSTAR experimental campaign.

Lee, K. D., E-mail: kdlee@nfri.re.kr; Nam, Y. U.; Seo, Seong-Heon; Kim, Y. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

Larsen, David A. (Clifton Park, NY); Bacchi, David P. (Schenectady, NY); Connors, Timothy F. (Watervliet, NY); Collins, III, Edwin L. (Albany, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Susskind, Leonard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tripartite entanglement in qudit stabilizer states and application in quantum error correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consider a stabilizer state on n qudits, each of dimension D with D being a prime or squarefree integer, divided into three mutually disjoint sets or parts. Generalizing a result of Bravyi et al.[J. Math. Phys. 47, 062106 (2006)] for qubits (D=2), we show that up to local unitaries, the three parts of the state can be written as tensor product of unentangled signle-qudit states, maximally entangled Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs, and tripartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. We employ this result to obtain a complete characterization of the properties of a class of channels associated with stabilizer error-correcting codes, along with their complementary channels.

Looi, Shiang Yong; Griffiths, Robert B. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Petrology and origin of three rock outcrops off the Texas continental shelf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

&&pic' of sai&dst one I r&iiti I:c 98 f . it ho!a 1&i!011 i!ei. & . "I iidl cd v!1 th thc scanning cl&ictr&in micro. :cope, They showed tliai the c&m&ent is gencra11y pc!i pl!yro'ol;&st i c?with eel & its rhombo!!Cd] ol;s growing within th&. . iaicrocr Petal...'I OP FlGUIIKS I ocation of the 88, 98 ?and 99 f aI horn lu&oils PAGI. Bathymetrv of the area of thc three I-. nol7 s, and the location of sparker profiIe A-A' Grain size an, . lysis of the sandstone from the 98 fathom knoll 12 Hcavv minerals...

Harber, Dale Lynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

ER=EPR, GHZ, and the Consistency of Quantum Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper illustrates various aspects of the ER=EPR conjecture.It begins with a brief heuristic argument, using the Ryu-Takayanagi correspondence, for why entanglement between black holes implies the existence of Einstein-Rosen bridges. The main part of the paper addresses a fundamental question: Is ER=EPR consistent with the standard postulates of quantum mechanics? Naively it seems to lead to an inconsistency between observations made on entangled systems by different observers. The resolution of the paradox lies in the properties of multiple black holes, entangled in the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger pattern. The last part of the paper is about entanglement as a resource for quantum communication. ER=EPR provides a way to visualize protocols like quantum teleportation. In some sense teleportation takes place through the wormhole, but as usual, classical communication is necessary to complete the protocol.

Leonard Susskind

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

394

Post-Selection Loophole-Free Bell Test over an Installed Optical Fiber Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Device-independent (DI) quantum communication will require a loophole-free violation of Bell inequalities. In typical scenarios where line-of-sight between the communicating parties is not available, it is convenient to use energy-time entangled photons due to intrinsic robustness while propagating over optical fibers. Here we show an energy-time Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality violation with two parties separated by 3.7 km over the deployed optical fiber network belonging to the University of Concepci\\'on in Chile. Remarkably, this violation is free of the post-selection loophole affecting all previous in-field long-distance energy-time experiments. Our work takes a further step towards a fiber-based loophole-free Bell test, which is highly desired for secure quantum communication due to the widespread existing telecommunication infrastructure.

Carvacho, Gonzalo; Saavedra, Gabriel; Cuevas, Ńlvaro; Fuenzalida, Jorge; Toledo, Felipe; Figueroa, Miguel; Cabello, AdŠn; Larsson, Jan-Ňke; Mataloni, Paolo; Lima, Gustavo; Xavier, Guilherme B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

More efficient Bell inequalities for Werner states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the nonlocal properties of two-qubit Werner states parameterized by the visibility parameter 0Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality. This answers a question posed by Gisin in the positive, i.e., there exist Bell inequalities which are more efficient than the CHSH inequality in the sense that they are violated by a wider range of two-qubit Werner states.

T. Vťrtesi

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

Correlation properties of entangled multiphoton states and Bernstein's paradox  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A normally ordered characteristic function (NOCF) of Bose operators is calculated for a number of discrete-variable entangled states (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) and Werner (W) qubit states and a cluster state). It is shown that such NOCFs contain visual information on two types of correlations: pseudoclassical and quantum correlations. The latter manifest themselves in the interference terms of the NOCFs and lead to quantum paradoxes, whereas the pseudoclassical correlations of photons and their cumulants satisfy the relations for classical random variables. Three- and four-qubit states are analyzed in detail. An implementation of an analog of Bernstein's paradox on discrete quantum variables is discussed. A measure of quantumness of an entangled state is introduced that is not related to the entropy approach. It is established that the maximum of the degree of quantumness substantiates the numerical values of the coefficients in multiqubit vector states derived from intuitive considerations.

Chirkin, A. S., E-mail: aschirkin@rambler.ru; Belyaeva, O. V., E-mail: lisenok.msu@gmail.com; Belinsky, A. V., E-mail: belinsky@inbox.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Deepwater Horizon Disaster: What Happened and Why  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deepwater Horizon disaster was the largest oil spill in US history, and the second largest spill in the world. 11 men lost their lives in the explosion and fire. Although the impacts of the spill were evident to large numbers of people, its causes were harder to see. This lecture will focus on the technical aspects of the events that led to the spill itself: what happened on the rig before, during and after the event, up to the time the rig sank. As with many engineering disasters, the accident was due to a sequence of failures, including both technical systems and procedural issues. Although the causes were complex and interacting, the lecture will focus on four main problems: (1) the failure of the cement and casing seal, (2) the failure to recognize and respond to hydrocarbon flow into the riser, (3) the ignition of hydrocarbons on the rig, and (4) the failure of the blow-out preventer (BOP) to seal the well. The lecture will conclude with some suggestions as to how events such as the Deepwater Horizon disaster can be avoided in the future. (Roland N. Horne is the Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, and was the Chairman of Petroleum Engineering from 1995 to 2006. He holds BE, PhD and DSc degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, all in Engineering Science. Horne is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and is also an Honorary Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers.)

Horne, Roland N. (Stanford University) [Stanford University

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

399

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 6Ė4 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the oceanĖatmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010Ė2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Naval Petroleum Reserves in California site environmental report for calendar year 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary for Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) is divided into NPR-1 and NPR-2. Monitoring efforts at NPR-1 include handling and disposal of oilfield wastes; environmental preactivity surveys for the protection of endangered species and archaeological resources; inspections of topsoil stockpiling; monitoring of revegetated sites; surveillance of production facilities for hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions; monitoring of oil spill prevention and cleanup; and monitoring of wastewater injection. No major compliance issues existed for NPR-1 during 1989. Oil spills are recorded, reviewed for corrective action, and reported. Environmental preactivity surveys for proposed projects which may disturb or contaminate the land are conducted to prevent damage to the federally protected San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Tipton kangaroo rat and the giant kangaroo rat. Projects are adjusted or relocated as necessary to avoid impact to dens, burrows, or flat-bottomed drainages. A major revegetation program was accomplished in 1989 for erosion control enhancement of endangered species habitat. The main compliance issue on NPR-2 was oil and produced water discharges into drainages by lessees. An additional compliance issue on NPR-2 is surface refuse from past oilfield operations. 17 refs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

Tillman, Jack B.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Endangered species program Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In FY94, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to conserve endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 400 preactivity surveys covering approximately 315 acres were conducted in FY94. Mitigation measures implemented as a result of survey findings resulted in avoidance of incidental takes of listed species during construction activities. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. Third-party projects in FY94 included three pipeline projects and two well abandonment/clean-up projects. Cultural resource support provided to NPRC consisted primarily of conducting preliminary surveys for cultural resources, and preparing a Cultural Resource Management Plan and Programmatic Agreement for NPR-1. These two documents will be finalized in FY95. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY94, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was initiated to assess reclamation efficacy. Results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In addition to this effort, 347 reclaimed sites were assessed to evaluate reclamation success.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

407

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

Auty, David John; /Sussex U.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Quantum metrology from a quantum information science perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarise important recent advances in quantum metrology, in connection to experiments in cold gases, trapped cold atoms and photons. First we review simple metrological setups, such as quantum metrology with spin squeezed states, with Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, Dicke states and singlet states. We calculate the highest precision achievable in these schemes. Then, we present the fundamental notions of quantum metrology, such as shot-noise scaling, Heisenberg scaling, the quantum Fisher information and the Cramer-Rao bound. Using these, we demonstrate that entanglement is needed to surpass the shot-noise scaling in very general metrological tasks with a linear interferometer. We discuss some applications of the quantum Fisher information, such as how it can be used to obtain a criterion for a quantum state to be a macroscopic superposition. We show how it is related to the the speed of a quantum evolution, and how it appears in the theory of the quantum Zeno effect. Finally, we explain how uncorrela...

Toth, Geza

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

State preservation by repetitive error detection in a superconducting quantum circuit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum computing becomes viable when a quantum state can be preserved from environmentally-induced error. If quantum bits (qubits) are sufficiently reliable, errors are sparse and quantum error correction (QEC) is capable of identifying and correcting them. Adding more qubits improves the preservation by guaranteeing increasingly larger clusters of errors will not cause logical failure - a key requirement for large-scale systems. Using QEC to extend the qubit lifetime remains one of the outstanding experimental challenges in quantum computing. Here, we report the protection of classical states from environmental bit-flip errors and demonstrate the suppression of these errors with increasing system size. We use a linear array of nine qubits, which is a natural precursor of the two-dimensional surface code QEC scheme, and track errors as they occur by repeatedly performing projective quantum non-demolition (QND) parity measurements. Relative to a single physical qubit, we reduce the failure rate in retrieving an input state by a factor of 2.7 for five qubits and a factor of 8.5 for nine qubits after eight cycles. Additionally, we tomographically verify preservation of the non-classical Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state. The successful suppression of environmentally-induced errors strongly motivates further research into the many exciting challenges associated with building a large-scale superconducting quantum computer.

J. Kelly; R. Barends; A. G. Fowler; A. Megrant; E. Jeffrey; T. C. White; D. Sank; J. Y. Mutus; B. Campbell; Yu Chen; Z. Chen; B. Chiaro; A. Dunsworth; I. -C. Hoi; C. Neill; P. J. J. O'Malley; C. Quintana; P. Roushan; A. Vainsencher; J. Wenner; A. N. Cleland; John M. Martinis

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

Logic gates at the surface code threshold: Superconducting qubits poised for fault-tolerant quantum computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum computer can solve hard problems - such as prime factoring, database searching, and quantum simulation - at the cost of needing to protect fragile quantum states from error. Quantum error correction provides this protection, by distributing a logical state among many physical qubits via quantum entanglement. Superconductivity is an appealing platform, as it allows for constructing large quantum circuits, and is compatible with microfabrication. For superconducting qubits the surface code is a natural choice for error correction, as it uses only nearest-neighbour coupling and rapidly-cycled entangling gates. The gate fidelity requirements are modest: The per-step fidelity threshold is only about 99%. Here, we demonstrate a universal set of logic gates in a superconducting multi-qubit processor, achieving an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 99.92% and a two-qubit gate fidelity up to 99.4%. This places Josephson quantum computing at the fault-tolerant threshold for surface code error correction. Our quantum processor is a first step towards the surface code, using five qubits arranged in a linear array with nearest-neighbour coupling. As a further demonstration, we construct a five-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state using the complete circuit and full set of gates. The results demonstrate that Josephson quantum computing is a high-fidelity technology, with a clear path to scaling up to large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum circuits.

R. Barends; J. Kelly; A. Megrant; A. Veitia; D. Sank; E. Jeffrey; T. C. White; J. Mutus; A. G. Fowler; B. Campbell; Y. Chen; Z. Chen; B. Chiaro; A. Dunsworth; C. Neill; P. O`Malley; P. Roushan; A. Vainsencher; J. Wenner; A. N. Korotkov; A. N. Cleland; John M. Martinis

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Storage of hyperentanglement in a solid-state quantum memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two photons can simultaneously share entanglement between several degrees of freedom such as polarization, energy-time, spatial mode and orbital angular momentum. This resource is known as hyperentanglement, and it has been shown to be an important tool for optical quantum information processing. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of photonic hyperentanglement in a solid-state quantum memory. A pair of photons entangled in polarization and energy-time is generated such that one photon is stored in the quantum memory, while the other photon has a telecommunication wavelength suitable for transmission in optical fibre. We measured violations of a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality for each degree of freedom, independently of the other one, which proves the successful storage and retrieval of the two bits of entanglement shared by the photons. Our scheme is compatible with long-distance quantum communication in optical fibre, and is in particular suitable for linear-optical entanglement purification for quantum repeaters.

Alexey Tiranov; Jonathan Lavoie; Alban Ferrier; Philippe Goldner; Varun B. Verma; Sae Woo Nam; Richard P. Mirin; Adriana E. Lita; Francesco Marsili; Harald Herrmann; Christine Silberhorn; Nicolas Gisin; Mikael Afzelius; Felix Bussieres

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

Method and apparatus for optimized sampling of volatilizable target substances  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for capturing, from gases such as soil gas, target analytes. Target analytes may include emanations from explosive materials or from residues of explosive materials. The apparatus employs principles of sorption common to solid phase microextraction, and is best used in conjunction with analysis means such as a gas chromatograph. To sorb target analytes, the apparatus functions using various sorptive structures to capture target analyte. Depending upon the embodiment, those structures may include a capillary tube including an interior surface on which sorptive material (similar to that on the surface of a SPME fiber) is supported (along with means for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the sorptive material). In one disclosed embodiment, at least one such sorptive structure is associated with an enclosure including an opening in communication with the surface of a soil region potentially contaminated with buried explosive material such as unexploded ordnance. Emanations from explosive materials can pass into and accumulate in the enclosure where they are sorbed by the sorptive structures. Also disclosed is the use of heating means such as microwave horns to drive target analytes into the soil gas from solid and liquid phase components of the soil.

Lindgren, Eric R.; Phelan, James M.

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

414

Method and apparatus for optimized sampling of volatilizable target substances  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for capturing, from gases such as soil gas, target analytes. Target analytes may include emanations from explosive materials or from residues of explosive materials. The apparatus employs principles of sorption common to solid phase microextraction, and is best used in conjunction with analysis means such as a gas chromatograph. To sorb target analytes, the apparatus functions using various sorptive structures to capture target analyte. Depending upon the embodiment, those structures may include 1) a conventional solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber, 2) a SPME fiber suspended in a capillary tube (with means provided for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the suspended fiber), and 3) a capillary tube including an interior surface on which sorptive material (similar to that on the surface of a SPME fiber) is supported (along with means for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the sorptive material). In one disclosed embodiment, at least one such sorptive structure is associated with an enclosure including an opening in communication with the surface of a soil region potentially contaminated with buried explosive material such as unexploded ordnance. Emanations from explosive materials can pass into and accumulate in the enclosure where they are sorbed by the sorptive structures. Also disclosed is the use of heating means such as microwave horns to drive target analytes into the soil gas from solid and liquid phase components of the soil.

Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Molecular gas in nearby powerful radio galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of CO(1-0) and CO(2-1) emission from the central region of nearby 3CR radio galaxies (z$gas content is below 10$^9$ \\msun. Their individual CO emission exhibit, for 5 cases, a double-horned line profile that is characteristic of an inclined rotating disk with a central depression at the rising part of its rotation curve. The inferred disk or ring distributions of the molecular gas is consistent with the observed presence of dust disks or rings detected optically in the cores of the galaxies. We reason that if their gas originates from the mergers of two gas-rich disk galaxies, as has been invoked to explain the molecular gas in other radio galaxies, then these galaxies must have merged a long time ago (few Gyr or more) but their remnant elliptical galaxies only recently (last 10$^7$ years or less) become active radio galaxies. Instead, we argue the the cannibalism of gas-rich galaxies provide a simpler explanation for the origin of molecular gas in the elliptical hosts of radio galaxies (Lim et al. 2000). Given the transient nature of their observed disturbances, these galaxies probably become active in radio soon after the accretion event when sufficient molecular gas agglomerates in their nuclei.

S. Leon; J. Lim; F. Combes; D. Van-Trung

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

An estimate of the error caused by the elongation of the wavelength in a focused beam in free-space electromagnetic parameters measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pair of spot-focusing horn lens antenna is the key component in a free-space measurement system. The electromagnetic constitutive parameters of a planar sample are determined using transmitted and reflected electromagnetic beams. These parameters are obtained from the measured scattering parameters by the microwave network analyzer, thickness of the sample, and wavelength of a focused beam on the sample. Free-space techniques introduced by most papers consider the focused wavelength as the free-space wavelength. But in fact, the incident wave projected by a lens into the sample approximates a Gaussian beam, thus, there has an elongation of the wavelength in the focused beam and this elongation should be taken into consideration in dielectric and magnetic measurement. In this paper, elongation of the wavelength has been analyzed and measured. Measurement results show that the focused wavelength in the vicinity of the focus has an elongation of 1%Ė5% relative to the free-space wavelength. Elongation's influence on the measurement result of the permittivity and permeability has been investigated. Numerical analyses show that the elongation of the focused wavelength can cause the increase of the measured value of the permeability relative to traditionally measured value, but for the permittivity, it is affected by several parameters and may increase or decrease relative to traditionally measured value.

Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, En, E-mail: lien@uestc.edu.cn; Guo, Gaofeng; Xu, Jiadi; Wang, Chao [School of Electronic Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 611731 (China)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

417

Current status of the LBNE neutrino beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab. The facility is designed to aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined by an amalgam of the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. The LBNE Neutrino Beam has made significant changes to the initial design through consideration of numerous Value Engineering proposals and the current design is described.

Moore, Craig Damon; Crowley, Cory Francis; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Lundberg, Byron; Marchionni, Alberto; McGee, Mike; Mokhov, Nikolai V; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Plunkett, Rob; Reitzner, Sarah Diane; Stefanik, Andrew M; Velev, Gueorgui; Williams, Karlton; Zwaska, Robert Miles

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Design of the LBNE Beamline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a wide band beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, about 1,300 km away. The main elements of the facility are a primary proton beamline and a neutrino beamline. The primary proton beam (60 -120 GeV) will be extracted from the MI-10 section of Fermilab's Main Injector. Neutrinos are produced after the protons hit a solid target and produce mesons which are sign selected and subsequently focused by a set of magnetic horns into a 204 m long decay pipe where they decay mostly into muons and neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account the physics goals, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~1.2 MW, however the facility is desi...

Papadimitriou, V; Hylen, J; Kobilarcik, T; Marchionni, A; Moore, C D; Schlabach, P; Tariq, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

SIMULATION OF A WIDE-BAND LOW-ENERGY NEUTRINO BEAM FOR VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present simulations of a wide-band low-energy neutrino beam for a future very long baseline neutrino oscillation (VLBNO) program using the proton beam from the Main Injector (MI) proton accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). The target and horn designs previously developed for Brookhaven Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) VLBNO program are used without modifications. The neutrino flux distributions for various MI proton beam energies and new high-intensity neutrino beam-line designs possible at Fermilab are presented. The beam-line siting and design parameters are chosen to match the requirements of an on-axis beam from Fermilab to one of the two possible sites for the future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL). A preliminary estimate of the observable event rates and spectra at a detector located in DUSEL for different beam configurations has been performed. Our preliminary conclusions are that a 40-60 GeV 0.5 to 1 MW beam from the Fermilab Main Injector to a DUSEL site has the potential to reach the desired intensity for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. Recent studies indicate that the Fermilab MI can reach a beam power of 0.5 MW at 60 GeV with incremental upgrades to the existing accelerator complex.

BISHAI, M.; HEIM, J.; LEWIS, C.; MARINO, A.D.; VIREN, B.; YUMICEVA, F.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Optical Nonlinearities and Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-dimensional semiconductors have attracted great interest due to the potential for tailoring their linear and nonlinear optical properties over a wide-range. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NC's) represent a class of quasi-zero-dimensional objects or quantum dots. Due to quantum cordhement and a large surface-to-volume ratio, the linear and nonlinear optical properties, and the carrier dynamics in NC's are significantly different horn those in bulk materials. napping at surface states can lead to a fast depopulation of quantized states, accompanied by charge separation and generation of local fields which significantly modifies the nonlinear optical response in NC's. 3D carrier confinement also has a drastic effect on the energy relaxation dynamics. In strongly confined NC's, the energy-level spacing can greatly exceed typical phonon energies. This has been expected to significantly inhibit phonon-related mechanisms for energy losses, an effect referred to as a phonon bottleneck. It has been suggested recently that the phonon bottleneck in 3D-confined systems can be removed due to enhanced role of Auger-type interactions. In this paper we report femtosecond (fs) studies of ultrafast optical nonlinearities, and energy relaxation and trap ping dynamics in three types of quantum-dot systems: semiconductor NC/glass composites made by high temperature precipitation, ion-implanted NC's, and colloidal NC'S. Comparison of ultrafast data for different samples allows us to separate effects being intrinsic to quantum dots from those related to lattice imperfections and interface properties.

Klimov, V.; McBranch, D.; Schwarz, C.

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Insect GDNF:TTC fusion protein improves delivery of GDNF to mouse CNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With a view toward improving delivery of exogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to CNS motor neurons in vivo, we evaluated the bioavailability and pharmacological activity of a recombinant GDNF:tetanus toxin C-fragment fusion protein in mouse CNS. Following intramuscular injection, GDNF:TTC but not recombinant GDNF (rGDNF) produced strong GDNF immunostaining within ventral horn cells of the spinal cord. Intrathecal infusion of GDNF:TTC resulted in tissue concentrations of GDNF in lumbar spinal cord that were at least 150-fold higher than those in mice treated with rGDNF. While levels of immunoreactive choline acetyltransferase and GFR{alpha}-1 in lumbar cord were not altered significantly by intrathecal infusion of rGNDF, GDNF:TTC, or TTC, only rGDNF and GDNF:TTC caused significant weight loss following intracerebroventricular infusion. These studies indicate that insect cell-derived GDNF:TTC retains its bi-functional activity in mammalian CNS in vivo and improves delivery of GDNF to spinal cord following intramuscular- or intrathecal administration.

Li, Jianhong; Chian, Ru-Ju; Ay, Ilknur; Kashi, Brenda B.; Celia, Samuel A.; Tamrazian, Eric [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)] [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Pepinsky, R. Blake [BiogenIdec, Inc., 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States)] [BiogenIdec, Inc., 14 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Fishman, Paul S. [Research Service, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) [Research Service, Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Brown, Robert H. [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)] [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Francis, Jonathan W., E-mail: jwfrancisby@gmail.com [Cecil B. Day Laboratory for Neuromuscular Research, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

422

Loss-tolerant hybrid measurement test of CHSH inequality with weakly amplified N00N states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although our understanding of Bell's theorem and experimental techniques to test it have improved over the last 40 years, thus far all Bell tests have suffered at least from the detection or the locality loophole. Most photonic Bell tests rely on inefficient discrete-outcome measurements, often provided by photon counting detection. One possible way to close the detection loophole in photonic Bell tests is to involve efficient continuous-variable measurements instead, such as homodyne detection. Here, we propose a test of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality that applies photon counting and homodyne detection on weakly amplified two-photon N00N states. The scheme suggested is remarkably robust against experimental imperfections and suits the limits of current technology. As amplified quantum states are considered, our work also contributes to the exploration of entangled macroscopic quantum systems. Further, it may constitute an alternative platform for a loophole-free Bell test, which is also important for quantum-technological applications.

Falk TŲppel; Magdalena Stobi?ska

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of a Dispatchable PV Peak Shainv System. PV: Bonus Program - Phase 1 Report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Delmarva Power and Light and its subcontractors in Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy's PV:BONUS Program. The purpose of the program is to develop products and systems for buildings which utilize photovoltaic (N) technology. Beginning with a cooperative research effort with the University of Delaware's Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research Delmarva Power developed and demonstrated the concept of Dispatchable PV Peak Shaving. This concept and the system which resulted horn the development work are unique from other grid-connected PV systems because it combines a PV, battery energy storage, power conversion and control technologies into an integrated package. Phase 1 began in July 1993 with the installation of a test and demonstration system at Delmarva's Northern Division General Office building near Newark, Delaware. Following initial testing throughout the summer and fall of 1993, significant modifications were made under an amendment to the DOE contract. Work on Phase 1 concluded in the early spring of 1995. Significant progress towards the goal of commercializing the system was made during Phase 1, and is summarized. Based on progress in Phase 1, a proposal to continue the work in Phase 2 was submitted to the US DOE in May 1995. A contract amendment and providing funds for the Phase 2 work is expected in July 1995.

None

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Method and apparatus for reducing range ambiguity in synthetic aperture radar  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system with reduced sensitivity to range ambiguities, and which uses secondary receiver channels to detect the range ambiguous signals and subtract them from the signal received by the main channel. Both desired and range ambiguous signals are detected by a main receiver and by one or more identical secondary receivers. All receivers are connected to a common antenna with two or more feed systems offset in elevation (e.g., a reflector antenna with multiple feed horns or a phased array with multiple phase shift networks. The secondary receiver output(s) is (are) then subtracted from the main receiver output in such a way as to cancel the ambiguous signals while only slightly attenuating the desired signal and slightly increasing the noise in the main channel, and thus does not significantly affect the desired signal. This subtraction may be done in real time, or the outputs of the receivers may be recorded separately and combined during signal processing.

Kare, Jordin T. (San Ramon, CA)

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Status of the Design of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota, about 1300 km away. The neutrinos are produced as follows: First, protons extracted from the MI-10 section of the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target above grade and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into a 200 m long decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the modelling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW in order to enable the facility to run with an upgraded accelerator complex. We discuss here the status of the design and the associated challenges.

Andrews, R.; Chen, A.Z.; Childress, S.C.; Moore, C.D.; Papadimitriou, V.; /Fermilab; Campbell, M.R.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Baseline avian use and behavior at the CARES wind plant site, Klickitat County, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a literature review on avian-wind turbine interactions and the results of a one-year avian baseline study conducted in 1998 at the proposed Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) wind development site in Klickitat County, Washington. Avian use of the site ranged from 1.11/survey in the winter to 5.69/survey in the spring. Average use by passerines in the study plots ranged from 1.15 minutes/survey in the winter to 40.98 minutes/survey in the spring. Raptors spent much less time within plots than other groups, ranging from 0.05 minutes/survey in the winter to 0.77 minutes/survey during the fall. Thirteen percent of all flying birds were within the rotor-swept height (25 to 75 m); 41.6% of all raptors were flying at this height. Raptors with the greatest potential turbine exposure are red-tailed hawks and golden eagles. Passerines with the highest turbine exposure are common ravens, American robins, and horned larks. Spatial use data for the site indicate that avian use tends to be concentrated near the rim, indicating that placing turbines away from the rim may reduce risk. Avian use data at the CARES site indicate that if a wind plant is constructed in the future, avian mortality would likely be relatively low.

Erickson, W.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Strickland, M.D.; Kronner, K.; Becker, P.S.; Orloff, S.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

427

Tripartite entanglement transformations and tensor rank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the nature of multipartite entanglement is a central mission of quantum information theory. To this end, we investigate the question of tripartite entanglement convertibility. We find that there exists no easy criterion to determine whether a general tripartite transformation can be performed with a nonzero success probability and in fact, the problem is NP-hard. Our results are based on the connections between multipartite entanglement and tensor rank (also called Schmidt rank), a key concept in algebraic complexity theory. Not only does this relationship allow us to characterize the general difficulty in determining possible entanglement transformations, but it also enables us to observe the previously overlooked fact that {\\em the Schmidt rank is not an additive entanglement measure}. As a result, we improve some best known transformation rates between specific tripartite entangled states. In addition, we find obtaining the most efficient algorithm for matrix multiplication to be precisely equivalent to determining the optimal rate of conversion between the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state and a triangular distribution of three Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states.

Eric Chitambar; Runyao Duan; Yaoyun Shi

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Two Copies of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen State of Light Lead to Refutation of EPR Ideas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bell's theorem applies to the normalizable approximations of the original Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) state. The constructions of the proof require measurements difficult to perform, and dichotomic observables. By noticing the fact that the four mode squeezed vacuum state produced in type II down-conversion can be seen both as two copies of approximate EPR states, and also as a kind of polarization supersinglet, we show a straightforward way to test violations of the EPR concepts with direct use of their state. The observables involved are simply photon numbers at outputs of polarizing beam splitters. Suitable chained Bell inequalities are based on the geometric concept of distance. For a few settings they are potentially a new tool for quantum information applications, involving observables of a nondichotomic nature, and thus of higher informational capacity. In the limit of infinitely many settings we get a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type contradiction: EPR reasoning points to a correlation, while quantum prediction is an anticorrelation. Violations of the inequalities are fully resistant to multipair emissions in Bell experiments using parametric down-conversion sources.

Krzysztof Roso?ek; Magdalena Stobi?ska; Marcin Wie?niak; Marek ?ukowski

2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Tissue phantom ratios for a Clinac 4/100  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tissue phantom ratios (TPR), based on a normalization depth of 5 cm, have been measured in water for field sizes from 5 x 5 cm/sup 2/ to approximately 40 x 40 cm/sup 2/ and for depths from 1 to 40 cm for a Varian Clinac 4/100. These TPR's have been compared with those calculated from percent depth doses measured at the same time, and the two sets of data generally agree to better than 1%, with an average ratio of measured to calculated TPR of 0.999 +- 0.013. Beam profiles have been measured for open and wedged fields, with particular concern for the often observed ''horns,'' or the increase in dose at the corners of the field. The maximum dose at a depth of 1 cm, along the diagonal of the field for this machine, is approximately 5% higher than at the same depth on the central axis, whereas along the principal plane the maximum dose is only about 3% higher.

Biggs, P.J.; Doppke, K.P.; Leong, J.C.; Russell, M.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Free-Space distribution of entanglement and single photons over 144 km  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Entanglement is the essence of quantum physics and inspires fundamental questions about the principles of nature. Moreover it is also the basis for emerging technologies of quantum information processing such as quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and quantum computation. Bell's discovery, that correlations measured on entangled quantum systems are at variance with a local realistic picture led to a flurry of experiments confirming the quantum predictions. However, it is still experimentally undecided whether quantum entanglement can survive global distances, as predicted by quantum theory. Here we report the violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality measured by two observers separated by 144 km between the Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife via an optical free-space link using the Optical Ground Station (OGS) of the European Space Agency (ESA). Furthermore we used the entangled pairs to generate a quantum cryptographic key under experimental conditions and constraints characteristic for a Space-to-ground experiment. The distance in our experiment exceeds all previous free-space experiments by more than one order of magnitude and exploits the limit for ground-based free-space communication; significantly longer distances can only be reached using air- or space-based platforms. The range achieved thereby demonstrates the feasibility of quantum communication in space, involving satellites or the International Space Station (ISS).

R. Ursin; F. Tiefenbacher; T. Schmitt-Manderbach; H. Weier; T. Scheidl; M. Lindenthal; B. Blauensteiner; T. Jennewein; J. Perdigues; P. Trojek; B. Oemer; M. Fuerst; M. Meyenburg; J. Rarity; Z. Sodnik; C. Barbieri; H. Weinfurter; A. Zeilinger

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

Characterizing the entanglement of symmetric many-particle spin-(1/2) systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyzing the properties of entanglement in many-particle spin-1/2 systems is generally difficult because the system's Hilbert space grows exponentially with the number of constituent particles, N. Fortunately, it is still possible to investigate a many-particle entanglement when the state of the system possesses sufficient symmetry. In this paper, we present a practical method for efficiently computing various bipartite entanglement measures for states in the symmetric subspace and perform these calculations for N{approx}10{sup 3}. By considering all possible bipartite splits, we construct a picture of the multiscale entanglement in large symmetric systems. In particular, we characterize dynamically generated spin-squeezed states by comparing them to known reference states (e.g., Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and Dicke states), and families of states with near-maximal bipartite entropy. We quantify the trade-off between the degree of entanglement and its robustness to particle loss, emphasizing that substantial entanglement need not be fragile.

Stockton, John K.; Geremia, J. M.; Doherty, Andrew C.; Mabuchi, Hideo [Norman Bridge Laboratory of Physics 12-33, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Teleportation with Multiple Accelerated Partners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the current revolution in communication is underway, quantum teleportation can increase the level of security in quantum communication applications. In this paper, we present a quantum teleportation procedure that capable to teleport either accelerated or non-accelerated information through different quantum channels. These quantum chan- nels are based on accelerated multi-qubit states, where each qubit of each of these channels represent a partner. Namely, these states are the the W state, Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, and the GHZ-like state. Here, we show that the fidelity of teleporting acceler- ated information is higher than the fidelity of teleporting non-accelerated information, both through a quantum channel that is based on accelerated state. Also, the comparison among the performance of these three channels shows that the degree of fidelity depends on type of the used channel, type of the measurement, and value of the acceleration. The result of comparison concludes that teleporting information through channel that is based on the GHZ state is more robust than teleporting information through channels that are based on the other two states. For future work, the proposed procedure can be generalized later to achieve communication through a wider quantum network.

Alaa Sagheer; Hala Hamdoun

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Subject no.: 1.4 Ė Policies and Programmes LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT FOR WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: Tech-wise A/S has conducted a life cycle assessment of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. A life cycle assessment (LCA), also known as a cradle to grave analysis, is an inventory of all environmental impact of a product, process or service within its complete lifecycle. An LCA includes a recovery of the resources used in the production through the utilisation to the dismantling and disposal of the product. As sample wind turbine a 2 MW offshore wind turbine placed at Horns Rev in the North Sea has been used, since this project is under development and Tech-wise A/S is the main consultant to this project. In this LCA assumptions have been made where there is information about certain materials. The assessment revealed- as expected- that the environmental impact is concentrated in the production and disposal phase. Mainly the use of normal and high-strength steel are contributors. This means that the main impact is found to come from the nacelle and the foundation. Keywords: Environmental Aspects, Off-shore, Materials, Life Cycle Assessment, EDIP-method The results of this LCA will be used to identify the most essential environmental impact in all life phases of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. This project is the first step in an examination of the possible improvement of the environmental performance of that particular wind turbine and was finalised in spring 2001. The plan is to finalise the next project by the end of 2001.

Henriette Hassing; SÝren Varming

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Entanglement, EPR steering, and Bell-nonlocality criteria for multipartite higher-spin systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop criteria to detect three classes of nonlocality that have been shown by Wiseman et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 140402 (2007)] to be nonequivalent: entanglement, EPR steering, and the failure of local hidden-variable theories. We use the approach of Cavalcanti et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 210405 (2007)] for continuous variables to develop the nonlocality criteria for arbitrary spin observables defined on a discrete Hilbert space. The criteria thus apply to multisite qudits, i.e., systems of fixed dimension d, and take the form of inequalities. We find that the spin moment inequalities that test local hidden variables (Bell inequalities) can be violated for arbitrary d by optimized highly correlated nonmaximally entangled states provided the number of sites N is high enough. On the other hand, the spin inequalities for entanglement are violated and thus detect entanglement for such states, for arbitrary d and N, and with a violation that increases with N. We show that one of the moment entanglement inequalities can detect the entanglement of an arbitrary generalized multipartite Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. Because they involve the natural observables for atomic systems, the relevant spin-operator correlations should be readily observable in trapped ultracold atomic gases and ion traps.

He, Q. Y.; Drummond, P. D.; Reid, M. D. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum-Atom Optics, Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Exploring inequality violations by classical hidden variables numerically  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are increasingly suggestions for computer simulations of quantum statistics which try to violate Bell type inequalities via classical, common cause correlations. The ClauserĖHorneĖShimonyĖHolt (CHSH) inequality is very robust. However, we argue that with the EinsteinĖPodolskyĖRosen setup, the CHSH is inferior to the Bell inequality, although and because the latter must assume anti-correlation of entangled photon singlet states. We simulate how often quantum behavior violates both inequalities, depending on the number of photons. Violating Bell 99% of the time is argued to be an ideal benchmark. We present hidden variables that violate the Bell and CHSH inequalities with 50% probability, and ones which violate Bell 85% of the time when missing 13% anti-correlation. We discuss how to present the quantum correlations to a wide audience and conclude that, when defending against claims of hidden classicality, one should demand numerical simulations and insist on anti-correlation and the full amount of Bell violation. -- Highlights: ēThe widely assumed superiority of the CHSH fails in the EPR problem. ēWe simulate Bell type inequalities behavior depending on the number of photons. ēThe core of Bellís theorem in the EPR setup is introduced in a simple way understandable to a wide audience. ēWe present hidden variables that violate both inequalities with 50% probability. ēAlgorithms have been supplied in form of Mathematica programs.

Vongehr, Sascha, E-mail: vongehr@usc.edu

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. They also locate and identify sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN) consists of 42 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. The operational rate for the first quarter of FY99 for stations in the HSN was 99.8%. There were 121 triggers during the first quarter of fiscal year 1999. Fourteen triggers were local earthquakes; seven (50%) were in the Columbia River Basalt Group, no earthquakes occurred in the pre-basalt sediments, and seven (50%) were in the crystalline basement. One earthquake (7%) occurred near or along the Horn Rapids anticline, seven earthquakes (50%) occurred in a known swarm area, and six earthquakes (43%) were random occurrences. No earthquakes triggered the Hanford Strong Motion Accelerometer during the first quarter of FY99.

DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel; AC Rohay

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

Creation of NOON states by double Fock-state/Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOON states (states of the form $|N>_{a}|0>_{b}+|0>_{a}|N>_{b}$ where $a$ and $b$ are single particle states) have been used for predicting violations of hidden-variable theories (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger violations) and are valuable in metrology for precision measurements of phase at the Heisenberg limit. We show theoretically how the use of two Fock state/Bose-Einstein condensates as sources in a modified Mach Zender interferometer can lead to the creation of the NOON state in which $a$ and $b$ refer to arms of the interferometer and $N$ is the total number of particles in the two condensates. The modification of the interferometer involves making conditional ``side'' measurements of a few particles near the sources. These measurements put the remaining particles in a superposition of two phase states, which are converted into NOON states by a beam splitter. The result is equivalent to the quantum experiment in which a large molecule passes through two slits. The NOON states are combined in a final beam splitter and show interference. Attempts to detect through which ``slit'' the condensates passed destroys the interference.

W. J. Mullin \\and F. LaloŽ

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

438

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Low cost impulse compatible wideband antenna  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An antenna apparatus and method for building the antenna is disclosed. Impulse signals travel through a feed point of the antenna with respect to a ground plane. A geometric fin structure is connected to the feed point, and through a termination resistance to the ground plane. A geometric ridge structure connected to the ground is positioned with respect to the fin in order to receive and radiate electromagnetic energy from the impulse signal at a predetermined impedance and over a predetermined set of frequencies. The fin and ridge can be either a wire or a planar surface. The fin and ridge may be disposed within a radiation cavity such as a horn. The radiation cavity is constructed of stamped and etched metal sheets bent and then soldered together. The fin and ridge are also formed from metal sheets or wires. The fin is attached to the feed point and then to the cavity through a termination resistance. The ridge is attached to the cavity and disposed with respect to the fin in order to achieve a particular set of antenna characteristics.

Rosenbury, Erwin T. (Livermore, CA); Burke, Gerald J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Tracy, CA); Stever, Robert D. (Lathrop, CA); Governo, George K. (Livermore, CA); Mullenhoff, Donald J. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements in vertebrate HOX gene clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to their high degree of conservation, comparisons of DNA sequences among evolutionarily distantly-related genomes permit to identify functional regions in noncoding DNA. Hox genes are optimal candidate sequences for comparative genome analyses, because they are extremely conserved in vertebrates and occur in clusters. We aligned (Pipmaker) the nucleotide sequences of HoxA clusters of tilapia, pufferfish, striped bass, zebrafish, horn shark, human and mouse (over 500 million years of evolutionary distance). We identified several highly conserved intergenic sequences, likely to be important in gene regulation. Only a few of these putative regulatory elements have been previously described as being involved in the regulation of Hox genes, while several others are new elements that might have regulatory functions. The majority of these newly identified putative regulatory elements contain short fragments that are almost completely conserved and are identical to known binding sites for regulatory proteins (Transfac). The conserved intergenic regions located between the most rostrally expressed genes in the developing embryo are longer and better retained through evolution. We document that presumed regulatory sequences are retained differentially in either A or A clusters resulting from a genome duplication in the fish lineage. This observation supports both the hypothesis that the conserved elements are involved in gene regulation and the Duplication-Deletion-Complementation model.

Santini, Simona; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Meyer, Axel

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Robust test of Bell's inequality with amplified N00N states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For more than 40 years physicists have been struggling to perform an indisputable test of Bell's inequality. Although our understanding of Bell's theorem and experimental techniques to test it have improved over the years, thus far all Bell tests have suffered at least from the detection or the locality loophole. Most optical Bell tests rely on inefficient discrete-outcome measurements, often provided by photon counting detection. One possible way to close the detection loophole in optical Bell tests is to involve efficient continuous-variable measurements instead, such as homodyne detection. Here, we propose a test of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality that applies photon counting and homodyne detection on amplified two-photon N00N states. The scheme suggested is remarkably robust against experimental imperfections and suits the limits of current technology. Our work explores the opportunities and limits of macroscopic quantum states. It may constitute an alternative platform for a loophole-free Bell test, which is also important for quantum-technological applications.

Falk TŲppel; Magdalena Stobi?ska; Gerd Leuchs

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

442

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

443

Enhancing robustness of multiparty quantum correlations using weak measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multipartite quantum correlations are important resources for the development of quantum information and computation protocols. However, the resourcefulness of multipartite quantum correlations in practical settings is limited by its fragility under decoherence due to environmental interactions. Though there exist protocols to protect bipartite entanglement under decoherence, the implementation of such protocols for multipartite quantum correlations has not been sufficiently explored. Here, we study the effect of local amplitude damping channel on the generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, and use a protocol of optimal reversal quantum weak measurement to protect the multipartite quantum correlations. We observe that the weak measurement reversal protocol enhances the robustness of multipartite quantum correlations. Further it increases the critical damping value that corresponds to entanglement sudden death. To emphasize the efficacy of the technique in protection of multipartite quantum correlation, we investigate two proximately related quantum communication tasks, namely, quantum teleportation in a one sender, many receivers setting and multiparty quantum information splitting, through a local amplitude damping channel. We observe an increase in the average fidelity of both the quantum communication tasks under the weak measurement reversal protocol. The method may prove beneficial, for combating external interactions, in other quantum information tasks using multipartite resources.

Uttam Singh; Utkarsh Mishra; Himadri Shekhar Dhar

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

444

Bell Transform, Teleportation Operator and Teleportation-Based Quantum Computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce the concept of the Bell transform to represent known quantum gates in the literature, which are a unitary basis transformation from the product basis to the Bell states or the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. The algebraic structure of the four dimensional Bell transform has been studied systematically in this paper and we point out that it may be not a Clifford gate. The representative examples of the four dimensional Bell transform are verified as maximally entangling Clifford gates and some of them are recognized as parity-preserving gates or matchgates or Yang--Baxter gates. We define the teleportation operator in terms of the four dimensional Bell transform and apply it to the reformulation of the fault-tolerant construction of single-qubit gates and two-qubit gates in teleportation-based quantum computation. The algebraic structure of the higher dimensional Bell transform is also included and representative examples for it are verified as multi-qubit Clifford gates. Our research suggests that the Bell transform may play important roles in quantum information and computation as a new type of quantum transform.

Yong Zhang; Kun Zhang

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

445

The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard [alpha]-Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study ofMammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard {alpha}-keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard {alpha}-keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, including multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard {alpha}-keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid {alpha}-keratin structure.

James, Veronica (ANU)

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

X-RAY EMISSION LINE PROFILES FROM WIND CLUMP BOW SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The consequences of structured flows continue to be a pressing topic in relating spectral data to physical processes occurring in massive star winds. In a preceding paper, our group reported on hydrodynamic simulations of hypersonic flow past a rigid spherical clump to explore the structure of bow shocks that can form around wind clumps. Here we report on profiles of emission lines that arise from such bow shock morphologies. To compute emission line profiles, we adopt a two-component flow structure of wind and clumps using two 'beta' velocity laws. While individual bow shocks tend to generate double-horned emission line profiles, a group of bow shocks can lead to line profiles with a range of shapes with blueshifted peak emission that depends on the degree of X-ray photoabsorption by the interclump wind medium, the number of clump structures in the flow, and the radial distribution of the clumps. Using the two beta law prescription, the theoretical emission measure and temperature distribution throughout the wind can be derived. The emission measure tends to be power law, and the temperature distribution is broad in terms of wind velocity. Although restricted to the case of adiabatic cooling, our models highlight the influence of bow shock effects for hot plasma temperature and emission measure distributions in stellar winds and their impact on X-ray line profile shapes. Previous models have focused on geometrical considerations of the clumps and their distribution in the wind. Our results represent the first time that the temperature distribution of wind clump structures are explicitly and self-consistently accounted for in modeling X-ray line profile shapes for massive stars.

Ignace, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614 (United States); Waldron, W. L. [Eureka Scientific Inc., 2452 Delmer Street, Oakland, CA 94602 (United States); Cassinelli, J. P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Burke, A. E., E-mail: ignace@etsu.edu, E-mail: wwaldron@satx.rr.com, E-mail: cassinelli@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: burke.alexander@gmail.com [990 Washington Street 317, Dedham, MA 02026 (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Molecular Gas in the Powerful Radio Galaxies 3C~31 and 3C~264: Major or Minor Mergers?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the detection of $^{12}$CO~($1 \\to 0$) and $^{12}$CO~($2 \\to 1$) emission from the central regions ($\\lesssim 5$--$10 {\\rm kpc}$) of the two powerful radio galaxies 3C~31 and 3C~264. Their individual CO emission exhibits a double-horned line profile that is characteristic of an inclined rotating disk with a central depression at the rising part of its rotation curve. The inferred disk or ring distributions of the molecular gas is consistent with the observed presence of dust disks or rings detected optically in the cores of both galaxies. For a CO to H$_2$ conversion factor similar to that of our Galaxy, the corresponding total mass in molecular hydrogen gas is $(1.3 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^9 {\\rm M_{\\odot}}$ in 3C~31 and $(0.31 \\pm 0.06) \\times 10^9 {\\rm M_{\\odot}}$ in 3C~264. Despite their relatively large molecular-gas masses and other peculiarities, both 3C~31 and 3C~264, as well as many other powerful radio galaxies in the (revised) 3C catalog, are known to lie within the fundamental plane of normal elliptical galaxies. We reason that if their gas originates from the mergers of two gas-rich disk galaxies, as has been invoked to explain the molecular gas in other radio galaxies, then both 3C~31 and 3C~264 must have merged a long time (a few billion years or more) ago but their remnant elliptical galaxies only recently (last tens of millions of years or less) become active in radio. Instead, we argue that the cannibalism of gas-rich galaxies provides a simpler explanation for the origin of molecular gas in the elliptical hosts of radio galaxies. Given the transient nature of their observed disturbances, these galaxies probably become active in radio soon after the accretion event when sufficient molecular gas agglomerates in their nuclei.

J. Lim; S. Leon; F. Combes; Dinh-V-Trung

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Generalized Tsirelson Inequalities, Commuting-Operator Provers, and Multi-Prover Interactive Proof Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A central question in quantum information theory and computational complexity is how powerful nonlocal strategies are in cooperative games with imperfect information, such as multi-prover interactive proof systems. This paper develops a new method for proving limits of nonlocal strategies that make use of prior entanglement among players (or, provers, in the terminology of multi-prover interactive proofs). Instead of proving the limits for usual isolated provers who initially share entanglement, this paper proves the limits for "commuting-operator provers", who share private space, but can apply only such operators that are commutative with any operator applied by other provers. Commuting-operator provers are at least as powerful as usual isolated but prior-entangled provers, and thus, limits for commuting-operator provers immediately give limits for usual entangled provers. Using this method, we obtain an n-party generalization of the Tsirelson bound for the Clauser-Horne- Shimony-Holt inequality for every n. Our bounds are tight in the sense that, in every n-party case, the equality is achievable by a usual nonlocal strategy with prior entanglement. We also apply our method to a 3-prover 1-round binary interactive proof for NEXP. Combined with the technique developed by Kempe, Kobayashi, Matsumoto, Toner and Vidick to analyze the soundness of the proof system, it is proved to be NP-hard to distinguish whether the entangled value of a 3-prover 1-round binary-answer game is equal to 1 or at most 1-1/p(n) for some polynomial p, where n is the number of questions. This is in contrast to the 2-prover 1-round binary-answer case, where the corresponding problem is efficiently decidable. Alternatively, NEXP has a 3-prover 1-round binary interactive proof system with perfect completeness and soundness 1-2^{-poly}.

Tsuyoshi Ito; Hirotada Kobayashi; Daniel Preda; Xiaoming Sun; Andrew C. -C. Yao

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

449

Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

None

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

A new, very massive modular Liquid Argon Imaging Chamber to detect low energy off-axis neutrinos from the CNGS beam. (Project MODULAr)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper is considering an opportunity for the CERN/GranSasso (CNGS) neutrino complex, concurrent time-wise with T2K and NOvA, to search for theta_13 oscillations and CP violation. Compared with large water Cherenkov (T2K) and fine grained scintillators (NOvA), the LAr-TPC offers a higher detection efficiency and a lower backgrounds, since virtually all channels may be unambiguously recognized. The present proposal, called MODULAr, describes a 20 kt fiducial volume LAr-TPC, following very closely the technology developed for the ICARUS-T60o, and is focused on the following activities, for which we seek an extended international collaboration: (1) the neutrino beam from the CERN 400 GeV proton beam and an optimised horn focussing, eventually with an increased intensity in the framework of the LHC accelerator improvement program; (2) A new experimental area LNGS-B, of at least 50000 m3 at 10 km off-axis from the main Laboratory, eventually upgradable to larger sizes. A location is under consideration at about 1.2 km equivalent water depth; (3) A new LAr Imaging detector of at least 20 kt fiducial mass. Such an increase in the volume over the current ICARUS T600 needs to be carefully considered. It is concluded that a very large mass is best realised with a set of many identical, independent units, each of 5 kt, "cloning" the technology of the T600. Further phases may foresee extensions of MODULAr to meet future physics goals. The experiment might reasonably be operational in about 4/5 years, provided a new hall is excavated in the vicinity of the Gran Sasso Laboratory and adequate funding and participation are made available.

B. Baibussinov; M. Baldo Ceolin; G. Battistoni; P. Benetti; A. Borio; E. Calligarich; M. Cambiaghi; F. Cavanna; S. Centro; A. G. Cocco; R. Dolfini; A. Gigli Berzolari; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; G. Fiorillo; D. Gibin; A. Guglielmi; G. Mannocchi; F. Mauri; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; C. Montanari; O. Palamara; L. Periale; A. Piazzoli; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; C. Rubbia; P. Sala; G. Satta; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

Brane Stabilization and Regionality of Extra Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extra dimensions are a common feature of beyond the Standard Model physics. In a braneworld scenario, local physics on the brane can depend strongly on the brane's location within the bulk. Generically, the relevant properties of the bulk manifold for the physics on/of the brane are neither local nor global, but depend on the structure of finite regions of the bulk, even for locally homogeneous and isotropic bulk geometries. In a recent work, various mechanisms (in a braneworld context) were considered to stabilize the location of a brane within bulk spaces of non-trivial topology. In this work we elaborate on and generalize that work by considering additional bulk and brane dimensionalities as well as different boundary conditions on the bulk scalar field that provides a Casimir force on the brane, providing further insight on this effect. In D=2+1 (D=5+1) we consider both local and global contributions to the effective potential of a 1-brane (4-brane) wrapped around both the 2-dimensional hyperbolic horn and Euclidean cone, which are used as toy models of an extra-dimensional manifold. We calculate the total energy due to brane tension and elastic energy (extrinsic curvature) as well as that due to the Casimir energy of a bulk scalar satisfying both Dirchlet and Neumann boundary conditions on the brane. In some cases stable minima of the potential are found that result from the competition of at least two of the contributions. Generically, any one of these effects may be sufficient when the bulk space has less symmetry than the manifolds considered here. We highlight the importance of the Casimir effect for the purpose of brane stabilization.

David M. Jacobs; Glenn D. Starkman; Andrew J. Tolley

2014-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient.

Nandi, K.N.; Beal, J.A.; Knight, D.S. (Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1987 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The smelt outmigration was monitored at wapatox on the Naches River and Prosser on the lower Yakima. The spring outmigration at Wapatox was estimated to be 16,141 smolts. The 1987 spring outmigration of wild spring chinook from the Yakima Basin was estimated to be 251,975 smolts at Prosser. The survival from egg to smelt was calculated using the 1985 redd counts and the 1987 smolt outmigration at Prosser. The estimated survival was 4.16%, which gives a mean egg to smolt survival over four years of 6.32%. In 1987 a total of 3,683 adult and 335 jack spring chinook salmon returning to the Yakima River were counted at Prosser fish ladder. This gives a total of 4,018 salmon returning to Prosser Dam. The median dates of passage were May 12 and May 16 for adults and jacks respectively. An additional 372 fish were estimated to have been caught in the Yakima River subsistence dipnet fishery below Horn Rapids and Prosser Dams. Therefore, total return to the Yakima system was 4,390 spring chinook salmon. Spring chinook were counted at Roza Dam from May 1 to September 30, 1987. Passage at Roza Dam was 1,610 adult and 67 jack spring chinook for a total of 1,677 wild fish. The median dates of passage at Roza Dam were May 29 and May 26 for spring chinook adults and jacks respectively. The smolt to adult (S{sub sa}) survival was calculated based on the 1983 smelt outmigration estimated at Prosser and the 1984 return of jacks (3 year old fish) the 1985 return of four year old adults, and the 1986 return of five year old fish to the Yakima River. It was estimated that 6,012 wild three, four, and five year old fish returned from an estimated smolt outmigration of 135,548 fish in 1983. This gives an estimated survival from smolt to adult of 4.4%. The smolt to adult survival for the 1984 smolt outmigration was 5.3% with 423 jacks returning in 1985, 5,163 four year old adults returning in 1986, and 983 five year old fish returning in 1987 fran an estimated 123,732 smolts in 1984. Spring chinook adults from fourteen different hatchery release groups were recovered in 1987. A total of 211 coded wire tags were recovered and these were expanded to an estimated 253 returning hatchery fish in 1987. Nine of these fish were jacks.

Fast, David E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1987-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

458

Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

459

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

IMPROVED NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELL REMEDIATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research conducted during Budget Period One on the project ''Improved Natural Gas Storage Well Remediation''. The project team consisted of Furness-Newburge, Inc., the technology developer; TechSavants, Inc., the technology validator; and Nicor Technologies, Inc., the technology user. The overall objectives for the project were: (1) To develop, fabricate and test prototype laboratory devices using sonication and underwater plasma to remove scale from natural gas storage well piping and perforations; (2) To modify the laboratory devices into units capable of being used downhole; (3) To test the capability of the downhole units to remove scale in an observation well at a natural gas storage field; (4) To modify (if necessary) and field harden the units and then test the units in two pressurized injection/withdrawal gas storage wells; and (5) To prepare the project's final report. This report covers activities addressing objectives 1-3. Prototype laboratory units were developed, fabricated, and tested. Laboratory testing of the sonication technology indicated that low-frequency sonication was more effective than high-frequency (ultrasonication) at removing scale and rust from pipe sections and tubing. Use of a finned horn instead of a smooth horn improves energy dispersal and increases the efficiency of removal. The chemical data confirmed that rust and scale were removed from the pipe. The sonication technology showed significant potential and technical maturity to warrant a field test. The underwater plasma technology showed a potential for more effective scale and rust removal than the sonication technology. Chemical data from these tests also confirmed the removal of rust and scale from pipe sections and tubing. Focusing of the underwater plasma's energy field through the design and fabrication of a parabolic shield will increase the technology's efficiency. Power delivered to the underwater plasma unit by a sparkplug repeatedly was interrupted by sparkplug failure. The lifecycle for the plugs was less than 10 hours. An electrode feed system for delivering continuous power needs to be designed and developed. As a result, further work on the underwater plasma technology was terminated. It needs development of a new sparking system and a redesign of the pulsed power supply system to enable the unit to operate within a well diameter of less than three inches. Both of these needs were beyond the scope of the project. Meanwhile, the laboratory sonication unit was waterproofed and hardened, enabling the unit to be used as a field prototype, operating at temperatures to 350 F and depths of 15,000 feet. The field prototype was extensively tested at a field service company's test facility before taking it to the field site. The field test was run in August 2001 in a Nicor Gas storage field observation well at Pontiac, Illinois. Segmented bond logs, gamma ray neutron logs, water level measurements and water chemistry samples were obtained before and after the downhole demonstration. Fifteen tests were completed in the field. Results from the water chemistry analysis showed an increase in the range of calcium from 1755-1984 mg/l before testing to 3400-4028 mg/l after testing. For magnesium, the range increased from 285-296 mg/l to 461-480 mg/l. The change in pH from a range of 3.11-3.25 to 8.23-8.45 indicated a buffering of the acidic well water, probably due to the increased calcium available for buffering. The segmented bond logs showed no damage to the cement bond in the well and the gamma ray neutron log showed no increase in the amount of hydrocarbons present in the formation where the testing took place. Thus, the gas storage bubble in the aquifer was not compromised. A review of all the field test data collected documents the fact that the application of low-frequency sonication technology definitely removes scale from well pipe. Phase One of this project took sonication technology from the concept stage through a successful ''proof-of-concept'' downhole application in a natural gas storage field

James C. Furness; Donald O. Johnson; Michael L. Wilkey; Lynn Furness; Keith Vanderlee; P. David Paulsen

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Hydrogeologic Evaluation of a Ground-Source Cooling System at the BSF/CSF on the Battelle Campus: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents both the field characterization activities and the numerical modeling effort at the BSF/CSF site to determine the viability of an open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP). The primary purpose of the integrated field and modeling study was to determine far-field impacts related to a non-consumptive use water right for the well field containing four extraction and four injection wells. In the field, boreholes were logged and used to develop the geologic conceptual model. Hydraulic testing was performed to identify hydraulic properties and determine sustainable pumping rates. Estimates of the Ringold hydraulic conductivity (60-150 m/d) at the BSF/CSF site were consistent with the local and regional hydrogeology as well as estimates previously published by other investigators. Sustainable pumping rates at the extraction wells were variable (100 Ė 700 gpm), and confirmed field observations of aquifer heterogeneity. Field data were used to develop a numerical model of the site. Simulations assessed the potential of the well field to impact nearby contaminant plumes, neighboring water rights, and the thermal regime of nearby surface water bodies. Using steady-state flow scenarios in conjunction with particle tracking, a radius of influence of 400Ė600 m was identified around the well field. This distance was considerably shorter than the distance to the closest contaminant plume (~1.2 km northwest to the DOE Horn Rapids Landfill) and the nearest water right holder (~1.2 km southeast to the City of Richland Well Field). Results demonstrated that current trajectories for nearby contaminant plumes will not be impacted by the operation of the GSHP well field. The objective of the energy transport analysis was to identify potential thermal impacts to the Columbia River under likely operational scenarios for the BSF/CSF well field. Estimated pumping rates and injection temperatures were used to simulate heat transport for a range of hydraulic conductivity estimates for the Ringold Formation. Two different operational scenarios were simulated using conservative assumptions, such as the absence of river water intrusion in the near shore groundwater. When seasonal injection of warm and cool water occurred, temperature impacts were insignificant at the Columbia River (< +0.2ļC), irrespective of the hydraulic conductivity estimate. The second operational scenario simulated continuous heat rejection, a condition anticipated once the BSF/CSF is fully loaded with laboratory and computer equipment. For the continuous heat rejection case, where hourly peak conditions were simulated as month-long peaks, the maximum change in temperature along the shoreline was ~1ļC. If this were to be interpreted as an absolute change in a static river temperature, it could be considered significant. However, the warmer-than-ambient groundwater flux that would potentially discharge to the Columbia River is very small relative to the flow in the river. For temperatures greater than 17.0ļC, the flow relative to a low-flow condition in the river is only 0.012%. Moreover, field data has shown that diurnal fluctuations in temperature are as high as 5ļC along the shoreline.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; DeSmet, Darrell J.; Lindsey, K. A.; Porcello, J. J.

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

464

Performance tuned radioisotope thermophotovoltaic space power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trend in space exploration is to use many small, low-cost, special-purpose satellites instead of the large, high-cost, multipurpose satellites used in the past. As a result of this new trend, there is a need for lightweight, efficient, and compact radioisotope fueled electrical power generators. This paper presents an improved design for a radioisotope thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) space power system in the 10 W to 20 W class which promises up to 37.6 watts at 30.1{percent} efficiency and 25 W/kg specific power. The RTPV power system concept has been studied and compared to radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) radioisotope, Stirling generators and alkali metal thermal electric conversion (AMTEC) generators (Schock, 1995). The studies indicate that RTPV has the potential to be the lightest weight, most efficient and most reliable of the three concepts. However, in spite of the efficiency and light weight, the size of the thermal radiator required to eliminate excess heat from the PV cells and the lack of actual system operational performance data are perceived as obstacles to RTPV acceptance for space applications. Between 1994 and 1997 EDTEK optimized the key converter components for an RTPV generator under Department of Energy (DOE) funding administered via subcontracts to Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) and EG&G Mound Applied Technologies Laboratory (Horne, 1995). The optimized components included a resonant micromesh infrared bandpass filter, low-bandgap GaSb PV cells and cell arrays. Parametric data from these components were supplied to OSC who developed and analyzed the performance of 100 W, 20 W, and 10 W RTPV generators. These designs are described in references (Schock 1994, 1995 and 1996). Since the performance of each class of supply was roughly equivalent and simply scaled with size, this paper will consider the OSC 20 W design as a baseline. The baseline 20-W RTPV design was developed by Schock, et al of OSC and has been presented elsewhere. The baseline design, centered around components and measured parametric data developed by EDTEK, Inc., promised an overall thermal-to-electric system output of 23 W at a conversion efficiency of 19{percent}, 1.92 kg system weight, and a specific power of 13.3 W/kg. The improved design reported herein promises up to 37.6 W at 30.1{percent} efficiency, 1.5 kg system weight, up to 25 W/kg specific power, a six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size over the baseline design, as well as a lower isotope temperature for greater safety. The six-fold reduction in thermal radiator size removes one of the greatest obstacles to applying RTPV in space missions. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Horne, W.E.; Morgan, M.D.; Saban, S.B. [EDTEK, Inc., 7082 South 220th Street, Kent, Washington 98032-1910 (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

A Measurement of Electron Neutrino Appearance in the MINOS Experiment After Four Years of Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work attempts to measure or set a limit on sin{sub 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}), the parameter which describes {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e oscillations. The MINOS detectors at Fermilab are used to perform a search for the oscillations utilizing a beam of {nu}{mu} neutrinos created in the NuMI beamline by the collisions of 120 GeV protons with a carbon target. These collisions create ?{sup {+-}} and K{sup {+-}} which are focused with magnetic horns, are allowed to decay, and result in a beam of {nu}{mu} in the energy range of 1 to 30 GeV. Two functionally identical steel-scintillator calorimetric detectors are utilized to measure the interactions of the generated neutrinos. A detector close to the NuMI beam, located 104 m underground and 1040 m from the target, is used to measure the properties of the neutrino beam, including the flux, composition, and energy spectrum. This information is used in part to generate a predicted spectrum of neutrinos in absence of {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e oscillations in the detector located far from the target, at a distance of 705 m underground and 735.5 km from the target. An excess of predicted {nu}e charged current events in this far detector will be interpreted as {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e oscillations, and a measurement of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) will be made using a Feldman-Cousins analysis. The measurement of {nu}{mu} {yields} {nu}e requires the separation of {nu}e candidates from background events. New reconstruction software was developed with a focus on identifying {nu}e candidate events in order to reduce systematic errors. The event parameters measured by this software were used as an input to an artificial neutral network event discriminator. The details of this reconstruction software and the other steps of the analysis necessary to making the measurement will be discussed. This work builds on a previous measurement made with this experiment. After two years of running with 3.14 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT), a limit was set at {delta}CP = 0 for the normal (inverted) hierarchy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) < 0.29 (0.42) at 90% C.L. This study finds after four years of data with an accumulated intensity of 7 x 10{sup 20} POT that sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) < 0.12 (0.20) with {delta}CP = 0 at 90% C.L. for the normal (inverted) hierarchy.

Cavanaugh, Steven; /Harvard U.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

National Geothermal Data System: Transforming the Discovery, Access, and Analytics of Data for Geothermal Exploration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compendium of Papers from the 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California February 11-13, 2013 The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a distributed, interoperable network of data collected from state geological surveys across all fifty states and the nationís leading academic geothermal centers. The system serves as a platform for sharing consistent, reliable, geothermal-relevant technical data with users of all types, while supplying tools relevant for their work. As aggregated data supports new scientific findings, this content-rich linked data ultimately broadens the pool of knowledge available to promote discovery and development of commercial-scale geothermal energy production. Most of the up-front risks associated with geothermal development stem from exploration and characterization of subsurface resources. Wider access to distributed data will, therefore, result in lower costs for geothermal development. NGDS is on track to become fully operational by 2014 and will provide a platform for custom applications for accessing geothermal relevant data in the U.S. and abroad. It is being built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community. The basic structure of the NGDS employs state-of-the art informatics to advance geothermal knowledge. The following four papers comprising this Open-File Report are a compendium of presentations, from the 38th Annual Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, taking place February 11-13, 2013 at Stanford University, Stanford, California. ďNGDS Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs,Ē outlines the efforts of a set of nationwide data providers to supply data for the NGDS. In particular, data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. The paper addresses the various types of data and metadata required and why simple links to existing data are insufficient for promoting geothermal exploration. Authors of this paper are Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office, David Blackwell, Southern Methodist University (SMU), Cathy Chickering (SMU), Toni Boyd, Oregon Institute of Technologyís GeoHeat Center, Roland Horne, Stanford University, Matthew MacKenzie, Uberity, Joe Moore, University of Utah, Duane Nickull, Uberity, Stephen Richard, Arizona Geological Survey, and Lisa Shevenell, University of Nevada, Reno. ďNGDS User Centered Design: Meeting the Needs of the Geothermal Community,Ē discusses the user- centered design approach taken in the development of a user interface solution for the NGDS. The development process is research based, highly collaborative, and incorporates state-of-the-art practices to ensure a quality user interface for the widest and greatest utility. Authors of this paper are Harold Blackman, Boise State University, Suzanne Boyd, Anthro-Tech, Kim Patten, Arizona Geological Survey, and Sam Zheng, Siemens Corporate Research. ďFueling Innovation and Adoption by Sharing Data on the DOE Geothermal Data Repository Node on the National Geothermal Data System,Ē describes the motivation behind the development of the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) and its role in the NGDS. This includes the benefits of using the GDR to share geothermal data of all types and DOEís data submission process. Authors of this paper are Jon Weers, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office. Finally, ďDeveloping the NGDS Adoption of CKAN for Domestic & International Data Deployment,Ē provides an overview of the ďNode-In-A-BoxĒ software package designed to provide data consumers with a highly functional interface to access the system, and to ease the burden on data providers who wish to publish data in the system. It is important to note that this software package constitutes a reference implementation and that the NGDS architecture is based on open standards, which means other server software can make resources available, a

Patten, Kim [Arizona Geological Survey

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must be upgraded to 0.2 s to reach the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz. The required upgrade of the AGS power supply, the rf system, and other rate dependent accelerator issues is discussed. The design of the target/horn configuration is shown. The material selected for the proton target is a Carbon-Carbon composite. It is a 3-dimensional woven material that exhibits extremely low thermal expansion for temperatures up to 1000 C; for higher temperatures it responds like graphite. This property is important for greatly reducing the thermo-elastic stresses induced by the beam, thereby extending the life of the target. The target consists of a 80 cm long cylindrical rod of 12 mm diameter. The target intercepts a 2 mm rms proton beam of 10{sup 14} protons/pulse. The total energy deposited as heat in the target is 7.3 kJ with peak temperature rise of about 280 C. Heat will be removed from the target through forced convection of helium gas across its outside surface. The extracted proton beam uses an existing beamline at the AGS, but is then directed to a target station atop a constructed earthen hill. The target is followed by a downward slopping pion decay channel. This vertical arrangement keeps the target and decay pipe well above the water table in this area. The 11.3 degrees slope aims the neutrino beam at a water Cerenkov neutrino detector to be located in the Homestake mine at Lead, South Dakota. A 3-dimensional view of the beam transport line, target station, and decay tunnel is provided.

WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

472

Is it sensible to 'deform' dose? 3D experimental validation of dose-warping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Strategies for dose accumulation in deforming anatomy are of interest in radiotherapy. Algorithms exist for the deformation of dose based on patient image sets, though these are sometimes contentious because not all such image calculations are constrained by physical laws. While tumor and organ motion has been a key area of study for a considerable amount of time, deformation is of increasing interest. In this work, we demonstrate a full 3D experimental validation of results from a range of dose deformation algorithms available in the public domain. Methods: We recently developed the first tissue-equivalent, full 3D deformable dosimetric phantom-'DEFGEL.' To assess the accuracy of dose-warping based on deformable image registration (DIR), we have measured doses in undeformed and deformed states of the DEFGEL dosimeter and compared these to planned doses and warped doses. In this way we have directly evaluated the accuracy of dose-warping calculations for 11 different algorithms. We have done this for a range of stereotactic irradiation schemes and types and magnitudes of deformation. Results: The original Horn and Schunck algorithm is shown to be the best performing of the 11 algorithms trialled. Comparing measured and dose-warped calculations for this method, it is found that for a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2} square field, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.9%; for a 20 Multiplication-Sign 20 mm{sup 2} cross-shaped field, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.1%; and for a multiple dynamic arc (0.413 cm{sup 3} PTV) treatment adapted from a patient treatment plan, {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 95%. In each case, the agreement is comparable to-but consistently {approx}1% less than-comparison between measured and calculated (planned) dose distributions in the absence of deformation. The magnitude of the deformation, as measured by the largest displacement experienced by any voxel in the volume, has the greatest influence on the accuracy of the warped dose distribution. Considering the square field case, the smallest deformation ({approx}9 mm) yields agreement of {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 99.9%, while the most significant deformation ({approx}20 mm) yields agreement of {gamma}{sub 3%/3mm}= 96.7%. Conclusions: We have confirmed that, for a range of mass and density conserving deformations representative of those observable in anatomical targets, DIR-based dose-warping can yield accurate predictions of the dose distribution. Substantial differences can be seen between the results of different algorithms indicating that DIR performance should be scrutinized before application todose-warping. We have demonstrated that the DEFGEL deformable dosimeter can be used to evaluate DIR performance and the accuracy of dose-warping results by direct measurement.

Yeo, U. J.; Taylor, M. L.; Supple, J. R.; Smith, R. L.; Dunn, L.; Kron, T.; Franich, R. D. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia) and Medical Physics, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria 3181 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia) and Medical Physics, William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria 3181 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia) and Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

Interpretation of data obtained from non-destructive and destructive post-test analyses of an intact-core column of culebra dolomite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing a nuclear waste disposal facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic wastes produced by the defense nuclear-weapons program. Pefiormance assessment analyses (U.S. DOE, 1996) indicate that human intrusion by inadvertent and intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for significant releases of radionuclides horn the disposal system. These releases may occur by five mechanisms: (1) cuttings, (2) cavings, (3) spallings, (4) direct brine releases, and (5) long- term brine releases. The first four mechanisms could result in immediate release of contaminant to the accessible environment. For the last mechanisq migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado are important, and major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer in the disposal system. For reasons of initial quantity, half-life, and specific radioactivity, certain isotopes of T~ U, Am, and Pu would dominate calculated releases from the WIPP. In order to help quantifi parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been carried out using five intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the Waste Isolation Pilot Pknt (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. This report deals primarily with results of analyses for 241Pu and 241Am distributions developed during transport experiments in one of these cores. All intact-core column transport experiments were done using Culebra-simukmt brine relevant to the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft - AK). Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for intact-core columns were obtained via experiments using conservative tracer `Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers `2U and `?Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of these species. Elution experiments with tracers 24% and 24*Arn were performed, but no elution of either species was observed in any flow experiment to date, including experiments of many months' duration. In order to quanti~ retardation of the non-eluted species 24*Pu and 241Arn afler a period of brine flow, non-destructive and destructive analyses of an intact-core column were carried out to determine distribution of these actinides in the rock. Analytical results indicate that the majority of the 241Am is present very near the top (injection) surface of the core (possibly as a precipitate), and that the majority of the 241Pu is dispersed with a very high apparent retardation value. The 24]Pu distribution is interpreted using a single-porosity advection-dispersion model, and an approximate retardation value is reported for this actinide. The specific radionuclide isotopes used in these experiments were chosen to facilitate analysis. Even though these isotopes are not necessarily the same as those that are most important to WIPP performance, they are isotopes of the same elements, and their chemical and transport properties are therefore identical to those of isotopes in the inventory.

Lucero, Daniel L.; Perkins, W. George

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Column Experiments for Radionuclide Adsorption Studies of the Culebra Dolomite: Retardation Parameter Estimation for Non-Eluted Actinide Species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing a nuclear waste disposal facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic wastes produced by the defense nuclear-weapons program. Performance assessment analyses (U.S. DOE, 1996) indicate that human intrusion by inadvertent and intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for significant releases of radionuclides horn the disposal system. These releases may occur by five mechanisms: (1) cuttings, (2) cavings, (3) spallings, (4) direct brine releases, and (5) long-term brine releases. The first four mechanisms could result in immediate release of contaminant to the accessible environment. For the last mechanism, migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado are important, and major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer in the disposal system. For reasons of initial quantity, half-life, and specific radioactivity, certain isotopes of Th, U, Am, and Pu would dominate calculated releases from the WIPP. In order to help quanti~ parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been carried out using five intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. This report deals primarily with results of mathematical analyses related to the retardation of %J%, 24%, and 24'Am in two of these cores (B-Core - VPX26-11A and C-Core - VPX28-6C). All B-Core transport experiments were done using Culebra-simukmt brine relevant to the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft - AIS). Most experiments with C-Core were done with AIS brine with some admixture of a brine composition (ERDA-6) that simulated deeper formation brines. No significant changes in transport behavior were observed for changes in brine. Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for the cores were obtained via experiments using conservative tracer `Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers `*U and %Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of these species. Elution experiments with tracers `%, 24'Pu, and 24'Ani were performed, but no elution of any of these species was observed in any flow experiment to date, including experiments of up to two years duration. However, B-Core was subjected to tomographic analysis from which a retardation factor can be inferred for%. Moreover, the fact of non- elution for 24*Pu and 24'Am after more than two years brine flow through C-Core can be coupled with the minimum detectable activity for each of these species to compute minimum retardation factors in C-Core. The retardation factors for all three species can then be coupled with the apparent hydraulic characteristics to estimate an apparent minimum solutionhock distribution coefficient, &, for each actinide. The specific radionuclide isotopes used in these experiments were chosen to facilitate analysis. Even though these isotopes are not necessarily the same as those that are most important to WIPP performance, they are isotopes of the same elements, and . their chemical and transport properties are therefore identical to those of isotopes in the WIPP inventory. The retardation factors and & values deduced from experimental results strongly support the contention that sorption in the Culebra provides an effective barrier to release of Th, Pu, and Am during the regulatory period.

Brown, G.O.; Lucero, D.A.; Perkins, W.G.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

Introduction to the Proceedings of the Sixth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop, Stanford Geothermal Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on thenumerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed i n these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented . Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey ( U.S.G.S.) , Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would l i k e t o thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

Ramey, Henry J. Jr.; Kruger, Paul; Donaldson, Ian G.

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z