National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for flat-tailed horned lizard

  1. Amphibia-Reptilia 34 (2013): 363-387 Additions to the lizard diversity of the Horn of Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Amphibia-Reptilia 34 (2013): 363-387 Additions to the lizard diversity of the Horn of Africa: Two Böhme2 Abstract. The Horn of Africa is a center of diversity for African agamid lizards. Among the nine species of Agama occurring in the Horn of Africa, Agama spinosa is the most widely distributed. The A

  2. How the Horned Lizard Got Its Horns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodie III, Edmund D.

    observed in most selection stud- ies ( 0.15) (5) but nonetheless indicate that constant selection, 245 (2001). 7. H. C. Bumpus, Biol. Lect. Wood

  3. Protecting Cattle from Horn Flies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-05-24

    Horn flies are the most damaging insect to cattle in Texas. This publication explains biological, cultural and chemical methods of controlling horn flies. Various insecticides used to suppress horn flies are listed...

  4. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characteristics. 11(So. Cal's flat-tailed horned lizard) 12 Grasslands #12;4 13 Grasslands · Communities Freshwater Ecosystems · Include standing waters of ponds and lakes, and flowing waters of rivers and streams · Vertical stratification is an important aspect of oceans and many ponds/lakes (especially if large and

  5. Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm #12;Prepared for: ELSAM A/S, Overgade 45 prior to the construction of an offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, situated approximately 15 km off

  6. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 13 May 2004 Prepared: Michael Bech

  7. Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Infauna Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2004 Published: 21 April-2004................................................. 48 Wind farm area (Turbine), Reference area (Ref

  8. Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns RevHorns Rev Offshore Wind FarmOffshore Wind Farm #12;Prepared for: ELSAM A/S, Overgade 45 to establish an offshore wind farm with an output of 150 MW in the waters of Horns Rev, approximately 15 km off to some environmental guidelines for offshore wind farms prepared by the Dani

  9. Thermal dependence of endurance and locomotory energetics in a lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    Thermal dependence of endurance and locomotory energetics in a lizard HENRY B. JOHN thermal dependencies of endurance and the rates of oxygen consumption (v02) and carbon dioxide production processesare generally very tempera- ture dependent. Consequently, a comparable thermal dependence

  10. Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 #12;Hard Bottom Substrate Monitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Annual Status Report 2003 Published: 14 May 2004

  11. Emergency Preparedness Plan Horn Point Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Emergency Preparedness Plan Horn Point Laboratory March 2015 Introduction This plan summarizes the actions which will be taken in preparation for and in response to emergencies impacting the regular technology security and infrastructure, business functions, and academic and research continuity. Emergencies

  12. Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Environmental Impact Assessment of Sea Bottom and Marine Biology #12 Design ApS 01.03.2000 #12;Bio/consult A/S Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1........................................................................................................................................................... 36 #12;Bio/consult A/S ELSAM Horns Rev. Offshore Wind Farm Doc. No. 1680-1-02-03-003 rev. 1 Page 4

  13. Winter Thermal Ecology of the Iguanid Lizard Tropidurus peruvianus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huey, Raymond B.

    in summer on the Galapagos Islands. Eurythermy of T. albemarlensis may relate to the higher cost comparisons with similar data on Tropidurus albemarlensis from Santa Cruz, Galapagos Islands, during the late-watt light-heat source at one end above the sand-bottomed runway. Two or three newly captured lizards

  14. Energetics of Lizard Embryos Are Not Canalized by Thermal Acclimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    of energetics, one must consider the cellular processes that determine the acquisition and allocation of energy573 Energetics of Lizard Embryos Are Not Canalized by Thermal Acclimation Michael J. Angilletta Jr of ectotherms, temperature has little or no effect on the amount of energy expended during embryonic development

  15. Does `gliding while gravid' explain Rensch's rule in flying lizards?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, Jimmy A.

    with sexual size dimorphism (SSD), taxa in which males are the larger sex have increasing SSD with increasing KEYWORDS: Draco ­ lizard ­ sexual dimorphism ­ wing loading. INTRODUCTION Sexual size dimorphism (SSD of gravidity in females, and switches sexual selection in males away from a small-male, gliding advantage

  16. Nordic Society Oikos Colonization and Saturation of Habitats by Lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordic Society Oikos Colonization and Saturation of Habitats by Lizards Author(s): Robert T. M. 78, No. 2 (Mar., 1997), pp. 283-290 Published by: Blackwell Publishing on behalf of Nordic Society speciesin colonization,differencesamonghabitattypes in colonization,andthe timetrajectoryof colonization

  17. Numerical simulation of the truss spar 'Horn Mountain' using COUPLE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theckum Purath, Basil

    2006-08-16

    A truss spar, named as Horn Mountain, was deployed in the Gulf of Mexico in 1,650 m of water, approximately 150 km southeast of New Orleans in June 2002. Horn Mountain is operated by British Petroleum (B.P.). Extensive field measurements were made...

  18. LIZARD CHEMICAL SIGNALS Around Mt Isa. A Guide to the Flora and Fauna, Pair-bonding in chameleons. Naturwissenschaften

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macedonia, Joseph

    and Coloration in the JamaicanRadiation of Anolis Lizards JOSEPH M. MACEDONIA,~,~SARAHJAMES,' W. WITTLE

  19. Gunderson and Leal. Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard. Functional Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal, Manuel S.

    ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! N4G8!O#8!Lizard body (filled circles) and copper model (open diamonds) temperatures at nine! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! N4G8!O$8!Estimated performance capacity of lizards (filled circles) and copper models (open diamonds) at each site in July and August.! ! ! #12;! P! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! N4G8!OD8!Lizard (filled circles

  20. Global warming and positive fitness response in mountain populations of common lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danchin, Etienne

    Global warming and positive fitness response in mountain populations of common lizards Lacerta, Madrid, Spain Abstract Recent global warming threatens many species and has already caused population and individual-based approaches. Keywords: body size, fitness, global warming, life-history trade-offs, lizards

  1. A NEW SPECIES OF RHABDIAS (NEMATODA: RHABDIASIDAE) FROM AGAMID LIZARDS ON LUZON ISLAND, PHILIPPINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    A NEW SPECIES OF RHABDIAS (NEMATODA: RHABDIASIDAE) FROM AGAMID LIZARDS ON LUZON ISLAND, PHILIPPINES. is described on the basis of specimens found in the lungs of 2 species of agamid lizards: the Philippine flying in Aurora Province, Luzon Island, Philippines. The new species of Rhabdias is characterized by presence of 4

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLE The scale of genetic differentiation in the Dunes Sagebrush-Lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE The scale of genetic differentiation in the Dunes Sagebrush-Lizard (Sceloporus+Business Media B.V. 2008 Abstract The Dunes Sagebrush-Lizard (Sceloporus are- nicolus) is a North American species endemic to sand- shinnery oak habitats of the Mescalero and Monahans sand dunes in eastern New

  3. Ultra-wideband horn antenna with abrupt radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An ultra-wideband horn antenna transmits and receives impulse waveforms for short-range radars and impulse time-of flight systems. The antenna reduces or eliminates various sources of close-in radar clutter, including pulse dispersion and ringing, sidelobe clutter, and feedline coupling into the antenna. Dispersion is minimized with an abrupt launch point radiator element; sidelobe and feedline coupling are minimized by recessing the radiator into a metallic horn. Low frequency cut-off associated with a horn is extended by configuring the radiator drive impedance to approach a short circuit at low frequencies. A tapered feed plate connects at one end to a feedline, and at the other end to a launcher plate which is mounted to an inside wall of the horn. The launcher plate and feed plate join at an abrupt edge which forms the single launch point of the antenna.

  4. Ultra-wideband horn antenna with abrupt radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-19

    An ultra-wideband horn antenna transmits and receives impulse waveforms for short-range radars and impulse time-of flight systems. The antenna reduces or eliminates various sources of close-in radar clutter, including pulse dispersion and ringing, sidelobe clutter, and feedline coupling into the antenna. Dispersion is minimized with an abrupt launch point radiator element; sidelobe and feedline coupling are minimized by recessing the radiator into a metallic horn. Low frequency cut-off associated with a horn is extended by configuring the radiator drive impedance to approach a short circuit at low frequencies. A tapered feed plate connects at one end to a feedline, and at the other end to a launcher plate which is mounted to an inside wall of the horn. The launcher plate and feed plate join at an abrupt edge which forms the single launch point of the antenna. 8 figs.

  5. A New Algorithm for Learning Range Restricted Horn Expressions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Marta; Khardon, Roni

    A learning algorithm for the class of range restricted Horn expressions is presented and proved correct. The algorithm works within the framework of learning from entailment, where the goal is to exactly identify some ...

  6. Performing Lena: Race, Representation, and the Postwar Autobiographical Performances of Lena Horne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Megan E.

    2012-05-31

    of Lena Horne (New York: Stein and Day, 1984); Gail Lumet Buckley, The Hornes: An American Family (New York: Knopf, 1986); and Leslie Palmer, Lena Horne: Entertainer (New York: Chelsea House, 1989). 7 Club. While performing as the lead vocalist..., Horne played the lead in Lew Leslie’s unsuccessful production of Blackbirds of 1939 on Broadway. In 1940, Horne left her husband and children in Pittsburgh as she looked for a job as a vocalist in New York. That year, Horne returned to show business...

  7. Predation Cost of Conspicuous Male Coloration in Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris): An Experimental Test Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macedonia, Joseph

    ): An Experimental Test Using Clay-Covered Model Lizards Jerry F. Husak*, Joseph M. Macedonia , Stanley F. Fox to explain population level differences in coloration (Baird et al. 1997; Macedonia et al. 2002; Kwiatkowski

  8. Pulses of marine subsidies amplify reproductive potential of lizards by increasing individual growth rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    EV-1 Pulses of marine subsidies amplify reproductive potential of lizards by increasing individual into the relationship between individual traits and population responses. Here we investigated how pulsed marine

  9. Aalborg Universitet Switching studies for the Horns Rev 2 wind farm main cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    Aalborg Universitet Switching studies for the Horns Rev 2 wind farm main cable Jensen, Christian studies for the Horns Rev 2 wind farm main cable. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Power from vbn.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Switching studies for the Horns Rev 2 wind farm main cable C

  10. Investigations of migratory birds during operation of Horns rev offshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigations of migratory birds during operation of Horns rev offshore wind farm: Preliminary analyses of bird studies conducted during spring 2004 in relation to the offshore wind farm at Horns Rev of the Horns Rev offshore wind farm - preliminary note on the issue of potential habitat loss. Christensen, T

  11. Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact assessment NERI Report Environmental Research Institute Effects on birds of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact of an offshore wind park at Horns Rev: Environmental impact assessment Authors: Henning Noer, Thomas Kjær

  12. EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

  13. Testing Video Playback to Lizards in the Field Author(s): David L. Clark, Joseph M. Macedonia and Gil G. Rosenthal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macedonia, Joseph

    Testing Video Playback to Lizards in the Field Author(s): David L. Clark, Joseph M. Macedonia-423 Testing Video Playback to Lizards in the Field DAVIDL. CLARK,JOSEPHM. MACEDONIA,AND GIL G. ROSENTHAL Video), birds (Evans and Marler, 1991; Evans et al., 1993a, 1993b), lizards (Macedonia et al., 1994; Macedonia

  14. Clauser-Horne Bell test with imperfect random inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao Yuan; Qi Zhao; Xiongfeng Ma

    2015-05-16

    Bell test is one of the most important tools in quantum information science. On the one hand, it enables fundamental test for the physics laws of nature, and on the other hand, it can be also applied in varieties of device independent tasks such as quantum key distribution and random number generation. In practice, loopholes existing in experimental demonstrations of Bell tests may affect the validity of the conclusions. In this work, we focus on the randomness (freewill) loophole and investigate the randomness requirement in a well-known Bell test, the Clauser-Horne test, under various conditions. With partially random inputs, we explicitly bound the Bell value for all local hidden variable models by optimizing the classical strategy. Our result thus puts input randomness requirement on the Clauser-Horne test under varieties of practical scenarios. The employed analysis technique can be generalized to other Bell's inequalities.

  15. Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping can quadruple potential activity time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping can quadruple potential activity time in an arid city Jeffrey W. Ackley1 & Michael J. Angilletta Jr.1 & Dale DeNardo1 of 3 °C warmer than the surrounding desert. With continuing urbanization and climate change, thermal

  16. Small island biogeography in the Gulf of California: lizards, the subsidized island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wait, D. Alexander

    Small island biogeography in the Gulf of California: lizards, the subsidized island biogeography the subsidized island biogeography (SIB) hypothesis, which predicts that spatial subsidies may cause insular. Methods To evaluate the SIB hypothesis, we first identified subsidized and unsubsidized islands based

  17. Testing Hypotheses of Vicariance in the Agamid Lizard Laudakia caucasia from Mountain Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte, Jim

    NOTE Testing Hypotheses of Vicariance in the Agamid Lizard Laudakia caucasia from Mountain Ranges- ing Iranian plates on which the L. caucasia species group is endemic, producing mountain barriers Sea; (3) the Kopet-Dagh and Balkhan mountains of Turkmenistan and northeast Iran rise to the east

  18. Vitamin E Supplementation Increases the Attractiveness of Males' Scent for Female European Green Lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifton, Ken

    Vitamin E Supplementation Increases the Attractiveness of Males' Scent for Female European Green-tocopherol ( = vitamin E) in their femoral secretions. Because vitamin E is metabolically important and can only lizards that received a dietary supplement of vitamin E increased proportions of vitamin E

  19. Population enumeration and the effects of oil and gas development on dune-dwelling lizards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolensky, Nicole Limunga

    2009-05-15

    abundances of dune-dwelling lizards among sites that varied in oil and gas development. I conducted distance line transects and compared those density estimates to densities obtained from total removal plots. I quantified the amount of oil and gas development...

  20. Running on water: Three-dimensional force generation by basilisk lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    because it readily yields to any applied force. Previous studies have shown that static stability during during water running. Our results give insight into the mechanics of how basilisk lizards run across challenge established rules for the mechanics of legged locomotion. Basiliscus plumifrons hydrodynamics

  1. Food consumption does not affect the preferred body temperature of Yarrow's spiny lizard (Sceloporus jarrovi)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    Food consumption does not affect the preferred body temperature of Yarrow's spiny lizard animals consume less food, they must reduce their body temperature to maximize growth. However, high because the consumption, digestion, and assimilation of food depend strongly on body temperature

  2. Big Horn Rural Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher HomesBeverly,Lake,GeysersBig Horn

  3. Big Horn Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher HomesBeverly,Lake,GeysersBig HornWind

  4. State-Estimators for Chemical Reaction Networks of Feinberg-Horn-Jackson Zero De ciency Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaves, Madalena

    State-Estimators for Chemical Reaction Networks of Feinberg-Horn-Jackson Zero De#12;ciency Type #3 for detectability for chemical reaction networks of the Feinberg-Horn-Jackson zero de#12;ciency type. Under. Keywords: observers, chemical reaction systems, detectability 1 Introduction One of the most interesting

  5. APPALACHIAN LABORATORY CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY HORN POINT LABORATORY AN INSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF MARYLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    APPALACHIAN LABORATORY CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY HORN POINT LABORATORY AN INSTITUTION. of Budget and Management Please fax this form to: 410-333-7122 UMCES Agency #12;APPALACHIAN LABORATORY CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY HORN POINT LABORATORY AN INSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF MARYLAND

  6. Clauser-Horne/Eberhard inequality violation by a local model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald A. Graft

    2015-08-10

    The Clauser-Horne/Eberhard inequality has taken center stage in tests of locality thanks to its immunity to the detection loophole. I describe a local model that violates the inequality using a plausible mechanism relying upon a parameter of the apparatus, the emission rate. The effect is generated through the analysis of time-tagged data using a standard windowed coincidence method; however, the detection times are not functions of the measurement settings. The analysis does not introduce the nonlocal behavior typical of previous coincidence window models. This finding has implications for the design and interpretation of experiments, as it shows that the coincidence window loophole cannot be eliminated by a demonstration of independence of the detection times and settings. The paper describes a reliable coincidence counting method and shows that it delivers an accurate count of true coincidences. Recent experimental tests of local realism based on the Clauser-Horne/Eberhard inequality are considered and it is shown that in one case (Christensen et al.) the emission rate is appropriately limited to ensure valid counting, and the data confirms local realism; in a second case (Giustina et al.) the experiment fails to appropriately limit the emission rate, and the claimed violation can be accounted for locally.

  7. Rich lizards: How affluence and land cover influence the diversity and abundance of desert reptiles persisting in an urban landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    development could lower water and energy use while benefiting lizards in undisturbed habitats. However introduce exotic plants and supplement natural sources of food and water for animals (Fuller et al., 2008

  8. Development and operational experience of magnetic horn system for T2K experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekiguchi, T; Fujii, Y; Hagiwara, M; Hasegawa, T; Hayashi, K; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, H; Kobayashi, T; Koike, S; Koseki, K; Maruyama, T; Matsumoto, H; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nakayoshi, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Shibata, M; Suzuki, Y; Tada, M; Takahashi, K; Tsukamoto, T; Yamada, Y; Yamanoi, Y; Yamaoka, H; Ichikawa, A K; Kubo, H; Butcher, Z; Coleman, S; Missert, A; Spitz, J; Zimmerman, E D; Tzanov, M; Bartoszek, L

    2015-01-01

    A magnetic horn system to be operated at a pulsed current of 320 kA and to survive high-power proton beam operation at 750 kW was developed for the T2K experiment. The first set of T2K magnetic horns was operated for over 12 million pulses during the four years of operation from 2010 to 2013, under a maximum beam power of 230 kW, and $6.63\\times10^{20}$ protons were exposed to the production target. No significant damage was observed throughout this period. This successful operation of the T2K magnetic horns led to the discovery of the $\

  9. Development and operational experience of magnetic horn system for T2K experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sekiguchi; K. Bessho; Y. Fujii; M. Hagiwara; T. Hasegawa; K. Hayashi; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; H. Kobayashi; T. Kobayashi; S. Koike; K. Koseki; T. Maruyama; H. Matsumoto; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; K. Nakayoshi; K. Nishikawa; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; M. Shibata; Y. Suzuki; M. Tada; K. Takahashi; T. Tsukamoto; Y. Yamada; Y. Yamanoi; H. Yamaoka; A. K. Ichikawa; H. Kubo; Z. Butcher; S. Coleman; A. Missert; J. Spitz; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Tzanov; L. Bartoszek

    2015-02-05

    A magnetic horn system to be operated at a pulsed current of 320 kA and to survive high-power proton beam operation at 750 kW was developed for the T2K experiment. The first set of T2K magnetic horns was operated for over 12 million pulses during the four years of operation from 2010 to 2013, under a maximum beam power of 230 kW, and $6.63\\times10^{20}$ protons were exposed to the production target. No significant damage was observed throughout this period. This successful operation of the T2K magnetic horns led to the discovery of the $\

  10. Population genetics of the pecan weevil, Curculio caryae Horn (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), inferred from mitochondrial nucleotide data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mynhardt, Glene

    2006-10-30

    The pecan weevil, Curculio caryae Horn, is an obligate nut feeder of all North American hickory (Carya) and a key pest of the pecan, C. illinoinensis Koch. This study investigated population structure of the pecan weevil. ...

  11. Waterfront developments in the Middle East case study : the Golden Horn Project, Istanbul, Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alamuddin, Hana S. (Hana Slieman)

    1987-01-01

    This thesis examines waterfront developments in the Middle East . It concentrates on the Golden Horn project in Istanbul as it raises a number of issues that are central to any such development in that region. In order for ...

  12. HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

    2005-05-16

    This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

  13. The Paleoindian skeletal material from Horn Shelter, Number 2, in central Texas: an analysis and perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Diane Elizabeth

    1986-01-01

    individuals to I) more recent Texas aboriginal populations and 2) a temporal sample comprised of the other generally accepted Paleoindian skeletons in North America . In the regional comparison, the question asked is simply, are the Horn individuals... in order to establish a biological framework within which to interpret Pal eoi ndi an skeletal material . Finally, Chapter VII compares the Horn Shelter individuals to I) more recent Texas aboriginal populations and 2) a temporal sample comprised...

  14. Distribution, abundance, and habitat use of the endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizard on the Naval Petroleum Reserves, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.T.; Rose, B.R.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1987-09-01

    The distribution, abundance, and habitat use of the endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus, was studied on and adjacent to Naval Petroleum Reserves No. 1 (NPR-1, Elk Hills), and No. 2 (NPR-2, Buena Vista), Kern County, CAlifornia. A total of 262 blunt-nosed leopard lizards were seen over 8 years (1979-1987) in 28 sections of NPR-1, 15 sections of NPR-2, and 10 sections adjacent to the petroleum reserves. All but one were in areas of gentle or flat relief with sparse annual ground cover. Home range size and overlap, activity patterns, and habitat use were determined from monitoring blunt-nosed leopard lizards fitted with miniature radiocollars on two study sites. Mean home range size estimated by the minimum polygon method was 2.7 acres for female blunt-nosed leopard lizards, which was significantly smaller than the 5.4 acres mean home range size for males inhabiting a major wash. The structure of the habitat affected significantly the lizards' activity and burrow use. Lizards inhabiting the wash study site were more frequently seen on the surface not associated with a burrow than lizards in the more sparsely vegetated grassland study site (63% compared with 48% of their sightings); 51.5% of the sightings for lizards in the grassland study site were associated with burrows, compared with 37.1% for lizards in the wash study site. Burrows were not shared and some burrows were used more than once (30% of burrows and 62% of burrow sightings).

  15. Sexually dimorphic estrogen receptor mRNA expression in the preoptic area and ventromedial hypothalamus of green anole lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    Sexually dimorphic estrogen receptor mRNA expression in the preoptic area and ventromedial activator of male sexual behavior in green anole lizards. As in other vertebrate groups, however, E2 (Morali et al., 1977; Roselli et al., 1985). E2 then acts within the brain to promote sexual behaviors

  16. Evolution, 49(5), 1995, pp. 848-863 EVOLUTION OF SPRINT SPEED IN LACERTID LIZARDS: MORPHOLOGICAL, PHYSIOLOGICAL,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    Evolution, 49(5), 1995, pp. 848-863 EVOLUTION OF SPRINT SPEED IN LACERTID LIZARDS: MORPHOLOGICAL@reks.uia.ac.be Abstract.-Organismal performance abilities occupy a central position in phenotypic evolution are achieved during evolution are therefore fundamentally important for understanding correlated evolution

  17. Relative clonal proportions over time in mixed-genotype infections of the lizard malaria parasite Plasmodium mexicanum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shorter, James

    Relative clonal proportions over time in mixed-genotype infections of the lizard malaria parasite malaria Malaria life history Mixed-clone infections Clonal proportions Microsatellites a b s t r a c biology. However, how relative clonal proportions vary over time in a host is still poorly known

  18. Responses of Anolis grahami Males to Manipulations of Species Identity and Components of Displays in Lizard Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macedonia, Joseph

    in Lizard Robots JOSEPH M. MACEDONIA 1,3 , DAVID L. CLARK 2 , Z.NICHOLAS BROWN 1 , SARA GENSTERBLUM 2 interspecific variation in headbob display structure and dewlap color patterns (e.g., Jenssen 1977; Macedonia of display compo- nent function in Anolis (Ord and Stamps 2008, 2009; Partan et al. 2011; Macedonia et al

  19. SOUTHWESTERNENTOMOLOGIST JUN.1999 THE DIFFERENCESBETWEEN HORN FLY' DENSITIES ON CATTLE PASTURED IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Phillip E.

    SOUTHWESTERNENTOMOLOGIST JUN.1999 THE DIFFERENCESBETWEEN HORN FLY' DENSITIES ON CATTLE PASTURED, 1800and 2400 m) over two years using fly counts on cattle. In 1995, cattle at the 800 m elevation had the highest density of flies. In 1996,the greatest density of flies occurred on cattle at the 1800m elevation

  20. CONCEPT DESIGN OF THE TARGET/HORN SYSTEM FOR THE BNL NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    for heat removal, special surface treatments in the form of nano-structured films are being explored. 2 and energy deposited due to beam/target interaction, the integration of the two systems, and the heat removal, vibration and heat. The paper addresses these issues of horn mechanical response, heat removal scenario

  1. From Data Fusion to Knowledge Fusion Xin Luna Dong, Evgeniy Gabrilovich, Geremy Heitz, Wiko Horn,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kevin Patrick

    From Data Fusion to Knowledge Fusion Xin Luna Dong, Evgeniy Gabrilovich, Geremy Heitz, Wiko Horn|gabr|geremy|wilko|kpmurphy|sunsh|weizh}@google.com ABSTRACT The task of data fusion is to identify the true values of data items (e.g., the true date of birth (and unknown) reliabil- ity. A recent survey [20] has provided a detailed comparison of various fusion

  2. Enrofloxacin and amikacin pharmacokinetics in Scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah) following a single intravenous dose 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, Kathryn Christine

    1995-01-01

    Single dose pharmacokinetics of amikacin and enrofloxacin in adult Scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah) were determined. The (mean) intravenous doses were 5.8mg/kg for amikacin and 1.3mg/kg for enrofloxacin, derived from metabolic energy scaling...

  3. Monolithic Source of Photon Pairs Rolf Horn,1,* Payam Abolghasem,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monolithic Source of Photon Pairs Rolf Horn,1,* Payam Abolghasem,2 Bhavin J. Bijlani,2 Dongpeng and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue W, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada 2 The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King

  4. Noncommuting local common causes for correlations violating the Clauser-Horne inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gábor Hofer-Szabó; Péter Vecsernyés

    2012-01-27

    In the paper the EPR-Bohm scenario will be reproduced in an algebraic quantum field theoretical setting with locally finite degrees of freedom. It will be shown that for a set of spatially separated correlating events (projections) maximally violating the Clauser-Horne inequality there can be given a common causal explanation if commutativity is abandoned between the common cause and the correlating events. Moreover, the noncommuting common cause will be local and supported in the common past of the correlating events.

  5. Development of horn antenna mixer array with internal local oscillator module for microwave imaging diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuwahara, D., E-mail: dkuwahar@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Ito, N. [Department of Intelligent System Engineering, Ube National College of Technology, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8555 (Japan); Nagayama, Y. [Department of Helical Plasma Research, National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshinaga, T. [Department of Applied Physics, National Defense Academy, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-0811 (Japan); Yamaguchi, S. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Yoshikawa, M.; Kohagura, J. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Sugito, S. [Equipment Development Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [Department of Information Electronics, Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Mase, A. [Art, Science and Technology Center for Cooperative Research, Kyusyu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A new antenna array is proposed in order to improve the sensitivity and complexity of microwave imaging diagnostics systems such as a microwave imaging reflectometry, a microwave imaging interferometer, and an electron cyclotron emission imaging. The antenna array consists of five elements: a horn antenna, a waveguide-to-microstrip line transition, a mixer, a local oscillation (LO) module, and an intermediate frequency amplifier. By using an LO module, the LO optics can be removed, and the supplied LO power to each element can be equalized. We report details of the antenna array and characteristics of a prototype antenna array.

  6. Preprint submitted to the Proceedings of the European Wind Energy Conference EWEC in Madrid, Spain June 2003 PREVIENTO meets HORNS REV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    of future offshore wind farms. Surprisingly, in all possible thermal conditions measured speeds of westerly Horns Rev offshore wind farm has to be considered as a step to new dimensions in wind power production June 2003 1 PREVIENTO meets HORNS REV Short-Term Wind-Power Prediction ­ adaptation to Offshore Sites

  7. Emergence of the adult pecan weevil Curculio caryae (Horn) in relation to soil mechanical impedance and moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchard, Calvin Earl

    1981-01-01

    and content by: (Chairman of the Committee) 1 '~J' r' "'f'/""' (Member) (Member) / ( ead of Depart e t) May 1981 111 ABSTRACT Emergence of the Adu'It Pecan Weevil Curculio ~car ae (Horn) in Relation to Soil Mechanical Impedance and Moisture. (May... and the factors nec- essary for subsequent release follow, Citations of this and the following pages follow the style and f t fE 1 tt~Et REVIEW OF LITERATURE Taxonomic Position The pecan weevil, Curculio ~car ae (Horn), belongs to the order Coleoptera...

  8. QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen Risø National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, Roskilde, Denmark Email: charlotte.hasager@risoe.dk, morten.nielsen@risoe.dk, merete.bruun.christiansen@risoe.dk ABSTRACT Wind vector observations from 85 ERS

  9. Project Title Mobile Device Management. Team Pam Horne, Jolene King, Jim Lehman, Marcus Lill, Terry Schroeder, David Shaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Project Title Mobile Device Management. Team Pam Horne, Jolene King, Jim Lehman, Marcus Lill, Terry and supporting mobile devices that access Purdue data and information. Hypothesis We anticipate there would be several advantages from providing a model of supporting mobile devices. These advantages would be in areas

  10. Biological assessment of the effects of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California, on the endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.T.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1986-06-01

    Surveys to determine the distribution and relative abundance of blunt-nosed leopard lizards on Naval Petroleum Reserve-1 were conducted in 1980 and 1981. In 1982 radiotelemetry and pitfall trapping techniques were used to gain additional information on the species and develop alternative methods of study. Incidental observations of blunt-nosed leopard lizards were recorded and used in the distribution information for NPR-1. DOE determined during this biological assessment that the construction projects and operational activities necessary to achieve and sustain MER have not adversely affected the blunt-nosed leopard lizard and its habitat, because only approximately 6% of the potential blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat on NPR-1 was disturbed by construction and operational activities. DOE believes that the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of MER will not jeopardize the continued existence of the species, because results of surveys indicated that blunt-nosed leopard lizards are mainly distributed near the periphery of Elk Hills where few petroleum developments occurred in the past and where they are unlikely to occur in the future. A policy of conducting preconstruction surveys to protect blunt-nosed leopard lizard habitat was initiated, a habitat restoration plan was developed and implemented, and administrative policies to reduce vehicle speeds, contain oil spills, restrict off-road vehicle (ORV) travel, and to prohibit public access, livestock grazing, and agricultural activities were maintained.

  11. 37Guadalupe Mountains National Park ROBERT J. BAKER, Ph.D., is a Horn Professor of biology and museum science and is director of the Natural Sci-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Robert J.

    there, and we got there late in the afternoon, and two bull elk started bugling at each other. They came down out of the hills breaking trees; this was serious fighting. They came down and they locked horns

  12. Vertical distribution of larval stages of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.), in relation to manure pat temperature gradients 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March, Philip Anderson

    1981-01-01

    control strategists to recommend the mechanical destruction of the intact manure pat by harrowing (Smith 1889). Mariatt ( 1910) suggested placement of swine in cattle pastures to achieve the same purpose. Rapid dessication of the scattered manure...VERTICAL DISTRISUTION OF LARVAL STAGES OF THE HORN FLY, HAEMATOBIA IRRITANS IRRITANS (L. ), IN RELATION TO MANURE PAT TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS A Thesis by PHILIP ANDERSON MARCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AijM University...

  13. Design of Dual-Polarization Horn-Coupled Kinetic Inductance Detectors for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Sean; Che, George; Day, Peter; Flanigan, Daniel; Johnson, Bradley R; Jones, Glenn; Kjellstrand, Bjorn; Limon, Michele; Mauskopf, Philip; McCarrick, Heather; Miller, Amber; Smiley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background is yielding exciting data on the origin of the universe, the reionization of the universe, and the growth of cosmic structure. Kilopixel arrays represent the current state of the art, but advances in detector technology are needed to enable the larger detector arrays needed for future measurements. Here we present a design for single-band dual-polarization Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) at 20% bandwidths centered at 145, 220, and 280 GHz. The detection and readout system is nearly identical to the successful photon-noise-limited aluminum Lumped-Element KIDs that have been recently built and tested by some of the authors. Fabricating large focal plane arrays of the feed horns and quarter-wave backshorts requires only conventional precision machining. Since the detectors and readout lines consist only of a single patterned aluminum layer on a SOI wafer, arrays of the detectors can be built commercially or at a standard university cleanroom.

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_BRIAN_HORN_NRC and DOE recognition May 13 2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn, NRC Pete

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_BRIAN_HORN_NMMSS Overrview-May 12 2014.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn, NRCMonday, May

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Pete_Deessaules_Brain_Horn_NMMSS_2014_screensaver.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn,EmergingWelcome

  17. Elk Hills Endangered Species Program: environmental assessment of the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Crotaphytus silus. Phase 2, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, R.K.

    1981-02-01

    This report represents an extension of previous findings concerning the status of the endangered species, Crotaphytus silus (blunt-nosed leopard lizard) on the Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1), Elk Hills, California. Previous findings in 1979 were limited to superficial observations of the occurrence and distribution of C. silus on NPR-1. The present report details findings from more extensive field work conducted from late May to early August 1980, and complements the 1979 work. The ultimate purpose of the investigations reported here is to provide sufficient bases for making informed decisions concerning the relationships of present and possible future oil-related activities at Elk Hills to the status of C. silus. There have been no particularly unique life history indicators of environmental impact on C. silus mediated through activities on NPR-1. Observations may be made, however, on the seasonal correlates of such activities: (1) individual C. silus may be buried or fatally exposed to the environment by construction activities occurring during the species' hibernation; (2) during periods when adult C. silus is active on the surface, construction activities may displace individuals that may not then be able to successfully occupy a new range, although it is to be noted in this regard that the home range of the species can be rather plastic; (3) construction activities bury or expose nest chambers of C. silus. This would unfavorably affect an average of three potential hatchlings with each burial or exposure; and (4) construction occurring when only (or predominantly) hatchlings are active on the surface may affect animals less able to avoid these activities than adults. In addition, hibernating adults will be affected, as previously noted.

  18. Fast generation of N-atom Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state in separate coupled cavities via transitionless quantum driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu-Jiang Shan; Ye-Hong Chen; Yan Xia; Jie Song

    2015-05-19

    By jointly using quantum Zeno dynamics and the approach of "transitionless quantum driving (TQD)" proposed by Berry to construct shortcuts to adiabatic passage (STAP), we propose an efficient scheme to fast generate multiatom Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states in separate cavities connected by opitical fibers only by one-step manipulation. We first detail the generation of the three-atom GHZ states via TQD, then, we compare the proposed TQD scheme with the traditional ones with adiabatic passage. At last, the influence of various decoherence factors, such as spontaneous emission, cavity decay and fiber photon leakage, is discussed by numerical simulations. All the results show that the present TQD scheme is fast and insensitive to atomic spontaneous emission and fiber photon leakage. Furthermore, the scheme can be directly generalized to realize N-atom GHZ states generation by the same principle in theory.

  19. One-step generation of multi-atom Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states in separate cavities via adiabatic passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si-Yang Hao; Yan Xia; Jie Song; Nguyen Ba An

    2013-01-04

    We propose a scheme to deterministically generate Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of $N\\geq 3$ atoms trapped in spatially separated cavities connected by optical fibers. The scheme is based on the technique of fractional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage which is one-step in the sense that one needs just wait for the desired entangled state to be generated in the stationary regime. The parametrized shapes of the Rabi frequencies of the classical fields that drive the two end atoms are chosen appropriately to realize the scheme. We also show numerically that the proposed scheme is insensitive to the fluctuations of the pulses' parameters and, at the same time, robust against decoherence caused by the dissipation due to fiber decay. Moreover, a relatively high fidelity can be obtained even in the presence of cavity decay and atomic spontaneous emission.

  20. Exact solutions for the Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in five dimensions: Black holes, wormholes and spacetime horns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo Dotti; Julio Oliva; Ricardo Troncoso

    2007-09-26

    An exhaustive classification of certain class of static solutions for the five-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in vacuum is presented. The class of metrics under consideration is such that the spacelike section is a warped product of the real line with a nontrivial base manifold. It is shown that for generic values of the coupling constants the base manifold must be necessarily of constant curvature, and the solution reduces to the topological extension of the Boulware-Deser metric. It is also shown that the base manifold admits a wider class of geometries for the special case when the Gauss-Bonnet coupling is properly tuned in terms of the cosmological and Newton constants. This freedom in the metric at the boundary, which determines the base manifold, allows the existence of three main branches of geometries in the bulk. For negative cosmological constant, if the boundary metric is such that the base manifold is arbitrary, but fixed, the solution describes black holes whose horizon geometry inherits the metric of the base manifold. If the base manifold possesses a negative constant Ricci scalar, two different kinds of wormholes in vacuum are obtained. For base manifolds with vanishing Ricci scalar, a different class of solutions appears resembling "spacetime horns". There is also a special case for which, if the base manifold is of constant curvature, due to certain class of degeneration of the field equations, the metric admits an arbitrary redshift function. For wormholes and spacetime horns, there are regions for which the gravitational and centrifugal forces point towards the same direction. All these solutions have finite Euclidean action, which reduces to the free energy in the case of black holes, and vanishes in the other cases. Their mass is also obtained from a surface integral.

  1. DC power supply for charging of a 12 KV 200 KJ energy storage capacitor battery of a 500 KA pulse system for the magnetic horn and reflectors of the CERN neutrino beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langeseth, B

    1968-01-01

    DC power supply for charging of a 12 KV 200 KJ energy storage capacitor battery of a 500 KA pulse system for the magnetic horn and reflectors of the CERN neutrino beam

  2. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT/CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 527: HORN SILVER MINE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2004-08-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADDKR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996). Corrective Action Unit 527 is located within Area 26 of the NTS and consists of CAS 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. This CADDKR refers to the site as CAU 527 or the Horn Silver Mine (HSM). This CADDKR provides or references the specific information necessary to support the closure of this CAU. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from November 12,2003 through January 21,2004. Additional sampling of liquid obtained from HSM-3 was conducted on May 3,2004. Corrective action investigation activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527 (NNSAiNV, 2002a). Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities identified the explosive nitrobenzene as a contaminant of concern (COC) on the floor of the 500-foot drift (HSM No.2). No other COCs were identified in the rock samples collected during the investigation activities. The air samples collected from borings HSM-1, HSM-2, and HSM-3 showed volatile organic compounds (primarily gasoline-related contaminants) to be present above the acceptable residential exposure criteria in the boreholes. A conservative modeling effort demonstrated that these concentrations would not migrate to the surface at concentrations that will present an unacceptable risk to future land users. However, other COCs are assumed to exist based on historical documentation on the types of waste placed in the shaft; therefore, the mine including the 300- and 500-foot drifts is considered to be contaminated above action levels. Current results of the field investigation show there are no active transport mechanisms or exposure routes for the contaminants identified in the 500-foot drift. The analytical data did not show the migration of COCs beyond the floor of the 500-foot drift or from the air within the drift. On a conservative basis, the subsurface volume of the zone of contamination is limited to a depth from 150 ft to a maximum of 670 feet below ground surface extending to a radius of 300 feet from the mineshaft. Based on these data, a use restriction will be established for this volume of soil. In addition, the security of the mineshaft is maintained and does not allow unauthorized personnel to enter the vicinity of the mineshaft. Since the removal of the contaminants is not feasible, the close in place with administrative controls corrective action alternative is appropriate because it will prevent inadvertent contact with the subsurface COCs and meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site. Post-closure monitoring will be conducted for one year. This monitoring will include using the lysimeter at HSM-3 and the data logger to measure precipitation-induced vadose zone moisture flow through the rock beneath the waste shaft at the Horn Silver Mine. Results of the monitoring will be documented in a letter report at the end of one year, anticipated in June 2005. A copy of this report will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. After one year of monitoring, a determination will be made by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office if future monitoring is needed or if use restriction boundaries need to be adjusted. If a large enough pulse of water moves into the lysimeter, a sample will he collected for laboratory analysis. If there is not sufficient volume of liquid collected for a sample or if no COCs are detected in collected samples at the end of this time period, it is recommended that the monitoring wells at the HSM be sealed in accordance with the State of Nevada regulations.

  3. Biological assessment: possible impacts of exploratory drilling in sections 8B and 18H, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and other sensitive species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Sauls, M.L.

    1982-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy proposes to drill exploratory wells on two sections, 8B and 18H, within Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 in western Kern County, California. The proposed sites are thought to provide habitat for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard, as well as two sensitive species: the giant kangaroo rat and San Joaquin antelope ground squirrel. The objective was to assess the possible impacts of the exploratory drilling on these species and their essential habitats. Although 23 potential San Joaquin kit fox den sites were found during surveys of a total of 512 ha (1280 acres) surrounding both well sites, no burrows were closer than 30 m from proposed disturbance, and most were over 200 m away. Two blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed on private land within 8B, one was observed on private land in 18H, and two were seen on DOE portions of 18H. No evidence of blunt-nosed leopard lizards was gathered in the immediate vicinity of either proposed well site. Although 5 ha of habitat will be disturbed, there is no evidence to indicate any of the species has burrows on-site that will be lost during land clearing. Loss of habitat will be mitigated during the cleanup and restoration phases when disturbed areas will be revegetated. Increased traffic, human activities, noise and ground vibration levels, as well as illumination throughout the night, may disturb the fauna. However, these species have adapted to intensive human disturbances on Elk Hills without obvious negative effects. The short duration of the project should allow any displaced animals to return to the sites after drilling ceases.

  4. Van Horn folio, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, G. B. (George Burr), 1872-1949.

    1914-01-01

    7 acres, 2009 ? City purchased 23 acres, 2010 ? Demolition began in Sept. 2011 ? Sun Metro will begin construction of the Northgate Transfer Center, 2012 ? Dover Kohl TOD report pending approval in 2011 ? RFI for public/private partnership...

  5. Interview of Gabriel Horn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Gabriel

    2008-06-17

    heard about from Bill Thorpe at the Thorpe-Zangwill club; in animals, they give a response to a novel stimulus but if not rewarded with food, for example, they don't respond; I suddenly realized that we were dealing with a nerve neural counterpart... in 1965 before I went to Makerere; when I came back we began to think of ways of dealing with that problem; on the habituation front, I went on to study it in the insect brain and work out its characteristics and a year after Dick Hill and I published...

  6. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1 (Including Records of Technical Change No.1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2002-12-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527, Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 527 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. The site is located in an abandoned mine site in Area 26 (which is the most arid part of the NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Historical documents may refer to this site as CAU 168, CWD-1, the Wingfield mine (or shaft), and the Wahmonie mine (or shaft). Historical documentation indicates that between 1959 and the 1970s, nonliquid classified material and unclassified waste was placed in the Horn Silver Mine's shaft. Some of the waste is known to be radioactive. Documentation indicates that the waste is present from 150 feet to the bottom of the mine (500 ft below ground surface). This CAU is being investigated because hazardous constituents migrating from materials and/or wastes disposed of in the Horn Silver Mine may pose a threat to human health and the environment as well as to assess the potential impacts associated with any potential releases from the waste. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  7. Photon noise from chaotic and coherent millimeter-wave sources measured with horn-coupled, aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanigan, Daniel; Jones, Glenn; Johnson, Bradley R; Ade, Peter; Araujo, Derek; Bradford, Kristi; Cantor, Robin; Che, George; Day, Peter K; Doyle, Simon; Kjellstrand, Carl Bjorn; LeDuc, Henry G; Limon, Michele; Luu, Vy; Mauskopf, Philip; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony; Tucker, Carole; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    We report photon-noise limited performance of horn-coupled, aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors at millimeter wavelengths. The detectors are illuminated by a millimeter-wave source that uses an active multiplier chain to produce radiation between 140 and 160 GHz. We feed the multiplier with either amplified broadband noise or a continuous-wave tone from a microwave signal generator. We demonstrate that the detector response over a 40 dB range of source power is well-described by a simple model that considers the number of quasiparticles. The detector noise-equivalent power (NEP) is dominated by photon noise when the absorbed power is greater than approximately 1 pW, which corresponds to $\\mathrm{NEP} \\approx 2 \\times 10^{-17} \\; \\mathrm{W} \\; \\mathrm{Hz}^{-1/2}$, referenced to absorbed power. At higher source power levels we observe the relationships between noise and power expected from the photon statistics of the source signal: $\\mathrm{NEP} \\propto P$ for broadband (chaotic) illumination ...

  8. Fin-line horn antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reindel, John (San Diego, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A fin line circuit card containing a fin line slot feeds a dipole antenna ich extends a quarterwave outside the waveguide and provides an energy beam focal point at or near the open end of the waveguide. The dipole antenna thus maintains a wide and nearly constant beamwidth, low VSWR and a circular symmetric radiation pattern for use in electronic warfare direction finding and surveillance applications.

  9. Horn Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNew Jersey:Hopkinsville, Kentucky: EnergyWind Jump to:

  10. Biological assessment: possible impacts of exploratory drilling in Section 18B, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2, Kern County, California on the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and other sensitive species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.

    1981-11-01

    The proposed site is thought to provide habitat for the endangered an Joaquin kit fox and blunt-nosed leopard lizard, as well as the giant kangaroo rat and San Joaquin antelope ground squirrel. The objective of this study was to assess the possible impacts of the exploratory drilling on these species and their essential habitats. The proposed project will have four phases: (1) surveying; (2) site preparation; (3) drilling, logging, and testing; and (4) cleanup and restoration. During site preparation approximately 1.5 acres of vegetation and surface soils will be removed for an access road and well pad. During a 20-day drilling, logging, and testing phase, there will be increased vehicular traffic, human activities, noise and ground vibrations, and illumination during the night. Although 1.5 acres of habitat will be disturbed, there is no evidence to indicate any of the species has burrows on-site that will be lost during land clearing. Loss of habitat will be mitigated during the cleanup and restoration phases when disturbed areas will be revegetated. Increased traffic, human activities, noise and ground vibration levels, as well as illumination throughout the night, may disturb the fauna. However, these species have adapted to intensive human disturbances on Elk Hills without obvious negative effects. The most direct threat to the species is the possibility that they might be killed by vehicles. Since the project poses so few threats to individual endangered or sensitive species, and since minor habitat disturbances will be mitigated during a restoration program, it is unlikely that completion of the project jeopardizes the continued existence of any of the species or their essential habitats. (ERB)

  11. 26 INT IEEE SpEcTrum aprIl 2009 www.spectrum.ieee.org aprIl 2009 IEEE SpEcTrum INT 27www.spectrum.ieee.org26 INT IEEE SpEcTrum aprIl 2009 www.spectrum.ieee.org aprIl 2009 IEEE SpEcTrum INT 27www.spectrum.ieee.org zebra-tailed lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Daniel I.

    .spectrum.ieee.org A zebra-tailed lizard stands on a bed of tiny glass beads and shifts its weight. The beads slip underfoot, and the many other types of terrain it may face in the des- ert. In the lab, the bed of glass beads stands in for desert sand, and by blowing air through it or packing it down, we can make the ground looser or more

  12. First report of introduced African Rainbow Lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carranza, Salvador

    Anolis porcatus GRAY, 1840 occurred, its ecological analogue, the native Hispaniolan Green Anole Anolis House Gecko Hemidactylus frenatus SCHLEGEL, 1936 has displaced on the Christmas Island the endemic and House Gecko Hemidactylus mabouia (MOREAU DE JONNÈS, 1818) were introduced a few de- cades ago

  13. Oogenesis in Unisexual Whiptail Lizards (genus Aspidoscelis)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutes, Aracely

    2012-12-31

    Parthenogenesis is a reproductive mode that does not require males. Though theoretically advantageous, its rarity among metazoans suggests otherwise. Paradoxically, some unisexual species within the genus Aspidoscelis ...

  14. Big Horn 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher HomesBeverly,Lake,Geysers Geothermal2

  15. Monitoring and managing the harvest of tegu lizards in Paraguay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieres Romero, Maria Margarita

    2002-01-01

    the 1980s, the annual harvest averaged 1.9 million skins, and current quotas for Argentina and Paraguay are 1 million and 300,000, respectively. Commercial trade in Tupinambis is legal in these countries, and management programs require monitoring...

  16. INTRODUCTION The Common or viviparous lizard (Lacerta now Zooto-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through the entire Eurasian land- mass to Sakhalin Id. (Russia) and Hokkaido Id. (Japan) in the east

  17. Inconspicuous Lizards Evolved To Blend In Jeff Mitton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitton, Jeffry B.

    on and digging in sand. It grows to a length of about six inches and it is prey to a variety of visual predators predators, such as kestrels, hunt them as well. If avoidance of predators is a matter of blending in, prey

  18. Measuring sound-induced motions of the alligator lizard cochlea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranyosi, Alexander James, 1970-

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the hearing sense are determined primarily by mechanical properties of the cochlea. These mechanical properties are poorly understood in any species. This thesis contributes to ...

  19. Conversation between Sir Gabriel Horn and Sir Patrick Bateson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Gabriel; Bateson, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    to learning PB: The final experiment we did before we went on to much more detailed analysis was an ingenious experiment in which we trained one lot of birds for a little bit of time and another lot for a long period; then a day later we trained both groups... into science GH: It took Sydney Brenner there and other distinguished people... PB: They have very good students as the education system is so good; I have no experience of Japan or China, but I was very impressed by Taiwan where they have an extremely good...

  20. BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2006-04-01

    This is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity.

  1. Gyro-resonant electron acceleration RICHARD B. HORNE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    transport of cold dense plasma is replaced by inward transport of low-density higher-energy (1­100 ke to that for electron transport. Gyro- resonant acceleration is most effective between 6 and 12 jovian radii (RjV) plasma. As the plasma is transported into increasing magnetic-field strength, a temperature anisotropy

  2. Big Horn County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)Daddy s Biodiesel Inc JumpBig

  3. Big Horn County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)Daddy s Biodiesel Inc

  4. Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher HomesBeverly,Lake,Geysers

  5. Quantitative Genetics of Locomotor Speed and Endurance in the Lizard Lacerta vivipara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saltzman, Wendy

    -term demographic studies. We estimated the heritability of maximal sprirzt speed, treadmill endurance, and tail as body size (mass and snout-vent length), dam age, and length of time dams were held in captivity prior~kantfor speed but rel- atively highfor both endurance (0.46) and tail length (0.51). None of thepheno- typic

  6. First Data on the Molecular Phylogeography of Scincid Lizards of the Genus Mabuya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vences, Miguel

    on the Comoros, and one species on the small Europa island (Brygoo, 1981). In the present paper we present

  7. Sexual selection, natural selection and the evolution of dimorphic coloration and ornamentation in agamid lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart-Fox, D M; Ord, Terry J

    2004-01-01

    I. R. 1998 Sexual dimorphism in birds: why are there so manyMortality costs of sexual dimorphism in birds. Proc. R. Soc.the evolution of sexual dimorphism in birds. Evolution 55,

  8. Sculpting reproductive circuits: Relationships among hormones, morphology and behavior in anole lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    : Available online 19 December 2011 Keywords: Sexual dimorphism Androgen Estrogen Steroid receptor Steroid as particular muscles associated with sexual behaviors, are often enlarged in animals that display sexual in males than females. For example, species of frogs, fish and song- birds all produce vocalizations

  9. Seasonal Plasticity in the Copulatory Neuromuscular System of Green Anole Lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    : The copulatory system of green an- oles is highly sexually dimorphic. Males possess bilateral copulatory organs carolinensis; androgen; hemipene; sex- ual dimorphism; reproduction INTRODUCTION Sexually dimorphic it are regulated by androgens in fish, frogs, and birds (e.g., Brantley et al., 1993a; Breno- witz and Lent, 2002

  10. HormonalAlterationsandReproductiveInhibition inMaleFenceLizards(Sceloporusoccidentalis)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schall, Joseph J.

    display fewer courtship and territorial behaviors, have altered sexually dimorphic coloration, and have- asitic infection in the wild. Although many species of mammals, birds, and reptiles can carrymalaria and altered sexual coloration, exhibit fewer courtshipandterritorialbehaviors,andstore less fatduring

  11. Multiple Sources, Admixture, and Genetic Variation in Introduced Anolis Lizard Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glor, Rich

    during introduc- tion. Reduction in genetic variation in introduced species may limit population growth limitar el crecimiento pobla- cional, incrementar el riesgo de extinci´on y limitar la adaptaci´on, lo que

  12. Lineage Diversification of Lizards (Phrynosomatidae) in Southwestern North America: Integrating Genomics and Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottscho, Andrew David

    2015-01-01

    and potential impacts from expanded renewable energyfaces potential threats from renewable energy development (

  13. Variation in Reproductive Behavior and Sexual Signals Within and Among Populations of an Incipiently Speciating Lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastiaans, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    MA. Dijkstra, P.D. , Van Dijk, S. , Groothuis, T.G.G. ,184–199. Dijkstra, P.D. , Van Dijk, S. , Groothuis, T.G.G. ,24, Dijkstra, P.D. , Van Dijk, S. , Groothuis, T.G.G. ,

  14. Lineage Diversification of Lizards (Phrynosomatidae) in Southwestern North America: Integrating Genomics and Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottscho, Andrew David

    2015-01-01

    the Natural History and Geology of the Countries VisitedSunderland. Lonsdale P. 1989. Geology and tectonic historyDM, Decker RW editors. The Geology of North America, Vol. N:

  15. Individual, Sexual, Seasonal, and Temporal Variation in the Amount of Sagebrush Lizard Scent Marks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ord, Terry

    Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA J. Slaven I E. A. Housworth Department, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Centers graciosus . Behavior cycle . Reptilia . Iguania . Phrynosomatidae Introduction In many animals, the behavior

  16. Phylogenetic Relationships among Agamid Lizards of the Laudakia caucasia Species Group: Testing Hypotheses of Biogeographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulte, Jim

    caused by uplifting of the Zagros Mountains in the late Miocene or early Pliocene [5­10 MYBP (million in the Zagros Mountains and Khurasan Hills of southern and eastern Iran. Two subspecies of L. caucasia

  17. From Microevolutionary Processes to Macroevolutionary Patterns: Investigating Diversification at Multiple Scales in Southeast Asian Lizards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barley, Anthony John

    2014-05-31

    A comprehensive understanding of the evolutionary processes responsible for generating biodiversity is best obtained using integrative approaches at multiple scales. In doing so, these investigations can provide complex ...

  18. Conspicuousness of Dickerson's collared lizard (Crotaphytus dickersonae) through the eyes of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macedonia, Joseph

    of conspecifics and predatorsbij_1217 749..765 JOSEPH M. MACEDONIA1 *, A. KRISTOPHER LAPPIN2 , ELLIS R. LOEW3

  19. Conspicuous male coloration impairs survival against avian predators in Aegean wall lizards, Podarcis erhardii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Kate L. A.; Philpot, Kate E.; Stevens, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Donough, 2002; Macedonia et al., 2002; Kwiatkowski & Guyer, 2003; Stuart-54 Fox et al., 2003; Husak et al., 2006; but see Götmark, 1992, 1993), especially when predators 55 often have visual systems tuned to detect the communication signals of their prey (e...

  20. Evolutionary consequences of Cenozoic climate change on African lacertid lizards (Squamata: Lacertidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipsley, Christy Anna

    2012-01-01

    ZMB 47122 Pestani, Macedonia Algyroides nigropunctatusZMB 47123 Pestani, Macedonia Algyroides nigropunctatusZMB 47124 Pestani, Macedonia Anatololacerta danfordi ZMB

  1. Sexual Dichromatism and Color Conspicuousness in Three Populations of Collared Lizards (Crotaphytus collaris)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macedonia, Joseph

    collaris) from Oklahoma1 JOSEPH M. MACEDONIA,2,3 JERRY F. HUSAK,4 YONI M. BRANDT,5 A. KRISTOPHER LAPPIN,6, 2003; Wiens et al., 1999; LeBas and Marshall, 2000; Macedonia et al., 2002). Although conspicuous

  2. Interactive video playback and opponent assessment in lizards Terry J. Ord a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ord, Terry

    ,b), foraging behaviour (Roster et al., 1995), maleÁ/male agonistic interactions (Macedonia and Stamps, 1994; Macedonia et al., 1994; Yang et al., 2001), female mate choice (Clark and Uetz, 1992

  3. Ecological Consequences of Landscape Fragmentation on the Lizard Community in the Mescalero-Monahans Shinnery Sands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavitt, Daniel 1979-

    2012-10-29

    or captured 11 in the region between Loco Hills and Maljamar, NM. Study design Research described in the following research chapters was conducted in the MMSS between the towns of Loco Hills and Maljamar, New Mexico (Fig. 2). Between April... trapping grid I placed a 1.2 m green t-post. Each pit trap was a 20 l (5-gallon) plastic bucket with a plywood lid propped < 2 cm off the bucket lid when open. Each grid was sampled three times in 2009 and six times each in 2010 and 2011. Between...

  4. 04/2015 Page 0 Linda Whitacre Endowed Chair and Horn Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Modern Physics Physics of Solids Undergraduate Service Courses: General Physics I (targeted for life science majors) General Physics II (targeted for life science majors) Physical World (targeted for non-science majors) General Physics Recitation (Problem solving session) Engineering Physics Recitation (targeted

  5. Olfactory sensilla of the antennal flagellum of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans, (Linnaeus) (Diptera: Muscidae) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Sandy Lee

    1978-01-01

    of curved hairs which vary greatly in length. The longest thick-walled multiporous sensilla, 150 to 370 um in length, are reported from the male saturniid moth, Antheraea ~em i, (Ernst Table l. Electron microscopy studies of the sensilla of insect...); Slifer (1969) Richerson et al. (1972) and Steinbrecht, unpubl. quoted by Schneider and Steinbrecht, 1968); among the shortest are the uniporous thick-walled receptors, 14 to 21 um in length, from the antennae of 4 species of Simuiiidae (Mercer and Mc...

  6. Visualizing Biodiversity with Voronoi Treemaps Michael S. Horn, Matthew Tobiasz, and Chia Shen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to display supplemental hierarchical information to augment our primary data source. In particular, we have, the Voronoi treemap algo- rithm is an information visualization technique for displaying hierarchical data supplemental hierarchical data to augment information in the treemap. Thus we propose an extension

  7. Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus) Productivity and Home Range Characteristics in a Shortgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reuse. Ninety-five percent adaptive kernel mean home range size did not differ between ages or sexes and transformed into an urban wildlife refuge through cooperative efforts by the United States Army, Shell Oil and was designated to be an urban wildlife refuge in 1992. The climate is semi-arid, with low humidity, light

  8. The Interface between P and NP: COL, XOR, NAE, 1-in-, and Horn SAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    question. We identify phase transition behavior in each of these problem classes. Surprisingly we observe makes NP-complete problems hard to solve? Re- search into phase transition behavior has given much at §¨¦! " (Mitchell, Selman, & Levesque 1992). Associated with this transition is a rapid increase in problem

  9. Citrus long-horned beetle Anoplophora chinensis Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    host plants for this insect are present in urban landscapes, orchards, hardwood forests, and riparian in orchards in an attempt to reduce populations (McDougall 2001). Economic and environmental significance

  10. HRENSEMBLEHR High Resolution Ensemble for Horns Rev: A project overview Mhrlen, C.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of large wind farms change between nearly constant output to highly variable power output. A balance benefits of offshore wind power is a smoothing effect on the energy price, because it has it's own of 14GW wind power in the Northsea. For this purpose an algorithm based on ensemble predictions

  11. PoS(Nufact08)075 Horn vs. Solenoid Options for Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    factories, neutrinos are generated from decay of accelerated muons. To inject muons in accelerators, muon specifications. The magnetic field at the production target reaches 20 Tesla by combining superconducting coil.75 Tesla in the decay solenoid with the inner bore of 60 cm. The field is tapered in 6 m. 2.2 Solenoid

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_BRIAN_HORN_NRC and DOE recognition...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    30 days of submission 2 Inventory Reporting and Reconciliation-Licensees During 2013, - 309 RIS's Report Inventory to NMMSS - 283 RIS's reconcile their inventory with NMMSS...

  13. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Tertiary igneous rocks of the Eagle Mountains, Van Horn, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Ronald Alan

    1972-01-01

    , 0 1, 9 4h 18 IR 1. 8 1. 5 '1. 4 5p 0 p Sd 8101214 Ca 'ro Fig12re 13. Hb/Sr vs. Cap plot for the rocks of the Eagle Mountains. 39 2. 1 2. 0 ~ VI' 1. 9 1. 7 ep sd O ~ Na/ K Figure l4. Rb/Sr vs. Ma/K plot for the rooks... Page 3 ~ 5. 6. 7 ~ 8. Map of a portion of West Texas showing the location of' the Eagle Mountains. . . 4 The Cretaceous section of the Eagle Mountains after Underwood. (1962) . . . . 8 Distribution of igneous rock and sample locations...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_BRIAN_HORN_NMMSS Overrview-May 12 2014...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    23 Desired improvements * Simplify process for sites to report data to NMMSS - Use of internet - Use of e-mail * No new burden on sites * Keep reporting simple for reporting sites...

  15. RAL/ISS meeting, April 24-28 2006 Marcos Dracos Collection system, horn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    · power supply design : looking for suppliers, collaborations and financing · infrastructure and team Dracos the power supply control/monitoringcommand/triggering interfaces charger capacitor bench switching preliminary schedule · Design of Power Supply: 2006 · R&D, tests and simulations: 2006-2007 · new prototype

  16. Expression of Candidate Genes for Horn Growth in Early Bovine Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitanza, Sarah M.

    2011-02-22

    .................................................................................... 3.4Primer Design.......................4 3.5 Polymerase Chain Reaction ................................................................ 14 6Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction.............................18 3.7 Analysis of Real... Page 3.1 Gene specific primers used for qualitative RT-PCR.................................. 15 3.2 Gene specific PCR primers for real-time RT-.................................... 16 3.3 Primers for each exon of C21orf66...

  17. MODELS OF ON-LINE SOCIAL NETWORKS ANTHONY BONATO, NOOR HADI, PAUL HORN, PAWEL PRALAT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pralat, Pawel

    . Introduction On-line social networks (OSNs) such as Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, and Flickr have become actually decreases over time, and that these net- works exhibit power-law degree distributions. Golder et al. [23] analyzed the Facebook network by studying the messaging pattern between friends

  18. KISHOR C. MEHTA P.W. Horn Professor of Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xinzhong

    Engineering University of Michigan, 1957-58, M.S. in Civil Engineering (Structures) University of Texas Standards at Texas Tech, Texas Section, ASCE, 1969. Noteworthy Contribution to Civil Engineering awards for the papers by ASCE Texas Section, in 1974 for Wind Energy; in 1976 for Tornado Resistant Design of Precast

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Closing Summary_Brian Horn_Pete Dessaules...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and obligations - Mission and programmatic planning - Commerce - Safety and health - Licensingcompliance Transmit matching issues, e.g., - Batch ID 2 Summary...

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Closing Summary_Brian Horn_Pete Dessaules_James Crabtree

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3OverviewAustralian Nuclear

  1. FY_2010_REPORTING_INSTRUCTIONS_TRANSMITTAL_8-26-10-Horn.pdf | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FY 2007 FeeFederalFirst

  2. Ornament evolution in dragon lizards: multiple gains and widespread losses reveal a complex history of evolutionary change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ord, T J; Stuart-Fox, D

    2006-01-01

    the evolution of sexual dimorphism in birds. Evolution 55:Hormonal basis of sexual dimorphism in birds: implicationsevolution of sexual color dimorphism in passerine birds. Auk

  3. Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches for Heating in a Mediterranean Lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    369 Influence of Heat Transmission Mode on Heating Rates and on the Selection of Patches the role of heat trans- mission modes on heating rates and on the selection of sites for heating a significant effect on the heating rate, with heat gain per unit of time being faster at the higher operative

  4. The Interface between P and NP: COL, XOR, NAE, 1ink, and Horn SAT Cork Constraint Computation Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    question. We identify phase transition behavior in each of these problem classes. Surprisingly we observe makes NP­complete problems hard to solve? Re­ search into phase transition behavior has given much at l=n #25; 4:3 (Mitchell, Selman, & Levesque 1992). Associated with this transition is a rapid

  5. Review: War & the Politics of Identity in Ethiopia: the making of enemies & allies in the Horn of Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidane, Saba T

    2013-01-01

    War and the Politics of Identity in Ethiopia: the Making ofISBN 978 1 84701 612 6. In War and the Politics of Identityin explaining the latest war with their friendly-neighbor-

  6. Effects of nonnormality on studies of morphological variation of a Rhabdomesine bryozoan, Streblotrypa (Streblascopora) prisca (Gabb and Horn)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hageman, S. J.

    1993-11-01

    of Geology, Univer- sity of Illinois (UI), Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), University of Kansas Museum of Invertebrate Paleontology (KUMIP). Species distinctions.—This study employs a single mor- phological group of rhabdomesine cryptostome Bryozoa...); and one specimen housed in the Illinois State Geological Survey ISGS, (ISM) 2821-10 (Ulrich, 1890, pl. 71, fig. 9' top specimen). Addi- tional important material labeled as S. nicklesi by Ulrich includes four from Nickles's original locality designated...

  7. Global control methods for Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-state generation on a one-dimensional Ising chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xiaoting; Schirmer, Sophie G. [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Bayat, Abolfazl; Bose, Sougato [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    We discuss how to prepare an Ising chain in a GHZ state using a single global control field only. This model does not require the spins to be individually addressable and is applicable to quantum systems such as cold atoms in optical lattices, some liquid- or solid-state NMR experiments, and many nanoscale quantum structures. We show that GHZ states can always be reached asymptotically from certain easy-to-prepare initial states using adiabatic passage, and under certain conditions finite-time reachability can be ensured. To provide a reference useful for future experimental implementations, three different control strategies to achieve the objective--adiabatic passage, Lyapunov control, and optimal control--are compared, and their advantages and disadvantages discussed, in particular in the presence of realistic imperfections such as imperfect initial state preparation, system inhomogeneity, and dephasing.

  8. Don-Hyung Ha > Postdoc - MIT (Shao-Horn Group) > Center Alumni > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel pricesCenterDistributedofIIAPINational

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - Recent NMSS Interactions with Foreign Countries and Organizationss_Brian Horn_Pete Dessaules [Compatibil

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure Tamara Reavis

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Reporting Small Quantities to NMMSS_Brian Horn_Suzanne Ani [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure Tamara ReavisSmall Quantities to

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Reporting data to the IAEA by a newly selected facility_Brian Horn [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure Tamara ReavisSmall Quantities

  12. Active tails enhance arboreal acrobatics in geckos Ardian Jusufi, Daniel I. Goldman*, Shai Revzen, and Robert J. Full

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Daniel I.

    behavior, we studied the flat-tailed house gecko, Cosymbotus platyurus, because it is agile and has a sizeable, active tail. Moreover, the dynamics of house geckos' horizontal running (14) and vertical climbing (1) are well characterized. Our results suggest that large tails not only serve as passive

  13. Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    beneath the eye Reticulated Python 14 to 18 ft. Distinct reddish eyes; tan body with dark brown net dull with age. Males have larger spikes along back. Black and White Tegu 2 to 3 ft. Dark bands. Yellowish-tan to dark brown; red dewlap with yellow border Ianaré Sévi NATIVE Look-a-Likes David Barkasy

  14. Engineering rodents create key habitat for lizards A.D. Davidson , D.C. Lightfoot, J.L. McIntyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    , engineer dams, which create important riparian habitat for plants and other animals, and elephants Staalduinen and Werger, 2007; Zhang et al., 2003). Contents lists available at ScienceDirect journal homepage

  15. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERN-SL-2001-061 AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    .5 ¢ £¥¤ ¡§¨ 2.6 ¢ £¥¤ ¡§¨ Target material lHg Hg lHg Collection system Horn Horn Solenoid Energy range/MeV 100

  16. Bibliographia Nudibranchia, second edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Gary R

    2009-01-01

    screening study for offshore wind farm developments - marinemonitoring Horns Rev offshore wind farm, annual statusmonitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm, Annual Status

  17. Bibliographia Nudibranchia, second edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Gary R

    2009-01-01

    screening study for offshore wind farm developments - marineNGINEERING . 2005. Elsam Offshore Wind Turbines – Horns Revmonitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm 2004. Survey Report

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ANTENNAS AND PROPAGATION, VOL. 54, NO. 5, MAY 2006 1393 A Monolithic Active Conical Horn Antenna Array for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Yang

    , University of London, London E1 4NS, U.K. He is now with the Greek Army, Athens, Greece. Y. Hao and C. G

  19. Pregnancy Rates in Mares Inseminated with 0.5 or 1 Million Sperm Using Hysteroscopic or Transrectally Guided Deep-Horn Insemination Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Shelby Shalene

    2013-11-08

    lubricated with 3 – 5 mL of sterile, non- spermicidal lubricating jelly (Priority Care; First Priority, Inc., Elgin, IL, USA) and fitted with an in-line nylon gel filter (Animal Reproduction Systems, Chino, CA, USA). A mare exhibiting behavioral estrus...

  20. A dynamic model for on-line social networks A. Bonato1, N. Hadi2, P. Horn3, P. Pralat4, and C. Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pralat, Pawel

    simulating such bad expansion properties. 1 Introduction On-line social networks such as Facebook, My other things) that the average distance between users actually decreases over time, and that these networks exhibit power-law degree distributions. Golder et al. [19] analyzed the Facebook network

  1. Relating the Ancient Ona Culture to the Wider Northern Horn: Discerning Patterns and Problems in the Archaeology of the First Millennium BC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Matthew C.

    2009-01-01

    large globular storage or brewing pots with rounded bottomscoarse brownware storage or brewing pot from Mai Hutsa (withopen bowls, and possible brewing vessels (Fig. 6f: Schmidt

  2. Scoring and mapping bovine anchor loci and screening polymorphic markers for horns and coat color in a Bos indicus X Bos taurus cross 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenneman, Rick Alan

    1994-01-01

    polymorphisms have been mapped to bovine chromosomes and were selected for scoring in the Angleton families. Ten blood group systems, the blood proteins hemoglobin, albumin, transferrin and the liver enzymes: alcohol dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase...

  3. Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna I.

    2005-01-01

    to  supply  mainland. ”  Windpower  Monthly,  October  14  Horns  Reef  repairs. ”  Windpower  Monthly.   November, 

  4. Solenoid Focus of Pions for Superbeamsp Irvine, Ca.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Solenoid Focus of Pions for Superbeamsp NUFACT06 Irvine, Ca. August 28, 2006 Harold G. Kirk and negatives Horn More cost effective More easily replacedy p Harold G. Kirk #12;First Attemptsp PAC99 28 Ge fluxes. Harold G. Kirk #12;The Horn Bench Mark J. Heim, M. Bishai, B. Viren BNL Horn 1: Length =2.2m Horn

  5. Boundary processes between a desert sand dune community and an encroaching suburban landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrows, Cameron W.; Allen, M F; Rotenberry, J T

    2006-01-01

    biology of the Namib dune lizard, Aporosaura anchietae,energetics of a Namib Desert dune ecosystem. Journal of Aridbetween a desert sand dune community and an encroaching

  6. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  7. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  8. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    including salamanders otters muskrats minks rabbits beavers frogs lizards snakes fish and birds The combination of macro and micro vertebrates invertebrates terrestrial and...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial...

  10. Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazard, Lisa C.

    22 Ion Secretion by Salt Glands of Desert Iguanas (Dipsosaurus dorsalis) Lisa C. Hazard* DepartmentCl-secreting salt glands of many birds and reptiles, the nasal salt glands of lizards can secrete potassium as well iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis. Lizards were given combinations of ions for several days, and secreted salt

  11. Species List A001 Tiger Salamander

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    flavipunctatus A016 Tailed Frog Ascaphus truei A017 Western Spadefoot Scaphiopus hammondii A018 Western Toad Bufo Pond Turtle Clemmys marmorata R002 Western Fence Lizard Sceloporus occidentalis R003 Sagebrush Lizard Ringneck Snake Diadophis punctatus R014 Sharp-tailed Snake Contia tenuis R015 Racer Coluber constrictor R

  12. RAPID COMMUNICATION Yolk Testosterone Varies With Sex in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    RAPID COMMUNICATION Yolk Testosterone Varies With Sex in Eggs of the Lizard, Anolis carolinensis), a lizard with genotypic sex determination, yolk testosterone (T) concentration is greater in male previous studies. If yolk T levels are also sex-specific before eggs are laid, a period during which

  13. Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels Presentation given by Douglas Horne of the Clean Vehicle Energy Foundation at the CNG and Hydrogen Lessons Learned Workshop on December 10, 2009 cngh2workshop7horne.pdf...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 9_NRC Roundtable Cover_Wensday_NMMSS_2014...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and Industry Roundtable Discussion Paul Adam, Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corp Suzanne Ani, NRC Brian Horn, NRC...

  15. HMSC Safety Committee November 6, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for strobe lights and horns in the NAL courtyard and GFCI receptacles in areas with seawater are on hold

  16. Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horns Rev Offshore Wind Power Farm Environmental Impact Assessment on Water Quality #12;Prepared with a planned 150 MW offshore wind farm at Horns Rev, an assessment was made of the effects the wind farm would for the preparation of EIA studies for offshore wind farms." Horns Rev is situated off Blåvands Huk, which is Denmark

  17. Out of Africa & into the Sunshine State : tracking an exotic invader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Erin Maureen

    2013-01-01

    This is the story of an invasive species and one man's quest to eradicate it. The Nile monitor lizard (Varanus niloticus), smaller cousin of the famed Komodo dragon, grows into six feet of carnivorous, ill-tempered muscle. ...

  18. Testosterone Regulates Androgen Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Copulatory, but not Courtship, Neuromuscular System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    , motoneurone, muscle, season, lizard, reproduction, sexual dimorphism, sex difference. Abstract Androgens. Male green anoles possess two sexually dimorphic neuromuscular systems, one controlling throat fan are frequently sexually dimorphic (7). Androgens serve not only to activate the behaviours in adulthood

  19. Hormonal Regulation of Progesterone Receptor mRNA Expression in the Hypothalamus of Whiptail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, David

    Hormonal Regulation of Progesterone Receptor mRNA Expression in the Hypothalamus of WhiptailRNA in the ventromedial hypothalamus of whiptail lizards and rodents, we find that there is no discernible effect

  20. Research Report Sex and seasonal differences in morphology of limbic forebrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    brain region volume and total neuron number in the POA, AMY, and the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH plasticity Lizard Preoptic area Ventromedial amygdala Ventromedial hypothalamus 1. Introduction Parallels nuclei: the preoptic area (POA), medial amygdala and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). While

  1. DOI 10.1007/s00227-006-0416-z RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grutter, Alexandra "Lexa"

    and Coconut Beach) were located on opposite sides of Lizard Island. Live gnathiids were collected with light was greater at Coconut Beach than Casuarina Beach. Although emergence counts were not consistently a

  2. Reconstruction of gross avian genome structure, organization and evolution suggests that the chicken lineage most closely resembles the dinosaur avian ancestor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanov, Michael N.; Farré, Marta; Lithgow, Pamela E.; Fowler, Katie E.; Skinner, Benjamin M.; O’Connor, Rebecca; Fonseka, Gothami; Backström, Niclas; Matsuda, Yoichi; Nishida, Chizuko; Houde, Peter; Jarvis, Erich D.; Ellegren, Hans; Burt, David W.; Larkin, Denis M.; Griffin, Darren K.

    2014-12-11

    of ancestral chromosome rearrangements. Evo- lution Highway screenshots for avian species and lizard outgroup compared to chicken chromosomes 5 and 11 are illustrated in Figure 1 (these chromosomes chosen throughout as they give the clearest representative exam...

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/evo.12100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodie III, Edmund D.

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/evo.12100 CONVERGENT EVOLUTION OF SEXUAL DIMORPHISM IN SKULL SHAPE of morphological diversity among Anolis lizards. KEY WORDS: Allometry, Anolis, craniofacial, evo-devo, face length

  4. Novel Laser-Based Manufacturing of nano-LiFePO4-Based Materials for High Power Li Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Craig R.; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Chang, On; Crane, S.; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Emile

    2006-01-01

    II “Olivines in Lithium Batteries” The Beckman Institute,for High Power Li Ion Batteries C.R. Horne 1 , A. Jaiswal

  5. Chapter 4: The Building Architectural Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Skylight performance. Lightpipe cross-section. Translucent insulating skylight panels help to offset more than 75% of the electric lighting load in BigHorn Home...

  6. The Potential of Art and Performance in a Pedagogical Setting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Hailey Lyn

    2015-01-01

    Rethinking and Strengthening Arts Education." EDgov Blog.Horn, S. (2009), “Performance Art at Secondary Level. ”International Journal of Art & Design Education, 28: 160–

  7. Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urrechaga, Jose; Wei, Xinghan

    2012-01-01

    Troy Horn, Oct, 2003 4.   Alamo Creek final report, 2005Biodiversity Corridors in Alamo Creek, Vacaville, Californiain the city and uses Alamo Creek, in Vacaville, California,

  8. Compressed Sensing Environmental Mapping by an Autonomous Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Mapping by an Autonomous Robot M. Horning ? , M. Lin ? , S.sens- ing for autonomous robots performing environmentalrequirements. A prototype robot sends data collected over

  9. Common Cattle Parasites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faries Jr., Floron C.

    2005-11-11

    This publication discusses common internal and external parasites in cattle: hairworms, lung worms, liver flukes, coccidia, horn flies, lice and grubs. Preventive and treatment methods are also covered....

  10. Welcome / Year in review

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Welcome Presentation Peter Dessaules - Department of Energy Brian Horn - Nuclear Regulatory Commission NMMSS Users Annual Training Meeting San Antonio, Texas-May 20-22, 2008...

  11. Data Fitting in Partial Differential Algebraic Equations: Some Academic and Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schittkowski, Klaus

    dynamics of hydro systems, · MCFC fuel cells, · horn radiators for satellite communication. The dynamical engineering. Key words: parameter estimation, data fitting, least squares optimization, partial differential

  12. Gas Shale Plays? The Global Transition

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and transportation capacity in the Horn River Basin is being expanded to provide improved market access for its growing shale gas production. Pipeline infrastructure is being...

  13. Operational Experience of Target Systems for Neutrino Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    helium) Pros · Simple ­ no containment · Access to target/horn possible ·Simple ­ no containment · Clean, shielding, fluids, etc... ­ Intervention on equipment `impossible' · Remote handling by overhead crane

  14. External Parasites of Cattle. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Manning A.; Hamman, Philip J.; Newton, Weldon H.

    1969-01-01

    .............................................. Bloodsucking Flies ............................................. Horn fly ........................................................... Stable fly ...................................................... Tabanids (Horse flies and deer flies) ........... Black... flies or buffalo gnats ............................... Biting midges .................................................. Mosquitoes ...................................................... : Screwworm...

  15. Normal-Incidence Photoemission Electron Microscopy (NI-PEEM) for Imaging Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschlimann, Martin

    Philip Kahl & Simone Wall & Christian Witt & Christian Schneider & Daniela Bayer & Alexander Fischer-incidence photoemission microscopy P. Kahl :S. Wall :C. Witt :M. Horn-von Hoegen : F.

  16. Aalborg Universitet Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    characteristic is investigated in this paper. The largest wind farms in the world, Horns Rev 2 Offshore Wind Farm turbines (WTs) with full-scale converters used in large offshore wind farms (OWFs) is increasing into consideration, the largest in the world Horns Rev 2 Offshore Wind Farm and located in Poland Karnice Onshore

  17. Non-surgical collection of ovine embryos 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coonrod, Scott Alexander

    1991-01-01

    . The uterine horns were located with the aid of a laparoscope and the tips were exteriorized through a 2. 5 cm incision through the linea alba. The horns were then cannulated with intravenous catheters near the uterotubal junction. Approximately 60 ml...

  18. Feasibility of Underwater Sensor Networks for Lifetime Assessment of Offshore Civil Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    farms, the Middelgrunden and Horn Revs offshore wind farms in Denmark, are considered based on numerical, Middelgrunden and Horns Rev offshore wind farms, are simulated as case studies using numerical simulation. In this paper, the network communication topology and in-network processing algorithm for two offshore wind

  19. Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Fish Communities in Offshore Wind Farms Annual Report 2004 Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Published: May 2005 Prepared by: Christian B. Hvidt Lars Brünner Frank Reier farms Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm 2004 2519-03-003-rev3.doc TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 1. Introduction

  20. National Environmental Research Institute Ministry of the Environment . Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and distribution in the Horns Rev offshore wind farm area Annual status report 2003 Report commissioned by Elsam of the Environment . Denmark Bird numbers and distribution in the Horns Rev offshore wind farm area Annual status reports for 2003, concerning bird studies in relation to the offshore wind farms at Nysted in the Baltic

  1. Characterizing, predicting and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    can increase. Offshore wind farms. Increase of power : Horns RevI : 190MW , Horns RevII : 210MW production from a single multi-megawatt wind farm. Variability of wind power depends on the time and spatial-megawatt wind farm. Variability of wind power depends on the time and spatial scale. R. Girard (Mines

  2. Models for Assessing Power Fluctuations from Large Wind Farms N. A. Cutululis1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the active power supplied from the first large 160 MW offshore wind farm in this system, Horns Rev today). Figure 1. Power generation of Horns Rev offshore wind farm and onshore turbines, January 18 2005Models for Assessing Power Fluctuations from Large Wind Farms N. A. Cutululis1) , P. Sørensen1) , A

  3. Using satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (no wind) Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm Blaavandshuk Met. mast N #12;Wind Horns Rev Wind speed map from · Wake near large offshore wind farms is quantified in space and time · Software for usersUsing satellite data for mapping offshore wind resources and wakes Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete

  4. British Columbia's Exploring perspectives and seeking common ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Research Group EMRG #12;The Pembina Institute ii British Columbia's Carbon Tax Horne, Matt, PetropavlovaBritish Columbia's Carbon Tax Exploring perspectives and seeking common ground Matt Horne · Ekaterina Petropavlova · P.J. Partington June 2012 #12;British Columbia's Carbon Tax Exploring perspectives

  5. Electron Acceleration and Loss in the Earth'sElectron Acceleration and Loss in the Earth's Radiation Belts: The Contribution of WaveRadiation Belts: The Contribution of Wave--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Anthony Arthur

    's Radiation Belts: The Contribution of WaveRadiation Belts: The Contribution of Wave-- particle.Horne@bas.ac.ukR.Horne@bas.ac.uk Tutorial, GEM, Telluride, Colorado, 25 June 2002 Outline ·· RelevanceRelevance ·· Radiation belt variabilityRadiation belt variability ·· Existing theoriesExisting theories ·· Evidence for wave

  6. Role of 5-HT2C receptors in modulating spinal nociceptive processing in neuropathic pain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Anisha

    2010-01-01

    the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, which may help to explain the abnormal pain responses observed in humans and animals. Descending inputs from the brainstem can modulate nociception at the level of the spinal dorsal horn and serotonin (5-HT) is one...

  7. U.S. Department of the Interior June 2001 U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for ball clay (30% and 25%, respectively); foundry sand (25%), pet waste absorbent (22%), drilling mud (19. Gonzales Utah * Redmond Clay and Salt Co. Inc. Sanpete * Western Clay Co. Sevier Wyoming * American Colloid Johnson, Natrona, Washakie * M-I Drilling Fluids Inc. Big Horn * Wyo-Ben Inc. Big Horn *Asterisk indicates

  8. Psychological Review 1991, Vol. 98, No. 4, 569-603

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Garrison W.

    as the construction of useful representations about the world (e.g., Horn, 1986; Marr, 1976,1982; Ullman, 1979 is a many-to-onemappingand is not uniquely inverti- ble (see Gregory, 1970; Horn, 1986; Marr, 1982; Richards.g., Hildreth, 1983;Marr &Ullman, 1981). Anotherexam- ple is the stereo correspondence problem: local

  9. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory Solenoid Focus of Pions for Superbeams NUFACT06 Irvine, Ca. August 28, 2006 #12;Harold G. Kirk Compare Solenoid to Horn Focusing Solenoid DC operation between positive and negatives Horn More cost effective More easily replaced #12;Harold G. Kirk First

  10. Ordering and Product Information: 1-800-223-4524 (856-692-3333) ACE GLASS Sonochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    It Works The ultrasonic power supply (generator) converts 50/60 Hz voltage to high frequency 20 kHz (20 the horn to be held in an Ace-Thred without affecting sonic output and enables easy adaptation processed usually dictate the horn size, i.e. 1/2", 3/4" or 1", and their intensity -- high, medium or low

  11. Use of Low-Frequency Sonic Devices for Control of Deposits in Boilers and Precipitators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, D. A.; Schwartz, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Acousticlean Sonic Sootblowers, or 'horns' are low frequency, high energy acoustical devices which offer a low-cost approach to cleaning many areas of the boiler and its associated equipment. The horns are presently in use and/or are being...

  12. Distributing medicine using PageRank Department of Mathematics and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, Wayne

    Background Approach Results Distributing medicine using PageRank Paul Horn Department October 7, 2010 Horn Distributing medicine using PageRank #12;Background Approach Results The Problem Disease breaks out! We need to stop it before it becomes an epidemic! We want to distribute medicine so

  13. Roughly 120 years ago, an incon-spicuous pest took a ride on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    Roughly 120 years ago, an incon- spicuous pest took a ride on a ship from Europe bound discussed the projects he had avail- able, the horn fly project fit best with my background. Horn Fly First, the cattle use costly energy meant for growth to rid themselves of the flies. Some of the behavioral changes

  14. Determining Pregnancy in Cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly, John R.; Sprott, L. R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2008-12-16

    . The cervix may also act as a sperm sieve, trapping some abnormal sperm cells and allowing normal sperm cells to travel into the uterus and oviducts. The uterus is Y-shaped with a right and left horn. The horns share a connecting region known as the body..., the placental membranes are well developed and extend into both horns of the uterus. About 38 days into gestation, these membranes begin at- taching to the uterine wall at special, raised areas known as caruncles. Located throughout the uterus...

  15. The evolution of foraging behavior in the Galapagos marine iguana: natural and sexual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Dustin R.

    Islands and become intrigued by the unique habits of the world's only sea-going lizard, the Galapagos of the islands' first visitors, Charles Darwin, reported fascination with watching these creatures forage, and he constraints (e.g. tidal cycle, the rapid loss of body heat during foraging, variation in body size) that act

  16. MARINE TURTLE POPULATIONS OF PULAU REDANG : THEIR STATUS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THEIR MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestwich, Ken

    By JEANNE A . MORTIMER A Report Submitted to the Turtle Sanctuary Advisory Council of Terengganu Produced Unde r WWF Project No . 3868 September 1991 WWF Malaysi a Locked Bag No . 91 1 Jalan Sultan P .O Predation by Lizards 20 7 .1 .3 Compensation to the Villagers for the Eggs 20 7 .1 .3 .1 Direct

  17. Hannah Kim Frank hkfrank@stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadly, Elizabeth

    in mainland and Caribbean Anolis lizards" Council on International Educational Exchange, Monteverde, Costa on predator avoidance in foraging, nectar feeding bats Polytechnic School, Pasadena, CA (September 1991 - June in house finches in molecular ecology lab under the direction of Professor Scott Edwards Harvard Museum

  18. Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    1 23 Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155 Urban Ecosyst DOI 10.1007/s11252-015-0460-x Urban heat island at link.springer.com". #12;Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping. Urban heat island (UHI) effects may further exacerbate the impacts of climate change on organisms

  19. Aerobic and Anaerobic Metabolism Aerobic = oxidative metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    and lizards · Anaerobic metabolism may supply 50-90% of energy during activity · As with many other processes high rates of gas exchange or efficient circulation · Has low thermal dependence ­ that is, it is not dependent on extensive generation of heat/energy which may be advantageous in poikilotherms (esp. small ones

  20. J. Avian Biol. 38: 163171, 2007 doi: 10.1111/j.2007.0908-8857.03803.x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    of age and sexual pigment dimorphism in orchard and Fuertes's orioles. Carotenoids and melanins are two-based color in two sexually dichromatic New World orioles. Using a combination of reflectance spectrometry found in birds, fish, lizards, and frogs have been attributed to carotenoids and achromatic black

  1. EFFECTS OF ESTRADIOL, SEX, AND SEASON ON ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA mRNA EXPRESSION AND FOREBRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    regions in females compared to males [Beck LA, Wade J (2009b) Sexually dimorphic estrogen re- ceptor m rodents and birds. In green anole lizards estradiol facilitates receptivity in fe- males but, unlike production of appropriate sexual behaviors, perhaps by modifying mor- phology of relevant brain regions

  2. Oecologia (Berlin) (1984) 65:51 57 Oecologia9 Springer-Verlag1984 Sexual differences in habitat use by small mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Douglas W.

    1984-01-01

    habitat use to suitable nesting areas. Sexual dimorphism in resource use is common in certain lizards (eg., Schoener 1967, 1968) and birds (e.g, Selander 1966; Storer 1966; Robins 1971; Hespenheide 1975), but sexualOecologia (Berlin) (1984) 65:51 57 Oecologia9 Springer-Verlag1984 Sexual differences in habitat use

  3. Oecologia (1989) 78:158-164 O lOgla (? Springer-Verlag1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schall, Joseph J.

    1989-01-01

    into sexualselectiontheory.Theyargued that sexually dimorphic traits, in which one sex (usually males) displays extravagant random selection of mates. Key words: Parasites - Malaria - Lizards - Sexual selection - Sexual dimorphism - Hamilton/Zuk hypothesis Although some parasitescause obvious severe damage to their hosts

  4. Published for the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) byWiley-Blackwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumstein, Daniel T.

    -distributed barn owl A. Roulin and N. Salamin 935 Indirect genetic effects in a sex-limited trait: the case diversification in dragon lizards D. C. Collar, J. A. Schulte II, B. C. O'Meara and J. B. Losos 1050 Wing are located preferentially in regions of low recombination rates in the human genome G. Liu, H. Li and L. Cai

  5. 402 Herpetological Review 38(4), 2007 RITTENHOUSE, T. A. G., AND R. D. SEMLITSCH. 2007. Distribution of am-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Alison R.

    for pond- breeding salamanders. Conserv. Biol. 12:1113­1119. ­­­­­­. 2000. Principles for management manipulation of the tail base (Stebbins 2003). However, inva- sive procedures can cause permanent damage will occasionally cause tail loss or stress a lizard during invasive sexing methods. These techniques are even more

  6. Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudspeth, A. James

    Effects of salicylates and aminoglycosides on spontaneous otoacoustic emissions in the Tokay gecko the pharmacological sensitivity of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) in a lizard, the Tokay gecko. In a quiet environment, each ear produced a complex but stable pattern of emissions. These SOAEs were reversibly

  7. E-Mail karger@karger.com Original Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wade, Juli

    the volume of the ventromedial hypothalamus of gonadectomized ani- mals in the BS, but not the NBS. AR protein in dissections of the hypothalamus and preoptic area was increased in males compared to females hypothalamus · Anolis carolinensis Abstract Sexual behavior in male green anole lizards is regulated

  8. Z .Brain Research 838 1999 104109 www.elsevier.comrlocaterbres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, David

    hypothalamus and preoptic area­anterior hypothalamus in normal female whiptail lizards and in genetic female hypothalamus 1. Introduction In male vertebrates, the preoptic area and anterior hypo- Z .thalamus POAH are involved in the integration of male w xsex behavior 7,22,28 . The ventromedial hypothalamus Z .VMH appears

  9. AMPHIBIANS AND REPTILES OF THE GREAT FALLS BYPASSED REACHES IN SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    of the Catawba River situated only slightly north of the juncture of the Piedmont and Upper Coastal Plain of the amphibians and reptiles inhabiting the Great Falls Bypassed Reaches of the Catawba River in South Carolina salamanders, 7 turtles, 6 lizards, and 11 snakes. No species of amphibian or reptile considered rare

  10. Notes and records Reptiles of Katavi National Park, western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    , PO Box 661, Arusha, Tanzania, 3 PO Box 345, Usa River, Tanzania, 4 Conservation Science Group plains. Annual rainfall totals approximately 900 mm falling between November and April. The first study hinged terrapin X X X Squamata Lizards and Snakes Gekkonidae Geckos Hemidactylus mabouiaeac Tropical

  11. COMMUNITY ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH The effect of chronic seaweed subsidies on herbivory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    -mediated fertilization pathway overshadows lizard-mediated predator pathways Jonah Piovia-Scott · David A. Spiller · Gaku focussed on a single pathway of resource input. We used path analysis to evaluate multiple pathways terrestrial ecosystem. We found statistical support for a fertilization effect (seaweed increased foliar

  12. Ecology, 91(5), 2010, pp. 14241434 2010 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    are eaten by lizards and predatory arthropods, which in turn consume terrestrial herbivores. Additionally components were consistent with the experimental results. We suggest two causal pathways for the effects of marine subsidies on terrestrial plants: (1) the ``fertilization effect'' in which seaweed adds nutrients

  13. Can Microsatellites Be Used to Infer Phylogenies? Evidence from Population Affinities of the Western Canary Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    of the Western Canary Island Lizard (Gallotia galloti) Murielle Richard1 and Roger S. Thorpe2 School of the West- ern Canary Island lacertid (Gallotia galloti) as a model. The geological times of island in 12 populations from four islands (representing five haplotype lineages) was investigated in five

  14. Common and Scientific Names Table D1 Common and scientific names as referred to in document.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green-winged teal Anas crecca Horned lark Eremophila alpestris Lazuli bunting Passerina amoena Lewis Symphoricarpos albus Douglas spirea Spirea douglasii Fools huckleberry Menziesia ferruginea Glandular Labrador-tea

  15. Aalborg Universitet Comparison of overhead line lightning performance based on two different tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    , Norway, Germany and the offshore wind farms in Horns Rev, Denmark. The new Eagle pylon has been designed TSO is in the process of constructing a new gas insulated substation (GIS) in Revsing. This includes

  16. ANALYZING MUSCULAR PAIN AND THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE ON CHRONIC PAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Neena

    2008-08-22

    device and Fos expression of the dorsal horn spinal cells. The effect of aerobic exercise on chronic pain state was tested with behavioral and molecular measures. The results indicated that acid injections induced cutaneous and muscle hyperalgesia...

  17. Making history from U.S. colonial amnesia : Filipino American and U.S. Puerto Rican poetic genealogies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caronan, Faye Christine

    2007-01-01

    37:2 (2006): 260-273. Volkswagen Automobile Company. “In February 2007, a Volkswagen television advertisementA white male in a white Volkswagen sedan honks his horn and

  18. Complexity in Natural Landform Patterns B. T. Werner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , linear, and star-shaped forms. Shorelines are molded into smooth arcuate bays interrupted by cuspate horns. Frozen soils throughout the Arctic are broken by a latticework of thermal contraction fractures

  19. the Central Basin Platform,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mapped on the surface (Geologic Atlas of Texas, Van Horn-El Paso Sheet, Barnes, 1983; Tectonic Map of Texas, Ewing et al., 1995). Faults in the Apache Mountains (to west of...

  20. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  1. LOW ALLOY STEELS FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report for Period Oct. 1, 1976 to Sept. 30, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS R. M, Horn, E. R. Parker,FOR THICK WALL PRESSURE VESSELS Yearly Report f o r PeriodManufacture Pressure Vessel Fabrication Under ASME Code

  2. Feature Detection in the Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafii, Sohail S

    2014-01-01

    Eck Forest. . . Vattenfall’s Horns Rev 1 offshore wind farm122] C. Steiness. Cutting costs for offshore wind farms.11/cutting-costs-for-offshore-wind-farms/. [123] D. Sujudi

  3. Sensations: a fabric of natural alcoves to provide relief from city life and stimulate the five senses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Megan (Megan Francesca)

    2008-01-01

    Cities have always been, and will likely always be, hectic. With every new technological advance this characteristic becomes amplified, and today city life offers little relief from cell phone chatter, honking car horns, ...

  4. 2009 The Psychonomic Society, Inc. 390 Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Tim

    .3758/PBR.16.2.390 T. Curran, tim.curran@colorado.edu Expert image analysts show enhanced visual processing in change detection Tim Curran University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado Laurie Gibson and James H. Horne

  5. First evidence for chorus at a large geocentric distance as a source of plasmaspheric hiss: Coordinated THEMIS and Van Allen Probes observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    B. Horne (2011b), Modeling the wave power distribution andGreen et al. , 2005]. Although wave power above 2–3 kHz fromthe majority of hiss wave power is below 2 kHz. Regarding in

  6. Feature Detection in the Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafii, Sohail S

    2014-01-01

    Eck Forest. . . Vattenfall’s Horns Rev 1 offshore wind farm122] C. Steiness. Cutting costs for offshore wind farms.2012/09/ 11/cutting-costs-for-offshore-wind-farms/. [123] D.

  7. Fully Integrated Silicon Terahertz Transceivers for Sensing and Communication Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jungdong

    2012-01-01

    a down-converter, and a spectrum analyzer as shown in Fig.X6 LO RF LNA RF Spectrum Analyzer WR-10 STD Horn Antennabandwidth of the spectrum analyzer, N Rx is output noise

  8. Processing allophonic variants in the visual world paradigm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Adam Junxiang

    2013-01-01

    b?d] Mispronunciation slige beb breag foog cloub birb [T food joystick food T food S food S food T bed beehive bebMP beb MP bird french horn birb MP birb MP food cassette

  9. 2008 NMMSS Users Training Meeting | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    BR-0007 (Brian Horn) 67 KB Revision of ANSI N15.8 "Nuclear Material Control Systems for Nuclear Power Plants (Thomas Morello) 212.89 KB Ownership Codes (Pete Dessaules, Brian...

  10. Laura Clayton Director of Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applebaum, David

    Laura Clayton Director of Administration (Arts & Humanities) Jane Elderton Academic Services Powell Project Officer (CompLit; English) Stephanie Mannion Programme Administrator (Communications & Partnerships) (E&IS; French; German; SPLAS) Tom Horne Programme Administrator (Learning & Teaching) (E

  11. Small Grains Forage Management and Evaluation in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franks, Aaron Michael

    2013-04-25

    nutrition disorders in cattle. Milk fever (hypocalcemia) and grass tetany (hypomagnesemia) are common ailments of lactating cattle, but can also afflict young stocker steers that generally graze small grains, with tetany being most prevalent (Horn, et al...

  12. Pacific AC Intertie (Oregon -Washington -Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GORGE ELK CREEK Black Butte Lake COVELO LAYTONVILLE FORT BRAGG BIG RIVER ELK WILLITS A POTTER VALLEY. A&B GREENLEAF 2 Nevada City BRUNSWICK GRASS VALLEY BANGOR DOBBINS COLGATE COLUMBIA HILL CAPE HORN

  13. John Craig (above left), the Department of Biology's greenhouse manager, gives a talk recently to a group of math and science campers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieb, Jason

    and the horns they might see on an elk or white-tailed deer. The department has hosted four groups from for the Town of Chapel Hill's HOPE (Homeless Outreach Poverty Eradication) Garden as well as Carolina Faculty

  14. TARZWELLDRIVE To Route 1A and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviatt, Candace

    Development Laboratory Maintenance Building Marine Operations Building Marine Logistics Building Perkins Small Building Horn Laboratory Maintenance Building Marine Ecosystem Research Laboratory Marine Geological Laboratory Marine Laboratory Marine Logistics Building Marine Operations Building Middleton Building / South

  15. Peripheral nerve injury of various types, for example complete nerve transection or loose nerve constrictions (Bennett model), results in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandini, Giulio

    -induced phenotypic change. Thus the marker used for sprouting, the cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit, is normally taken defence systems for inflammatory and neuropathic pain. There are also plastic changes in the dorsal horn

  16. The effects of soil moisture on pecan weevil emergence and predicting drought delay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schraer, Stephen Martin

    1996-01-01

    Timing of chemical applications is of key importance in managing pecan weevil, Curculio caryae (Horn). Proper timing is achieved by monitoring pecan weevil emergence and can be improved by predicting delays in emergence due to drought hardened...

  17. 2006 NMMSS Users Training Meeting | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    KB SRS - Reconciliation (Fay G. Armstrong) 50.93 KB NMMSS Data Quality (Brian Horn) 35.6 KB Reconciliation (John Ballard) 23.53 KB The MOX Adventure (Tamara Reavis) 94.86 KB...

  18. Facies analyses and environment of deposition for the Jurassic "A" zone of the "Mulussa" (Dolaa) Group, in the Homs block, Syria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quintana, Miguel Alfredo

    1988-01-01

    mainly sequences of alternating limestone, dolomite, anhydrite, rare siltstones, and shales. These rocks are interpreted to represent tidal-flat and sabkha deposits along the southeast margin of the Palmyrid trough along the Rutbah high... of the Horns block, with wells and Jurassic outcrops (shaded pattern). Position of Palmyrid Trough within the Arabian Plate (Adapted from Lovelock, 1984) Major structural framework surrounding the Horns block (After Rowell and Swan- son, 1984...

  19. 1 Introducci'on TIC 920793

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpuente, María

    perezosas en Programaci'on L'ogica con restricciones ecuacionales Este trabajo ha sido parcialmente'ia ecuacional de Horn [1, 2]. CLP( ) a'una el estilo de programaci'on l'ogica basado en cl'ausulas de Horn, el paradigma basado en ecuaciones (condi­ cionales) y la programaci'on con restricciones. Como n'ucleo de su

  20. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  1. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  2. Detection probability enhancement as a natural feature of Local Hidden Variable models (and Quantum Mechanics too?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, David

    2011-01-01

    Experimental tests of Bell inequalities often require supplementary assumptions, one of the usual ones being the "no-enhancement" assumption. Here we show how an already well known Local Hidden Variables (LHV) model for the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality, when extended to account for the probabilities of detection when the polarizers are removed (such as how it would need to be done in a test of the Clauser-Horne inequality), gives rise, as the most natural feature, to the so-called "enhancement" (breaking of the no-enhancement assumption formulated by Clauser and Horne themselves for the operational expression of their inequality). Aside from exposing that key role of enhancement, our work is useful (at least in our case it has been) to gain understanding on some other known results. We also add some comments that we think may be thought-provoking.

  3. What is Pseudonovibos spiralis?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Robert M.; Olson, Link E.; Brandt, John H.; Dioli, Maurizio

    2001-12-01

    ) pneumatization of the skull pronounced; (4) frontals flat and not enlarged, with posterior margin forming a ridge or crest between the horns. This combination of char- acters places the animal in the genus Bos following the definition provided by Groves (1981... molecularly inter- preted as being bogus, being derived from cow horns (Hassanin et al., 2001; Hassanin, submitted). (2) The five specimens identified as fakes (four de- scribed in the paper of Hassanin et al., 2001 and one in the paper of Kuznetsov et al...

  4. Bronze Age Representations of Aegean Bull-Leaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1976-01-01

    describes a wall relief fresco as a man holding the horn of a bull (PM Ill 5o4-5o7, fig. 35oA). According to the late Dr. Bernd Kaiser (personal conversation, May 1974) the object is not a horn, however, for it does not taper' It seems best. therefore... Position r ll.Z. Sealing from Knossos, Room of the Niche,' itiptessed by a ring or amygdaloid and then counter-marked' LM IIIA:t' "iii.t 73, no' oa (HM ro8); Betts' fig' Bull right in a flying gallop; above, a leaper' "r*, o"rrt.tr.tched before him...

  5. Low energy 2+1 string gravity; black hole solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Garcia Diaz; G. Gutierrez Cano

    2014-12-17

    In this report a detailed derivation of the dynamical equations for an n dimensional heterotic string theory of the Horowitz type is carried out in the string frame and in the Einstein frame too. In particular, the dynamical equations of the three dimensional string theory are explicitly given. The relation of the Horowitz Welch and Horne Horowitz string black hole solution is exhibited. The Chan Mann charged dilaton solution is derived and the subclass of string solutions field is explicitly identified. The stationary generalization, via SL(2;R) transformations, of the static (2+1) Horne Horowitz string black hole solution is given.

  6. Passive millimeter wave differential interference contrast polarimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernacki, Bruce E; Kelly, James F; Sheen, David M; Tedeschi, Jonathan R; Hall, Thomas E; Hatchell, Brian K; Valdez, Patrick; McMakin, Douglas L

    2014-04-29

    Differential polarization imaging systems include an axicon configured to provide a displacement of ray bundles associated with different image patches. The displaced ray bundles are directed to antenna horns and orthomode transducers so as to provide outputs correspond to orthogonal linear states of polarization (SOPs). The outputs are directed to a differential radiometer so that Stokes parameter differences between image patches can be obtained. The ray bundle displacements can be selected to correspond to a mechanical spacing of antenna horns. In some examples, ray bundle displacement corresponds to a displacement less than the diffraction limit.

  7. Wake models are used to improve predictions of Annual Energy Production (AEP) of wind farms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    measurements in the ETHZ facility compare well with measurements at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm·Wake models are used to improve predictions of Annual Energy Production (AEP) of wind farms. ·Wake and wind turbine wakes in large windfarms offshore, Wind Energy 12, pp. 431-444, 2009. [2] L.P. Chamorro

  8. Ris Energy Report 5 Technical challenges to energy systems' operation and markets 55 A future energy system that includes a high propor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of wind power plants Large wind farms such as the 160 MW Horns Rev and the 165 MW Nysted offshore wind farms in Denmark are connected to the transmission system, in that sense these wind farms are comparable power in the wind. since there are no fuel savings the cost reduction of a wind farm is very limited

  9. Annual status report 2003 to Elsam Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rev and Nysted Offshore Wind Farms In the Local Communities Compiled by Susanne Kuehn ECON Analyse of the socio-economic project on the local communities' reception of the Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm, west of Blaavands Huk in Jutland, and the Nysted Offshore Wind Farm, south of Lolland. The project is part

  10. Modeling of wind farm controllers Poul Srensen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (typically offshore) wind farms has initiated the development of advanced, automatic wind farm controllers. As the first large offshore wind farm, the Horns Rev offshore wind farm controller is probably the most plants (CHP) provide increased supply during cold days. The main aim of the advanced offshore wind farm

  11. Review report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Review report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm Demonstration Project: Horns Rev and Nysted Offshore Wind Farms Environmental impact assessment and monitoring Prepared for The Environmental Group By Elsam Engineering and ENERGI E2 October 2005 #12;- 2 - Review Report 2004 The Danish Offshore Wind Farm

  12. RWT TOOL: OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY MAPPING FROM SAR C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much interest during the last decade. The adventure started in 1991 when the first offshore wind farm. New development plans near Horns Rev and Nysted are ongoing. Offshore wind farms are in development the highest spatial detail (~500 m by 500 m grid cells) and are observed within the offshore `wind-farming

  13. Ris-PhD-27(EN) Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    winds in offshore wind resource assessment. Firstly, wind wakes behind two large offshore wind farms farming 3 2.1 Horns Rev and Nysted offshore wind farms 4 3 Synthetic aperture radar 6 3.1 Imaging geometry in offshore wind energy planning as a supplement to on site measurements, which are costly and sparse

  14. Fluctuations of offshore wind generation -Statistical modelling , L.E.A. Christensen, H. Madsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of power fluctuations at large offshore wind farms has a significant impact on the control and management of their parameters. Simulation results are given for the case of the Horns Rev and Nysted offshore wind farms. An overview of offshore wind energy in Europe is given in [1]. Such large offshore wind farms concentrate

  15. Memo 2005-044 Annual report 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    report 2004 Sociological Investigation of the Reception of Nysted Offshore Wind Farm Table of Contents: 1 Offshore Wind Farm 1 Introduction This annual report presents the work related to the sociological part wind farms: Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm, west of Blaavands Huk in Jutland, and Nysted Offshore Wind

  16. LiDAR observations of offshore winds at future wind turbine operating heights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the Horns Rev offshore wind farm. The influence of atmospheric stability on the surface layer wind shear of offshore wind farms in the coming years. In contrast with the situation over land, the knowledge turbine manufacturers and wind farm developers, although the offshore environment represents other

  17. MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 807, pp. 14, 3 figs. Addax nasomaculatus. By Paul R. Krausman and Anne L. Casey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayssen, Virginia

    be distinguished from face of partially sympatric scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dam- mah) by spiral twisting of ringed of tail, 25­35; height at shoulder, 105­ 115 in males and 95­110 in females (Haltenorth and Diller 1980 sole face. Foot glands are present on fore and hind feet (Haltenorth and Diller 1980). Tail

  18. SEASONALITY OF FISHES OCCUPYING A SURF ZONE HABITAT IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND STEPHEN T. ROSS2 ABSTRACf The ichthyofauna occupying the surfzone habitat ofHom Island, Mississippi tides), increased metabolic efficiency via heat acquisition, and protection from predation. Surf zone occurrences within the surf zone of Horn Island, Miss., a barrier island in the northern Gulf of Mexico

  19. Aalborg Universitet Full Scale Test on a 100km, 150kV AC Cable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    wind farm Horns Rev 2, located in Denmark west coast, to Denmark's 400 kV transmission network from the electrical measurements on a 99.7 km, 150 kV three-phase AC cable, connecting 215 MW offshore

  20. Infragravity energy is dependent on beach slope and incident wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    CHAOTIC SWASH FRONT INTERACTIONS Zachary Williams UNC Wilmington Department of Physics and Physical of nonlinearity ·Natural horn appears linear #12;Thank you to.... Dr. Dylan McNamara Dr. Brian Davis Dr. Daniel Guo Dr. John Morrison Dr. Bill Atwill Dr. Russell Herman #12;

  1. A Century of Shope Papillomavirus in Museum Rabbit Specimens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duch, Clara Escudero; Williams, Richard Alexander John; Timm, Robert M.; Perez-Tris, Javier; Benitez, Laura

    2015-07-06

    Sylvilagus floridanus Papillomavirus (SfPV) causes growth of large horn-like tumors on rabbits. SfPV was described in cottontail rabbits (probably Sylvilagus floridanus) from Kansas and Iowa by Richard Shope in 1933, and detected in S. audubonii...

  2. Updated 1-12 Bryan H. Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as an attorney with the Department of the Navy's Office of the General Counsel (OGC). Initially appointed as ONR Counsel in 2007, he was the first Navy OGC attorney to deploy to a combat zone in his civilian OGC Force-Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) in Djibouti, Africa. Mr. Wood began his career with Navy OGC

  3. Mechanisms of Tempered Martensite Embrittlement in Low Alloy Steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Mechanisms of Tempered Martensite Embrittlement in Low Alloy Steels R. M. HORN AND ROBERT O strength martensitic steels, heat-treated to achieve optimum combinations of strength, ductility, and tough-quenched alloy steels in the range 250 to 450~ (tempered martensite embrittlement). Whereas there is now a large

  4. H A&S 220c Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun Brief presentations for Thursday, 11 Nov.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H A&S 220c Energy and Environment: Life Under the Pale Sun Brief presentations for Thursday, 11 Nov there is some news). It is a sort of strange triangle, Denmark, the US and the natives. 3. Frantz, Horn, Huang

  5. Dove Management in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ben; Johnson, Jason; Roberson, Jay; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Silvy, Nova; Linex, Ricky

    2006-05-03

    snakes, great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and hawks such as Cooper?s hawk (Ac- cipiter cooperi). Great-tailed grackles (Quiscalus mexicanus) are considered to be serious nest predators on white-winged doves in South Texas. Weather and human...

  6. InsideIllinoisNov. 1, 2007 Vol. 27, No. 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Jennifer

    gear of three-quarter-length coats and boots with heavy, encapsulating bunker gear. The current gear en- hances burn protection, but it re- stricts air circulation around the body. The researchers are test- ing and engineering in the College of Engineering. Horn and Denise Smith, a research scientist at IFSI and professor

  7. Stumbling Toward Capitalism: The State, Global Production Networks, and the Unexpected Emergence of China's Independent Auto Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Crystal Whai-ku

    2011-01-01

    electrical grid need to meet the increased electricity demand posed by electric cars,electrical systems, electronic sensors, and actuators have taken over control and monitoring of carElectrical control switch, roof, horn, Charade components Geely‘s suppliers carpet Components from Suppliers of Fuel tank other car

  8. Complex ecology: the part-whole relation in ecosystems Iedited by BernardC. Patten : coedited by Sven E. JQrgensen : with a foreword

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    in apprance, but they are built up horn simple mathematical statements and stotisticol distributionswhich capable of transforming many wastes emanating from human activities into useful compo- nents of regional and global cycles. Excessive waste inputs can. however, overwhelm the natural cycles. In such cases

  9. Injection seeding of a Ti: sapphire laser using a Ramp-Hold-Fire technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Matthew P

    1997-01-01

    An injection seeded Ti:sapphire laser, pumped by the second harmonic of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, has been constructed for use in an experiment that will explore the validity of the Bell-Clauser-Horne inequalities.[] A new technique, Ramp...

  10. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that have only one or a very few number of key ecological functions. Functional specialist species could = Critical functional link species, species that are the only ones that perform a specific ecological Merganser Boreal Toad Wolverine FS Horned Grebe Long-toed Salamander CFLS BIRDS House Finch CFLS Northern

  11. THE TOPHAT EXPERIMENT: A BALLOON-BORNE INSTRUMENT FOR MAPPING MILLIMETER AND SUBMILLIMETER EMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    . Nørgaard-Nielsen Danish Space Research Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark and G. W. Wilson Department . Theradiometer usedcryogenic bolometers coupled to a single feed horn via a dichroic filter system. The observing 1. INTRODUCTION The angular power spectrum of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB

  12. A Simple Measurement Technique for Characterizing Active Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    at the receiver from the AUT. Here we assume that there is no transmission through the ampli- fier with DC bias has recently been described which is suit- able for transmission amplifiers [1]-[3].This technique uses two standard waveguide horn antennas to measure the power transmission through the amplifier cell

  13. International Journal of Offshore and Polar Engineering (ISSN 1053-5381) Copyright by The International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel, Lance

    the Accuracy of Offshore Wind Turbine Reliability-based Design Loads from the Environmental Contour Method Korn-regulated offshore wind turbine. Two different Danish offshore environments, Rødsand and Horns Rev, are considered loads in many applications, including offshore platforms (Winterstein et al., 1993) and onshore wind

  14. ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 2002, 63, 11431151 doi:10.1006/anbe.2002.3011, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beecher, Michael

    ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 2002, 63, 1143­1151 doi:10.1006/anbe.2002.3011, available online at http in populations with low song type sharing. 2002 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour. Published & Young 1986; Shackleton et al. 1991; Horn et al. 1992). Most studies of song matching to date have been

  15. Development of a simple and sensitive fluorimetric method for isolation of coumaphos-hydrolysing bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    -hydrolysing bacteria R.L. Harcourt*, I. Horne, T.D. Sutherland, B.D. Hammock1 , R.J. Russell and J.G. Oakeshott . Incorporation of coumaphos into agar plates allowed the rapid detection of coumaphos-hydrolysing bacteria when tool to screen for bacteria possessing phosphotriesterase activity. INTRODUCTION Organophosphorus (OP

  16. Using Radio Telemetry to Assess Movement Patterns in a Giant Rhinoceros Beetle: Are There Differences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emlen, Douglas J.

    Using Radio Telemetry to Assess Movement Patterns in a Giant Rhinoceros Beetle dichotomus . male dimorphism . movement . radio telemetry Introduction The Japanese horned beetle Trypoxylus of a radio-telemetry study that examined the movement patterns of T. dichotomus major males, minor males

  17. Georgia Institute of Technology Environmental Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NO NA ITEMS TO CHECK Yes NO NA EXTERIOR LIGHTS Vehicle is free of fluid leaks? High & low beam Windshield Wipers are good? Horn Works? UNDER HOOD Gauges works? Adequate Coolant Level? Fuel Level > ¼ tank? Battery is free of leaks? Back-up alarm works? Windshield washer fluid? Heating, Air Conditioner

  18. EXPLORING BROADBAND GRB BEHAVIOR DURING -RAY EMISSION S. A. Yost,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    . Hardin,9 D. Horns,2 U¨ . K5z5loglu,13 H. A. Krimm,5,14 S. Lepine,15 E. P. Liang,8 J. L. Marshall,7 T. A-III telescope network detected prompt optical emission contemporaneous with the -ray emission of Swift events from the prompt phase onward, and thus the early observations are readily compared to the Swift XRT

  19. On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques Alfredo Pe~na1 for a wind assessment campaign on the transformer/platform of Horns Rev, the world's largest offshore wind masts surrounding the wind farm. LiDAR and SoDAR observations of mean wind speed agree for the first

  20. /fzilsa Vision Res. Vol. 34. No. 22. DD.3005-3012. 1994 0042_6989(94)EOO81-U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    27 Ma-v 1993; in revisedform 13 December 1993 Marr [(1982) Vision, San Francisco, Calif.: Freeman1 (Barrow & Tenenbaum, 1978; Brady, Ponce, Yuille & Asada, 1985; Koenderink, 1990; Marr, 1978, 1982. Horn (1975) and Marr (1978) emphasized the surface orientation map as a means of representing surface

  1. Perception, 1994, volume 23, pages 191-200 Shape from shading. II. Geodesic bisection and alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    transformation which is unavailable in a representa- tional system like Marr and Nishihara's 2.5-D sketch (Marr that envisaged by Marr and Nishihara (1978), Barrow and Tenenbaum (1978), and Horn (1975). Subjects find great of its utility as well as its adequacy. One advantage of a representation of the kind envisaged by Marr

  2. Music at Brasenose Concert Term Card

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Music at Brasenose Concert Term Card Michaelmas Term 2012 All concerts are in Brasenose College Horn Triumph Brass quintet is made up of current and former students of the Royal College of Music repertoire. The quintet aspires to entertain their audiences, whilst maintaining the highest musical

  3. Target R & D LBNE Collaboration Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    are not planning on having an integrated target / horn 1 · Will of course change if appropriate · The R&D effort Hall utilities) David Hickson (Target Hall utilities) Pat Hurh (Target technical components Tariq (Target pile, remote handling) Karl Williams (Target Hall utilities) Tim Wyman (Target Hall

  4. Jean Goubault-Larrecq Fabrice Parrennes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    , Dolev-Yao model, Horn clause, trust assertion, H1 PACS: Partially supported by the ACI jeunes chercheurs "Sécurité informatique, protocoles cryptographiques et détection d'intrusions" and the ACI cryptologie "Psi in standard no- tation (right). The goal is for A and B to exchange their secret texts NA and NB while

  5. Inflammation persistently enhances nocifensive behaviors mediated by spinal group I mGluRs through sustained ERK activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gereau, Robert W. IV

    sustained ERK activation Hita Adwanikara , Farzana Karima,b , Robert W. Gereau IVa,b,* a Division signaling pathways, which involve the extracellular signal- regulated kinases (ERKs), have been implicated but is associated with increased levels of phosphorylated ERK in dorsal horn neurons. We also tested whether

  6. 1Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, South Dakota State University, Box 2140B, Brookings, SD 57007. 2Present address: Bureau of Science Services, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, 2801 Progress Road, Madison, WI 53716. E-mail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) neonates (1 month old) by adult females (>18 months old) is well documented throughout the geographic range of defense of neonates against coyotes by male pronghorn. She reported 2 instances of adult male prong- horn. Our purpose was to report occurrences of antipredator defense of neonatal pronghorn (1 month old

  7. Proceedings of the 2003 Particle Accelerator Conference CONCEPTDESIGN OF THE TARGETEIOFZN SYSTEM FOR THE BNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Proceedings of the 2003 Particle Accelerator Conference CONCEPTDESIGN OF THE TARGETEIOFZN SYSTEM of 20ps duration will flow through the horn at 2.5 Hz repetition rate inducing high compressive forces are the low resistivity, the high strength and the resistance to corrosion and micro-cracking. The pulsed

  8. Quarterly Report for October -December 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Quarterly Report for October - December 1999 Stanford Geothermal Program DE-FG07-99ID13763 #12, 1999), but holding the experimental pressure as close as possible to a constant value. 1.1 BACKGROUND saturation in rocks to obtain steam-water relative permeability curves (Satik and Horne, 1998, Mahiya, 1999

  9. Compressed Sensing Environmental Mapping by an Autonomous Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    Compressed Sensing Environmental Mapping by an Autonomous Robot M. Horning, M. Lin, S. Srinivasan of compressed sens- ing for autonomous robots performing environmental mapping in order to reduce data collection, storage, and transmission requirements. A prototype robot sends data collected over adaptively

  10. Growth and Survival of Immature Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) is Influenced by Bacteria Isolated from Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selinger, Brent

    by Bacteria Isolated from Cattle Manure and Conspecific Larvae M. A. PEROTTI, T. J. LYSYK, L. D. KALISCHUK from cattle manure and seven species were isolated from the gut of larval horn ßy Hematobia irritans (L bacterial species were evaluated by rearing larvae in sterilized cattle manure that was inoculated

  11. September 2011 Dear FL Beef Cattle Producers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    September 2011 Dear FL Beef Cattle Producers, I am the veterinary entomologist for UF-IFAS and am beef cattle producers who have extensively used the Avenger insecticide ear tag on their cattle on beef cattle. However, the horn fly is expected to develop resistance to this chemical as it has most

  12. An early date for cattle from Namaqualand, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An early date for cattle from Namaqualand, South Africa: implications for the origins of herding in southern Africa Jayson Orton1 , Peter Mitchell2 , Richard Klein3 , Teresa Steele4 & K. Ann Horsburgh5 When did cattle come to South Africa? Radiocarbon dates on a newly found cow horn indicates a time

  13. Reducing Pesticide Use in Forestry P R A C T I C E G U I D E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Printed in the United Kingdom on Robert Horne Hello Matt FCPG015/FG(KMA/ECD)/NMS-3500/APR04 Enquiries Summary of specific measures to protect aquatic habitats 123 2.3 Protection of the public 125 Forest users rate 128 Hydraulic spray nozzles 128 Boom/nozzle height 129 #12;iv Managers are advised to seek expert

  14. INFORMATION NETWORKS TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MSIS 5623 INFORMATION NETWORKS TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT Spring 2015 Spears School of Business Oklahoma State University Instructor: Dr. Jeretta Horn Nord, Professor Management Science and Information Systems Classroom: Online Class: http://oc.okstate.edu Contact Information: Office: Business 223 Stillwater Email

  15. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000--000 (0000) Printed 20 August 2008 (MN L A T E X style file v1.3) A Metric and Optimisation Scheme for Microlens Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Keith

    that the planet is detectable is P det # 0.2 (mp/mJ ) 1/2 for ``cool planets'' in the ``lensing zone'', a # 0.3) A Metric and Optimisation Scheme for Microlens Planet Searches Keith Horne 1 , Colin Snodgrass 2 , Yianni by planets near the lens stars. We advocate optimizing microlens planet searches by using an automatic

  16. Solar Energy Applications Page 1 Rev. September 23, 2009 Field Office Serial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    MW Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Trough Located in Maricopa Co. between Harquahala Mtns Horn Mountains and north of I- 10. Pending 5. AZA 034540 Aguila Horizon Wind Energy LLC 3/4/2008 11 Valley Arizona Renewable Ventures 8/12/08 14,765 500 MW CSP Trough Located in Maricopa Co. in Dendora

  17. Neutrino Physics at a Muon Collider K.T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GeV: light Higgs, calibrate on Z0. Cost: > 1$B. Could the case be strengthened by ancillary physics-energy (and ) beams exist in the early stages of a muon collider. 2 #12;Summary of Ancillary Physics than a horn. Bottom line: Present understanding of ancillary physics capabilities does not provide

  18. WilsonBull., 102(3), 1990, pp. 487-500 STOPOVER ON A GULF COAST BARRIER ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Frank R.

    during spring migration on Horn Island, a barrier island along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico studiedwhen they stoppedon a barrier island alongthe coastof Mississippi following springtrans-Gulf migration migration. Stopover areas must be viewed as important links in species'annualcycleif the conservationof

  19. West Virginia University Geology 404, Geology Field Camp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    .geo.wvu.edu/~kammer/geol404.htm Format: Five weeks of geologic field work in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Field areas, Wyoming, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park, and Southwest will include the Black Hills, Big Horn Mountains, Yellowstone National Park, Grand Teton National Park

  20. Mapping of offshore wind resources C. B. Hasager, P. Astrup, M. B. Christiansen, M. Nielsen, A. Pea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oct Nov Dec 1995 - 2005 5 6 7 8 9 10 11Windspeed[m/s] Baltic Sea North Sea Monthly profile of averageMapping of offshore wind resources C. B. Hasager, P. Astrup, M. B. Christiansen, M. Nielsen, A The European Wind Atlas, Risø Weibull fitting: A = scale parameter k = shape parameter #12;Horns Rev, Elsam A

  1. Amazing Images: Summer under the Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    . A females likes them dark. If she mates with one and finds another with a darker breast, she'll bolt. "For bigger horns or giant tusks -- serves to indicate overall suitability for reproduction. The dark red on Keeping Control of Web New 'Biological' Robots Build Themselves People Respond to Computer's Flattery

  2. Derivaciones perezosas en Programaci'on L'ogica con restricciones ecuacionales*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpuente, María

    Derivaciones perezosas en Programaci'on L'ogica con restricciones(H=E) a'una el estilo de programaci'on l'ogica basado en cl'ausulas de Horn, el paradigma* * basado en ecuaciones (condi- cionales) y la programaci'on con restricciones. Como n'ucleo de su sem

  3. Project Title Review mobile device support strategies. This project scope has been broadened from the original request of reviewing departmentally owned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Project Title Review mobile device support strategies. This project scope has been broadened from the original request of reviewing departmentally owned mobile device support strategies. Team Pam Horne, Jolene a more holistic approach to managing and supporting mobile devices that access Purdue data

  4. MODERATION OF COGNITIVE--ACHIEVEMENT RELATIONS FOR CHILDREN WITH SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES: A MULTI-GROUP LATENT VARIABLE ANALYSIS USING CHC THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niileksela, Christopher Robert

    2012-05-31

    --achievement relations. A three-stratum model of cognitive abilities based on Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory was used in the analysis. Results showed that the factor structure and factor loadings of the CHC model were invariant among groups, and SLD group membership...

  5. Mantle upwellings and convective instabilities revealed by seismic tomography and helium isotope geochemistry beneath eastern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montagner, Jean-Paul

    geochemistry beneath eastern Africa Jean-Paul Montagner,1 Bernard Marty,2 Ele´onore Stutzmann,1 De for North and East Africa using a high resolution three-dimensional anisotropic tomographic model derived from seismic data of a French experiment ``Horn of Africa'' and existing broadband data. The joint

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplment au n" 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-142 Magnetic neutron scattering on intermetallic uranium compounds (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    neutron scattering on intermetallic uranium compounds (*) M. Loewenhaupt (f ), S. Horn (**), F. Steglich.- Abstract. -- We report on inelastic neutron scattering experiments performed in the temperature range 5 K quasielastic line. Using thermal neutrons, no inelastic contributions to the magnetic scattering could

  7. Half-metallic to insulating behavior of rare-earth nitrides C. M. Aerts,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    Half-metallic to insulating behavior of rare-earth nitrides C. M. Aerts,1 P. Strange,1 M. Horne,1 W in the literature that rare-earth nitrides may form half-metallic ferromagnets.6­8 This is sur- prising because 30 January 2004 The electronic structure of the rare-earth nitrides is studied systematically using

  8. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 64, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST, 1999); P. 11811192, 10 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Azimuthal variation in P-wave signatures due to fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    the overburden using vertical seismic profiles (VSPs) (Horne and MacBeth, 1997) and in the labora- Published for attenuation in the upper crust at seismic frequencies is intracrack fluid flow. In cracked media period of the workshop on Azimuthal Variations in Seismic Signature (held in conjunction with the 1997

  9. HFSSHFSSHFSSHFSS electronic design automation software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ­ Patches, Dipoles, Horns, Conformal Cell Phone Antennas, Quadrafilar Helix, Specific Absorption Rate West Station Square Drive Suite 200 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 USA Phone:Phone:Phone:Phone: 412-261-3200 Fax EMC/EMI ­ Shield Enclosures, Coupling, Near- or Far-Field Radiation Antennas/Mobile Communications

  10. CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ESCHINGER-BRUCEVILLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -GRANTLINE ELK GROVE-COLTON BOND-ELK GROVE FLORIN SEASONS- BRUCEVILLE APPLE INC STOCKTON- SHELDON MORGAN HILLS- SONOMA HILLS ELK GROVE FLORIN BIG HORN- MEADOWSPRING CARSON ICE SACRAMENTO REGIONAL WWTP CARSON ICE COGEN COSUMNES RANCHO SECO COLONY-WOODS DILLARD-WILTON GRANTLINE-SIEFKER DILLARD-ORANGE ELK GROVE WATERMAN

  11. Pacific AC Intertie (Oregon -Washington -Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willows WILLOWS A LOGAN CREEK & SCHULLER JACINTO PROVIDENT STONY GORGE ELK CREEK Black Butte Lake COVELO LAYTONVILLE FORT BRAGG BIG RIVER ELK WILLITS A POTTER VALLEY MENDOCINO CALPELLA Ukiah MASONITE UKIAH UPPER BRUNSWICK GRASS VALLEY BANGOR DOBBINS COLGATE COLUMBIA HILL CAPE HORN SHADY GLEN BEALE AFB 2 BEALE AFB 1

  12. EXPERTS GUIDE University of Maryland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    ."--Bill Dennison #12;6 ALTERNATIVE ENERGY BIOFUEL--Feng Chen, Associate Professor (IMET): Marine microbial ecology Grant Appalachian Laboratory Horn Point Laboratory Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology #12;3 LEADERSHIP Donald Boesch President Areas of expertise: Marine and estuarine ecology, marine pollution

  13. CX-008786: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lovell, Basin, and Buffalo Bill Substations, Control Building Rehabilitation Projects Big Horn and Park Counties, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.4 Date: 07/02/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  14. The Cowpea Weevil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paddock, F. B. (Floyd B.); Reinhard, H.J.

    1919-01-01

    ) of this work in 1853 he criticizes the "unnatural classif?cation of this famil!.." Horn, in 18'72, places this species in the genus Bruchus, in his revision of the Bruchidne of the.United States. In 1894., Hamil- ton in his "Catalogue of Coleoptera," lists...

  15. KT McDonald Snowmass Frontier Workshop (BNL) Apr 19, 2013 1 The High-Power-Target System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    (in contrast to toroidal magnetic horns) High capture efficiency of low energy / favors use kW flows out of the target system into the downstream beam-transport elements. Total energy Frontier Physics with Muon-Based Accelerators CP Violation in the neutrino sector: The best measurements

  16. Bestiario y metamorfosis en Santísima la nauyaca de Tomás Espinosa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Huidobro, Matí as

    1982-10-01

    ."11 El mito forma parte de una energía y un poder físico e intelectual que se crea y recrea constantemente dentro de las integrantes de una determindada cultura, en cualquier momento y no importa el grado de civilización. De ahí proviene la... notion may have been suggested to them by the observation of certain animals, such as serpents and lizards, which seems to renew their youth by casting their skins and appear refreshed and renovated in new integuments."20 "Thus it appears that some...

  17. Biotransformation and Incorporation into Proteins along a Simulated Terrestrial Food Chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unrine, J.M., B.P. Jackson and W.A. Hopkins

    2007-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element in vertebrates, but there is a narrow concentration range between dietary requirement and toxicity threshold. Although a great deal is known about the biochemistry of Se from a nutritional perspective, considerably less attention has been focused on the specific biochemistry of Se as an environmental toxicant. Recent advances in hyphenated analytical techniques have provided the capability of quantifying specific chemical forms of Se in biological tissues as well as the distribution of Se among macromolecules. We applied liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to investigate biotransformations of selenomethionine along a simulated terrestrial food chain consisting of selenomethionine exposed crickets (Acheta domesticus) fed to western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis). Evidence was obtained for selenomethionine biotransformation as well as for sex-specific differences in the metabolism of Se compounds and their subsequent incorporation into proteins in the lizard. The results demonstrate the complexities involved in trophic transfer of Se due to the potential for extensive biotransformation and the species- and even sex-specific nature of these biotransformations.

  18. THE BNL SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM PROJECT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAPARIA,D.

    2005-01-26

    BNL plans to create a very long base line super neutrino beam facility by upgrading the AGS from the current 0.14 MW to 1.0 MW and beyond. The proposed facility consists of three major components. First is a 1.5 GeV superconducting linac to replace the booster as injector for the AGS, second is the performance upgrade of the AGS itself for higher intensity and repetition rate, and finally is the target and horn system for the neutrino production. The major contribution for the higher power is from the increase of the repetition rate of the AGS from 0.3 Hz to 2.5 Hz, with moderate increase from the intensity. The accelerator design considerations to achieve high intensity and low losses for the new linac and the AGS will be presented. The target and horn design for high power operation and easy maintenance will also be covered.

  19. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  20. Name Email Address Phone Department Chair/Director Allen, Mark mallen@med.wayne.edu 577-0856 Ophthalmology Dr. Mark Juzych X X X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    (DMC) reljarou@med.wayne.edu 745-1283 PM&R-DMC Dr. Lawrence Horn X X X X All WSU/UPG Elliott, John jelliott@med.wayne.edu 429-7977 Ortho Dr. Lawrence Morawa Administrator Elliott, John PM&R Oakwood Dr. Jay ereaves@med.wayne.edu 429-7845 Dermatology Dr. Darius Mehregan X X X Sanderson, Thomas tsanders

  1. West Texas Rain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Commission, Culberson County Underground Water District and county officials to install a 2,500-gallon rainwater harvesting tank at the Culberson County Courthouse. West Texas Rain Rainwater harvesting demonstration sites save water and money (Above... Left) One of the three rainwater harvesting demonstrations is located at the Culberson County Courthouse in Van Horn. This 2,500-gallon tank has been installed to catch and store the rainwater. (Above Right) Landscape irrigation using the harvested...

  2. Conservation Implications of Illegal Bird Trade and Disease Risk in Peru 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daut, Elizabeth Frances

    2015-04-24

    in economic or biological terms, but published reports estimate it at a fourth to a third the value of legal trade (Cook et al. 2002; Ratchford et al. 2013). Illegal wildlife trade, with help from the media, frequently congers images of slaughtered rhinos... ban would decrease demand for wildlife and wildlife products (Cooney & Jepson 2006). Numerous bans or more strictly regulated trade have increased demand in specialty markets, particularly for products with inelastic demand such as for rhino horn...

  3. Foraging behavior of juvenile steller sea lions in the Gulf of Alaska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrader, Wendy Jane

    2007-09-17

    Bernd Würsig Committee Members, Fran Gelwick Doug Biggs Head of Department, Robert Brown May 2006 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences iii ABSTRACT Foraging Behavior of Juvenile Steller Sea Lions... in the Gulf of Alaska. (May 2006) Wendy Jane Schrader, B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Markus Horning Dr. Bernd Würsig Relating the behavior of predators to prey density is an important aspect...

  4. Eighteenth-century colonial American merchant ship construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanHorn, Kellie Michelle

    2005-02-17

    ); and the Charon, Yorktown, Virginia (1778). Finally, two small riverine craft were also considered: the Brown?s Ferry vessel, Black River, South Carolina (pre-1740s) and the Town Point vessel, Pensacola, Florida (1763-1781). Figure 1 shows a map of these vessel...) (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Anthropology iii ABSTRACT Eighteenth-Century Colonial American Merchant Ship Construction. (December 2004) Kellie Michelle VanHorn, B.S., Indiana University Chair of Advisory...

  5. The United States and disarmament, 1921-1934 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Roy

    1968-01-01

    be abolished. To this utterly z idiculous lIsaiah 2 proposal, the lion and tiger, looking sideways at the rhinocerous, declared, "Horns must be abolished. " Siding with the rhinocerous, the bull said, "Paws, and especially claws must be abolished. " "Claws.... Once inside the relative safety of their quarters, the animals began to look upon one another with a friendlier attitude. 2 The Prussian "eagle", the Eritish "lion", the Russian "bear" and all the European powers whose parallels may readily...

  6. Moisture absorption in hybrid composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Dan Laro

    1983-01-01

    Moisture Analysis for Steady State Boundary Conditions", Journal of Com osite Materials, Vol. 15, March 1981, pp. 142-152. 7. Weitsman, Y. , Priorate Communication, Texas A&M University, January 1983. 8. Wirth, Patricia E. and Rodin, Ervin Y. , "A... of Department) December 1983 111. ABSTRACT Moisture Absorption in Hybrid Composites (December 1983) Dan Laro Clark, B. S. Aerospace Engineering Texas A&M University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Comnittee: Dr. Y. Weitsman Dr. W. J. Horn This thesis presents...

  7. Acculturation in the Upper Middle Missouri Valley as Reflected in Modified Bone Assemblages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Timothy

    1986-05-01

    Gliders 207 Piercing Tools (Awls ) • 20 Tubes/Beads 208 Expedient Tools 211 Other Tool Categories 214 Horn Core/Frontal Tools. 21 Fleshing Tools 21 Cancellous Tools 7 Fish Hooks 8 Polished Fragments • • 221 Ochre-Stained Bone 22 Ornaments . • 22... Components 251 Big Hidatsa Original Components 4 Condensed Components 25 Lower Hidatsa 257 Sakakawea 260 Big Hidatsa 3 Other Measures of Change •. •. 266 Metal/Stone Modification 26 Predominant Method of Manufacture.... .. 271 Combined Site Assemblages...

  8. Final Technical Status Report as of January 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-01-12

    This project was completed in January 1996 after a panel of four Licensing Executive Society members met in Boston (December 1995) to discuss the requirements for, incentive of and barriers to licensing horn independent inventors and small businesses. Three team members from Mohawk Research Corporation reviewed and analyzed the discussion notes to reach a series of recommendations which are contained in a report which was submitted in February under separate cover. This completes this project.

  9. Physiological Effects of Rhythmic Melatonin on Peripheral Cells in a Superfusion System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tran, Diana

    2007-09-17

    procedures are detailed in Appendix A and were developed based similar methods used in other cell-culture systems (Horn 2006). After two days of incubation, the coating mixture of collagen and laminin showed to be most compatible with cell growth (Fig 10... be connected to a flow-through system by Luer locks. Pumped media will flow over the cells grown in the coated channels as seen in the (A) side view and (B) top view..............................................22 10 Photos of pinealocytes within...

  10. A void growth model relating fracture toughness and constraint 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Timothy Clark

    1992-01-01

    , Hartwig (member) Dr, , K. Kinra (member) Dr. W, L. Bradley (Head of Department) August 1992 ABSTRACT A Void Model Relating Fracture Toughness and Constraint. (August 1992) Timothy Clark Miller, B. S. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory... bonded). 3 f" ) (a) particles (b) nucleation (c) void grovvtb (d) coalescence Figure 1. Void phenomena and ductile fracture of a metal (Ada@ed horn [11] ) (a) initial state (b) void growth at tip ~ ' ':. ~ . :; -. . e-"""", ? ' " (c...

  11. Elk Hills endangered and threatened species program: Phase 1 progress summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.

    1980-03-01

    The endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and bluntnosed leopard lizard, Crotaphytus silus, are known to occur on the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, NPR-1. An integrated, multiphased field program was designed to gather, synthesize, and interpret ecological information necessary for Biological Assessments required by the Secretary of Interior. These assessments will be used as the basis for a formal consultation with the Department of Interior to determine whether DOE activities on Elk Hills are compatible with the continued existence of the two species. Transects totalling 840 km were walked through all sections of Elk Hills to determine: (1) the presence and relative densities of endangered or threatened species; (2) past and potential impacts of NPR-1 activities on endangered and threatened species; and (3) the potential application of remote sensing for gathering necessary data.

  12. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  13. Field Notebook and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 1101-1707 [2468] (1935-1936) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, William B.

    2012-04-09

    , W base Mt. Diaoio, Contra Costa Co*, Caiif. Jan, 13, 1101? Cbrynorhynus 92-45-10-31 Tr. 11 ?oil. By H. Twining 1102? " 101-48-10-32 Tr. 11 " M " " Stool, Aiameda Co., Caiif. Jan. 30. 1103?acu Screech Owl. (C6?21? by Joy Lesure.). Berkeley Hills... Rogerson Twin Fails County, Idaho. May 13, A horned Owl was heard hooting from the cliffs below the dam last night and again tonight* Aldrich brought in a young Marmot today and reported a large colony on the west side of the canyon. Twining brought...

  14. Insect carriers of cephalosporium diospyri / by Terrence Wayne Jares 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jares, Terrence Wayne

    1978-01-01

    : Plant Pathology INSECT CARRIERS OF CEPHALOSPORIUM DIOSPYRI A Thesis by TERRENCE WAYNE DARES App ed as to style and content by airman of os ttee Hea o Department Member Nem er May 1978 442916 ABSTRACT Insect Carriers of ~te halos orium ~dios i.... (May 19787 Terrence Wayne Jares, B. S. , Texas ANN University; Chairman of Advisory Co((n(ittee: Dr. Eugene P. Van Arsdel Several isolates of ~te halos orium (=~pe(a(o horn( have been isolated from insects that emerged from live, post, and water oak...

  15. Energy deposition and radiological studies for the LBNF Hadron Absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakhno, I L; Tropin, I S; Eidelman, Y I

    2015-01-01

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition and radiological studies performed for the LBNF hadron absorber with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system - all with corresponding radiation shielding - was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable design options.

  16. Engineering of multi-dimensional entangled states of photon pairs using hyper-entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi-Feng Ren; Guo-Ping Guo; Jian Li; Chuan-Feng Li; Guang-Can Guo

    2005-02-01

    Multi-dimensional entangled states have been proven to be more powerful in some quantum information process. In this paper, down-converted photons from spontaneous parametric down conversion(SPDC) are used to engineer multi-dimensional entangled states. A kind of multi-degree multi-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger(GHZ) state can also be generated. The hyper-entangled photons, which are entangled in energy-time, polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM), is proved to be useful to increase the dimension of systems and investigate higher-dimensional entangled states.

  17. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

    1988-06-20

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

  18. Electron beam collector for a microwave power tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dandl, Raphael A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a cylindrical, electron beam collector that efficiently couples the microwave energy out of a high power microwave source while stopping the attendant electron beam. The interior end walls of the collector are a pair of facing parabolic mirrors and the microwave energy from an input horn is radiated between the two mirrors and reassembled at the entrance to the output waveguide where the transmitted mode is reconstructed. The mode transmission through the collector of the present invention has an efficiency of at least 94%.

  19. The Viking Look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landsberg, Melvin

    2000-01-01

    -by-step development, using specially selected cattle as his final animal subjects. By the end of twelve years he felt that the results were positive enough for him to undertake work on humans. “Wanted, volunteer subjects for a well-advanced experiment in growing a... of lesions in their scalps. In vain they were applying antibiotic ointments—and then . . . a horror appeared. As complements to their emerging teeth, the subjects were developing horns on their heads. This hadn’t happened with Jones’ animal subjects. (Of...

  20. University Calendar, April 16, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-16

    . Sponsored by School of Music. Call 785-864-3436. 17 Wednesday Film. Africa World Documentary Film Festival. All-day event. Rooms 3139 and 3140 Wescoe Hall. Free. Sponsored by Department of Film and Media Studies. Call 785-864-3745. Through..., Display, Photovoltaic and Energy Storage Applications.” 4 p.m. Big 12 Room, Kansas Union. Sponsored by Department of Chemistry. Call 785-864-4670. Concert. KU Horn Ensemble. 5 p.m. Swarthout Recital Hall, Murphy Hall. Free. Sponsored by School...

  1. Texas Fever: Experiments Made by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, in Co-operation with the Missouri Experiment Station and the Missouri State Board of Agriculture, in Immunizing Northern Breeding Cattle Against Texas Fever. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connaway, J. W.; Francis, M. (Mark)

    1899-01-01

    of maintaining a quarantined pasture, and the necessity of hand-feeding in the case of calves of non-immune cows; this method is not as desirable as that of blood i?zoculation. In the blood inoculation experiments 0ve.r -200 pure bred catt'le have been used... No. 4 died from accident, having been horned into the manger, probably by a Texas cow that was kept in the same pen. No. 2 and No. 3 improved during tlrc winter, and were put on the grass in the spring in fair condition. In July, 1898, both were...

  2. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duran, Edward L. (Santa Fe, NM); Lundin, Ralph L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation.

  3. Quantum Matching Pennies Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azhar Iqbal; Derek Abbott

    2008-10-21

    A quantum version of the Matching Pennies (MP) game is proposed that is played using an Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm (EPR-Bohm) setting. We construct the quantum game without using the state vectors, while considering only the quantum mechanical joint probabilities relevant to the EPR-Bohm setting. We embed the classical game within the quantum game such that the classical MP game results when the quantum mechanical joint probabilities become factorizable. We report new Nash equilibria in the quantum MP game that emerge when the quantum mechanical joint probabilities maximally violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt form of Bell's inequality.

  4. A Preliminary Reconstruction of the Yassiada Sixteenth-Century Ottoman Wreck 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labbe, Matthew A.

    2010-07-14

    most of the ships in the Ottoman fleet had been destroyed at Gallipoli in 1416.20 Recognizing the strength and value of the Byzantine fleet, the shipyards of Constantinople were quickly commandeered by Mehmed II (1432-1481).21 Most of the shipwrights...-of-the-art shipyard built at Kas?mpa?a on the Golden Horn and expanded existing shipyards at Gallipoli in the Dardanelles and Kad?rga in Constantinople. The navy was also instructed to seek out experienced sailors from around the Mediterranean and Black Sea coasts...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 12_gary_Tuesday 5-21 Facility Performance.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn, NRC

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Cruz_Import Export_NMMSS 2013 Presentation.pptx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn, NRCMonday,

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_JAMES_ANDERSON_UPDATED_2014-5-14 NMMSS Users Annual Training Meeting - Yucca - Andersen.pptx

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn,

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_JESSICA_WHITE-HORTON_NMMSS_2014_JWH+5714+PTS.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn,Emerging

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 1_Thursday 5-23 830 NMMSS_2013_Presentation_Obligations.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3 Recognitions Brian Horn,EmergingWelcome

  10. EA-1710: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i Framing DocumentUnits atisOlympicHornNonradioactive DangerousEnerDel,

  11. EA-1711: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i Framing DocumentUnits atisOlympicHornNonradioactive

  12. Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Yiming; Yuan Chengwei; Qian Baoliang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2012-12-15

    High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF{sub 6} breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF{sub 6} are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF{sub 6} breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF{sub 6} breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF{sub 6} is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

  13. In situ radioglaciological measurements near Taylor Dome, Antarctica and implications for UHE neutrino astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Besson; J. Jenkins; S. Matsuno; J. Nam; M. Smith; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; W. R. Binns; C. Chen; P. Chen; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; R. C. Field; D. Goldstein; P. W. Gorham; A. Goodhue; C. Hast; C. L. Hebert; S. Hoover; M. H. Israel; J. Kowalski; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; E. Lusczek; B. Mercurio; C. Miki; P. Miocinovic; C. J. Naudet; J. Ng; R. Nichol; K. Palladino; K. Reil; A. Romero-Wolf; M. Rosen; L. Ruckman; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; G. S. Varner; D. Walz; F. Wu

    2008-10-07

    Radiowave detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced by neutrino-ice collisions requires an understanding of the radiofrequency (RF) response of cold polar ice. We herein report on a series of radioglaciological measurements performed approximately 10 km north of Taylor Dome Station, Antarctica from Dec. 6, 2006 - Dec. 16, 2006. Using RF signals broadcast from: a) an englacial discone, submerged to a depth of 100 meters and broadcasting to a surface dual polarization horn receiver, and b) a dual-polarization horn antenna on the surface transmitting signals which reflect off the underlying bed and back up to the surface receiver, we have made time-domain estimates of both the real (index-of-refraction) and imaginary (attenuation length) components of the complex ice dielectric constant. We have also measured the uniformity of ice response along two orthogonal axes in the horizontal plane. We observe a wavespeed asymmetry of order 0.1%, projected onto the vertical propagation axis, consistent with some previous measurements, but somewhat lower than others.

  14. In situ radioglaciological measurements near Taylor Dome, Antarctica and implications for UHE neutrino astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, D; Matsuno, S; Nam, J; Smith, M

    2007-01-01

    Radiowave detection of the Cherenkov radiation produced by neutrino-ice collisions requires an understanding of the radiofrequency (RF) response of cold polar ice. We herein report on a series of radioglaciological measurements performed approximately 10 km north of Taylor Dome Station, Antarctica from Dec. 6, 2006 - Dec. 16, 2006. Using RF signals broadcast from: a) an englacial discone, submerged to a depth of 100 meters and broadcasting to a surface dual polarization horn receiver, and b) a dual-polarization horn antenna on the surface transmitting signals which reflect off the underlying bed and back up to the surface receiver, we have made time-domain estimates of both the real (index-of-refraction) and imaginary (attenuation length) components of the complex ice dielectric constant. We have also measured the uniformity of ice response along two orthogonal axes in the horizontal plane. We observe a wavespeed asymmetry of order 0.1%, projected onto the vertical propagation axis, consistent with some previ...

  15. THE BNL SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WENG,W-T.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-12-02

    To determine the neutrino mixing amplitudes and phase accurately, as well as the CP violation parameters, a very long base line super neutrino beam facility is needed. This is possible due to the long distance and wideband nature of the neutrino beam for the observation of several oscillations from one species of the neutrino to the other [1,2]. BNL plans to upgrade the AGS proton beam from the current 0.14 MW to higher than 1.0 MW and beyond for such a neutrino facility which consists of three major subsystems. First is a 1.5 GeV superconducting linac to replace the booster as injector for the AGS, second is the performance upgrade for the AGS itself for the higher intensity and repetition rate, and finally is target and horn system for the neutrino production. The major contribution for the higher power is from the increase of the repetition rate of the AGS form 0.3 Hz to 2.5 Hz, with moderate increase from the intensity [3]. The design consideration to achieve high intensity and low losses for the linac and the AGS will be reviewed. The target horn design for high power operation and easy maintenance will also be presented.

  16. A high-elevation, multi-proxy biotic and environmental record of MIS 6–4 from the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site, Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian M. Miller; Mitchell A. Plummer; Various Others

    2014-10-01

    In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the ocean–atmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010–2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5

  17. Results of preconstruction surveys used as a management technique for conserving endangered species and their habitats on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.T.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Johnson, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    In 1976 an intensive program of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate was initiated on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) in western Kern County, California. In a Biological Opinion required by the Endangered Species Act, the US Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that proposed construction and production activities may jeopardize the continued existence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus, inhabiting the Reserve. DOE committed itself to carrying out a compensation/mitigation plan to offset impacts of program activities on endangered species and their habitats. One compensation/mitigation strategy was to develop and implement preconstruction surveys to assess potential conflicts between proposed construction activities, and endangered species and their critical habitats, and to propose reasonable and prudent alternatives to avoid conflicts. Between 1980 and 1984, preconstruction surveys were completed for 296 of a total of 387 major construction projects encompassing 3590 acres. Fewer than 22% of the projects potentially conflicted with conservation of endangered species, and most conflicts were easily resolved by identifying sensitive areas that required protection. Only 8% of the projects received minor modification in their design or locations to satisfy conservation needs, and only three projects had to be completely relocated. No projects were cancelled or delayed because of conflicts with endangered species, and costs to conduct preconstruction surveys were minimal. 27 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillman, Jack B.

    2008-09-01

    In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

  19. Naval Petroleum Reserves in California site environmental report for calendar year 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This summary for Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) is divided into NPR-1 and NPR-2. Monitoring efforts at NPR-1 include handling and disposal of oilfield wastes; environmental preactivity surveys for the protection of endangered species and archaeological resources; inspections of topsoil stockpiling; monitoring of revegetated sites; surveillance of production facilities for hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions; monitoring of oil spill prevention and cleanup; and monitoring of wastewater injection. No major compliance issues existed for NPR-1 during 1989. Oil spills are recorded, reviewed for corrective action, and reported. Environmental preactivity surveys for proposed projects which may disturb or contaminate the land are conducted to prevent damage to the federally protected San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Tipton kangaroo rat and the giant kangaroo rat. Projects are adjusted or relocated as necessary to avoid impact to dens, burrows, or flat-bottomed drainages. A major revegetation program was accomplished in 1989 for erosion control enhancement of endangered species habitat. The main compliance issue on NPR-2 was oil and produced water discharges into drainages by lessees. An additional compliance issue on NPR-2 is surface refuse from past oilfield operations. 17 refs.

  20. Endangered Species Program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Chevron USA. Production Company (CPDN). Four federally-listed endangered animal species and one federally-threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, giant kangaroo rat, Tipton kangaroo rat, and Hoover`s wooly-star. All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, which declares that it is ``...the policy of Congress that all Federal departments and agencies shall seek to conserve endangered species and threatened species and shall utilize their authorities in furtherance of the purposes of the Act.`` DOE is also obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The major objective of the EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc. Endangered Species Program on NPRC is to provide DOE with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the Endangered Species Act. The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress and results of the Endangered Species Program made during fiscal year 1993.

  1. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, annual report FY97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC) are oil fields administered by the DOE in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California. Four federally endangered animal species and one federally threatened plant species are known to occur on NPRC: San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), blunt-nosed leopard lizard (Gambelia silus), giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens), Tipton kangaroo rat (Dipodomys nitratoides), and Hoover`s wooly-star (Eriastrum hooveri). All five are protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973. The DOE/NPRC is obliged to determine whether actions taken by their lessees on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will have any effects on endangered species or their habitats. The primary objective of the Endangered Species and Cultural Resources Program is to provide NPRC with the scientific expertise necessary for compliance with the ESA, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). The specific objective of this report is to summarize progress, results, and accomplishments of the program during fiscal year 1997 (FY97).

  2. Endangered species and cultural resources program Naval petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY96

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    In FY96, Enterprise Advisory Services, Inc. (EASI) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on federal properties. Population monitoring activities were conducted for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. Kit fox abundance and distribution was assessed by live-trapping over a 329-km{sup 2} area. Kit fox reproduction and mortality were assessed by radiocollaring and monitoring 22 adults and two pups. Reproductive success and litter size were determined through live-trapping and den observations. Rates and sources of kit fox mortality were assessed by recovering dead radiocollared kit foxes and conducting necropsies to determine cause of death. Abundance of coyotes and bobcats, which compete with kit foxes, was determined by conducting scent station surveys. Kit fox diet was assessed through analysis of fecal samples collected from live-trapped foxes. Abundance of potential prey for kit foxes was determined by conducting transect surveys for lagornorphs and live-trapping small mammals.

  3. Multiplexing scheme for simplified entanglement-based large-alphabet quantum key distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dada, Adetunmise C

    2015-01-01

    We propose a practical quantum cryptographic scheme which combines high information capacity, such as provided by high-dimensional quantum entanglement, with the simplicity of a two-dimensional Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell test for security verification. By applying a state combining entanglement in a two-dimensional degree of freedom, such as photon polarization, with high-dimensional correlations in another degree of freedom, such as photon orbital angular momentum (OAM) or path, the scheme provides a considerably simplified route towards security verification in quantum key distribution (QKD) aimed at exploiting high-dimensional quantum systems for increased secure key rates. It also benefits from security against collective attacks and is feasible using currently available technologies.

  4. Dewatering Treatment Scale-up Testing Results of Hanford Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tedeschi, A.R.; May, T.H.; Bryan, W.E.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process. (authors)

  5. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  6. Effects of Grassland Restoration on Avian Assemblage Characteristics and Dickcissel Nesting Success in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lituma, Christopher M.

    2010-07-14

    Naturalist 110: 1?13. Stake, M. M., F. R. Thompson, J. Faaborg, and D. E. Burhans. 2005. Patterns of snake predation at songbird nests in Missouri and Texas. Journal of Herpetology 39: 215?222. Van Horne, B. 1983. Density as a misleading indicator...?2008. C ou n t y S i z e ( h a) D I C K A b u n d . E ve n n e s s C ou n t y S i z e ( h a) D I C K A b u n d . E ve n n e s s W a s h i n g t on 34 0 0. 81 W a s h i n g t on 29 0. 43 0. 69 N a v a r r o 34 0. 13 0. 82 C ol or a do 29 0. 3 0. 8 N a...

  7. The Circumstellar Envelope of pi Gru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. Knapp; K. Young; M. Crosas

    1999-03-23

    CO(J = 2-1) and SiO(J = 5-4) emission has been observed from the molecular envelope around the nearby S star pi Gru. The CO line profile differs from the usual parabolic shape seen in uniformly expanding envelopes; it has a Voigt-like profile and two horns. A model for line formation in the envelope shows that a tilted, expanding disk reproduces the observations well. The star also has a fast molecular wind, with a projected outflow speed of at least 70 and perhaps as high as 90 km/s. The fast wind is presumably ejected from the poles of the disk. These observations show that the complex structure seen in many planetary nebulae, including quadrupolar structure and fast winds, may largely evolve from structure formed while the progenitor star is in the last stages of evolution on the AGB.

  8. The 1.3 mm Full-Stokes Polarization System at CARMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Charles L H

    2015-01-01

    The CARMA 1.3 mm polarization system consists of dual-polarization receivers that are sensitive to right- (R) and left-circular (L) polarization, and a spectral-line correlator that measures all four cross polarizations (RR, LL, LR, RL) on each of the 105 baselines connecting the 15 telescopes. Each receiver comprises a single feed horn, a waveguide circular polarizer, an orthomode transducer (OMT), two heterodyne mixers, and two low-noise amplifiers (LNAs), all mounted in a cryogenically cooled dewar. Here we review the basics of polarization observations, describe the construction and performance of key receiver components (circular polarizer, OMT, and mixers -- but not the correlator), and discuss in detail the calibration of the system, particularly the calibration of the R-L phase offsets and the polarization leakage corrections. The absolute accuracy of polarization position angle measurements was checked by mapping the radial polarization pattern across the disk of Mars. Transferring the Mars calibrati...

  9. Experimental demonstration of a compact high efficient relativistic magnetron with directly axial radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Wei; Liu Yonggui; Shu Ting; Yang Hanwu; Fan Yuwei; Yuan Chengwei; Zhang Jun [College of Optoelectric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2012-01-15

    A compact relativistic magnetron with axial microwave radiation is experimentally investigated. Under the modified magnetic field distribution, only connecting a special horn antenna in the axial direction, the relativistic magnetron can stably radiate high power and high efficiency microwaves. The total length of the device is {approx}0.3 m, and the volume is {approx}0.014m{sup 3}. In such working condition that the applied voltage is 539 kV and the magnetic field is {approx}0.38 T, the output microwave power is {approx}1.24 GW. Correspondingly, the total efficiency is about 34.1%. The radiating frequency is 2.35GHz, which is in agreement with the {pi} mode frequency of the theoretical expectation.

  10. Modified magnetic field distribution in relativistic magnetron with diffraction output for compact operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Wei; Liu Yonggui [College of Opto-Electric Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha, Hunan 410073 (China)

    2011-02-15

    A modified magnetic field distribution in relativistic magnetron with diffraction output (MDO) for compact operation is proposed in this paper. The principle of how the modified magnetic field confines electrons drifting out of the interaction space is analyzed. The results of the particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the MDO with the modified magnetic field distribution show that the output power of the MDO is improved, and the long cylindrical waveguide used for collecting the drifting electrons can be omitted. The latter measure allows the horn antenna of the MDO to produce more focused energy with better directivity in the far field than it does with the long cylindrical waveguide. The MDO with the modified magnetic field distribution promises to be the real most compact narrow band high power microwave source.

  11. DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-01-23

    This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

  12. Automated Search for new Quantum Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Zeilinger, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts a number of at first sight counterintuitive phenomena. It is therefore a question whether our intuition is the best way to find new experiments. Here we report the development of the computer algorithm Melvin which is able to find new experimental implementations for the creation and manipulation of complex quantum states. And indeed, the discovered experiments extensively use unfamiliar and asymmetric techniques which are challenging to understand intuitively. The results range from the first implementation of a high-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, to a vast variety of experiments for asymmetrically entangled quantum states - a feature that can only exist when both the number of involved parties and dimensions is larger than 2. Additionally, new types of high-dimensional transformations are found that perform cyclic operations. Melvin autonomously learns from solutions for simpler systems, which significantly speeds up the discovery rate of more complex experim...

  13. Violation of Bell's inequality with a quantum dot in a tapered nanowire waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus D. Jöns; Lucas Schweickert; Marijn A. M. Versteegh; Dan Dalacu; Philip J. Poole; Angelo Gulinatti; Andrea Giudice; Val Zwiller; Michael E. Reimer

    2015-10-13

    We present a bright and directional polarization-entangled photon-pair source generated by a photonic nanostructure that violates Bell's inequality. The solid-state quantum light source is an InAsP quantum dot in a tapered InP nanowire waveguide. Utilizing quasi-resonant excitation at the wurtzite InP nanowire resonance reduces multi-photon emission resulting in an entanglement fidelity of $F=0.835\\,\\pm\\,0.004$ without temporal post-selection. The performed Bell test using the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality reveals clear violation ($S_{\\text{CHSH}}>2$) of the local hidden variable theory by 3.5 standard deviations and highlights the possible application in source-independent quantum key distribution.

  14. The shadow interpretation versus quantum paradoxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leffler, Warren

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the consequences of denying the "emptiness of paths not taken," EPNT, premise of Bernstein, Greenberger, Horne, and Zeilinger (BGHZ) in their paper titled, Bell theorem without inequalities.[ ] Carrying out the negation of EPNT leads to the concept of a "shadow stream." Streams are essentially particle implementations of the paths in Feynman path-integrals, resulting in a simple and consistent extension of the standard axioms for quantum mechanics. The construct provides elegant resolutions of single- and multi-particle interference paradoxes. Moreover, combining the argument of this paper with that of BGHZ shows that there are just two choices for quantum foundations: interpretations closely similar to the present one or those that harbor instantaneous action at a distance.

  15. Testing tripartite Mermin inequalities by spectral joint-measurements of qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, J S; Wei, L F

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that Bell inequality supporting the local realism can be violated in quantum mechanics. Numerous tests of such a violation have been demonstrated with bipartite entanglements. Using spectral jointmeasurements of the qubits, we here propose a scheme to test the tripartite Mermin inequality (a three-qubit Bell-type inequality) with three qubits dispersively-coupled to a driven cavity. First, we show how to generate a three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state by only one-step quantum operation. Then, spectral joint-measurements are introduced to directly confirm such a tripartite entanglement. Assisted by a series of single-qubit operations, these measurements are further utilized to test the Mermin inequality. The feasibility of the proposal is robustly demonstrated by the present numerical experiments.

  16. A biomechanical modeling study of the effects of the orbicularis oris muscle and jaw posture on lip shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavness, Ian; Perrier, Pascal; Demolin, Didier; Payan, Yohan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors' general aim is to use biomechanical models of speech articulators to explore how possible variations in anatomical structure contribute to differences in articulatory strategies and phone systems across human populations. Specifically, they investigated 2 issues: (a) the link between lip muscle anatomy and variability in lip gestures and (b) the constraints of coupled lip/jaw biomechanics on jaw posture in labial sounds. Method: The authors used a model coupling the jaw, tongue, and face. First, the influence of the orbicularis oris (OO) anatomical implementation was analyzed by assessing how changes in depth (from epidermis to the skull) and peripheralness (proximity to the lip horn center) affected lip shaping. Second, the capability of the lip/jaw system to generate protrusion and rounding, or labial closure, was evaluated for different jaw heights. Results: Results showed that a peripheral and moderately deep OO implementation is most appropriate for protrusion and rounding; a superf...

  17. Practical and efficient experimental characterization of multiqubit stabilizer states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiara Greganti; Marie-Christine Roehsner; Stefanie Barz; Mordecai Waegell; Philip Walther

    2015-02-23

    Vast developments in quantum technology have enabled the preparation of quantum states with more than a dozen entangled qubits. The full characterization of such systems demands distinct constructions depending on their specific type and the purpose of their use. Here we present a method that scales linearly with the number of qubits for characterizing stabilizer states. Our approach allows simultaneous extraction of information about the fidelity, the entanglement, and the nonlocality of the state and thus is of high practical relevance. We demonstrate the efficient applicability of our method by performing an experimental characterization of a photonic four-qubit cluster state and three- and four-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. Our scheme can be directly extended to larger-scale quantum information tasks.

  18. Energy deposition studies for the LBNE beam absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakhno, Igor L; Tropin, Igor S

    2015-01-01

    Results of detailed Monte Carlo energy deposition studies performed for the LBNE absorber core and the surrounding shielding with the MARS15 code are described. The model of the entire facility, that includes a pion-production target, focusing horns, target chase, decay channel, hadron absorber system -- all with corresponding radiation shielding -- was developed using the recently implemented ROOT-based geometry option in the MARS15 code. This option provides substantial flexibility and automation when developing complex geometry models. Both normal operation and accidental conditions were studied. Various design options were considered, in particular the following: (i) filling the decay pipe with air or helium; (ii) the absorber mask material and shape; (iii) the beam spoiler material and size. Results of detailed thermal calculations with the ANSYS code helped to select the most viable absorber design options.

  19. Setting in the Modern Short Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Elizabeth

    1913-06-05

    . Tlte Am r oan Slort-8tor¥. ewood, N. J., 1 12. r. TA Philo8op!?'y of the ftlort- • Y., 1 01. Pit ln, alter B., T Art and. B iness of StOJ1'y r1t1n. N. Y., 1 12. Phil080ph¥ or Composition, horne' 8 TaJ. 8. 1842. Q~irk, Lesl! • Ko to Writ N. Y., 1... 04. III. ColI otlons _ ............ Short-story. Bal n, ,Ch e. S. Am rio n Short-storie. 1 04. Co,d-Y f Sherwin. Tlt Q rld t 8 B st Short- at or Cb1oaso, 1 11. . .. , • De; son, • J'. and Coning b,y .. Great l1ne1Ueh art ... ator.V' r1 t ere...

  20. Operational Status and Power Upgrade Prospects of the Neutrino Experimental Facility at J-PARC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taku Ishida; for the T2K Beam Group

    2015-03-08

    In order to explore CP asymmetry in the lepton sector, a power upgrade to the neutrino experimental facility at J-PARC is a key requirement for both the Tokai to Kamioka (T2K) long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment and a future project with Hyper-Kamiokande. Based on five years of operational experience, the facility has achieved stable operation with 230 kW beam power without significant problems on the beam-line apparatus. After successful maintenance works in 2013-2014 to replace all electromagnetic horns and a production target, the facility is now ready to accomodate a 750-kW-rated beam. Also, the possibility of achieving a few to multi-MW beam operation is discussed in detail.

  1. Coherent detection of metal-metal terahertz quantum cascade lasers with improved emission characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Anthony; Beere, Harvey E.; Ritchie, David A. [Semiconductor Physics, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Freeman, Joshua R., E-mail: j.r.freeman@leeds.ac.uk; Cavalié, Pierrick; Maysonnave, Jean; Tignon, Jérôme; Dhillon, Sukhdeep S. [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Supérieure, CNRS (UMR 8551), Université P. et M. Curie, Université D. Diderot, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-02-24

    Coherent detection of emission from quantum cascade lasers with metal-metal waveguides is demonstrated through free-space coupling of a THz pulse to the sub-wavelength waveguide. We implement a simple, monolithic planar horn antenna design on the metal-metal waveguide that reduces the impedance mis-match to the waveguide. The resulting devices show up to 10 times more directed output power than conventional metal-metal waveguides. This enhanced coupling to free-space allows a more efficient injection of broad-band THz pulses into the waveguide. Through this, we are able to seed the laser emission and coherently detect the laser emission by electro-optic sampling.

  2. Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larsen, David A. (Clifton Park, NY); Bacchi, David P. (Schenectady, NY); Connors, Timothy F. (Watervliet, NY); Collins, III, Edwin L. (Albany, NY)

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

  3. Design of a Doppler reflectometer for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K. D., E-mail: kdlee@nfri.re.kr; Nam, Y. U.; Seo, Seong-Heon; Kim, Y. S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    A Doppler reflectometer has been designed to measure the poloidal propagation velocity on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It has the operating frequency range of V-band (50-75 GHz) and the monostatic antenna configuration with extraordinary mode (X-mode). The single sideband modulation with an intermediate frequency of 50 MHz is used for the heterodyne measurement with the 200 MHz in-phase and quadrature (I/Q) phase detector. The corrugated conical horn antenna is used to approximate the Gaussian beam propagation and it is installed together with the oversized rectangular waveguides in the vacuum vessel. The first commissioning test of the Doppler reflectometer system on the KSTAR tokamak is planned in the 2014 KSTAR experimental campaign.

  4. Relationships between stress corrosion cracking tests and utility operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baum, Allen

    1999-10-22

    Several utility steam generator and stress corrosion cracking databases are synthesized with the view of identifying the crevice chemistry that is most consistent with the plant cracking data. Superheated steam and neutral solution environments are found to be inconsistent with the large variations in the observed SCC between different plants, different support plates within a plant, and different crevice locations. While the eddy current response of laboratory tests performed with caustic chemistries approximates the response of the most extensively affected steam generator tubes, the crack propagation kinetics in these tests differ horn plant experience. The observations suggest that there is a gradual conversion of the environment responsible for most steam generator ODSCC from a concentrated, alkaline-forming solution to a progressively more steam-enriched environment.

  5. Post-Selection Loophole-Free Bell Test over an Installed Optical Fiber Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvacho, Gonzalo; Saavedra, Gabriel; Cuevas, Álvaro; Fuenzalida, Jorge; Toledo, Felipe; Figueroa, Miguel; Cabello, Adán; Larsson, Jan-Åke; Mataloni, Paolo; Lima, Gustavo; Xavier, Guilherme B

    2015-01-01

    Device-independent (DI) quantum communication will require a loophole-free violation of Bell inequalities. In typical scenarios where line-of-sight between the communicating parties is not available, it is convenient to use energy-time entangled photons due to intrinsic robustness while propagating over optical fibers. Here we show an energy-time Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality violation with two parties separated by 3.7 km over the deployed optical fiber network belonging to the University of Concepci\\'on in Chile. Remarkably, this violation is free of the post-selection loophole affecting all previous in-field long-distance energy-time experiments. Our work takes a further step towards a fiber-based loophole-free Bell test, which is highly desired for secure quantum communication due to the widespread existing telecommunication infrastructure.

  6. Postselection-Loophole-Free Bell Test Over an Installed Optical Fiber Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalo Carvacho; Jaime Cariñe; Gabriel Saavedra; Álvaro Cuevas; Jorge Fuenzalida; Felipe Toledo; Miguel Figueroa; Adán Cabello; Jan-Åke Larsson; Paolo Mataloni; Gustavo Lima; Guilherme B. Xavier

    2015-07-14

    Device-independent (DI) quantum communication will require a loophole-free violation of Bell inequalities. In typical scenarios where line-of-sight between the communicating parties is not available, it is convenient to use energy-time entangled photons due to intrinsic robustness while propagating over optical fibers. Here we show an energy-time Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt Bell inequality violation with two parties separated by 3.7 km over the deployed optical fiber network belonging to the University of Concepci\\'on in Chile. Remarkably, this is the first Bell violation with spatially separated parties that is free of the post-selection loophole, which affected all previous in-field long-distance energy-time experiments. Our work takes a further step towards a fiber-based loophole-free Bell test, which is highly desired for secure quantum communication due to the widespread existing telecommunication infrastructure.

  7. Plans for Neutrino Super Beams in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dracos, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. The first part of these facilities consists of an intense proton driver producing a beam higher than a MW power. The protons hit a target able to afford the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to produce elements able to resist to the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from the LHC upgrades. For this reason, the initial design of these upgrades has to include the possibility to go to high power facilities.

  8. Comparative biosedimentology of some terraced travertine deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J.D.; Des Marais, D.J. (NASA, Moffett Field, CA (United States). Ames Research Center)

    1992-01-01

    The authors have compared several travertine spring systems representing a range of thermal regimes and geological settings. The goal is to derive a facies model for terraced travertine deposits that integrates biological influences on sedimentary fabric and microstructure. The springs chosen for comparison include Asta Spring (Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone; [le] 85 C), Angel Terrace (Mammoth Group, Yellowstone; [le] 72 C), and Big Horn Spring, Wyoming ([le] 56 C). At the highest temperatures microbial mats are absent and primary structures are dense, botryoidal masses of calcite exhibiting radial acicular fabrics. At intermediate temperatures a variety of mat types and associated sedimentary fabrics were observed, their distribution being correlated with temperature and flow velocity. Two types of current-oriented streamer fabrics were observed, a type at 72--74 C formed by the precipitation of aragonite on surfaces of a finely-filamentous bacterial species resembling Thiothrix, and a second type at 45--55 C, formed by aragonite blades associated with thin microbial mats dominated by Spirulina that appear to bind small dumbell-shaped crystals of aragonite. In quiet water at 45--50 C, microbial mats dominated by species of Phormidium formed tufted mats associated with ridged networks and open fenestral fabrics. At Big Horn Spring, a filamentous eukaryotic alga forms mats in lower terracette ponds at < 40 C. Moving down the system, algal-coated pisoids up to 1 cm. became abundant. Algal filaments were able to retain mm-sized pisoids on spillways, where they had become embedded in terracette faces. All of the biogenic fabrics noted above survive early diagenesis, and have been identified in Holocene and Pleistocene travertines.

  9. Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1992-01-31

    PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

  10. Endangered species program Naval Petroleum Reserves in California. Annual report FY94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In FY94, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to conserve endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 400 preactivity surveys covering approximately 315 acres were conducted in FY94. Mitigation measures implemented as a result of survey findings resulted in avoidance of incidental takes of listed species during construction activities. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. Third-party projects in FY94 included three pipeline projects and two well abandonment/clean-up projects. Cultural resource support provided to NPRC consisted primarily of conducting preliminary surveys for cultural resources, and preparing a Cultural Resource Management Plan and Programmatic Agreement for NPR-1. These two documents will be finalized in FY95. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY94, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was initiated to assess reclamation efficacy. Results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In addition to this effort, 347 reclaimed sites were assessed to evaluate reclamation success.

  11. Endangered species and cultural resources program, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California: Annual report FY95

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In FY95, EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc. (EG and G/EM) continued to support efforts to protect endangered species and cultural resources at the Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC). These efforts are conducted to ensure NPRC compliance with regulations regarding the protection of listed species and cultural resources on Federal properties. Population monitoring activities are conducted annually for San Joaquin kit foxes, giant kangaroo rats, blunt-nosed leopard lizards, and Hoover`s wooly-star. To mitigate impacts of oil field activities on listed species, 674 preactivity surveys covering approximately 211 hectares (521 acres) were conducted in FY95. EG and G/EM also assisted with mitigating effects from third-party projects, primarily by conducting biological and cultural resource consultations with regulatory agencies. EG and G/EM has conducted an applied habitat reclamation program at NPRC since 1985. In FY95, an evaluation of revegetation rates on reclaimed and non-reclaimed disturbed lands was completed, and the results will be used to direct future habitat reclamation efforts at NPRC. In FY95, reclamation success was monitored on 50 sites reclaimed in 1985. An investigation of factors influencing the distribution and abundance of kit foxes at NPRC was initiated in FY94. Factors being examined include habitat disturbance, topography, grazing, coyote abundance, lagomorph abundance, and shrub density. This investigation continued in FY95 and a manuscript on this topic will be completed in FY96. Also, Eg and G/EM completed collection of field data to evaluate the effects of a well blow-out on plant and animal populations. A final report will be prepared in FY96. Finally, EG and G/EM completed a life table analysis on San Joaquin kit foxes at NPRC.

  12. Long distance nu_e -> nu_mu transitions and CP-violation with high intensity beta-beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Rubbia

    2013-06-10

    The recent experimental determinations of a large theta_13 angle have opened the way to a determination of the mass hierarchy and of the CP-violating phase. Experiments based on horn produced (anti-)neutrino conventional beams are presently under development. The event rates are marginal for a definitive search, since they require very intense beams and extremely large detector masses. Zucchelli has proposed a method in which pure (anti-)nu_e beams are generated by the beta-decay of relativistic radio-nuclides stored in a high energy storage ring pointing towards a far away neutrino detector. Since they have a much smaller transverse momentum distribution, the neutrino flux will be much more narrowly concentrated than with a horn. The isomeric doublet Li-8 (anti-nu_e, tau_1/2=0.84s) and B-8 (nu_e, tau_1/2=0.77s) has been studied. Neutrino and antineutrino beams are produced with an average transverse momentum of about 6.5 MeV/c. Radioactive ions may be generated with a dedicated table-top storage ring to supply a suitable ion source to be accelerated at high energies either at FNAL or at CERN. Ions should then extracted from the accelerator and accumulated in a decay storage ring with a long straight section pointing toward the neutrino detector. A massive detector based on liquid Argon technology is probably offering the best opportunities for such future programme. The present ICARUS LAr-TPC experiment has already collected at LNGS events in the relevant neutrino energy region. They should provide a first evidence for a conclusive experimental study of the competing signals and more generally for the actual feasibility of the beta-beam option in a search of the CP violating phase. Additional data may be provided in the near future with the ICARUS and MicroBooNe neutrino experiments located at a short distance neutrino beam and that will collect a much larger number of neutrino events.

  13. Testing CPT conservation using the NuMI neutrino beam with the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auty, David John; /Sussex U.

    2010-05-01

    The MINOS experiment was designed to measure neutrino oscillation parameters with muon neutrinos. It achieves this by measuring the neutrino energy spectrum and flavor composition of the man-made NuMI neutrino beam 1km after the beam is formed and again after 735 km. By comparing the two spectra it is possible to measure the oscillation parameters. The NuMI beam is made up of 7.0% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, which can be separated from the {nu}{sub {mu}} because the MINOS detectors are magnetized. This makes it possible to study {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations separately from those of muon neutrinos, and thereby test CPT invariance in the neutrino sector by determining the {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillation parameters and comparing them with those for {nu}{sub {mu}}, although any unknown physics of the antineutrino would appear as a difference in oscillation parameters. Such a test has not been performed with beam {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} before. It is also possible to produce an almost pure {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam by reversing the current through the magnetic focusing horns of the NuMI beamline, thereby focusing negatively, instead of positively charged particles. This thesis describes the analysis of the 7% {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} component of the forward horn current NuMI beam. The {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} of a data sample of 3.2 x 10{sup 20} protons on target analysis found 42 events, compared to a CPT conserving prediction of 58.3{sub -7.6}{sup +7.6}(stat.){sub -3.6}{sup +3.6}(syst.) events. This corresponds to a 1.9 {sigma} deficit, and a best fit value of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} = 18 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23} = 0.55. This thesis focuses particularly on the selection of {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} events, and investigates possible improvements of the selection algorithm. From this a different selector was chosen, which corroborated the findings of the original selector. The thesis also investigates how the systematic errors affect the precision of {Delta}{bar m}{sub 32}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}}{sub 23}. Furthermore, it describes a study to determine the gains of the PMTs via the single-photoelectron spectrum. The results were used as a crosscheck of the gains determined at higher intensities by an LED-based light-injection system.

  14. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

  15. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1991-01-25

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  16. Generation and complete nondestructive analysis of hyperentanglement assisted by nitrogen-vacancy centers in resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian Liu; Mei Zhang

    2015-07-22

    We present two efficient schemes for the deterministic generation and the complete nondestructive analysis of hyperentangled Bell states in both the polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom (DOFs) of two-photon systems, assisted by the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamonds coupled to microtoroidal resonators as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). With the input-output process of photons, two-photon polarization-spatial hyperentangled Bell states can be generated in a deterministic way and their complete nondestructive analysis can be achieved. These schemes can be generalized to generate and analyze hyperentangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states of multi-photon systems as well. Compared with previous works, these two schemes relax the difficulty of their implementation in experiment as it is not difficult to obtain the $\\pi$ phase shift in single-sided NV-cavity systems. Moreover, our schemes do not require that the transmission for the uncoupled cavity is balanceable with the reflectance for the coupled cavity. Our calculations show that these schemes can reach a high fidelity and efficiency with current technology, which may be a benefit to long-distance high-capacity quantum communication with two DOFs of photon systems.

  17. Short-duration radio bursts with apparent extragalactic dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saint-Hilaire, P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Benz, A. O.; Monstein, C., E-mail: shilaire@ssl.berkeley.edu [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the longest yet undertaken search for apparently extragalactic radio bursts at the Bleien Radio Observatory covering 21,000 hr (898 days). The data were searched for events of less than 50 ms FWHM duration showing a ?{sup –2} drift in the spectrogram characteristic of the delay of radio waves in plasma. We have found five cases suggesting dispersion measures between 350 and 400 cm{sup –3} pc while searching in the range of 75-2000 cm{sup –3} pc. Four of the five events occurred between 10:27 and 11:24 a.m. local civil time. The only exception occurred at night with the full Moon in the beam. It was an event that poorly fits plasma dispersion, but had the characteristics of a solar Type III burst. However, we were not able to confirm that it was a lunar reflection. All events were observed with a log-periodic dipole within 6800 hr, but none with a more directional horn antenna observing the rest of the time. These properties suggest a terrestrial origin of the 'peryton' type reported before. However, the cause of these events remains ambiguous.

  18. Loss-tolerant hybrid measurement test of CHSH inequality with weakly amplified N00N states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falk Töppel; Magdalena Stobi?ska

    2015-02-18

    Although our understanding of Bell's theorem and experimental techniques to test it have improved over the last 40 years, thus far all Bell tests have suffered at least from the detection or the locality loophole. Most photonic Bell tests rely on inefficient discrete-outcome measurements, often provided by photon counting detection. One possible way to close the detection loophole in photonic Bell tests is to involve efficient continuous-variable measurements instead, such as homodyne detection. Here, we propose a test of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality that applies photon counting and homodyne detection on weakly amplified two-photon N00N states. The scheme suggested is remarkably robust against experimental imperfections and suits the limits of current technology. As amplified quantum states are considered, our work also contributes to the exploration of entangled macroscopic quantum systems. Further, it may constitute an alternative platform for a loophole-free Bell test, which is also important for quantum-technological applications.

  19. The MINERvA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Deborah A.; Kopp, Sacha; /Fermilab

    2011-03-18

    The MINERvA experiment is a dedicated cross-section experiment whose aim is to measure neutrino cross sections for inclusive and exclusive final states on several nuclei. The detector is fully commissioned and began running in March 2010. As a dedicated cross-section experiment, MINERvA has a particular need to know the incident neutrino flux: both the absolute level and the energy dependence. In these proceedings we describe the MINERvA detector, give an update on the experimental status, and discuss the means to determine the neutrino flux. The MINERvA experiment is now running and has completed 25% of its full Low Energy run. There are various techniques planned for understanding the flux, including taking neutrino data at several different beam configurations. The experiment has gotten a first glimpse of two of the six configurations, and completed four horn current scans. Because of its exclusive final state reconstruction capabilities MINERvA can provide the much needed input for current and future oscillation experiments. The inclusive final state measurements and comparisons of nuclear effects across as many states as possible will provide new insights into neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  20. Geometric phase in entangled systems: A single-neutron interferometer experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sponar, S.; Klepp, J.; Loidl, R.; Durstberger-Rennhofer, K.; Badurek, G.; Hasegawa, Y. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Filipp, S. [Department of Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 16, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bertlmann, R. A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Rauch, H. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Institut Laue-Langevin, Boite Postale 156, F-38042 Grenoble CEDEX 9 (France)

    2010-04-15

    The influence of the geometric phase on a Bell measurement, as proposed by Bertlmann et al. [Phys. Rev. A 69, 032112 (2004)] and expressed by the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, has been observed for a spin-path-entangled neutron state in an interferometric setup. It is experimentally demonstrated that the effect of geometric phase can be balanced by a change in Bell angles. The geometric phase is acquired during a time-dependent interaction with a radiofrequency field. Two schemes, polar and azimuthal adjustment of the Bell angles, are realized and analyzed in detail. The former scheme yields a sinusoidal oscillation of the correlation function S, dependent on the geometric phase, such that it varies in the range between 2 and 2{radical}(2) and therefore always exceeds the boundary value 2 between quantum mechanic and noncontextual theories. The latter scheme results in a constant, maximal violation of the Bell-like CHSH inequality, where S remains 2{radical}(2) for all settings of the geometric phase.

  1. Experimental investigation of the dynamics of entanglement: Sudden death, complementarity, and continuous monitoring of the environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Salles; F. Melo; M. P. Almeida; M. Hor-Meyll; S. P. Walborn; P. H. Souto Ribeiro; L. Davidovich

    2008-04-30

    We report on an experimental investigation of the dynamics of entanglement between a single qubit and its environment, as well as for pairs of qubits interacting independently with individual environments, using photons obtained from parametric down-conversion. The qubits are encoded in the polarizations of single photons, while the interaction with the environment is implemented by coupling the polarization of each photon with its momentum. A convenient Sagnac interferometer allows for the implementation of several decoherence channels and for the continuous monitoring of the environment. For an initially-entangled photon pair, one observes the vanishing of entanglement before coherence disappears. For a single qubit interacting with an environment, the dynamics of complementarity relations connecting single-qubit properties and its entanglement with the environment is experimentally determined. The evolution of a single qubit under continuous monitoring of the environment is investigated, demonstrating that a qubit may decay even when the environment is found in the unexcited state. This implies that entanglement can be increased by local continuous monitoring, which is equivalent to entanglement distillation. We also present a detailed analysis of the transfer of entanglement from the two-qubit system to the two corresponding environments, between which entanglement may suddenly appear, and show instances for which no entanglement is created between dephasing environments, nor between each of them and the corresponding qubit: the initial two-qubit entanglement gets transformed into legitimate multiqubit entanglement of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) type.

  2. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadimitriou, Vaia

    2011-01-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the stat...

  3. Status of the Design of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, R; Childress, S C; Moore, C D; Papadimitriou, V; Campbell, M R

    2013-01-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota, about 1300 km away. The neutrinos are produced as follows: First, protons extracted from the MI-10 section of the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target above grade and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into a 250 m long decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a...

  4. Status of the Design of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, R.; Chen, A.Z.; Childress, S.C.; Moore, C.D.; Papadimitriou, V.; /Fermilab; Campbell, M.R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota, about 1300 km away. The neutrinos are produced as follows: First, protons extracted from the MI-10 section of the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target above grade and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into a 200 m long decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the modelling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW in order to enable the facility to run with an upgraded accelerator complex. We discuss here the status of the design and the associated challenges.

  5. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

  6. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaia Papadimitriou

    2011-12-04

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

  7. Design of the LBNE Beamline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadimitriou, V; Hylen, J; Kobilarcik, T; Marchionni, A; Moore, C D; Schlabach, P; Tariq, S

    2015-01-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a wide band beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, about 1,300 km away. The main elements of the facility are a primary proton beamline and a neutrino beamline. The primary proton beam (60 -120 GeV) will be extracted from the MI-10 section of Fermilab's Main Injector. Neutrinos are produced after the protons hit a solid target and produce mesons which are sign selected and subsequently focused by a set of magnetic horns into a 204 m long decay pipe where they decay mostly into muons and neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account the physics goals, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~1.2 MW, however the facility is desi...

  8. Harnessing high-dimensional hyperentanglement through a biphoton frequency comb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Zhenda; Shrestha, Sajan; Xu, XinAn; Liang, Junlin; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Bienfang, Joshua C; Restelli, Alessandro; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Wong, Franco N C; Wong, Chee Wei

    2015-01-01

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental resource for secure information processing and communications, where hyperentanglement or high-dimensional entanglement has been separately proposed towards high data capacity and error resilience. The continuous-variable nature of the energy-time entanglement makes it an ideal candidate for efficient high-dimensional coding with minimal limitations. Here we demonstrate the first simultaneous high-dimensional hyperentanglement using a biphoton frequency comb to harness the full potential in both energy and time domain. The long-postulated Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum revival is exhibited, with up to 19 time-bins, 96.5% visibilities. We further witness the high-dimensional energy-time entanglement through Franson revivals, which is observed periodically at integer time-bins, with 97.8% visibility. This qudit state is observed to simultaneously violate the generalized Bell inequality by up to 10.95 deviations while observing recurrent Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt S-parameters up to...

  9. Barchan dune corridors: field characterization and investigation of control parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicham Elbelrhiti; Bruno Andreotti; Philippe Claudin

    2007-07-10

    The structure of the barchan field located between Tarfaya and Laayoune (Atlantic Sahara, Morocco) is quantitatively investigated and compared to that in La Pampa de la Joya (Arequipa, Peru). On the basis of field measurements, we show how the volume, the velocity and the output sand flux of a dune can be computed from the value of its body and horn widths. The dune size distribution is obtained from the analysis of aerial photographs. It shows that these fields are in a statistically homogeneous state along the wind direction and present a `corridor' structure in the transverse direction, in which the dunes have a rather well selected size. Investigating the possible external parameters controlling these corridors, we demonstrate that none among topography, granulometry, wind and sand flux is relevant. We finally discuss the dynamical processes at work in these fields (collisions and wind fluctuations), and investigate the way they could regulate the size of the dunes. Furthermore we show that the overall sand flux transported by a dune field is smaller than the maximum transport that could be reached in the absence of dunes, i.e. in saltation over the solid ground.

  10. Automated Search for new Quantum Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Krenn; Mehul Malik; Robert Fickler; Radek Lapkiewicz; Anton Zeilinger

    2015-09-09

    Quantum mechanics predicts a number of at first sight counterintuitive phenomena. It is therefore a question whether our intuition is the best way to find new experiments. Here we report the development of the computer algorithm Melvin which is able to find new experimental implementations for the creation and manipulation of complex quantum states. And indeed, the discovered experiments extensively use unfamiliar and asymmetric techniques which are challenging to understand intuitively. The results range from the first implementation of a high-dimensional Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, to a vast variety of experiments for asymmetrically entangled quantum states - a feature that can only exist when both the number of involved parties and dimensions is larger than 2. Additionally, new types of high-dimensional transformations are found that perform cyclic operations. Melvin autonomously learns from solutions for simpler systems, which significantly speeds up the discovery rate of more complex experiments. The ability to automate the design of a quantum experiment can be applied to many quantum systems and allows the physical realization of quantum states previously thought of only on paper.

  11. Demonstrating genuine multipartite entanglement and nonseparability without shared reference frames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celal Furkan Senel; Thomas Lawson; Marc Kaplan; Damian Markham; Eleni Diamanti

    2015-04-02

    Multipartite nonlocality is of great fundamental interest and constitutes a useful resource for many quantum information protocols. However, demonstrating it in practice, by violating a Bell inequality, can be difficult. In particular, standard experimental setups require the alignment of distant parties' reference frames, which can be challenging or impossible in practice. In this work we study the violation of certain Bell inequalities, namely the Mermin, Mermin-Klyshko and Svetlichny inequalities, without shared reference frames, when parties share a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state. Furthermore, we analyse how these violations demonstrate genuine multipartite features of entanglement and nonlocality. For 3, 4 and 5 parties, we show that it is possible to violate these inequalities with high probability, when the parties choose their measurements from the three Pauli operators, defined only with respect to their local frames. Moreover, the probability of violation, and the amount of violation, are increased when each party chooses their measurements from the four operators describing the vertices of a tetrahedron. We also consider how many randomly chosen measurement directions are needed to violate the Bell inequalities with high probability. We see that the obtained levels of violation are sufficient to also demonstrate genuine multipartite entanglement and nonseparability. Finally, we show analytically that choosing from two measurement settings per party is sufficient to demonstrate the maximum degree of genuine multipartite entanglement and nonseparability with certainty when the parties' reference frames are aligned in one direction so that they differ only in rotations around one axis.

  12. The Molecular Architecture for the Intermediate Filaments of Hard ? -Keratin Based on the Superlattice Data Obtained from a Study of Mammals Using Synchrotron Fibre Diffraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    James, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    High- and low-angle X-ray diffraction studies of hard ? -keratin have been studied, and various models have been proposed over the last 70 years. Most of these studies have been confined to one or two forms of alpha keratin. This high- and low-angle synchrotron fibre diffraction study extends the study to cover all available data for all known forms of hard ? -keratin including hairs, fingernails, hooves, horn, and quills from mammals, marsupials, and a monotreme, and it confirms that the model proposed is universally acceptable for all mammals. A complete Bragg analysis of the meridional diffraction patterns, includingmore »multiple-time exposures to verify any weak reflections, verified the existence of a superlattice consisting of two infinite lattices and three finite lattices. An analysis of the equatorial patterns establishes the radii of the oligomeric levels of dimers, tetramers, and intermediate filaments (IFs) together with the centre to centre distance for the IFs, thus confirming the proposed helices within helices molecular architecture for hard ? -keratin. The results verify that the structure proposed by Feughelman and James meets the criteria for a valid ? -keratin structure. « less

  13. Signatures of Horndeski gravity on the Dark Matter Bispectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Bellini; Raul Jimenez; Licia Verde

    2015-05-12

    We present a detailed study of second-order matter perturbations for the general Horn- deski class of models. Being the most general scalar-tensor theory having second-order equations of motion, it includes many known gravity and dark energy theories and General Relativity with a cosmological constant as a specific case. This enables us to estimate the leading order dark matter bispectrum generated at late-times by gravitational instability. We parametrize the evolution of the first and second-order equations of motion as proposed by Bellini and Sawicki (2014), where the free functions of the theory are assumed to be proportional to the dark energy density. We show that it is unnatural to have large 10% ( 1%) deviations of the bispectrum introducing even larger ~ 30% (~ 5%) deviations in the linear growth rate. Considering that measurements of the linear growth rate have much higher signal-to-noise than bispectrum measurements, this indicates that for Horndeski models which reproduce the expansion history and the linear growth rate as predicted by GR the dark matter bispectrum kernel can be effectively modelled as the standard GR one. On the other hand, an observation of a large bispectrum deviation that can not be explained in terms of bias would imply either that the evolution of perturbations is strongly different than the evolution predicted by GR or that the theory of gravity is exotic (e.g., breaks the weak equivalence principle) and/or fine-tuned.

  14. Low cost impulse compatible wideband antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenbury, Erwin T. (Livermore, CA); Burke, Gerald J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Tracy, CA); Stever, Robert D. (Lathrop, CA); Governo, George K. (Livermore, CA); Mullenhoff, Donald J. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    An antenna apparatus and method for building the antenna is disclosed. Impulse signals travel through a feed point of the antenna with respect to a ground plane. A geometric fin structure is connected to the feed point, and through a termination resistance to the ground plane. A geometric ridge structure connected to the ground is positioned with respect to the fin in order to receive and radiate electromagnetic energy from the impulse signal at a predetermined impedance and over a predetermined set of frequencies. The fin and ridge can be either a wire or a planar surface. The fin and ridge may be disposed within a radiation cavity such as a horn. The radiation cavity is constructed of stamped and etched metal sheets bent and then soldered together. The fin and ridge are also formed from metal sheets or wires. The fin is attached to the feed point and then to the cavity through a termination resistance. The ridge is attached to the cavity and disposed with respect to the fin in order to achieve a particular set of antenna characteristics.

  15. Method and apparatus for optimized sampling of volatilizable target substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for capturing, from gases such as soil gas, target analytes. Target analytes may include emanations from explosive materials or from residues of explosive materials. The apparatus employs principles of sorption common to solid phase microextraction, and is best used in conjunction with analysis means such as a gas chromatograph. To sorb target analytes, the apparatus functions using various sorptive structures to capture target analyte. Depending upon the embodiment, those structures may include 1) a conventional solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber, 2) a SPME fiber suspended in a capillary tube (with means provided for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the suspended fiber), and 3) a capillary tube including an interior surface on which sorptive material (similar to that on the surface of a SPME fiber) is supported (along with means for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the sorptive material). In one disclosed embodiment, at least one such sorptive structure is associated with an enclosure including an opening in communication with the surface of a soil region potentially contaminated with buried explosive material such as unexploded ordnance. Emanations from explosive materials can pass into and accumulate in the enclosure where they are sorbed by the sorptive structures. Also disclosed is the use of heating means such as microwave horns to drive target analytes into the soil gas from solid and liquid phase components of the soil.

  16. Method and apparatus for optimized sampling of volatilizable target substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Phelan, James M.

    2004-10-12

    An apparatus for capturing, from gases such as soil gas, target analytes. Target analytes may include emanations from explosive materials or from residues of explosive materials. The apparatus employs principles of sorption common to solid phase microextraction, and is best used in conjunction with analysis means such as a gas chromatograph. To sorb target analytes, the apparatus functions using various sorptive structures to capture target analyte. Depending upon the embodiment, those structures may include a capillary tube including an interior surface on which sorptive material (similar to that on the surface of a SPME fiber) is supported (along with means for moving gases through the capillary tube so that the gases come into close proximity to the sorptive material). In one disclosed embodiment, at least one such sorptive structure is associated with an enclosure including an opening in communication with the surface of a soil region potentially contaminated with buried explosive material such as unexploded ordnance. Emanations from explosive materials can pass into and accumulate in the enclosure where they are sorbed by the sorptive structures. Also disclosed is the use of heating means such as microwave horns to drive target analytes into the soil gas from solid and liquid phase components of the soil.

  17. Various quantum nonlocality tests with a simple 2-photon entanglement source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomarico, Enrico; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Rochdi, Anas; Gisin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Nonlocality is a fascinating and counterintuitive aspect of Nature, revealed by the violation of a Bell inequality. The standard and easiest configuration in which Bell inequalities can be measured has been proposed by Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH). However, alternative nonlocality tests can also be carried out. In particular, Bell inequalities requiring multiple measurement settings can provide deeper fundamental insights about quantum nonlocality as well as offering advantages in the presence of noise and detection inefficiency. In this article we show how these nonlocality tests can be performed using a commercially available source of entangled photon pairs. We report the violation of a series of these nonlocality tests (I3322, I4422 and chained inequalities). With the violation of the chained inequality with 4 settings per side we put an upper limit at 0.49 on the local content of the states prepared by the source (instead of 0.63 attainable with CHSH). We also quantify the amount of true randomness ...

  18. Hacking energy-time entanglement-based systems with classical light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Jogenfors; Ashraf M. Elhassan; Johan Ahrens; Mohamed Bourennane; Jan-Åke Larsson

    2014-11-26

    Photonic systems based on energy-time entanglement have been proposed to test local realism using the Bell inequality. A violation of this inequality normally also certifies security of device-independent quantum key distribution, so that an attacker cannot eavesdrop or control the system. Here, we show how this security test can be circumvented in energy-time entangled systems when using standard avalanche photodetectors, allowing an attacker to compromise the system without leaving a trace. With tailored pulses of classical light we reach Bell values up to 3.63 at 97.6% detector efficiency which is an extreme violation. This is the first demonstration of a violation-faking source that both gives tunable violation and high detector efficiency. The implications are severe: the standard Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality cannot be used to show device-independent security for standard postselecting energy-time entanglement setups. We conclude with suggestions of improved tests and experimental setups that can re-establish device-independent security.

  19. Storage of hyperentanglement in a solid-state quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey Tiranov; Jonathan Lavoie; Alban Ferrier; Philippe Goldner; Varun B. Verma; Sae Woo Nam; Richard P. Mirin; Adriana E. Lita; Francesco Marsili; Harald Herrmann; Christine Silberhorn; Nicolas Gisin; Mikael Afzelius; Felix Bussieres

    2015-02-27

    Two photons can simultaneously share entanglement between several degrees of freedom such as polarization, energy-time, spatial mode and orbital angular momentum. This resource is known as hyperentanglement, and it has been shown to be an important tool for optical quantum information processing. Here we demonstrate the quantum storage and retrieval of photonic hyperentanglement in a solid-state quantum memory. A pair of photons entangled in polarization and energy-time is generated such that one photon is stored in the quantum memory, while the other photon has a telecommunication wavelength suitable for transmission in optical fibre. We measured violations of a Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality for each degree of freedom, independently of the other one, which proves the successful storage and retrieval of the two bits of entanglement shared by the photons. Our scheme is compatible with long-distance quantum communication in optical fibre, and is in particular suitable for linear-optical entanglement purification for quantum repeaters.

  20. A new, very massive modular Liquid Argon Imaging Chamber to detect low energy off-axis neutrinos from the CNGS beam. (Project MODULAr)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baibussinov, B; Battistoni, G; Benetti, P; Borio, A; Calligarich, E; Cambiaghi, M; Cavanna, F; Centro, Sandro; Cocco, A G; Dolfini, R; Berzolari, A Gigli; Farnese, C; Fava, A; Ferrari, A; Fiorillo, G; Gibin, D; Guglielmi, A M; Mannocchi, G; Mauri, F; Menegolli, A; Meng, G; Montanari, C; Palamara, O; Periale, L; Piazzoli, A; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Rappoldi, A; Raselli, G L; Rubbia, Carlo; Sala, P; Satta, G; Varanini, F; Ventura, Sandro; Vignoli, C

    2007-01-01

    The paper is considering an opportunity for the CERN/GranSasso (CNGS) neutrino complex, concurrent time-wise with T2K and NOvA, to search for theta_13 oscillations and CP violation. Compared with large water Cherenkov (T2K) and fine grained scintillators (NOvA), the LAr-TPC offers a higher detection efficiency and a lower backgrounds, since virtually all channels may be unambiguously recognized. The present proposal, called MODULAr, describes a 20 kt fiducial volume LAr-TPC, following very closely the technology developed for the ICARUS-T60o, and is focused on the following activities, for which we seek an extended international collaboration: (1) the neutrino beam from the CERN 400 GeV proton beam and an optimised horn focussing, eventually with an increased intensity in the framework of the LHC accelerator improvement program; (2) A new experimental area LNGS-B, of at least 50000 m3 at 10 km off-axis from the main Laboratory, eventually upgradable to larger sizes. A location is under consideration at about ...

  1. Harnessing high-dimensional hyperentanglement through a biphoton frequency comb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhenda Xie; Tian Zhong; Sajan Shrestha; XinAn Xu; Junlin Liang; Yan-Xiao Gong; Joshua C. Bienfang; Alessandro Restelli; Jeffrey H. Shapiro; Franco N. C. Wong; Chee Wei Wong

    2015-06-13

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental resource for secure information processing and communications, where hyperentanglement or high-dimensional entanglement has been separately proposed towards high data capacity and error resilience. The continuous-variable nature of the energy-time entanglement makes it an ideal candidate for efficient high-dimensional coding with minimal limitations. Here we demonstrate the first simultaneous high-dimensional hyperentanglement using a biphoton frequency comb to harness the full potential in both energy and time domain. The long-postulated Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum revival is exhibited, with up to 19 time-bins, 96.5% visibilities. We further witness the high-dimensional energy-time entanglement through Franson revivals, which is observed periodically at integer time-bins, with 97.8% visibility. This qudit state is observed to simultaneously violate the generalized Bell inequality by up to 10.95 deviations while observing recurrent Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt S-parameters up to 2.76. Our biphoton frequency comb provides a platform in photon-efficient quantum communications towards the ultimate channel capacity through energy-time-polarization high-dimensional encoding.

  2. Exact Fourier expansion in cylindrical coordinates for the three-dimensional Helmholtz Green function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John T. Conway; Howard S. Cohl

    2009-10-07

    A new method is presented for Fourier decomposition of the Helmholtz Green Function in cylindrical coordinates, which is equivalent to obtaining the solution of the Helmholtz equation for a general ring source. The Fourier coefficients of the Helmholtz Green function are split into their half advanced+half retarded and half advanced-half retarded components. Closed form solutions are given for these components in terms of a Horn function and a Kampe de Feriet function, respectively. The systems of partial differential equations associated with these two-dimensional hypergeometric functions are used to construct a fourth-order ordinary differential equation which both components satisfy. A second fourth-order ordinary differential equation for the general Fourier coefficent is derived from an integral representation of the coefficient, and both differential equations are shown to be equivalent. Series solutions for the various Fourier coefficients are also given, mostly in terms of Legendre functions and Bessel/Hankel functions. These are derived from the closed form hypergeometric solutions or an integral representation, or both. Numerical calculations comparing different methods of calculating the Fourier coefficients are presented.

  3. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-01-26

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  4. Economics of power plant district and process heating in Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1981-04-01

    The economic feasibility of utilizing hot water from nuclear reactors to provide district heating for private residences in Richland, Washington, and space and process heating for nearby offices, part of the Hanford Reservation, and the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant is assessed. Specifically, the practicality of using hot water from the Washington Public Power Supply System's WNP-1 reactor, which is currently under construction on the Hanford Reservation, just north of the City of Richland is established. World-wide experience with district heating systems and the advantages of using these systems are described. The GEOCITY computer model used to calculate district heating costs is described and the assumptions upon which the costs are based are presented. District heating costs for the city of Richland, process heating costs for the Lamb-Weston potato processing plant, district heating costs for the Horn Rapids triangle area, and process heating costs for the 300 and 3000 areas are discussed. An economic analysis is discussed and institutional restraints are summarized. (MCW)

  5. Alternative Scenarios of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions: II. Particle Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. B. Ivanov

    2013-06-04

    Particle production in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei is analyzed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 GeV $\\le \\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\le$ 62.4 GeV. The analysis is performed within the three-fluid model employing three different equations of state (EoS): a purely hadronic EoS, an EoS with the first-order phase transition and that with a smooth crossover transition. It is found that the hadronic scenario fails to reproduce experimental yields of antibaryons (strange and nonstrange), starting already from lower SPS energies, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 5 GeV. Moreover, at energies above the top SPS one, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 17.4 GeV, the mid-rapidity densities predicted by the hadronic scenario considerably exceed the available RHIC data on all species. At the same time the deconfinement-transition scenarios reasonably agree (to a various extent) with all the data. The present analysis demonstrates certain advantage of the deconfinement-transition EoS's. However, all scenarios fail to reproduce the strangeness enhancement in the incident energy range near 30A GeV (i.e. a horn anomaly in the $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio) and yields of $\\phi$-mesons at 20A--40A GeV.

  6. Method and apparatus for reducing range ambiguity in synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kare, Jordin T. (San Ramon, CA)

    1999-10-26

    A modified Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system with reduced sensitivity to range ambiguities, and which uses secondary receiver channels to detect the range ambiguous signals and subtract them from the signal received by the main channel. Both desired and range ambiguous signals are detected by a main receiver and by one or more identical secondary receivers. All receivers are connected to a common antenna with two or more feed systems offset in elevation (e.g., a reflector antenna with multiple feed horns or a phased array with multiple phase shift networks. The secondary receiver output(s) is (are) then subtracted from the main receiver output in such a way as to cancel the ambiguous signals while only slightly attenuating the desired signal and slightly increasing the noise in the main channel, and thus does not significantly affect the desired signal. This subtraction may be done in real time, or the outputs of the receivers may be recorded separately and combined during signal processing.

  7. A Proposal for a Three Detector Short-Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Program in the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Acciarri; C. Adams; R. An; C. Andreopoulos; A. M. Ankowski; M. Antonello; J. Asaadi; W. Badgett; L. Bagby; B. Baibussinov; B. Baller; G. Barr; N. Barros; M. Bass; V. Bellini; P. Benetti; S. Bertolucci; K. Biery; H. Bilokon; M. Bishai; A. Bitadze; A. Blake; F. Boffelli; T. Bolton; M. Bonesini; J. Bremer; S. J. Brice; C. Bromberg; L. Bugel; E. Calligarich; L. Camilleri; D. Caratelli; B. Carls; F. Cavanna; S. Centro; H. Chen; C. Chi; E. Church; D. Cianci; A. G. Cocco; G. H. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. Convery; G. De Geronimo; A. Dermenev; R. Dharmapalan; S. Dixon; Z. Djurcic; S. Dytmam; B. Eberly; A. Ereditato; J. Esquivel; J. Evans; A. Falcone; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; B. T. Fleming; W. M. Foreman; J. Freestone; T. Gamble; G. Garvey; V. Genty; M. Geynisman; D. Gibin; S. Gninenko; D. Göldi; S. Gollapinni; N. Golubev; M. Graham; E. Gramellini; H. Greenlee; R. Grosso; R. Guenette; A. Guglielmi; A. Hackenburg; R. Hänni; O. Hen; J. Hewes; J. Ho; G. Horton-Smith; J. Howell; A. Ivashkin; C. James; C. M. Jen; R. A. Johnson; B. J. P. Jones; J. Joshi; H. Jostlein; D. Kaleko; L. N. Kalousis; G. Karagiorgi; W. Ketchum; B. Kirby; M. Kirby; M. Kirsanov; J. Kisiel; J. Klein; J. Klinger; T. Kobilarcik; U. Kose; I. Kreslo; V. A. Kudryavtsev; Y. Li; B. Littlejohn; D. Lissauer; P. Livesly; S. Lockwitz; W. C. Louis; M. Lüthi; B. Lundberg; F. Mammoliti; G. Mannocchi; A. Marchionni; C. Mariani; J. Marshall; K. Mavrokoridis; N. McCauley; N. McConkey; K. McDonald; V. Meddage; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; I. Mercer; T. Miao; T. Miceli; G. B. Mills; D. Mladenov; C. Montanari; D. Montanari; J. Moon; M. Mooney; C. Moore; Z. Moss; M. H. Moulai; S. Mufson; R. Murrells; D. Naples; M. Nessi; M. Nicoletto; P. Nienaber; B. Norris; F. Noto; J. Nowak; S. Pal; O. Palamara; V. Paolone; V. Papavassiliou; S. Pate; J. Pater; Z. Pavlovic; J. Perkin; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; P. P?o?ski; S. Pordes; R. Potenza; G. Pulliam; X. Qian; L. Qiuguang; J. L. Raaf; V. Radeka; R. Rameika; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; P. N. Ratoff; B. Rebel; M. Richardson; L. Rochester; M. Rossella; C. Rubbia; C. Rudolf von Rohr; B. Russell; P. Sala; A. Scaramelli; D. W. Schmitz; A. Schukraft; W. Seligman; M. H. Shaevitz; B. Sippach; E. Snider; J. Sobczyk; M. Soderberg; S. Söldner-Rembold; M. Spanu; J. Spitz; N. Spooner; D. Stefan; J. St. John; T. Strauss; R. Sulej; C. M. Sutera; A. M. Szelc; N. Tagg; C. E. Taylor; K. Terao; M. Thiesse; L. Thompson; M. Thomson; C. Thorn; M. Torti; F. Tortorici; M. Toups; C. Touramanis; Y. Tsai; T. Usher; R. Van de Water; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli; T. Wachala; M. Weber; D. Whittington; P. Wilson; S. Wolbers; T. Wongjirad; K. Woodruff; M. Xu; T. Yang; B. Yu; A. Zani; G. P. Zeller; J. Zennamo; C. Zhang

    2015-03-05

    A Short-Baseline Neutrino (SBN) physics program of three LAr-TPC detectors located along the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab is presented. This new SBN Program will deliver a rich and compelling physics opportunity, including the ability to resolve a class of experimental anomalies in neutrino physics and to perform the most sensitive search to date for sterile neutrinos at the eV mass-scale through both appearance and disappearance oscillation channels. Using data sets of 6.6e20 protons on target (P.O.T.) in the LAr1-ND and ICARUS T600 detectors plus 13.2e20 P.O.T. in the MicroBooNE detector, we estimate that a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino appearance can be performed with ~5 sigma sensitivity for the LSND allowed (99% C.L.) parameter region. In this proposal for the SBN Program, we describe the physics analysis, the conceptual design of the LAr1-ND detector, the design and refurbishment of the T600 detector, the necessary infrastructure required to execute the program, and a possible reconfiguration of the BNB target and horn system to improve its performance for oscillation searches.

  8. Spin and Wind Directions: Identifying Entanglement in Nature and Cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diederik Aerts; Sandro Sozzo

    2015-07-31

    We performed a cognitive experiment in which we asked the participants to pick a pair of directions they considered as the 'preferred good example of two different wind directions'. The results of the experiment reveal that the 'Clauser Horne Shimony Holt' (CHSH) form of Bell inequalities is violated. The violation is significant and, amazingly enough, numerically almost equal to the violation of the CHSH inequality in coincidence spin measurements on a compound system of two quantum particles in an entangled spin state. Hence, it seems as if the human mind selects probabilistically on wind directions and their difference in the same way as Stern-Gerlach apparata select probabilistically on spin directions and their difference. As in the quantum case, our violation reveals that entanglement systematically occurs in human cognition, and that non-classical probabilistic structures of a quantum type are needed in the modeling of cognitive processes. We support this result by presenting a quantum theoretical model in Hilbert space, which exactly reproduces the collected data and further illustrates the analogies between quantum and cognitive entities.

  9. Development of a Dispatchable PV Peak Shainv System. PV: Bonus Program - Phase 1 Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Delmarva Power and Light and its subcontractors in Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy's PV:BONUS Program. The purpose of the program is to develop products and systems for buildings which utilize photovoltaic (N) technology. Beginning with a cooperative research effort with the University of Delaware's Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research Delmarva Power developed and demonstrated the concept of Dispatchable PV Peak Shaving. This concept and the system which resulted horn the development work are unique from other grid-connected PV systems because it combines a PV, battery energy storage, power conversion and control technologies into an integrated package. Phase 1 began in July 1993 with the installation of a test and demonstration system at Delmarva's Northern Division General Office building near Newark, Delaware. Following initial testing throughout the summer and fall of 1993, significant modifications were made under an amendment to the DOE contract. Work on Phase 1 concluded in the early spring of 1995. Significant progress towards the goal of commercializing the system was made during Phase 1, and is summarized. Based on progress in Phase 1, a proposal to continue the work in Phase 2 was submitted to the US DOE in May 1995. A contract amendment and providing funds for the Phase 2 work is expected in July 1995.

  10. An estimate of the error caused by the elongation of the wavelength in a focused beam in free-space electromagnetic parameters measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, En Guo, Gaofeng; Xu, Jiadi; Wang, Chao

    2014-09-15

    A pair of spot-focusing horn lens antenna is the key component in a free-space measurement system. The electromagnetic constitutive parameters of a planar sample are determined using transmitted and reflected electromagnetic beams. These parameters are obtained from the measured scattering parameters by the microwave network analyzer, thickness of the sample, and wavelength of a focused beam on the sample. Free-space techniques introduced by most papers consider the focused wavelength as the free-space wavelength. But in fact, the incident wave projected by a lens into the sample approximates a Gaussian beam, thus, there has an elongation of the wavelength in the focused beam and this elongation should be taken into consideration in dielectric and magnetic measurement. In this paper, elongation of the wavelength has been analyzed and measured. Measurement results show that the focused wavelength in the vicinity of the focus has an elongation of 1%–5% relative to the free-space wavelength. Elongation's influence on the measurement result of the permittivity and permeability has been investigated. Numerical analyses show that the elongation of the focused wavelength can cause the increase of the measured value of the permeability relative to traditionally measured value, but for the permittivity, it is affected by several parameters and may increase or decrease relative to traditionally measured value.

  11. A survey of cavity-nesting bees and wasps in loblolly pine stands of the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, S.; Hanula, J., L.

    2004-03-10

    Horn, Scott, and James L. Hanula. 2004. A survey of cavity-nesting bees and wasps in loblolly pine stands of the Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina. 39(3): 464-469. Abstract: In recent years concern over widespread losses in biodiversity has grown to include a possible decline of many native pollinators, primarily bees. Factors such as habitat fragmentation, agricultural practices, use of pesticides, the introduction of invasive species, or changes in land use may negatively impact these vital organisims. Most reported studies show that human impacts on pollinators are overwhelmingly negative. Reductions in pollinator populations may profoundly impact plant population dynamics and ecosystem function. Little baseline data exists on the diversity and relative abundance of bees and wasps in southern forests. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, effective method of surveying cavity-nesting bees and wasps and to determine species diversity in mature forests of loblolly pine, the most widely planted tree species in the southern United States.

  12. Building Rules on Top of Ontologies for the Semantic Web with Inductive Logic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisi, Francesca A

    2007-01-01

    Building rules on top of ontologies is the ultimate goal of the logical layer of the Semantic Web. To this aim an ad-hoc mark-up language for this layer is currently under discussion. It is intended to follow the tradition of hybrid knowledge representation and reasoning systems such as $\\mathcal{AL}$-log that integrates the description logic $\\mathcal{ALC}$ and the function-free Horn clausal language \\textsc{Datalog}. In this paper we consider the problem of automating the acquisition of these rules for the Semantic Web. We propose a general framework for rule induction that adopts the methodological apparatus of Inductive Logic Programming and relies on the expressive and deductive power of $\\mathcal{AL}$-log. The framework is valid whatever the scope of induction (description vs. prediction) is. Yet, for illustrative purposes, we also discuss an instantiation of the framework which aims at description and turns out to be useful in Ontology Refinement. Keywords: Inductive Logic Programming, Hybrid Knowledge...

  13. Spin and Wind Directions: Identifying Entanglement in Nature and Cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diederik Aerts; Sandro Sozzo

    2015-08-20

    We performed a cognitive experiment in which we asked the participants to pick a pair of directions they considered as the 'preferred good example of two different wind directions'. The results of the experiment reveal that the 'Clauser Horne Shimony Holt' (CHSH) form of Bell inequalities is violated. The violation is significant and numerically almost equal to the violation of the CHSH inequality predicted by quantum theory and observed in coincidence spin measurements on pairs of quantum particles in an entangled spin state. Analysing the experiment there are more similarities, as if the human mind selects probabilistically on wind directions and their difference in the same way as Stern-Gerlach apparatuses select probabilistically on spin directions and their difference. As in the quantum violation, our violation indicates that entanglement systematically occurs in human cognition, and that accordingly non-classical probabilistic structures of a quantum type are needed in the modeling of cognitive processes. We support this result by presenting a quantum theoretical model in Hilbert space, which exactly reproduces the collected data and enlightens the deep analogies existing between quantum and cognitive entities.

  14. Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; O`Farrell, T.P.; Briden, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted between July 3 and August 5, 1989 to determine the distribution and relative density of endangered species and other wildlife. Results were compared with other reported results, particularly the 1979 and 1984 surveys of NPR-1. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. Of the 516 San Joaquin kit fox dens observed, 496 were typical subterranean dens and 20 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated den density was 36.7 {plus_minus} 4.1 per square mile; and relative den density was 10.5/1,000 acres for all of NPR-1. Characteristics of typical kit fox dens were comparable to characteristics reported for other studies, except mean number of entrances per den, which was lower. Observers counted a total of 300 dens previously marked with an identification sign, 191 of which contained at least one complete entrance and would have been observed without a sign. Relative densities of preferred kit fox prey, black-toiled jackrabbits (40.1/1,000 acres) and desert cottontails (14.1/1,000 acres), were lower than previously recorded. Five blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed along the southwest and northeast perimeter of the Reserve. Most of the 59 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in the flat terrain along the northeast and south perimeters of the Reserve. San Joaquin antelope squirrels were observed in the central and western parts of NPR- 1. A total of 73 antelope squirrels were observed, and the relative density was 1.511,000 acres. A total.of 30 possible environmental hazards were observed during transect surveys. Most of these were oil and water leaks of small size and appeared to pose little risk to endangered species. Results of this survey indicate that NPR-1 is supporting less wildlife than it did during either the 1979 or 1984 surveys.

  15. Five-year resurvey for endangered species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Briden, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    A transect survey of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1), Kern County, California, was conducted between July 3 and August 5, 1989 to determine the distribution and relative density of endangered species and other wildlife. Results were compared with other reported results, particularly the 1979 and 1984 surveys of NPR-1. A total of 589.8 miles of transects were walked through approximately 47,235 acres in all or parts of 81 sections. Of the 516 San Joaquin kit fox dens observed, 496 were typical subterranean dens and 20 were atypical dens in man-made structures. Estimated den density was 36.7 [plus minus] 4.1 per square mile; and relative den density was 10.5/1,000 acres for all of NPR-1. Characteristics of typical kit fox dens were comparable to characteristics reported for other studies, except mean number of entrances per den, which was lower. Observers counted a total of 300 dens previously marked with an identification sign, 191 of which contained at least one complete entrance and would have been observed without a sign. Relative densities of preferred kit fox prey, black-toiled jackrabbits (40.1/1,000 acres) and desert cottontails (14.1/1,000 acres), were lower than previously recorded. Five blunt-nosed leopard lizards were observed along the southwest and northeast perimeter of the Reserve. Most of the 59 giant kangaroo rat burrow systems were observed in the flat terrain along the northeast and south perimeters of the Reserve. San Joaquin antelope squirrels were observed in the central and western parts of NPR- 1. A total of 73 antelope squirrels were observed, and the relative density was 1.511,000 acres. A total.of 30 possible environmental hazards were observed during transect surveys. Most of these were oil and water leaks of small size and appeared to pose little risk to endangered species. Results of this survey indicate that NPR-1 is supporting less wildlife than it did during either the 1979 or 1984 surveys.

  16. Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1993-01-28

    PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  17. A Pilot Study of Uterine Artery Embolization with Tris-Acryl Gelatin Microspheres in Guinea Pigs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Tan Guosheng; Guo Wenbo, E-mail: patrickguo2008@163.com [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); Yang Jianyong [The First Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Radiology (China)

    2012-06-15

    Objective: This study was designed to establish guinea pigs as an animal model for uterine artery embolization (UAE) with tris-acryl gelatin microspheres (TAGM). Methods: Twenty-five female adult guinea pigs were randomly divided into two groups, including a uterine artery casting mould group (n = 10) and a UAE group (n = 15). Pelvic angiography and vascular casting mould were performed in the first group. The anatomical characters of the pelvic cavity in guinea pigs were described. In the second group, the technical feasibility of performing UAE with TAGM in guinea pigs was investigated. The histopathological slides of the uterus of guinea pigs after UAE were examined to inspect the outcomes of UAE. Results: The uterine artery springs from the internal iliac artery, ascends tortuously along the cervix, and gives off vertically 8-10 branches to the cervix uteri and uterine horns. The diameters of the trunk of the uterine artery and its first branch were 0.32 {+-} 0.027 mm and 0.14 {+-} 0.01 mm, respectively. For UAE animals, the dosages of 40-120 and 100-300 {mu}m TAGM were 0.033 {+-} 0.003 ml and 0.015 {+-} 0.002 ml, respectively. On histopathological slides, embosphere particles were found in the first branches of the uterine artery, the subserous arteries, and the intramural arteries. Inflammatory reactions in the uterus were common in guinea pigs after UAE. Local or dispersed areas of necrosis in uterus also were observed in a few guinea pigs. Conclusions: Guinea pigs are an appropriate and feasible model for UAE with TAGM.

  18. Generalized Tsirelson Inequalities, Commuting-Operator Provers, and Multi-Prover Interactive Proof Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsuyoshi Ito; Hirotada Kobayashi; Daniel Preda; Xiaoming Sun; Andrew C. -C. Yao

    2008-04-11

    A central question in quantum information theory and computational complexity is how powerful nonlocal strategies are in cooperative games with imperfect information, such as multi-prover interactive proof systems. This paper develops a new method for proving limits of nonlocal strategies that make use of prior entanglement among players (or, provers, in the terminology of multi-prover interactive proofs). Instead of proving the limits for usual isolated provers who initially share entanglement, this paper proves the limits for "commuting-operator provers", who share private space, but can apply only such operators that are commutative with any operator applied by other provers. Commuting-operator provers are at least as powerful as usual isolated but prior-entangled provers, and thus, limits for commuting-operator provers immediately give limits for usual entangled provers. Using this method, we obtain an n-party generalization of the Tsirelson bound for the Clauser-Horne- Shimony-Holt inequality for every n. Our bounds are tight in the sense that, in every n-party case, the equality is achievable by a usual nonlocal strategy with prior entanglement. We also apply our method to a 3-prover 1-round binary interactive proof for NEXP. Combined with the technique developed by Kempe, Kobayashi, Matsumoto, Toner and Vidick to analyze the soundness of the proof system, it is proved to be NP-hard to distinguish whether the entangled value of a 3-prover 1-round binary-answer game is equal to 1 or at most 1-1/p(n) for some polynomial p, where n is the number of questions. This is in contrast to the 2-prover 1-round binary-answer case, where the corresponding problem is efficiently decidable. Alternatively, NEXP has a 3-prover 1-round binary interactive proof system with perfect completeness and soundness 1-2^{-poly}.

  19. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1986-01-23

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  20. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  1. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-26

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  2. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J.

    1987-01-22

    Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  3. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; Coney, L.; Pascoli, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  4. SU-E-T-537: Comparison of Intra-Operative Soft X-Rays to Low Energy Electron Beams for Treatment of Superficial Lesions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinsky, B; Diak, A; Gros, S; Sethi

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Superficial soft x-ray applicators have recently been designed for use with existing intra-operative radiotherapy systems. These applicators may be used in treating superficial lesions which are conventionally treated with electron beams. The purpose of this abstract is to compare dose distributions of an intra-operative 50kV x-ray unit with low energy electrons for the treatment of superficial lesions. Methods: Dosimetric parameters for 1 and 3-cm diameter Intrabeam superficial x-ray applicators were measured with EBT3 Gafchromic film in a solid water phantom. Depth dose distributions and profiles (d=2, 5, 10 and 15mm) were obtained by prescribing a dose of 400cGy at 5mm depth below the phantom surface. Corresponding dose profiles for 6-MeV electrons were acquired from a Varian Clinac 21EX at 100 SSD. H and D calibration curves were generated for each modality for 0-800cGy. Results: Dose coverage, penumbra, dose uniformity, surface dose, and dose fall-off were examined. Compared to electrons, Intrabeam lateral dose coverage at 5mm depth was 70% larger with a much sharper (1/4) penumbra. Electron isodose levels bulged with depth, whereas Intrabeam isodose levels exhibited a convex cone shape. The Intrabeam dose profiles demonstrated horns in the dose distribution up to a 5mm depth and an exponential dose fall-off. Relative surface dose was higher for the Intrabeam applicators. Treatment times were comparable for both modalities. Conclusions: The very small penumbra of Intrabeam at shallow depths could be useful in treating superficial lesions adjacent to critical structures. The exponential dose fall-off of Intrabeam makes it appealing in the sparing of structures beyond the lesion. However, for lesions past a depth of 5mm, electrons would be desirable as they penetrate farther and provide skin sparing. Intrabeam may be preferable for sites that are difficult to treat with electrons due to mechanical and physical limitations.

  5. Lessons Learned In Technology Development for Supplemental Treatment of Low-Activity Waste at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biyani, R.K. [Washington State Department of Ecology, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Hanford needs supplemental technology treatment of low-activity waste (LAW) in addition to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The Washington State Department of Ecology requires that supplemental technology provide the same protection to human health and the environment as WTP LAW glass. In 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) evaluated supplemental treatment technologies for LAW treatment and looked more closely at three: bulk vitrification (BV), steam reforming, and tailored cementitious stabilization. US DOE with Ecology's support chose to design and test BV because it believed BV would offer rapid deployment, low cost, and waste stream versatility. This paper will describe the path taken in choosing and developing technologies for additional LAW treatment capacity and, more importantly, the lessons learned along the way. In conclusion: Contractors' off-the-shelf vitrification technology that worked elsewhere may not apply easily to Hanford's waste challenges. The BV development process could have been improved by first identifying and then focusing on primary areas of concern. Continuing integrated tests at the Horn Rapids facility offers a convenient option to test both the dryer and the SMF. But the plan for development of the SMF must be short term with well defined success criteria. US DOE has the responsibility to carefully evaluate each proposal and make critical decisions that will make optimum use of limited funds. The ERP provided valuable technical guidance on improving BV's design. This must be complemented by a similar study of cost effectiveness of a process. We must have a better understanding of life cycle costs before a path for supplemental treatment is chosen. US DOE has now gained five years of experience in developing BV. It is time for US DOE to make defensible economic evaluations before further funding towards developing supplemental treatment. It must reevaluate if the projected advantages of rapid deployment, low cost, and waste stream versatility are still valid. The decision-making methodology US DOE uses to approve designs as part of its Critical Decision Process appears rigorous and useful. Looking ahead, Ecology expects US DOE will use lessons learned from BV and other testing in a concerted manner as part of their decision-making process. The success of Hanford's cleanup depends on it. (authors)

  6. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W.

    1988-01-21

    PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

  7. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  8. Corrosion Assessment of Candidate Materials for the SHINE Subcritical Assembly Vessel and Components FY14 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawel, Steven J.

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory corrosion testing of candidate alloys—including Zr-4 and Zr-2.5Nb representing the target solution vessel, and 316L, 2304, 304L, and 17-4 PH stainless steels representing process piping and balance-of-plant components—was performed in support of the proposed SHINE process to produce 99Mo from low-enriched uranium. The test solutions used depleted uranyl sulfate in various concentrations and incorporated a range of temperatures, excess sulfuric acid concentrations, nitric acid additions (to simulate radiolysis product generation), and iodine additions. Testing involved static immersion of coupons in solution and in the vapor above the solution, and was extended to include planned-interval tests to examine details associated with stainless steel corrosion in environments containing iodine species. A large number of galvanic tests featuring couples between a stainless steel and a zirconium-based alloy were performed, and limited vibratory horn testing was incorporated to explore potential erosion/corrosion features of compatibility. In all cases, corrosion of the zirconium alloys was observed to be minimal, with corrosion rates based on weight loss calculated to be less than 0.1 mil/year with no change in surface roughness. The resulting passive film appeared to be ZrO2 with variations in thickness that influence apparent coloration (toward light brown for thicker films). Galvanic coupling with various stainless steels in selected exposures had no discernable effect on appearance, surface roughness, or corrosion rate. Erosion/corrosion behavior was the same for zirconium alloys in uranyl sulfate solutions and in sodium sulfate solutions adjusted to a similar pH, suggesting there was no negative effect of uranium resulting from fluid dynamic conditions aggressive to the passive film. Corrosion of the candidate stainless steels was similarly modest across the entire range of exposures. However, some sensitivity to corrosion of the stainless steels was observed in solutions with 50 wppm iodine (the actual SHINE process expects 0.1–1 wppm) with the highest corrosion rates (up to ~6 mil/year) observed on specimens exposed in the vapor phase. Lower concentrations of iodine species (5 or 28 wppm) proved much less corrosive, and the planned-interval data indicated that metal corrodibility decreased with time for all immersed exposures and, with one minor exception, all vapor exposures. Little change in susceptibility to corrosion was observed as a result of nitric acid additions to the test environment (simulating radiolysis products). The trend toward reduced corrosion (immersion and vapor phase) with decreasing iodine concentration suggests that, at the expected conditions in the SHINE process, it is unlikely that iodine species will generate a general corrosion concern for the candidate stainless steels.

  9. Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2006-10-12

    This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

  10. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

  11. Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

    2007-03-01

    The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

  12. THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

    2004-10-08

    After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must be upgraded to 0.2 s to reach the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz. The required upgrade of the AGS power supply, the rf system, and other rate dependent accelerator issues is discussed. The design of the target/horn configuration is shown. The material selected for the proton target is a Carbon-Carbon composite. It is a 3-dimensional woven material that exhibits extremely low thermal expansion for temperatures up to 1000 C; for higher temperatures it responds like graphite. This property is important for greatly reducing the thermo-elastic stresses induced by the beam, thereby extending the life of the target. The target consists of a 80 cm long cylindrical rod of 12 mm diameter. The target intercepts a 2 mm rms proton beam of 10{sup 14} protons/pulse. The total energy deposited as heat in the target is 7.3 kJ with peak temperature rise of about 280 C. Heat will be removed from the target through forced convection of helium gas across its outside surface. The extracted proton beam uses an existing beamline at the AGS, but is then directed to a target station atop a constructed earthen hill. The target is followed by a downward slopping pion decay channel. This vertical arrangement keeps the target and decay pipe well above the water table in this area. The 11.3 degrees slope aims the neutrino beam at a water Cerenkov neutrino detector to be located in the Homestake mine at Lead, South Dakota. A 3-dimensional view of the beam transport line, target station, and decay tunnel is provided.

  13. National Geothermal Data System: Transforming the Discovery, Access, and Analytics of Data for Geothermal Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patten, Kim

    2013-05-01

    Compendium of Papers from the 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California February 11-13, 2013 The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is a distributed, interoperable network of data collected from state geological surveys across all fifty states and the nation’s leading academic geothermal centers. The system serves as a platform for sharing consistent, reliable, geothermal-relevant technical data with users of all types, while supplying tools relevant for their work. As aggregated data supports new scientific findings, this content-rich linked data ultimately broadens the pool of knowledge available to promote discovery and development of commercial-scale geothermal energy production. Most of the up-front risks associated with geothermal development stem from exploration and characterization of subsurface resources. Wider access to distributed data will, therefore, result in lower costs for geothermal development. NGDS is on track to become fully operational by 2014 and will provide a platform for custom applications for accessing geothermal relevant data in the U.S. and abroad. It is being built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) data integration framework to promote interoperability across the Earth sciences community. The basic structure of the NGDS employs state-of-the art informatics to advance geothermal knowledge. The following four papers comprising this Open-File Report are a compendium of presentations, from the 38th Annual Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, taking place February 11-13, 2013 at Stanford University, Stanford, California. “NGDS Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs,” outlines the efforts of a set of nationwide data providers to supply data for the NGDS. In particular, data acquisition, delivery, and methodology are discussed. The paper addresses the various types of data and metadata required and why simple links to existing data are insufficient for promoting geothermal exploration. Authors of this paper are Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office, David Blackwell, Southern Methodist University (SMU), Cathy Chickering (SMU), Toni Boyd, Oregon Institute of Technology’s GeoHeat Center, Roland Horne, Stanford University, Matthew MacKenzie, Uberity, Joe Moore, University of Utah, Duane Nickull, Uberity, Stephen Richard, Arizona Geological Survey, and Lisa Shevenell, University of Nevada, Reno. “NGDS User Centered Design: Meeting the Needs of the Geothermal Community,” discusses the user- centered design approach taken in the development of a user interface solution for the NGDS. The development process is research based, highly collaborative, and incorporates state-of-the-art practices to ensure a quality user interface for the widest and greatest utility. Authors of this paper are Harold Blackman, Boise State University, Suzanne Boyd, Anthro-Tech, Kim Patten, Arizona Geological Survey, and Sam Zheng, Siemens Corporate Research. “Fueling Innovation and Adoption by Sharing Data on the DOE Geothermal Data Repository Node on the National Geothermal Data System,” describes the motivation behind the development of the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) and its role in the NGDS. This includes the benefits of using the GDR to share geothermal data of all types and DOE’s data submission process. Authors of this paper are Jon Weers, National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Arlene Anderson, US DOE Geothermal Technologies Office. Finally, “Developing the NGDS Adoption of CKAN for Domestic & International Data Deployment,” provides an overview of the “Node-In-A-Box” software package designed to provide data consumers with a highly functional interface to access the system, and to ease the burden on data providers who wish to publish data in the system. It is important to note that this software package constitutes a reference implementation and that the NGDS architecture is based on open standards, which means other server software can make resources available, a

  14. Hydrogeologic Evaluation of a Ground-Source Cooling System at the BSF/CSF on the Battelle Campus: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Mackley, Rob D.; Waichler, Scott R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Moon, Thomas W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; DeSmet, Darrell J.; Lindsey, K. A.; Porcello, J. J.

    2010-05-12

    This report documents both the field characterization activities and the numerical modeling effort at the BSF/CSF site to determine the viability of an open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP). The primary purpose of the integrated field and modeling study was to determine far-field impacts related to a non-consumptive use water right for the well field containing four extraction and four injection wells. In the field, boreholes were logged and used to develop the geologic conceptual model. Hydraulic testing was performed to identify hydraulic properties and determine sustainable pumping rates. Estimates of the Ringold hydraulic conductivity (60-150 m/d) at the BSF/CSF site were consistent with the local and regional hydrogeology as well as estimates previously published by other investigators. Sustainable pumping rates at the extraction wells were variable (100 – 700 gpm), and confirmed field observations of aquifer heterogeneity. Field data were used to develop a numerical model of the site. Simulations assessed the potential of the well field to impact nearby contaminant plumes, neighboring water rights, and the thermal regime of nearby surface water bodies. Using steady-state flow scenarios in conjunction with particle tracking, a radius of influence of 400–600 m was identified around the well field. This distance was considerably shorter than the distance to the closest contaminant plume (~1.2 km northwest to the DOE Horn Rapids Landfill) and the nearest water right holder (~1.2 km southeast to the City of Richland Well Field). Results demonstrated that current trajectories for nearby contaminant plumes will not be impacted by the operation of the GSHP well field. The objective of the energy transport analysis was to identify potential thermal impacts to the Columbia River under likely operational scenarios for the BSF/CSF well field. Estimated pumping rates and injection temperatures were used to simulate heat transport for a range of hydraulic conductivity estimates for the Ringold Formation. Two different operational scenarios were simulated using conservative assumptions, such as the absence of river water intrusion in the near shore groundwater. When seasonal injection of warm and cool water occurred, temperature impacts were insignificant at the Columbia River (< +0.2ºC), irrespective of the hydraulic conductivity estimate. The second operational scenario simulated continuous heat rejection, a condition anticipated once the BSF/CSF is fully loaded with laboratory and computer equipment. For the continuous heat rejection case, where hourly peak conditions were simulated as month-long peaks, the maximum change in temperature along the shoreline was ~1ºC. If this were to be interpreted as an absolute change in a static river temperature, it could be considered significant. However, the warmer-than-ambient groundwater flux that would potentially discharge to the Columbia River is very small relative to the flow in the river. For temperatures greater than 17.0ºC, the flow relative to a low-flow condition in the river is only 0.012%. Moreover, field data has shown that diurnal fluctuations in temperature are as high as 5ºC along the shoreline.

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

    2002-02-01

    Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

  16. Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

    2006-04-30

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

  17. DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence: Synthesis and Processing of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Geohegan; Hui Hu; Mina Yoon; Alex A. Puretzky; Christopher M. Rouleau; Norbert Thonnard; Gerd Duscher; Karren More

    2011-05-24

    The objective of the project was to exploit the unique morphology, tunable porosity and excellent metal supportability of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) to optimize hydrogen uptake and binding energy through an understanding of metal-carbon interactions and nanoscale confinement. SWNHs provided a unique material to understand these effects because they are carbon nanomaterials which are synthesized from the 'bottom-up' with well-defined, sub-nm pores and consist of single-layer graphene, rolled up into closed, conical, horn-shaped units which form ball-shaped aggregates of {approx}100-nm diameter. SWNHs were synthesized without metal catalysts by the high-temperature vaporization of solid carbon, so they can be used to explore metal-free hydrogen storage. However, SWNHs can also be decorated with metal nanoparticles or coatings in post-processing treatments to understand how metals augment hydrogen storage. The project first explored how the synthesis and processing of SWNHs could be modified to tailor pore sizes to optimal size ranges. Nanohorns were rapidly synthesized at 20g/hr rates by high-power laser vaporization enabling studies such as neutron scattering with gram quantities. Diagnostics of the synthesis process including high-speed videography, fast pyrometry of the graphite target, and differential mobility analysis monitoring of particle size distributions were applied in this project to provide in situ process control of SWNH morphology, and to understand the conditions for different pore sizes. We conclude that the high-temperature carbon-vaporization process to synthesize SWNHs is scalable, and can be performed by electric arc or other similar techniques as economically as carbon can be vaporized. However, the laser vaporization approach was utilized in this project to permit the precise tuning of the synthesis process through adjustment of the laser pulse width and repetition rate. A result of this processing control in the project was to eliminate the large (2-3 nm) internal pores of typical SWNHs which were found not to store hydrogen effectively. Post processing treatments of the as-synthesized SWNHs focused on pore size, surface area, and metal decoration in order to understand the effects of each on measured hydrogen uptake. Wet chemistry and gas-phase oxidation treatments were developed throughout the life of the project to adjust the interstitial and slit pore sizes of the as-produced SWNHs, and increase the surface area to a maximum value of 2200 m2/g. In addition, wet chemistry approaches were used to develop methods to decorate the nanohorns with small Pt and Pd nanoparticles for metal-assisted hydrogen storage. Finally, oxygen-free decoration of SWNHs with alkaline earth metals (Ca) was developed using pulsed laser deposition and vacuum evaporation in order to produce surface coatings with high static electric fields sufficient to polarize and bind dihydrogen. Decoration of SWNHs with Pt and Pd nanoparticles resulted in enhanced binding energy (NREL, 36 kJ/mol), as well as enhancement in the room temperature uptake of 0.6 wt.% (for undecorated, oxidized, pure-C SWNHs at 20 bar), to 1.6 wt% for Pt- and Pd-decorated SWNHs at 100 bar, comparable to MOF-177 materials. NIST neutron scattering on gram quantity Pt- and Pd-decorated SWNHs showed clear evidence for 'spillover' type losses of molecular hydrogen and determined the onset temperature for this effect to be between 150K < T < 298K.High (2142 m2/g) surface area SWNH materials with variable pore sizes and metal-decorated SWNHs were demonstrated with metals (Pt, Pd) resulting in increased excess storage (3.5 wt. % at 77K). Compression results in bulk SWNH samples with density 1.03 g/cm3, and 30 g/L volumetric capacity. In summary, SWNHs were found to be unique carbon nanomaterials which can be produced continuously at high rates from vaporization of pure carbon. Their inherent pore structure exhibits significant room temperature hydrogen storage in sub-nm pores, and their morphology serves as an excellent metal catalyst support for

  18. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a