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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Some Lizards of the Middle West  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lizards of the Middle West Lizards of the Middle West Nature Bulletin No. 344-A May 10, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SOME LIZARDS OF THE MIDDLE WEST More than 2,500 kinds of lizards are now known in the world, and they vary more widely in size, shape, color and habit than any of the other three groups of reptiles -- the snakes, the turtles and the alligators. Three kinds of lizards are known to live within 50 miles of Chicago but they are so scarce, and so wary or secretive, that the total number found by all the reptile enthusiasts is often only one or two a year. Farther south they become more common and farm boys know them well. Lizards, having dry scaly skins that they shed from time to time, should not be confused with the salamanders which, altho also four- legged and cold-blooded, are amphibians -- not reptiles -- and have moist smooth skins. The only live lizards that most of us ever see are in the zoos, notably the sluggish Gila Monster which is one of the only two poisonous species; or a friendly little Horned "Toad" which someone may have brought back from the Southwest; or one of those little American chameleons sometimes sold at carnivals or county fairs in states where that is still permitted.

2

Horns and Antlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Horns and Antlers Horns and Antlers Nature Bulletin No. 730 November 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist HORNS AND ANTLERS A great many large grazing or browsing animals, the ones which have cloven hoofs and chew their cud, are armed with either horns or antlers. These weapons are used for defense against the attacks of bloodthirsty enemies and in duels between males for possession of a female or a harem of females. Although both horns and antlers are borne on the head and have similar uses, they are very different structures. Most of the world's cattle, sheep and goats -- both wild and domesticated -- have horns. In North America the only living horn- bearers are those noble beasts, the bison (usually called buffalo), the musk ox, the Rocky Mountain goat and the bighorn sheep.

3

Genetic analyses of the Texas horned lizard, Phrynosoma cornutum: implications for conservation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mitochondrial and nuclear analyses were performed on Phrynosoma cornutum from Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, to determine appropriate conservation goals f or this threatened animal. (more)

Guerra, Trina Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Horn Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Horn Wind Place Windthorst, Texas Zip 76389 Sector Wind energy Product Texas-based company that develops community-based industrial wind farms. Coordinates 33.576395°, -98.437329° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.576395,"lon":-98.437329,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Color Changes in Fish, Frogs and Lizards Nature Bulletin No. 706 February 23, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COLOR CHANGES IN FISH, FROGS AND LIZARDS Proverbially, the chameleon changes its color to suit every mood or situation. Hence the word is also an expression of contempt for a person who is fickle or changeable in character. That little lizard which is peddled at circuses or sold in pet shops under the name of "chameleon" is not the true Chameleon of the Old World tropics but the Anole, a native of the warm humid regions of our southeastern states. It is able to change from green to brown, or reverse, with some intermediate colors. Ordinarily it is pale green when quite warm or after it has been in the dark. In bright light or at low temperatures it is brown. Contrary to popular belief a brown anole may be found on a green leaf or a green one on brown bark.

6

The Owl Horn Radar Signature in Developing Southern Plains Supercells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During spring 2001 in the Southern Plains, a recurring, hitherto undocumented reflectivity signature that the authors have called the Owl Horn signature (because the radar reflectivity pattern resembles the profile of the Great Horned Owl) was ...

Matthew R. Kramar; Howard B. Bluestein; Andrew L. Pazmany; John D. Tuttle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc (Wyoming) Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 1683 References EIA Form EIA-861...

8

Oklahoma Book Award Lizards, Windows to the Evolution of Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oklahoma Book Award Lizards, Windows to the Evolution of Diversity March 14, 2004 Literary Book with the prestigious Oklahoma Book Award for "Lizards, Windows to the Evolution of Diversity", a comprehensive-Purdue University "This book is the first to provide a comprehensive introduction to the diver- sity of liz- ards

Pianka, Eric R.

9

Big Horn, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Relationship Tables Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigHorn,Wyoming&oldid227758" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

10

Big Horn 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Facility Big Horn 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser MSR Public Power Agency Location Near Bickleton WA Coordinates 45.871889°, -120.292354° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.871889,"lon":-120.292354,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Big Horn Rural Electric Co (Montana) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co (Montana) Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Horn Rural Electric Co Place Montana Utility Id 1675 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 LinkedIn...

12

The BigHorn Home Improvement Center; Silverthorne, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The BigHorn Home Improvement Center in Silverthorne, Colorado, was designed using a whole-building approach, looking at the way that the building's site, windows, walls, floors, electrical, and mechanical systems could work together most efficiently. The center includes a hardware store and building materials warehouse space, and features a 9.0 kw photovoltaic system to provide an average of 25% of the building's electricity. The BigHorn Center is one of the nation's first commercial buildings to integrate daylighting and natural ventilation cooling systems into a retail space. It is expected to reduce energy costs by 62% compared to conventionally designed retail buildings.

Epstein, K.; Torcellini, P.

2001-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Horn Operational Experience in K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives an overview of the operation and experience gained in the running of magnetic horns in conventional neutrino beam lines (K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS) over the last decade. Increasing beam power puts higher demands on horn conductors but even more on their hydraulic and electrical systems, while the horn environment itself becomes more hostile due to radiation. Experience shows that designing horns for remote handling and testing them extensively without beam become prerequisites for successful future neutrino beam lines.

Pardons, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Monitoring and managing the harvest of tegu lizards in Paraguay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two species of tegu lizards, the black-and-white tegu (Tupinambis merianae) and the red tegu (T. rufescens), are hunted for their skins to supply the exotic leather trade. Tegu lizards were among the most exploited reptiles in the world. During the 1980s, the annual harvest averaged 1.9 million skins, and current quotas for Argentina and Paraguay are 1 million and 300,000, respectively. Commercial trade in Tupinambis is legal in these countries, and management programs require monitoring the harvest. Skins are traded according to width: class 1 (>30 cm), class 2 (>25-29 cm), class 3 (<24 cm). Management guidelines consist of the national export quota, and a ban on commerce of class 3 skins, aimed at reducing the number of subadults harvested. I studied the tegu management and monitoring program in Paraguay. I recorded snout-vent length (SVL), width, sex, and species from skins measured at check stations and in tanneries from 1991 to 1998. Comparison among field sites and tanneries allowed me to evaluate efficiency of the management guidelines and analyze harvest trends. Analyses of 8 seasons of harvest data showed a statistically significant, but slight, increase in SVL, and an increase in the proportion of males harvested for both species. The sex ratio (M: F) of harvested black-and-white tegus and red tegus varied in different years, but was generally biased toward more males. Corresponding to the general increase in skin size, the proportion of subadults in the harvest decreased during the sampling period. For black-and-white tegus, skins < 24 cm wide occurred in a higher proportion at check stations than in tanneries, presumably due to re-stretching of the skins by middlemen. Results indicate that tegu lizards are withstanding the harvest in Paraguay. There is no indication of overharvest, and no indicators of population decline. However, more field studies are needed to obtain data on hunting effort, and to assess the impact of the harvest at regional levels. Recommendations to improve the management program include the creation of a special committee involving governmental and non-governmental agencies and organizations related to the tegu trade and conservation of renewable resources.

Mieres Romero, Maria Margarita

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Big Horn Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Project Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Horn Wind Power Project Facility Big Horn Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Modesto-Santa Clara-Redding Public Power Agency Location Klickitat County WA Coordinates 45.935948°, -120.284085° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.935948,"lon":-120.284085,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Population enumeration and the effects of oil and gas development on dune-dwelling lizards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Habitat loss is one of the leading causes of species decline across all taxa and conservation practices require information on population trends. The Mescalero Sands ecosystem, New Mexico, USA, is experiencing landscape changes associated with oil and gas development. The dune-dwelling lizard community contains a habitat specialist, Sceloporus arenicolus, that is of particular interest because it has a very limited geographic distribution that is entirely subject to oil and gas development. Distance sampling is widely used to estimate population densities of many vertebrate taxa however assumptions can be difficult to satisfy with certain species or in certain habitats. Researchers must investigate the likelihood that assumptions can be satisfied before implementing any population sampling method. I had two objectives. First to investigate the precision of population densities of dune-dwelling lizards estimated via distance sampling that was coupled with double-observer surveys. Second to compare abundances of dune-dwelling lizards among sites that varied in oil and gas development. I conducted distance line transects and compared those density estimates to densities obtained from total removal plots. I quantified the amount of oil and gas development, habitat quantity and quality and correlated those to lizard abundances to investigate the effects of oil and gas development on lizard populations. I found large differences in density estimates from distance sampling and total removal plots that resulted from violation of distance sampling assumptions. Although distance sampling is a low cost method, it does not produce reliable density estimates for dune-dwelling lizards and is not an appropriate sampling method in this system. I did not find oil and gas development effects on the habitat quantity, quality or on the abundances of lizards. Lizard abundances were most strongly correlated to habitat quantity. Lizard abundances may be influenced by complex interactions between oil and gas development and habitat quantity and quality but controlling for those interactions was beyond the scope of my study. Before and after experiments and long-term studies at multiple sites would be required to more fully address the effects of oil and gas development on lizard populations in the Mescalero Sands.

Smolensky, Nicole Limunga

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Bio/consult as Horns Rev. Summary of baseline surveys Dok. nr. 2041-02-03-004, rev. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bio/consult as Horns Rev. Summary of baseline surveys Dok. nr. 2041-02-03-004, rev. 2 Prep ................................................................................................................................9 #12;Bio/consult as Horns Rev. Summary of baseline surveys Dok. nr. 2041-02-03-004, rev. 2 Page 2 1 Figure 1. Map of locations sampled in June 2001. #12;Bio/consult as Horns Rev. Summary of baseline

18

Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Elec Coop, Inc County Elec Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc Place Montana Utility Id 1683 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Rate Commercial Industrial Rate Industrial Irrigation Rate Commercial Lighting Rate- (100W HPS) Lighting Lighting Rate- (175W MVL) Lighting Lighting Rate- (250W HPS) Lighting Lighting Rate- (400W MVL) Lighting Residential Rate Residential Small Commercial- Single Phase Commercial

19

BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BigHorn Development Project, located in Silverthorne, Colorado, is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The BigHorn Home Improvement Center, completed in the spring of 2000, is a 42,366-ft2 (3,936 m2) hardware store, warehouse, and lumberyard. The authors were brought in at the design stage of the project to provide research-level guidance to apply an integrated design process and perform a postoccupancy evaluation. An aggressive energy design goal of 60% energy cost saving was set early in the process, which focused the efforts of the design team and provided a goal for measuring the success of the project. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity. After construction, the authors installed monitoring equipment to collect energy performance data and analyzed the building's energy performance for two and one-half years. The authors also helped program the building controls and provided recommendations for improving operating efficiency. The building shows an estimated 53% energy cost saving and a 54% source energy saving. These savings were determined with whole-building energy simulations that were calibrated with measured data. This paper discusses lessons learned related to the design process, the daylighting performance, the PV system, and the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning system.

Deru, M.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Empirical Analysis of Intraseasonal Climate Variability over the Greater Horn of Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the intraseasonal climate variability over the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) during the rainy season of OctoberDecember (OND). The investigation is primarily based on empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of the pentad ...

Jared H. Bowden; Fredrick H. M. Semazzi

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Systematics of the Garden Lizards, Calotes versicolor Group (Reptilia, Squamata, Agamidae), in Myanmar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to recognize 53 clades in contrast to the 34 genera listed in Wermuth's 1967 agamid checklist. Moody lizard, and in 2000, Manthey and Denzer proposed a new genus, Hypsicalotes for C. kinabaluensis morphological features. That review is still in its earliest stages; nonetheless, we propose that the versicolor

Schulte, Jim

22

FOCUSING HORN SYSTEM FOR THE BNL VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO OSCILLATION EXPERIMENT.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the focusing horn system for the proposed very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment using a neutrino beam from BNL to an underground facility such as the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The proposed experiment uses a 1 MW upgraded AGS. In order to achieve this performance the AGS will operate with a cycle time of 2.5 Hz and 8.9 x 10{sup 13} protons on target at 28 GeV. This paper discusses the design criteria of a horn system necessary to handle this intense beam and the optical geometry to achieve the desired flux distribution at the detector.

KAHN,S.A.CARROLL,A.DIWAN,M.V.GALLARDO,J.C.KIRK,H.SCARLETT,C.SIMOS,N.VIREN,B.ZHANG,W.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

23

Proposed 230-kV Crossover Substation, Big Horn County, Montana: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

Western proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a 230-kV substation northwest of Hardin, Big Horn County, Montana. The proposed Crossover Substation would form an interconnection between Western's Yellowtail-Custer and MPC's Colstrip-Billings 230-kV transmission lines. Impacts and mitigation strategies are discussed.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Expression of Candidate Genes for Horn Growth in Early Bovine Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bovine horns develop primarily after birth and the presence or absence of horns is due to a single gene. It has been reported that the horn bud appears in the bovine embryo at d 60 of gestation. Our hypothesis is that the gene that determines the presence of horns is expressed in osteoprogenitor cells of the early fetus and will affect the expression of RUNX2, MSX1, MSX2, and/or TWIST1. To test this hypothesis, bovine fetal samples were collected from commercial females at the Caviness Packing Company in Hereford, Texas. Fetuses ranged from d 28 to d 80 of gestation. A survey of the expression of genes from the region on bovine chromosome 1 known to contain the locus that causes horns (IFNAR1 to SOD1), was conducted using qualitative and quantitative RT-PCR, and in situ hybridization. Genes with known roles in osteogenesis and chrondrogenesis (MSX1, TWIST1, RUNX2 and SOX9) were included as positive controls. With the exception of OLIG1, which was only expressed in the brain, all of the genes investigated were expressed in fetal frontal and parietal bones by qualitative RT-PCR. The level of expression of C21orf59, C21orf66, IL10RB, and SFRS15 increased in the frontal bone of horned samples from d 55 to d 70 of gestation. At d 60 of gestation, a change in the shape of the frontal bone was observed, which has been reported to be the developmental stage when the horn bud appears. At this time point, MSX1, TWIST1, RUNX2 and SOX9 were detected in frontal bone, in cells from the osteoblast lineage, as expected. Furthermore, C21orf59, C21orf62, C21or66 and SFRS15 from the polled interval were localized to developing mesenchyme, osteoblasts and/or osteoclasts of the frontal bone, suggesting that each of these genes has a role in intramembranous bone formation. In addition, gradients of expressed C21orf66 and SFRS15 were detected in developing endochondral bone. There was evidence of an antisense transcript of C21orf66 expressed in the same cell types as the sense transcript. Further characterization of this antisense transcript demonstrated that it covered the entire sense transcript. Based on observed expression in the mesenchyme, rather than just in mature osteoblasts or osteoclasts, C21orf66 and/or its antisense transcript become the most likely candidates for the polled locus.

Vitanza, Sarah M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Russian Journal of Herpetology Vol. 3, No. 1. 1996. pp. 18-31 EVOLUTION OF THE BISEXUAL SPECIES OF CAUCASIAN ROCK LIZARDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ,+lrchaeolacerta,phylogeny, systematics, genetics. Caucasus Mountains, allozymes. INTRODUCTION Few assemblages as have the rock lizards of the Caucasus Mountains. Within this gathering of lacertid lizards of the genus of the subgenus Ar- chaeolacerta from the Caucasus Mountains of south- ern Russia (Daghestan), Armenia

Murphy, Bob

26

Ecological Consequences of Landscape Fragmentation on the Lizard Community in the Mescalero-Monahans Shinnery Sands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape fragmentation poses a major threat to biodiversity world-wide. The goal of my dissertation research was to determine the effects of landscape fragmentation on a lizard community in the Mescalero-Monahans shinnery sands, New Mexico and the extent to which conservation efforts might protect biodiversity in this ecosystem. My research relied heavily on data collected from a large-scale spatially-replicated comparative study. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impacts of landscape fragmentation as a result of oil and gas development on the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus). Results from analysis of lizard community structure indicate that fragmented sites are less diverse than non-fragmented sites. In particular, two species are found in lower density and occupancy in the fragmented locations (Holbrookia maculata and Sceloporus arenicolus). Analysis of landscape configuration at the scale of a trapping grid indicated that sand dune blowout shape and size differed between fragmented and non-fragmented locations. Differences in landscape pattern were associated with reduced lizard diversity. Because of this association between lower diversity and altered landscape pattern, extensive alterations to landscape pattern may cause disassembly at the ecosystem level. The maintenance of existing landscape pattern may be important to the maintenance of diversity in this ecosystem. Evaluations of habitat use patterns of the lizards in this community demonstrate that a few species have narrow preferences for certain habitats. In particular, H. maculata, Phrynosoma cornutum, and S. arenicolus all demonstrated narrow habitat use patterns. Effect size of fragmentation for each species indicated that the same three species showed a large effect when comparing their average abundances between fragmented and non-fragmented locations. Thus species that are most likely to benefit or be harmed by landscape fragmentation are those with the most specific habitat requirements. Umbrella species represent one of many approaches to conservation using surrogate species. I used data on ants, beetles, small mammals, lizards, and endemic species to test the use of the dunes sagebrush lizard (Sceloporus arenicolus) as an umbrella for endemism and biodiversity of the Mescalero-Monahans shinnery sands ecosystem. I applied a comparative approach at three spatial scales to examine how conservation practices at different scales may affect biodiversity and endemism in this ecosystem. At the largest scale, the frequency of occurrence for endemic species increased though no other patterns emerged because S. arenicolus was present at all sites and there were no relationships between relative abundances of S. arenicolus and the other taxonomic groups. At the smallest scale, both beetle species richness, diversity, and endemic species richness were higher in the presence of S. arenicolus. To protect biodiversity in this ecosystem, conservation efforts should focus on protection at the scale of the species distribution rather than on the small-scale placement of individual well pads.

Leavitt, Daniel 1979-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTITATIVE REMOTE SENSING: HORNS REV WIND FARM CASE STUDY C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B of quantitative remote sensing for wind resource estimation. 1. INTRODUCTION Possibilities and limitations

28

Method for controlling directional drilling in response to horns detected by electromagnetic energy propagation resistivity measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For use in conjunction with an earth borehole drilling apparatus that includes: a drilling rig; a drill string operating from said drilling rig for drilling an earth borehole, said drill string including a bottom hole arrangement comprising a drill bit, a downhole resistivity measuring subsystem for measuring downhole formation resistivity near said bit by propagating electromagnetic energy into earth formations near said bit, receiving electromagnetic energy that has propagated through the formations and producing measurement signals that depend on the received signals; a method is described for directing the drilling of a well bore with respect to a geological bed boundary in said earth formations, comprising the steps of: producing from said measurement signals a recording of downhole formation resistivity as a function of borehole depth, determining the presence of a horn in said resistivity recording; and implementing a change in the drilling direction of said drill bit in response to said determination of the presence of a horn.

Luling, M.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

205 kA pulse power supply for neutrino focusing horns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new underground beamline is being constructed at Fermilab to generate and focus a beam of neutrinos on a detector 450 miles away in Soudan, Minnesota. A compact modulator utilizing capacitive energy storage and SCRs as the switching element has been built and tested at Fermilab. The 0.9 F capacitor bank operates at less than 1 kV. It delivers its output of up to 240 kA directly to the two series connected focusing horns via a multi-layer radiation hard stripline [1]. Dual pulse width capability allows for ready selection of 5.2 ms, for slow beam spills, or 2.6 ms operation for reduced thermal stresses on the focusing horns during fast spill. Intended for installation in an underground equipment room, the design incorporates several novel features to facilitate transport, installation, and maintenance. Various designs were examined to arrive at the most economical approach for providing the high pulse currents to the horns located in the very high radiation field, up to 3 x 10{sup 7} kRads/yr absorbed dose of the beamline. These included charge recovery and electronic polarity reversal systems. The direct coupling approach was selected for its overall economy and compactness. The system has been operational for several months and results of those tests will be discussed. Controls and safety issues will also be discussed.

Kenneth R. Bourkland, Kevin Roon and David Tinsley

2002-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

BigHorn Home Improvement Center: Proof that a Retail Building Can Be a Low Energy Building: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The BigHorn Home Improvement Center in Silverthorne, Colorado was one of the first commercial buildings in the United States to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. After monitoring and evaluation by NREL, the BigHorn Center was found to consume 54% less source energy and have 53% lower energy costs than typical retail buildings of similar size. The extensive use of daylighting to replace electric lighting reduced lighting energy requirements by 80% and significantly contributed to the reduced energy loads in the building.

Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.; Judkoff, R.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Invasive species early detection and eradication: A response to Horns (2011) M. Jake Vander Zanden , Gretchen J.A. Hansen, Scott N. Higgins 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with natural disasters, where disaster preparedness and emergency response plans are the norm, even in casesCommentary Invasive species early detection and eradication: A response to Horns (2011) M. Jake. In a response to our article, Horns (2011-this issue) highlights difficulties associated with invasive species

Vander Zanden, Jake

32

Seasonal-to-Interannual Variability of Ethiopia/Horn of Africa Monsoon. Part I: Associations of Wavelet-Filtered Large-Scale Atmospheric Circulation and Global Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horn of Africa rainfall varies on multiple time scales, but the underlying climate system controls on this variability have not been examined comprehensively. This study therefore investigates the linkages between JuneSeptember Horn of Africa (...

Zewdu T. Segele; Peter J. Lamb; Lance M. Leslie

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Predictability of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index in Kenya and Potential Applications as an Indicator of Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks in the Greater Horn of Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the progress made in producing predictions of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) over Kenya in the Greater Horn of Africa (GHA) for the OctoberDecember (OND) season is discussed. Several studies have identified a ...

Matayo Indeje; M. Neil Ward; Laban J. Ogallo; Glyn Davies; Maxx Dilley; Assaf Anyamba

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT/CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 527: HORN SILVER MINE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADDKR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996). Corrective Action Unit 527 is located within Area 26 of the NTS and consists of CAS 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. This CADDKR refers to the site as CAU 527 or the Horn Silver Mine (HSM). This CADDKR provides or references the specific information necessary to support the closure of this CAU. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from November 12,2003 through January 21,2004. Additional sampling of liquid obtained from HSM-3 was conducted on May 3,2004. Corrective action investigation activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527 (NNSAiNV, 2002a). Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities identified the explosive nitrobenzene as a contaminant of concern (COC) on the floor of the 500-foot drift (HSM No.2). No other COCs were identified in the rock samples collected during the investigation activities. The air samples collected from borings HSM-1, HSM-2, and HSM-3 showed volatile organic compounds (primarily gasoline-related contaminants) to be present above the acceptable residential exposure criteria in the boreholes. A conservative modeling effort demonstrated that these concentrations would not migrate to the surface at concentrations that will present an unacceptable risk to future land users. However, other COCs are assumed to exist based on historical documentation on the types of waste placed in the shaft; therefore, the mine including the 300- and 500-foot drifts is considered to be contaminated above action levels. Current results of the field investigation show there are no active transport mechanisms or exposure routes for the contaminants identified in the 500-foot drift. The analytical data did not show the migration of COCs beyond the floor of the 500-foot drift or from the air within the drift. On a conservative basis, the subsurface volume of the zone of contamination is limited to a depth from 150 ft to a maximum of 670 feet below ground surface extending to a radius of 300 feet from the mineshaft. Based on these data, a use restriction will be established for this volume of soil. In addition, the security of the mineshaft is maintained and does not allow unauthorized personnel to enter the vicinity of the mineshaft. Since the removal of the contaminants is not feasible, the close in place with administrative controls corrective action alternative is appropriate because it will prevent inadvertent contact with the subsurface COCs and meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site. Post-closure monitoring will be conducted for one year. This monitoring will include using the lysimeter at HSM-3 and the data logger to measure precipitation-induced vadose zone moisture flow through the rock beneath the waste shaft at the Horn Silver Mine. Results of the monitoring will be documented in a letter report at the end of one year, anticipated in June 2005. A copy of this report will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. After one year of monitoring, a determination will be made by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office if future monitoring is needed or if use restriction boundaries need to be adjusted. If a large enough pulse of water moves into the lysimeter, a sample will he collected for laboratory analysis. If there is not sufficient volume of liquid collected for a sample or if no COCs are detected in collected samples at the end of this time period, it is recommended that the monitoring wells at the HSM be sealed in accordance with the State of Nevada regulations.

NONE

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Temperature, but Not Available Energy, Affects the Expression of a Sexually Selected Ultraviolet (UV) Colour Trait in Male European Green Lizards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Colour signals are widely used in intraspecific communication and often linked to individual fitness. The development of some pigment-based (e.g. carotenoids) colours is often environment-dependent and costly for the signaller, however, for structural colours (e.g. ultraviolet [UV]) this topic is poorly understood, especially in terrestrial ectothermic vertebrates. Methodology/Principal Findings: In a factorial experiment, we studied how available energy and time at elevated body temperature affects the annual expression of the nuptial throat colour patch in male European green lizards (Lacerta viridis) after hibernation and before mating season. In this species, there is a female preference for males with high throat UV reflectance, and males with high UV reflectance are more likely to win fights. We found that (i) while food shortage decreased lizards body condition, it did not affect colour development, and (ii) the available time for maintaining high body temperature affected the development of UV colour without affecting body condition or other colour traits. Conclusions/Significance: Our results demonstrate that the expression of a sexually selected structural colour signal depends on the time at elevated body temperature affecting physiological performance but not on available energy gained from food per se in an ectothermic vertebrate. We suggest that the effect of high ambient temperature on UV colour in male L. viridis makes it an honest signal, because success in acquiring thermally favourable territories and/or effective behavioural

Katalin Bajer; Orsolya Molnr; Jnos Trk; Gbor Herczeg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 1 (Including Records of Technical Change No.1, 2, 3, and 4)  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527, Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 527 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. The site is located in an abandoned mine site in Area 26 (which is the most arid part of the NTS) approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas. Historical documents may refer to this site as CAU 168, CWD-1, the Wingfield mine (or shaft), and the Wahmonie mine (or shaft). Historical documentation indicates that between 1959 and the 1970s, nonliquid classified material and unclassified waste was placed in the Horn Silver Mine's shaft. Some of the waste is known to be radioactive. Documentation indicates that the waste is present from 150 feet to the bottom of the mine (500 ft below ground surface). This CAU is being investigated because hazardous constituents migrating from materials and/or wastes disposed of in the Horn Silver Mine may pose a threat to human health and the environment as well as to assess the potential impacts associated with any potential releases from the waste. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Horn OperationalHorn Operational in K2K, MiniBoone,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exchange 12G V / 6E12· 12GeV / 6E12 ppp "accessible" (RP) No time/money spent on remote handling design·Design with remote handling in mind ·Foresee full set of spares 04/07/2008 Ans PARDONS, NuFact2008 7 #12;Mini cyclesDesign: 1E7 cycles Remote handling, work cell builtwork cell built 04/07/2008 Ans PARDONS, Nu

McDonald, Kirk

39

Big Horn County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4.6036387°, -108.0941121° 4.6036387°, -108.0941121° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.6036387,"lon":-108.0941121,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Big Horn Rural Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rural Electric Co Rural Electric Co Place Wyoming Utility Id 1675 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial and Industrial (CI) - Industrial Industrial Commercial and Industrial (CI) Commercial Commercial Irrigation (IRR) Commercial Large General Service Industrial Medium General Service Commercial Montana - Commercial and Industrial (CI)- Commercial Commercial Montana - Commercial and Industrial (CI)- Industrial Industrial Rental Security Lighting-100 W High Pressure Sodium Lamp Lighting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Big Horn County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6036387°, -108.0941121° 6036387°, -108.0941121° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.6036387,"lon":-108.0941121,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity.

Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Conversation between Sir Gabriel Horn and Sir Patrick Bateson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; that was purely chance, a wonderful piece of coincidence, arising out of the collegiate structure; in those early days when we didn't know what to look for there was a lot of interest in this enzyme and there was a technique available for studying it, staining... to interview me at King's about the importance of the collegiate atmosphere in the winning of Nobel prizes; I gave the example of this long collaboration with Gabriel which started at a meeting over dinner; the sociality of it and the alcohol, all adds together...

Horn, Gabriel; Bateson, Patrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

BigHorn Home Improvement Center Energy Performance: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This is one of the nation's first commercial building projects to integrate extensive high-performance design into a retail space. The extensive use of natural light, combined with energy-efficient electrical lighting design, provides good illumination and excellent energy savings. The reduced lighting loads, management of solar gains, and cool climate allow natural ventilation to meet the cooling loads. A hydronic radiant floor system, gas-fired radiant heaters, and a transpired solar collector deliver heat. An 8.9-kW roof-integrated photovoltaic (PV) system offsets a portion of the electricity.

Deru, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Which Way the Horn of Africa: Disintegration or Confederation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Slovenia, Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Macedonia, andoutside protection as Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Otad.

Kendie, Daniel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Learning first-order Horn clauses from web text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Even the entire Web corpus does not explicitly answer all questions, yet inference can uncover many implicit answers. But where do inference rules come from? This paper investigates the problem of learning inference rules from Web ...

Stefan Schoenmackers; Oren Etzioni; Daniel S. Weld; Jesse Davis

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measuring sound-induced motions of the alligator lizard cochlea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sensitivity and frequency selectivity of the hearing sense are determined primarily by mechanical properties of the cochlea. These mechanical properties are poorly understood in any species. This thesis contributes to ...

Aranyosi, Alexander James, 1970-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Results of Surveys for Special Status Reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present the results of a live-trapping and visual surveys for special status reptiles at the Site 300 Facilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The survey was conducted under the authority of the Federal recovery permit of Swaim Biological Consulting (PRT-815537) and a Memorandum of Understanding issued from the California Department of Fish and Game. Site 300 is located between Livermore and Tracy just north of Tesla road (Alameda County) and Corral Hollow Road (San Joaquin County) and straddles the Alameda and San Joaquin County line (Figures 1 and 2). It encompasses portions of the USGS 7.5 minute Midway and Tracy quadrangles (Figure 2). Focused surveys were conducted for four special status reptiles including the Alameda whipsnake (Masticophis lateralis euryxanthus), the San Joaquin Whipsnake (Masticophis Hagellum ruddock), the silvery legless lizard (Anniella pulchra pulchra), and the California horned lizard (Phrynosoma coronanum frontale).

Woollett, J J

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

49

Pastoralism in the Horn of Africa: Classic and Current Issues ~ Curriculum Unit Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study. The recent discovery of oil in some countries of theThe locations of the oil that has been found, and whereSudan near the border with Kenya. (Oil was recently found in

Halderman, John Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Pastoralism in the Horn of Africa: Classic and Current Issues ~ Curriculum Unit Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understandingthehorn.org/ An online curriculum project ofA guide to the online curriculum unit contributing to theand Current Issues A curriculum unit for Understanding the

Halderman, John Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Book Review of 'Disrupting Class' by Clayton M. Christensen, Michael B. Horn, and Curtis W. Johnson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It seems like everyone these days wants to "fix" American education -- including the business community, which has produced a steady stream of books offering business-oriented solutions to the education "problem." 'Disrupting Class,' by Christensen, ...

John Sener

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pastoralism in the Horn of Africa: Classic and Current Issues ~ Curriculum Unit Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and increased use of solar power in pastoral areas. This ismission stations and towns. Solar power has already broughtThe increased use of solar power. What have been the effects

Halderman, John Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pipeline, rail backers lock horns on coal transport. [Coal pipeline act, H. R. 4370  

SciTech Connect

The backers of railroad and pipeline transport for coal clashed at hearings on the proposed Coal Pipeline Act. Slurry-pipeline advocates, claiming that high rail rates discourage industry and are counter to national energy goals, are seeking the eminent domain they need to secure rights-of-way for pipeline construction. Railroad lobbyists have successfully fought the idea so far and will continue to oppose a competing transport system. Proponents of several pipeline routes see them as a way to lower transport prices, while handling only about five percent of the nation's coal. The economics of pipelines appear to be a factor of distance and volume, with no hard evidence available. Arguments of both sides of the controversy are cited. Water rights are a major problem in transporting Western coal by pipeline and, in some states, are a larger issue than eminent domain. (DCK)

Murnane, T.

1980-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

MUS420/EE367A Lecture 7A Digital Waveguide Modeling of Horns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(n) = (h x)(n) = N m=0 hmx(n - m) · Transfer function: HFIR(z) = h0 + h1z-1 + . . . + hNz-N = z-N C off the tail of the impulse response gives HFIR(z) = h0 + h0pz-1 + · · · + h0pN z-N = h0 + h0pz-1(z)/A(z). The general procedure is to find the "tail filter" H IIR(z) and subtract it off: HFIR(z) = HIIR(z) - H IIR

Smith III, Julius Orion

55

Fiber optic networks: fairness, access controls and prototyping Nathan Allan VanderHorn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 5.3.3 FPGA System Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 5.3.4 Optical System Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 5.3.5 Testbed.1 Example Utilization Rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 5.1 Measured receive power

56

Kinematics and Mechanics of Jumping Lizards: the Modulation of Jump Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NC, USA) fitted with a carbon-fiber top plate (DragonPlate,destination was a carbon fiber plate of similar dimensions

Olberding, Jeffrey Paul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Variation in the Aggressive Behavior of the Parthenognetic Lizard (Cnemidophorus uniparens, Teiidae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulletin 466, pp. 49-71). Albany, NY: New York State Museum.Bulletin 466, pp. 49-71). Albany, NY: New York State Museum.

Grassman, Mark; Burton, David; Crews, David

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Testing Hypotheses of Vicariance in the Agamid Lizard Laudakia caucasia from Mountain Ranges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moun- tain chains (Fig. 1): (1) west of the Caspian Sea, the Lesser Caucasus of the Iranian Plateau connects to the Greater Caucasus; (2) the Elburz Range of Iran is situated directly south of the Caspian, with a major break separating populations occurring in the greater and lesser Caucasus from Turkmen populations

Schulte, Jim

59

Phylogenetic Relationships among Agamid Lizards of the Laudakia caucasia Species Group: Testing Hypotheses of Biogeographic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-413 90, Go¨ teborg, Sweden; §Institute of Zoology, Turkmenistan Academy of Sciences, Azadi Street 6 the Laudakia cau- casia species group on the Iranian Plateau were inves- tigated using 1708 aligned bases

Schulte, Jim

60

The role of PAX3-FOXO1 in the pathogenesis of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Lizard, I. Sidaner, C. Volk, J. P. Thiery, S. Olschwang,S. Lizard, I. Sidaner, C. Volk, J. P. Thiery, S. Olschwang,

Roeb, Wendy Linette

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Francis Poulenc's Sonata for Horn, Trumpet and Trombone: A Structural Analysis Identifying Historical Significance, Form and Implications for Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research has been conducted on Francis Poulenc and his prominent 20th century sonata for brass instruments. Poulenc and members of the French compositional collaboration known (more)

Cord, John T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reflection in membership equational logic, many-sorted equational logic, Horn logic with equality, and rewriting logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the generalized variant of formal systems where the underlying equational specifications are membership equational theories, and where the rules are conditional and can have equations, memberships and rewrites in the conditions is reflective. ... Keywords: Maude, Membership equational logic, Reflection, Reflective logics, Reflective programming languages, Rewriting logic, Universal theories

Manuel Clavel; Jos Meseguer; Miguel Palomino

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

First measurement of VuT & Ve events in an off-axis horn-focused neutrino beam  

SciTech Connect

We report the first observation of off-axis neutrino interactions in the MiniBooNE detector from the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The MiniBooNE detector is located 745 m distance from the NuMI production target, at 110 mrad angle (6.3{sup o}) with respect to the NuMI beam axis. Samples of charged current quasi-elastic {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub e} interactions are analyzed and found to be in agreement with expectation. This provides a direct verification of the expected pion and kaon contributions to the neutrino flux and validates modeling of the NuMI off-axis beam.

Louis, William C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The dragon lizard Pogona vitticeps has ZZ/ZW micro-sex chromosomes Tariq Ezaz1*, Alexander E. Quinn2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Amphibian Biology, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-1-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526, Japan *Correspondence Received 4 September 2005. Received in revised form and accepted

Canberra, University of

65

The evolution and ecology of interspecific territoriality: Studies of Anolis lizards and North American wood-warblers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. Bermingham. 2002. What is a wood-warbler? Molecularmultilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revisedplayback experiments with wood warblers. Ecology 82:207-218.

Losin, Neil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Algorithm for very fast computation of least absolute value regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Least Squares (LS) problem has been popular in industrial modeling applications due to its speed, efficiency and simplicity. However, the LS solution is known to be unreliable when the data distribution is not Gaussian and is flat-tailed and such ...

Amin Nobakhti; Hong Wang; Tianyou Chai

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Human transportation network as ecological barrier for wildlife on Brazilian Pantanal-Cerrado corridors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lizard Lizard Common-boa Anaconda Ground-snake Tree-snakemonkey; Ocelot; Yellow-anaconda; Crab-eating-fox; Tegu-Eunectes notaeus (yellow-anaconda), Rhea americana (greater-

Fischer, Wagner A.; Ramos-Neto, Mario B.; Silveira, Leandro; Jacomo, Anah T.A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Investigations of Altered Aquatic Ecosystems: Biomonitoring, Disease, and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

removal of lizards on Lyme disease risk. Proceedings of thereservoirs intervenes in the Lyme disease cycle. Proceedings

Lunde, Kevin Bryce

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Adsorption Behavior of Radionuclides on Ion-Exchange Resin from Cooling Water for the K2K Target and Magnetic Horns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (PART 3) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

Hiroshi Matsumura; Norikazu Kinoshita; Akihiro Toyoda; Kazuyoshi Masumoto; Kotaro Bessho; Masayuki Hagiwara; Yutaka Yamanoi

70

Elimination of self-absorption in fluorescence hard-x-ray absorption spectra P. Pfalzer, J.-P. Urbach, M. Klemm, and S. Horn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marten L. denBoer Department of Physics, Hunter College, City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue EXAFS is widely used to study the local physical and electronic envi- ronment of specific atomic species of the atomic species of interest and thin layers. For concentrated samples, however, FY de- tection yields

Frenkel, Anatoly

71

A History of the Founding of the Institutes of Religion, 1926-1936: A Case Study of a Religious Education Movement in American Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Southern California, Jeppson, Joseph Horne. Thepressure. 7 In Joseph H. Jeppsons dissertation on theIbid. , 337. Joseph Horne Jeppson, "The Secularization of

Tomlinson, Terry Lyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bibliographia Nudibranchia, second edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screening study for offshore wind farm developments - marinemonitoring Horns Rev offshore wind farm, annual statusmonitoring Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm, Annual Status

McDonald, Gary R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitigation Action Plan EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, Big Horn and Carbon Counties,...

74

Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constrictor 6 to 9 ft. Tan oval spots; reddish-brown tail Green Anaconda 13 to 15 ft. Green body; large, round, dark spots; eye stripes Yellow Anaconda 6 to 9 ft. Yellow body; large, dark spots; five dark stripes

Mazzotti, Frank

75

Millions on the Margins: Music, Ethnicity, and Censorship Among the Oromo of Ethiopia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Independence. Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Reinner Publishers.the Horn of Africa. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. Yang,

Mollenhauer, Shawn Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Bibliographia Nudibranchia, second edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zoologie, Bd. 28: Horn (Hrsg. ), multimodal convergences infr Gewsserkunde (HRSG. ), Die Biodiversitt in der

McDonald, Gary R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Thermal ecology and habitat selection of two cryptic skinks (Scincidae: Emoia cyanura, E. impar) on Mo'orea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

113. Bennett A. F. 1980. The thermal dependence of lizard1996. Microhabitat Use and Thermal Ecology of Two Narrowly1996. Body temperature, thermal tolerance and influence of

McElroy, Matt T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Predicting the direction and magnitude of small mammal disturbance effects on plant diversity across scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disturbancesonspe? cies diversity, richness and plantlizard density and diversity. Biodiversity andlimitation, and tree diversity in a Neotropical

Root-Bernstein, Meredith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Bibliographia Nudibranchia, second edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

screening study for offshore wind farm developments - marineHorns Rev offshore wind farm, annual status report 2003, 62Horns Rev Offshore Wind Farm, Annual Status Report 2004, 79

McDonald, Gary R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Understanding Long-Term Storage Access Patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horn libraries in preparation for their decommissioning. in the process of decommissioning. . . . . . . . . . .preparation for their decommissioning. denotes hardware in

Adams, Ian Forrest

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ranavirus in Australian Ellen Ariel / Matt Allender  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Switzerland, UK Four-horned chameleon UK Gecko Germany Green tree python Australia (ex-Irian Jaya) Burmese

Gray, Matthew

82

128/08/2006 1 Ans PARDONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Paris #12;528/08/2006 5 Ans PARDONS Designed for remote handlingDesigned for remote handling Pre Steps were tested & timed optimisation 100% remote handling (shielding): Tested coordinates noted down128/08/2006 1 Ans PARDONS CNGS HornsCNGS Horns CNGS Horns · Introduction · Design · « Remote

McDonald, Kirk

83

PoS(Nufact08)096 Copyright owned by the author(s) under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Licence. http://pos.sissa.it  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MI The two NuMI horns are designed for remote handling and exchange. A shielded and equipped work cell exists for remote handling and exchange. Special effort is put into the optimisation of dedicated tooling and in to ensure a high uptime of the neutrino beam line. Remote horn handling and remote horn exchange have

McDonald, Kirk

84

Global analysis of reptile elevational diversitygeb_528 541..553  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. 1966, KaBisch, engelMann 1969, 1970, angelov et al. 1972a, 1972b, 1972c, donev 1984a, 1984b, toMov 1990, Mitov 1995, donev et al. 2005). Balkan wall lizard (Podarcis tauricus) and Green lizard (Lacerta (Reptilia: Lacertidae) from South Bulgaria Ivelin Mollov1 , Peter Boyadzhiev2 , atanas Donev2 1 Paisii

McCain, Christy M.

85

EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line 17: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download

86

Out of Africa & into the Sunshine State : tracking an exotic invader  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the story of an invasive species and one man's quest to eradicate it. The Nile monitor lizard (Varanus niloticus), smaller cousin of the famed Komodo dragon, grows into six feet of carnivorous, ill-tempered muscle. ...

Weeks, Erin Maureen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Russian Journal of Herpetology Vol. 4, No. 2, 1997, pp. 115 -119 ALLOZYME VARIATION AND POPULATION SUBSTRUCTURING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cn, are interesting com- tov ofiacerta.mefirst step toward this goal is a Ponents of the Caucasus lizard fauna lacertas of the suxicola Georgia. Lacerta praticola pontica were collected group (Arnold, 1989; Fu et al

Murphy, Bob

88

Genetica 101: 125130, 1997. 125 c 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specimens of the uniparental Caucasian lizard Lacerta dahli from several locations in Armenia and Georgia dahli, a uniparental species, occurs in the southern Caucasus Mountains of Armenia and Geor- gia

Murphy, Bob

89

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

employment-based visas. She also is the mother of three children and the caretaker of a dog, cat, lizard, turtle and fish. Her move to Fermilab allows her to continue to interact...

90

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_Obligations case study May 23 2013 ...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 Foreign Obligations Case Study Thursday May 23rd Pete Dessaules Brian Horn Jessica Norles Background * On several occasions, we have been asked to participate in some discussion...

91

Survey of Novel Directed Microwave Fields (EMR) on Condensed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, New Roles for Electric and Magnetic Fields in Processing, ... The standard configuration consists of a power supply, magnetron and horn antenna.

92

Birds in Winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

some of them in considerable number. Crow Bluejay Tree sparrow Evening grosbeak Herring gull Junco Goldfinch Horned lark Pheasant Black-capped chickadee Redpoll Cardinal...

93

Tungsten Oxide and Heteropoly Acid Based System for Ultra-High...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction", K. Mason, M. Kuo, K. Horning, K. Neyerlin, and A. Herring, Journal of the Electrochemical Society (Submitted June 2012). 5. "Durability...

94

Microsoft PowerPoint - 06 Crawley Drive for Net Zero Energy Commercial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Goal: 70% energy savings (51%) * BigHorn Home Improvement Center-Colorado Net-Zero Energy Commercial Building Initiative commercialbuildings.energy.gov 15 Center...

95

Increase in the period of waves traveling over large distances : with applications to tsunamis, swell, and seismic surface waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25) seduce to tho wall-horn Porn aoco~ding .to wkiieh the ~oan now be written in the Porn If the bottom profile along

Munk, Walter H

1946-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the growing Horn River Basin, processing both conventional and unconventional shale gas resources. - The proposed Fort Nelson CCS project is a potential solution to...

97

ASSESSMENT OF MICRO HYDRO POWER POTENTIAL OF SELECTED ETHIOPIAN RIVERS- A CASE STUDY IN THE NORTH-WEST PART OF THE COUNTRY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethiopia is a country situated in the horn of Africa with a total population of 80 million of which 85% is living in rural areas (more)

Abebe, Tilahun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Pantex wildlife program featured on Amarillo's NewsChannel 10...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and study the wildlife living on the Pantex site. Pantex is currently studying how wind energy can impact the surrounding ecosystems and has studied rattlesnakes and horned...

99

Journal of Research Volume 63D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of absolute intensities of [OI] 5577 in the auroral and subauroral zones, p. 19 ... Radio-refractive-index climate near the ground, p. 259 Bean, BR ; Horn ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

100

Fermilab Cultural Events in Chicago's Far West Side  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mattern, and others. The ensemble is Ross Beacraft and Matthew Lee (trumpets), Gregory Flint (French Horn), James Mattern (trombone), and Dan Anderson (tuba). Cavatina Duo-...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

AMERICAN INDIAN LAW CAREER RESOURCE GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Holdaway Box 7 FF 10 "The Cheyene Way" by Susan Horton Box 7 FF 11 "The Blackfeet Indians" by Wally Horn

Vasilyev, Oleg V.

102

Data:0a6b030d-3500-4038-b323-0769ee62531c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Big Horn Rural Electric Co Effective date: 20100501 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation (IRR)...

103

Numerical estimation of the relative entropy of entanglement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[16] H. Wolkowicz, R. Saigal, L. Vandenberghe, Handbook of semidefinite programming: theory, algorithms, and appli- cations, Kluwer, 2000. [17] R.A. Horn and...

104

NMMSS News Sept 2011.cdr  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Nuclear Materials Integration (NA-73). Peter Dessaules (De partment Of Energy) and Brian Horn (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) continue as NMMSS program managers and...

105

Integrated Pest Management of Flies in Texas Dairies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication identifies and gives management strategies for various species of flies infesting Texas dairies, including houseflies, stable flies, horn flies, garbage flies and blow flies.

Stevenson, Douglas; Cocke, Jesse

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

Electoral Competition, Political Uncertainty and Policy Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty and Policy Insulation Horn, Murray. 1995. TheUncertainty and Policy Insulation United States Congress.UNCERTAINTY AND POLICY INSULATION Rui J. P. de Figueiredo,

de Figueiredo, Rui J. P. Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

U. S. Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and finance. Ms. Horning has also held key management positions at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. There she served as Director of various...

108

Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordinates Region ABS Alaskan Inc Van Horn Rd Fairbanks Alaska Gateway Solar Wind energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Solar PV Solar thermal Wind Hydro Small scale wind turbine...

109

Ninth International Symposium on Environmental Degradation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Framatome, France. Institute for Energy Technology, Norway ... Ontario Hydro Technologies. Francois DeKeroulas ... Ron Horn. GE Nuclear Energy. Bill Mills.

110

Fairytale Characteristics in Medieval Romances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Chevalere); or the changed status of the hero himself may be one of startling contrast Isumbras the wealthy landowner becomes a labourer and a rootless pilgrim. Horn?s companions in exile are either loyal (Aulf) or false (Fikenild); his ten other...

Burton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Questions and Answers For PON-10-604  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horning, Vice President of Sales, Clean Energy Fuels Corporation While some are calling natural gas "the, Don Horning said. Clean Energy Fuels Corporation started using compressed natural gas (CNG) in 1997 parameters to determine which fuel type--CNG or LNG--is best for their needs. "We can plug in a number

112

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid ­ A Novel Approach for Generation Renewable Energy with Simultaneous Sequestration of Carbon., and Horne, R.N. (2010), "CO2 as an EGS Working Fluid ­ The Effects of Dynamic Dissolution on CO2-Water IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Sarah Pistone1 , Robert Stacey2 , and Roland Horne1 1 Energy Resources Engineering

Stanford University

113

Compact UWB probe for near-field microwave target detection and imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical analysis and experimental characterization of an ultra-wideband (UWB) probe designed for near-field target detection and imaging are reported. The configuration, based on transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn, has two curved launching planes ... Keywords: probe, resistive load, transverse electromagnetic (TEM) horn, ultra-wideband (UWB)

Jing Xia; Wa Kong; Gang Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Reduced-volume antennas with integrated high-impedance electromagnetic surfaces.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several antennas with integrated high-impedance surfaces are presented. The high-impedance surface is implemented as a composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial fabricated from a periodic structure characterized by a substrate, filled with an array of vertical vias and capped by capacitive patches. Omnidirectional antennas placed in close proximity to the high-impedance surface radiate hemispherically with an increase in boresight far-field pattern gain of up to 10 dB and a front-to-back ratio as high as 13 dB at 2.45 GHz. Several TEM rectangular horn antennas are realized by replacing conductor walls with high-impedance surfaces. The TEM horn antennas are capable of operating below the TE{sub 1,0} cutoff frequency of a standard all-metal horn antenna, enabling a reduction in antenna volume. Above the cutoff frequency the TEM horn antennas function similarly to standard rectangular horn antennas.

Forman, Michael A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EA-1617: Draft Environmental Assessment for Public Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment for Public Review Environmental Assessment for Public Review DOE/EA-1617 Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Big Horn County, Wyoming and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Loveland, Colorado Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service July 2011 Montana Department of Environmental Quality Environmental Assessment for Public Review DOE/EA-1617 Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana and Big Horn County, Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Loveland, Colorado Cooperating Agencies:

116

The Painted Rock Site (SBa-502 and SBa-526): Sapaksi, The House of the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pictograph in red of a "sun" disc. This design dominates theSapaksi^ the House of the Sun GEORGIA LEE STEPHEN HORNE HEplace called "House of the Sun" by the Chumash. A CHUMASH

Lee, Georgia; Horne, Stephen

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

California Beach Health: Evaluation of Grunion as an Indicator Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-Tidal Rhythms. Author: Martin, K. L. M. Date: 2007 Bookharm grunion eggs? Authors: K. Martin, T. Speer-Blank, R.M. H. Horn, and K. L. M. Martin. Date: 2006 Bok Name: L.

Martin, Karen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

LEVEL 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 24, 2005 ... CIRCUIT BREAKER BOX. QUAD OUTLET (18" A.F.F.). DUPLEX OUTLET (18" A.F.F.). PULL ALARM (5'0" A.F.F.). FIRE HORN (7'0" A.F.F.). H.

119

2010 Program Review DC Nov 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevins, Ktech Corp. Craig Horne, EnerVault Corp. * Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through National Energy Technology...

120

SHSD Manager Safety Engineering Group Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety, Excavation Safety, Scaffold Safety D. Cubillo: Division Database Programmer J. Durnan: Design. Horn (0.5) ORPS Categorizer S. Moss (Emeritus) S. Kane, Group Manager 9/7/10 Environment, Safety

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Economic Potential for Agriculture Water-Saving Using Alternative Irrigation Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

four percent of aggregate water intake in the approximation,or reused) to total intake water. The DWR data give a quiteIntake of \\~ater by CalHorn:a (million acre ~lantlfacttlring feet) Firms Water

Vaux, Henry James Jr.; Marsh, Albert W

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sensations: a fabric of natural alcoves to provide relief from city life and stimulate the five senses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cities have always been, and will likely always be, hectic. With every new technological advance this characteristic becomes amplified, and today city life offers little relief from cell phone chatter, honking car horns, ...

Brown, Megan (Megan Francesca)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Free will and quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple example is provided showing that violation of free will allows to reproduce the quantum mechanical predictions, and that the Clauser-Horne parameter can take the maximum value 4 for a proper choice.

Antonio Di Lorenzo

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

Three-dimensional near-field microwave holography for tissue imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the progress toward a fast and reliable microwave imaging setup for tissue imaging exploiting near-field holographic reconstruction. The setup consists of two wideband TEM horn antennas aligned along each other's boresight and performing ...

Reza K. Amineh; Ali Khalatpour; Haohan Xu; Yona Baskharoun; Natalia K. Nikolova

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

No Slide Title  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Year in Review Brian Horn U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 2 NMMSS Users Annual Training Meeting New Orleans, Louisiana-May 24-26, 2005 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy...

126

The 1893 World's Columbian Exposition symbolized the rebirth of Chicago after the disastrous 1871 fire that had  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and explore questions of Jewish-Christian relations, aesthetic debates, and Reform Judaism's treatment to the Old World. Talkback moderated by Lisa Silverman. "Breath in a Ram's Horn: The Jewish Spirit

Saldin, Dilano

127

Addressing Inappropriate Driver Behavior at Rail-Highway Crossings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ragland. Driver Behavior at Rail Crossings. Draft Report, 5.T.G. Driver Behavior at Rail- Highway Grade Crossings: Aof Locomotive Horns at Highway-Rail Grade Crossings: Final

Cooper, Douglas L.; Ragland, David R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 12300 of 28,905 results. 91 - 12300 of 28,905 results. Download EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1617-finding-no-significant-impact Download EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1617-final-environmental-assessment Download EA-1503: Finding of No Significant Impact Vermont Electric Power Company Proposed Northern Loop Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1503-finding-no-significant-impact Download DOE-STD-1098-99 Radiological Control

129

ACTA ZOOLOGICA BULGARICA Acta zool. bulg., Suppl. 4, 2012: 129-136  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12; % 2 #12;Atanas Donev, Ivelin Mollov, Michail Kechev 110 4 1 1 $ #12;#12;5 +6 % $ 7 $ 3 #12; : (Diptera)% ' #12;Atanas Donev, Ivelin Mollov, Michail Kechev 112 #12; #12;$ 2@ $5 TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE TROPHIC SPECTRUM OF THREE SPECIES OF LACERTID LIZARDS FROM SOUTH BULGARIA Atanas D. Donev

Mollov, Ivelin Aldinov

130

Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grassland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

end up eliminating or harming many non-target species. This can only benefit RIFAs, which will quickly of the southern U.S. Costs for various control methods vary considerably. Per mound treatment costs range from- eral bird species, spiders, lizards, and toads. Their effectiveness at mound control undoubtedly var

Davidson, Ana

131

Microsoft Word - 07122-29 - Final Report Appendix - 11-19-11.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix to Final Report to Appendix to Final Report to COMPOSITION VARIATION DURING FLOW OF GAS-CONDENSATE WELLS Project Number 07122-29.FINAL September 2011 Authors: Hai Xuan Vo and Roland N. Horne PI: Roland N. Horne (horne@stanford.edu) Department of Energy Resources Engineering 367 Panama Street Stanford University, CA 94305-2220 (650)723-4744 ii LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by Stanford University as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR

132

Passively damped vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Actively controlled vibration welding system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

EA-1617: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1617: Draft Environmental Assessment Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Western Area Power Administration, Rocky Mountain Customer Service Region (Western) proposes to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana and the Basin-Lovell (BA-LV) 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming. The LV-YT No. 1 and 2 transmission lines parallel each other and are approximately 47 miles in length with termination points at the Yellowtail Substation near Fort Smith, Montana and the Lovell Substation near Lovell, Wyoming. The BA-LV transmission line is approximately 39 miles in length with termination

135

Mitigation Action Plan Phase I Lovell Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Phase I Lovell Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana and Big Horn County, Wyoming MITIGATION ACTION IDENTIFIER RESPONSIBLE PARTY FOR IMPLEMENTING MITIGATION ACTION LOCATION IF AVAILABLE/ STRUCTURE NUMBERS PARTY RESPONSIBLE FOR MONITORING AND ENSURING COMPLIANCE 1 Construction Contractor Western Maintenance Standard Construction Project Practices will be implemented through Phases I of Project construction and operation (Table 2.1-3 in the Final EA.) Western Construction (during Construction Phase) Western Maintenance (During maintenance of facility) NPS - WESTERN INTERAGENCY AGREEMENT FOR BIGHORN CANYON NRA 2 NPS, Western The Interagency Agreement between United

136

Computational power of correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the intrinsic computational power of correlations exploited in measurement-based quantum computation. By defining a general framework the meaning of the computational power of correlations is made precise. This leads to a notion of resource states for measurement-based \\textit{classical} computation. Surprisingly, the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt problems emerge as optimal examples. Our work exposes an intriguing relationship between the violation of local realistic models and the computational power of entangled resource states.

Janet Anders; Dan E. Browne

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

crd title p1.ai  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX I APPENDIX I NOISE AND VIBRATION IMPACT ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY NOISE AND VIBRATION IMPACT ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page I.1 Noise and Vibration Terminology...........................................................................................I-1 I.2 Noise Analysis Methodology ..................................................................................................I-2 I.2.1 Wayside Noise Model Methodology ................................................................................I-3 I.2.2 Horn Noise Model Methodology ......................................................................................I-5 I.3 Vibration Analysis Methodology ............................................................................................I-7

138

Common and Scientific Names Table D1 Common and scientific names as referred to in document.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green-winged teal Anas crecca Horned lark Eremophila alpestris Lazuli bunting Passerina amoena Lewis tenebrosus Red-legged frog Rana aurora Western toad Bufo boreas COMMON SCIENTIFIC MAMMALS American beaver Red alder Alnus rubra Russian olive Elaeagnus angustifolia Sitka spruce Picea sitchensis Subalpine fir

139

Wildlife Supplement Table 1. Land protection status by habitat type  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-skinned Newt Yes Yes Dunn's Salamander Larch Mountain Salamander Western Red-backed Salamander Ensatina Clouded Pacific Chorus (Tree) Frog Yes Yes Red-legged Frog Yes Yes Cascades Frog Columbia Spotted Frog Yes Yes Yes Pied-billed Grebe Yes Yes Horned Grebe Yes Yes Red-necked Grebe Yes Yes Eared Grebe Yes Western

140

BeginPackage "constants`" Modified 27 Jul 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, glass, lights, transmission, coolant system, emissions system and horn. The inspector will provide the inspection and may be returned to normal usage; otherwise, correction of any operating deficiency must-inspected, as appropriate, before returning to normal usage. III. Preventive Maintenance Preventive maintenance is obtained

Keil, Eberhard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DW02: Macomb and Dix from Elk Lake We had settled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

83 DW02: Macomb and Dix from Elk Lake We had settled into the lean-to at Slide Brook enjoying photo of the wedge is in DW08) and the Beck-horn on Dix is just Winter herd path Ascent of the Macomb

Reiter, Clifford A.

142

UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON SYSTEM ADMINISTRATIVE MEMORANDUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12-13 Appendix E Checklist for Powered Industrial Vehicles Electric Forklift Propane Forklift KEY OFF Procedures KEY OFF Procedures Vehicle Inspection Vehicle Inspection Overhead guard Overhead guard lights Windshield wiper (Yard Forklift) Horn Heater (Yard Forklift) Safety seat (if equipped) Fuel gauge

Bittner, Eric R.

143

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama Street Stanford the effect of shear-induced pore dilation, injection schedule, and the characteristic displacement scale dc/dynamic friction in McClure and Horne (2010). The effect of increasing characteristic displacement scale, dc

Stanford University

144

Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Wind Farm Structures' Impact on Harmonic Emission and Grid Interaction Lukasz Hubert Kocewiak, Jesper Hjerrild, Claus Leth Bak ABSTRACT HE impact of a wind farm's internal structures on harmonic in this paper. The largest wind farms in the world, Horns Rev 2 Offshore Wind Farm and Polish Karnice Onshore

Bak, Claus Leth

145

Neutrino Factory Accelerator R&D: Status and Priorities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Gilardoni et al. , Horn R&D for 20022003, AIP Conf.p. 334. J. Alessi et al. , An R&D Program for Targetry at aNeutrino Factory Accelerator R&D: Status and Priorities M.

Zisman, Michael S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Quarterly Report for Contract DE-FG36-08GO18192  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the connection between measured values in injection and production wells (e.g. Fienen et al., 2006; Horne the applicability of using ACE to reveal the relationship between tracer injection into multiple wells brine with high chemical concentration into multiple injection wells would have on the chemicals

Stanford University

147

Non-Uniform Data Complexity of Query Answering in Description Logics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. there is no dichotomy between PTIME and coNP-complete for CQ-answering w.r.t. ALCF-TBoxes, unless PTIME = NP; moreover, PTIME-complexity of CQ an- swering and many related problems are undecidable for ALCF. 3 and all Horn- ALCF-TBoxes; It should be noted that there has been steady progress regarding the dichotomy

Lutz, Carsten

148

Ris Energy Report 5 Technical challenges to energy systems' operation and markets 55 A future energy system that includes a high propor-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

become an issue, as the areas with good potential for wind power and wave energy are often located some of wind power plants Large wind farms such as the 160 MW Horns Rev and the 165 MW Nysted offshore wind to conventional power plant blocks. To obtain the maximum benefit from an overall power system, wind power should

149

UMass-Li-air-final-SUBMITTED.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

u, Z hichuan X u, H ubert G asteiger, S huo C hen, K imberly H amad---Schifferli, a nd Y ang S hao---Horn, J ACS, (2010) Li 2 O 2 C oats t he S urface o f C arbon a nd L i 2 CO 3...

150

Beam spoiling a reflector antenna with conducting shim.  

SciTech Connect

A horn-fed dish reflector antenna has characteristics including beam pattern that are a function of its mechanical form. The beam pattern can be altered by changing the mechanical configuration of the antenna. One way to do this is with a reflecting insert or shim added to the face of the original dish.

Doerry, Armin Walter

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Physics of Brass Musical Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is easy to think of a trumpet as a device for transmitting sound into a room. Actually, very little of the sound in a trumpet escapes to the outside. Most of the sound in a trumpet stays inside, where it forms standing waves that draw energy from the player's lips. I will show why sound traveling in a tube tends to reflect from an open end. Brass musical instruments consist of a mouthpiece, a conical lead pipe, a cylindrical section, and a flared bell. I build a trumpet to show the acoustical significance of these parts. Brass instruments rely on valves (or, in the case of the trombone, a slide) to extend the length of the tubing. In this they are unlike the woodwinds, which rely on side holes. In the era before valves, horn players learned to augment their meager supply of open notes by partially or completely blocking the air column with their right hands. Even through the modern horn relies on valves (rather than on this hand technique), horn players still keep their hands in the bell. I demonstrate the acoustical and musical significance of the right hand in horn playing.

Holmes, Brian (San Jose State University)

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

On the algebraic structure of declarative programming languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an algebraic framework, Logic Programming Doctrines, for the syntax, proof theory, operational semantics and model theory of Horn Clause logic programming based on indexed premonoidal categories. Our aim is to provide a uniform framework for ... Keywords: Abstract data types, Categorical logic, Constraint logic programming, Indexed categories, Logic programming

Gianluca Amato; James Lipton; Robert McGrail

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Merced and Randy Gee, MaryJane Hale and Guenter Fischer of Sol Focus. Please site this report acknowledge the guidance and assistance given by Heater Poiry, Steve Horne, Gary Conley, Randy Gee, MaryJane Hale, and Guenter Fischer of Sol Focus Project team members included: Alfonso Tovar, Jesus

154

Armed and dangerous: predicting the presence and function of defensive weaponry in mammals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mammals possess a wide range of behavioral and morphological adaptations to help detect, assess, deter, and escape from predators, including weaponry that is useful in antipredator defense. While some weapons have evolved in response to natural selection ... Keywords: Armor, anal glands, horns, spines, tusks, venom

Theodore Stankowich

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A guide to writing articles in energy science Martin Weiss a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PV Kingbird Solar Lower West Wind Energy Project Catalina Renewable Energy High Desert Solar Alta Solar Meadows Field Solar Project US Topco Energy Horn PV Manzana Wind Project Lake Hughes Wind AV Solar Palms PV Project GWF Tracy Amendment Gray Butte Solar PV Golden Hills (Altamont Repower II) North

156

Evaluation of the Energy Performance of Six High-Performance Buildings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy performance of six high-performance buildings around the United States was monitored and evaluated by the NREL. The six buildings include the Visitor Center at Zion National Park, the NREL Thermal Test Facility, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Merrill Center, the BigHorn Home Improvement Center, the Cambria Office Building, and the Oberlin College Lewis Center.

Torcellini, P. A.; Pless, S.; Crawley, D. B.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NERI Report Commissioned by Tech-wise A/S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods 8 2.1 Aerial surveys 8 2.2 Within-year and between-year variation in bird numbers 8 2 species recorded during 13 aerial surveys, there were no indications that the wind farm area was of any in the April 2001 survey. Preference analyses of bird exploitation of the Horns Rev area showed

158

Chris Densham T2K Target Remote Handling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chris Densham T2K Target Remote Handling CJ Densham, MD Fitton, M Baldwin, M Woodward Rutherford are handled by remote controlled crane. Concrete shield Horns are shielded by iron and concrete shields A numerical controlled crane is used in the TS. A remote handling machine is attached to this crane. Crane

McDonald, Kirk

159

PoS(Nufact08)097 Copyright owned by the author(s) under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike Licence. http://pos.sissa.it  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

targets or horns. Therefore, remote handling of shielding blocks and remote exchange of faulty components objects should only be done remotely. Thus, the installation of a remote handling facility (simplest would will heavily rely on remote handling and the possibility to perform repair work in a well-shielded work cell

McDonald, Kirk

160

Project-X Workshop 120 GeV Target  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activated components, etc). Look into ceramics, coatings/plating, etc. ­ Remote handling at 2.3 MW ­ Shielding requirements at this elevated power · Activation and Remote Handling ­ Remote handling experience · Windows are also targets · Magnetic horn (issues from increased power) · Activation & handling · Upgrading

McDonald, Kirk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Land use analysis using GIS, radar and thematic mapper in Ethiopia: PhD showcase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land degradation, and poverty issues are very common in our world, especially in developing countries in Africa. There are fewer adaptation strategies for climate change in these countries. Ethiopia is a tropical country found in the horn of Africa. ... Keywords: GIS, classification algorithm, land use change, modeling, remote sensing

Haile K. Tadesse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

NuMI Target Station AHIPA09 10/19/09  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MI Experience Focus of this talk: · Hot handling · Target pile design: thick shielding, maintaining alignment containment, minimal hot handling equipment Enough for target/horn replacement, but very limited repair: installing work cell with remote manipulator arms in C0 building. #12;NuMI Target Station AHIPA09 10

McDonald, Kirk

163

Biomechanics of the fibrillar adhesive system in insects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

places and display a great many forms. Dynamic structures are found on the foot pads of lizards, amphibians, mammals, spiders and insects. More static bonds are used by as diverse a range of organisms as marine mussels and climbing plants. Given... is the Hamaker constant (which depends on the number of atoms per unit volume in two interacting bodies and the interaction between the molecules) and h the separation between surfaces. Given that the denominator falls off with the second power, it is clear...

Bullock, James Michael Rex

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana For more information, contact: Mr. Jim Hartman A7400 Natural Resource Office Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 281213 Lakewood, CO 80228 Electronic mail: LovellYellowtailEA@wapa.gov Western Area Power Administration proposes to rebuild the Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 and the Basin to Lovell 115-kV transmission lines. The lines are located between Lovell, Wyoming, and Yellowtail Dam, Montana, and between Lovell and Basin, WY. The Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 transmission lines were constructed by the Bureau of Reclamation in 1956 and 1966,

165

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 1340 of 26,777 results. 31 - 1340 of 26,777 results. Download Financial and Activity Report- June 04, 2010 http://energy.gov/downloads/financial-and-activity-report-june-04-2010 Download C:\Documents and Settings\schwalm\Desktop\RDDRPTF14MAY03.wpd http://energy.gov/downloads/cdocuments-and-settingsschwalmdesktoprddrptf14may03wpd0 Download EA-1617: Draft Environmental Assessment Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1617-draft-environmental-assessment Download EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1617-finding-no-significant-impact Download EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment

166

EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana For more information, contact: Mr. Jim Hartman A7400 Natural Resource Office Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 281213 Lakewood, CO 80228 Electronic mail: LovellYellowtailEA@wapa.gov Western Area Power Administration proposes to rebuild the Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 and the Basin to Lovell 115-kV transmission lines. The lines are located between Lovell, Wyoming, and Yellowtail Dam, Montana, and between Lovell and Basin, WY. The Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 transmission lines were constructed by the Bureau of Reclamation in 1956 and 1966,

167

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lovell, Basin, and Buffalo Bill Substations, Control Building Rehabilitation P1·ojects Lovell, Basin, and Buffalo Bill Substations, Control Building Rehabilitation P1·ojects Big Horn and Park Counties, Wyoming A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) will conduct control building repairs and rehabilitation at its Lovell, Basin, and Buffalo Bill substations located in Big Horn and Park Counties, Wyoming. The repairs at each control building will vary. The proposed work at the Lovell control building consists of the following: replacing windows, installing a new heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, removing and filling in an existing floor drain, replacing damaged floor tiles, and installing a new threshold on the front entry door. Work at the Basin control building consists of replacing the air conditioning window unit, replacing the

168

EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1617: Final Environmental Assessment Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana For more information, contact: Mr. Jim Hartman A7400 Natural Resource Office Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 281213 Lakewood, CO 80228 Electronic mail: LovellYellowtailEA@wapa.gov Western Area Power Administration proposes to rebuild the Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 and the Basin to Lovell 115-kV transmission lines. The lines are located between Lovell, Wyoming, and Yellowtail Dam, Montana, and between Lovell and Basin, WY. The Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 transmission lines were constructed by the Bureau of Reclamation in 1956 and 1966,

169

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 8610 of 28,905 results. 01 - 8610 of 28,905 results. Download EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1617-mitigation-action-plan Download untitled http://energy.gov/management/downloads/untitled Download Program Update: 2nd Quarter 2010 The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time. http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/program-update-2nd-quarter-2010 Download EIS-0230: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the Satsop Combustion Turbine Project http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0230-doe-notice-availability-record-decision

170

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Powe1· Administration Powe1· Administration Lovell, Basin, and Buffalo Bill Substations, Control Building Rehabilitation P1·ojects Big Horn and Park Counties, Wyoming A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) will conduct control building repairs and rehabilitation at its Lovell, Basin, and Buffalo Bill substations located in Big Horn and Park Counties, Wyoming. The repairs at each control building will vary. The proposed work at the Lovell control building consists of the following: replacing windows, installing a new heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, removing and filling in an existing floor drain, replacing damaged floor tiles, and installing a new threshold on the front entry door. Work at the Basin control building consists of replacing the air conditioning window unit, replacing the

171

EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17: Finding of No Significant Impact 17: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1617: Finding of No Significant Impact Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana For more information, contact: Mr. Jim Hartman A7400 Natural Resource Office Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 281213 Lakewood, CO 80228 Electronic mail: LovellYellowtailEA@wapa.gov Western Area Power Administration proposes to rebuild the Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 and the Basin to Lovell 115-kV transmission lines. The lines are located between Lovell, Wyoming, and Yellowtail Dam, Montana, and between Lovell and Basin, WY. The Lovell to Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 transmission lines were constructed by the Bureau of Reclamation in 1956 and 1966,

172

CX-005494: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

94: Categorical Exclusion Determination 94: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005494: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replacement of the F/H Labs Fire Alarm Control Panel CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 02/28/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Fire alarm control panel is obsolete with few spare parts available. This panel is schedule to be replaced in fiscal year 2011. A sound survey has indicated that there are insufficient number of horns/strobes in the lab. In addition, another project is slated to renovation the north section by adding doors which will hinder the audibility of the horns. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005494.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000563: Categorical Exclusion Determination

173

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

O'Konski O'Konski Federal Environmental Symposium Future Meeting Tuesday January 26, 2010 10:00 to 12:00 Conference Room Next Meeting Tuesday October 27, 2009 10:00 to 12:00 Conference Room 4A -104 Phil Dalby Closing Remarks Peter O'Konski "Cool Roof" Discussion Monja Vadnais Status of RPAM Matt Gray HPSBWG Update Nestor Folta FY 2011 IFI Budget Crosscuts Cindy Hunt Back Brief on Bridge and Road Reports-Possible Modifications to FIMS Gary Horn Publication of FRPC Data Dictionary and Reporting Guidance, incl. Sustainability Peter O'Konski FRPC Committees on Repair Needs, Disposition, & Leasing Ivan Graff/Gary Horn Feedback From FIMS/Real Estate Workshop Monja Vadnais Restart of the FISC Ivan Graff Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board (FASAB) DM Task Force Update

174

Climate Zone 6B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Climate Zone 6B Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 6 and Climate Zone Subtype B. Climate Zone 6B is defined as Dry with IP Units 7200 < HDD65ºF ≤ 9000 and SI Units 4000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 5000 . The following places are categorized as class 6B climate zones: Adams County, Idaho Alamosa County, Colorado Albany County, Wyoming Alpine County, California Archuleta County, Colorado Bannock County, Idaho Bear Lake County, Idaho Beaverhead County, Montana Big Horn County, Montana Big Horn County, Wyoming

175

Quantification of abnormal intracranial pressure waves and isotope cisternography for diagnosis of occult communicating hydrocephalus  

SciTech Connect

Nineteen consecutive patients with suspected occult communicating hydrocephalus were investigated by means of clinical evaluation, neuropsychological testing, isotope cisternography, computed tomography scanning, and continuous intracranial pressure monitoring. Semi-quantitative grading systems were used in the evaluation of the clinical, neuropsychological, and cisternographic assessments. Clinical examination, neuropsychological testing, and computed tomography scanning were repeated 3 months after ventriculoperitoneal shunting. All patients showed abnormal intracranial pressure waves and all improved after shunting. There was close correlation between number, peak, and pulse pressures of B waves and the mean intracranial pressure. However, quantification of B waves by means of number, frequency, and amplitude did not help in predicting the degree of clinical improvement postshunting. The most sensitive predictor of favorable response to shunting was enlargement of the temporal horns on computed tomography scan. Furthermore, the size of temporal horns correlated with mean intracranial pressure. There was no correlation between abnormalities on isotope cisternography and clinical improvement.

Cardoso, E.R.; Piatek, D.; Del Bigio, M.R.; Stambrook, M.; Sutherland, J.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Enhanced oil recovery. Byron Field polymer waterflood will achieve two important firsts  

SciTech Connect

When Marathon Oil Co. starts up its long-awaited, Byron Field Tensleep-Embar Unit polymer waterflood this December 2, firsts will have been achieved: the Big-Horn basin will see its first full-field commercial tertiary flood, and Marathon also will see its first full-field commercial tertiary flood. Marathon's flood will use a massive amount of polymer. Seventy percent of pore volume will be injected. Big Horn basin fields usually have been subjected only to infill drilling and waterflood because the thicker than average crude lies in heterogeneous formations, yielding a situation whereby, even 60 to 70 yr after discovery, simple infill drilling can cause virgin oil to flow to the well bore. In some cases, 20-, 10-, or 5-acre spacing might be required to drain a reservoir adequately, giving long effective lift to simple primary production techniques. In addition, a natural water drive often is present.

Gill, D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

DRAFT Salmon Subbasin Assessment 5/26/2004 APPENDIX 1-1--LIST OF TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE SPECIES WITHIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Podilymbus podiceps G5/S4B,S3N resident breeder Horned grebe Podiceps auritus G5/S1? resident breeder Red platyrhynchos G5/S5B,S5N resident breeder Blue-winged teal Anas discors G5/S5B resident breeder Cinnamon teal Northern pintail Anas acuta G5/S5B,S3N resident breeder Green-winged teal Anas crecca G5/S4B,S4N resident

178

Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 1-1--LIST OF TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE SPECIES WITHIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G5/S3? Yes Yes Red-legged frog Rana aurora G5/S5 Yes Yes Columbia spotted frog Rana luteiventris G4 podiceps G5/S4B,S3N Yes Yes Horned grebe Podiceps auritus G5/S1? Yes Yes Red-necked grebe Podiceps Yes Yes Yes Blue-winged teal Anas discors G5/S5B Yes Cinnamon teal Anas cyanoptera G5/S5B Yes Northern

179

Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor  

SciTech Connect

A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell.

Nelson, Richard T. (Worthington, OH); Middleton, Marc G. (West Jefferson, OH)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cavitation Measurements on Silicone Oils by Utilization of a Pumping Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristic types of cavitation in silicone oils of different gas content and viscosities between 3 and 760 cP have been investigated microscopically and by utilization of a cavitation?pumping effect. The transducer was a 20?kHz stepped horn with a center hole 3 mm in diameter. At hydrostatic pressures between 30 and 760 Torr and transducer amplitudes between 0 and 24 ?

Ernest G. Lierke; Heinz Wollny

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

TES imaging array technology for CLOVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOVER is an experiment which aims to detect the signature of gravitational waves from inflation by measuring the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. CLOVER consists of three telescopes operating at 97, 150, and 220 GHz. The 97-GHz telescope has 160 horns in its focal plane while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 256 horns each. The horns are arranged in a hexagonal array and feed a polarimeter which uses finline-coupled TES bolometers as detectors. To detect the two polarizations the 97-GHz telescope has 320 detectors while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 512 detectors each. To achieve the required NEPs the detectors are cooled to 100 mK for the 97 and 150-GHz polarimeters and 230 mK for the 220-GHz polarimeter. Each detector is fabricated as a single chip to guarantee fully functioning focal planes. The detectors are contained in linear modules made of copper which form split-block waveguides. The detector modules contain 16 or 20 detectors each for compatibility with the hexagonal arrays of horns in the telescopes' focal planes. Each detector module contains a time-division SQUID multiplexer to read out the detectors. Further amplification of the multiplexed signals is provided by SQUID series arrays. The first prototype detectors for CLOVER operate with a bath temperature of 230 mK and are used to validate the detector design as well as the polarimeter technology. We describe the design of the CLOVER detectors, detector blocks, and readout, and give an update on the detector development.

Michael D. Audley; Robert W. Barker; Michael Crane; Roger Dace; Dorota Glowacka; David J. Goldie; Anthony N. Lasenby; Howard M. Stevenson; Vassilka Tsaneva; Stafford Withington; Paul Grimes; Bradley Johnson; Ghassan Yassin; Lucio Piccirillo; Giampaolo Pisano; William D. Duncan; Gene C. Hilton; Kent D. Irwin; Carl D. Reintsema; Mark Halpern

2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

182

SOFTWARE--PRACTICE AND EXPERIENCE Softw. Pract. Exper. (2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Horn4, M. U. Khan1, A. Mamelli2, G. A. Papadopoulos6, N. Paspallis6, R. Reichle1 and E. Stav4 1 for the development and operation of context-aware, self-adaptive applications. The main contributions of MADAM are (a; contract/grant number: FP6 IST 4159 Copyright q 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. #12;K. GEIHS ET AL. 1

Eliassen, Frank

183

Evidence of Reopened Microfractures in Production Data of Hydraulically Fractured Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frequently a discrepancy is found between the stimulated shale volume (SSV) estimated from production data and the SSV expected from injected water and proppant volume. One possible explanation is the presence of a fracture network, often termed fracture complexity, that may have been opened or reopened during the hydraulic fracturing operation. The main objective of this work is to investigate the role of fracture complexity in resolving the apparent SSV discrepancy and to illustrate whether the presence of reopened natural fracture network can be observed in pressure and production data of shale gas wells producing from two shale formations with different well and reservoir properties. Homogeneous, dual porosity and triple porosity models are investigated. Sensitivity runs based on typical parameters of the Barnett and the Horn River shale are performed. Then the field data from the two shales are matched. Homogeneous models for the two shale formations indicate effective infinite conductivity fractures in the Barnett well and only moderate conductivity fractures in the Horn River shale. Dual porosity models can support effectively infinite conductivity fractures in both shale formations. Dual porosity models indicate that the behavior of the Barnett and Horn River shale formations are different. Even though both shales exhibit apparent bilinear flow behavior the flow behaviors during this trend are different. Evidence of this difference comes from comparing the storativity ratio observed in each case to the storativity ratio estimated from injected fluid volumes during hydraulic fracturing. In the Barnett shale case similar storativity ratios suggest fracture complexity can account for the dual porosity behavior. In the Horn River case, the model based storativity ratio is too large to represent only fluids from hydraulic fracturing and suggests presence of existing shale formation microfractures.

Apiwathanasorn, Sippakorn

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

1983-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

185

Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell. 5 figs.

Nelson, R.T.; Middleton, M.G.

1983-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

187

Lessons Learned from Field Evaluation of Six High-Performance Buildings: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy performance of six high-performance buildings around the United States was monitored in detail. The six buildings include the Visitor Center at Zion National Park; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Thermal Test Facility; the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Merrill Center; The BigHorn Home Improvement Center; the Cambria DEP Office Building; and the Oberlin College Lewis Center. This paper discusses the design energy targets and actual performance.

Torcellini, P.; Deru, M.; Griffith, B.; Long, N.; Pless, S.; Judkoff, R.; Crawley, D. B.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Entanglement and quantum nonlocality demystified  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum nonlocality is presented often as the most remarkable and inexplicable phenomenon known to modern science. It has been known already for a long time that the probabilistic models used to prove Bell and Clauser-Horn-Shimony-Holt inequalities (BI-CHSH) for spin polarization correlation experiments (SPCE) are incompatible with the experimental protocols of SPCE. In particular these models use the same common probability space

Marian Kupczynski

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Multipartite secret key distillation and bound entanglement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently it has been shown that quantum cryptography beyond pure entanglement distillation is possible and a paradigm for the associated protocols has been established. Here we systematically generalize the whole paradigm to the multipartite scenario. We provide constructions of new classes of multipartite bound entangled states, i.e., those with underlying twisted Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) structure and nonzero distillable cryptographic key. We quantitatively estimate the key from below with the help of the privacy squeezing technique.

Augusiak, Remigiusz; Horodecki, Pawel [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland) and ICFO-Institute Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Session: Reservoir Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Compact-range coordinate system established using a laser tracker.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Establishing a Cartesian coordinate reference system for an existing Compact Antenna Range using the parabolic reflector is presented. A SMX (Spatial Metrix Corporation) M/N 4000 laser-based coordinate measuring system established absolute coordinates for the facility. Electric field characteristics with positional movement correction are evaluated. Feed Horn relocation for alignment with the reflector axis is also described. Reference points are established for follow-on non-laser alignments utilizing a theodolite.

Gallegos, Floyd H.; Bryce, Edwin Anthony

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Aquatic Turtles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aquatic Turtles Aquatic Turtles Nature Bulletin No 632 march 11, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist AQUATIC TURTLES Turtles are old and conservative. All other living reptiles -- crocodiles, lizards and snakes -- came along much later So did birds and mammals. The group was already ancient when the giant dinosaurs made their appearance, ruled the animal kingdom during the Age of Reptiles, then became extinct. The turtles merely smiled their toothless smile and slowly went their way. With a shell that is both a house and a suit of armor, they have survived 200 million years with very few changes. Five species of aquatic turtles are more or less common in the Chicago region and three others are rare. One or more kinds can be found in each of over a hundred bodies of water in the forest preserves.

193

Watch out for the Baboons: Three weeks at a research station in a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch out for the Baboons: Three weeks at a research station in a Watch out for the Baboons: Three weeks at a research station in a rainforest in Uganda Speaker(s): Donald Grether Date: April 24, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Don and his wife Becky, their son Greg and his wife Debra, their two daughters Briana and Paria (ages 12 and 4), and son Wiley (age 2) spent most of February 2009 going to, staying in, and returning from Uganda. Greg and Debra were the UCLA faculty leaders of a group of 15 undergraduates, two graduate students, and one postdoc on a biology field trip. At times Don and Becky were in-effect running a day care center at the research station while Greg and Debra were working with the students. However, it was seldom dull as in a sense the rainforest came to the research station: baboons, monkeys, an antelope, birds, lizards, and

194

Prototype finline-coupled TES bolometers for CLOVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOVER is an experiment which aims to detect the signature of gravitational waves from inflation by measuring the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background. CLOVER consists of three telescopes operating at 97, 150, and 220 GHz. The 97-GHz telescope has 160 feedhorns in its focal plane while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 256 horns each. The horns are arranged in a hexagonal array and feed a polarimeter which uses finline-coupled TES bolometers as detectors. To detect the two polarizations the 97-GHz telescope has 320 detectors while the 150 and 220-GHz telescopes have 512 detectors each. To achieve the target NEPs (1.5, 2.5, and 4.5x10^-17 W/rtHz) the detectors are cooled to 100 mK for the 97 and 150-GHz polarimeters and 230 mK for the 220-GHz polarimeter. Each detector is fabricated as a single chip to ensure a 100% operational focal plane. The detectors are contained in linear modules made of copper which form split-block waveguides. The detector modules contain 16 or 20 detectors each for compatibility with the hexagonal arrays of horns in the telescopes' focal planes. Each detector module contains a time-division SQUID multiplexer to read out the detectors. Further amplification of the multiplexed signals is provided by SQUID series arrays. The first prototype detectors for CLOVER operate with a bath temperature of 230 mK and are used to validate the detector design as well as the polarimeter technology. We describe the design of the CLOVER detectors, detector blocks, and readout, and present preliminary measurements of the prototype detectors performance.

Michael D. Audley; Robert W. Barker; Michael Crane; Roger Dace; Dorota Glowacka; David J. Goldie; Anthony N. Lasenby; Howard M. Stevenson; Vassilka Tsaneva; Stafford Withington; Paul Grimes; Bradley Johnson; Ghassan Yassin; Lucio Piccirillo; Giampaolo Pisano; William D. Duncan; Gene C. Hilton; Kent D. Irwin; Carl D. Reintsema; Mark Halpern

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

195

Microsoft PowerPoint - PI Organizational Structure-02 7 2013-FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirmira, S. Mirmira, S. Covey, J. Pipkins, D. LOCKWOOD, A. Harper, S. (DI) YOSHIDA, P. Alozie, K. Ruiz, A. (DI) DIFIGLIO, C. BROWNE, L. (A) Henderson, K. Knight, B. Rush, S. Caul, J. Horne, E. Morrow-Perkins, L. Washington, M. Cornitcher, M. Jacobs, H. Ramsey, T. Roth, R. (DO) Swinson, W. Sebastian, H. Telleen, P. Sweeney, T. Tillemann-Dick, L. COSTANTINO, F. BAUER, D. Prince, R. DAS for Climate Change Policy and Technology 380 200 000, PI-50 Clarke, D. Office of Domestic Climate PERSHING, J. MARLAY, R. Wilson, C. Legend: (A) Acting (C) Consultant

196

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports Co-PIs: Jia Wang, Miomir Vukmirovic, Kotaro Sasaki, Brookhaven National Laboratory Yang Shao-Horn Massachusetts Institute of Technology Rachel O'Malley, David Thompsett, Sarah Ball, Graham Hard Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells Radoslav Adzic Brookhaven National Laboratory DOE Projects Kickoff Meeting September 30 , 2009 2 Project Overview Project Overview 1. Objectives: Objectives: Developing high performance fuel cell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) comprising contiguous Pt monolayer Pt monolayer on stable, inexpensive metal or alloy nanorods, nanowires, nanobars and

197

Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Georgia Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Brian G. Horn U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission January 13, 2004 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA 004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA Overview of Meeting Overview of Meeting * Review how the Obligation Tracking System is working * Presentations: - Review of Government notification procedures - Establishment of the beginning Obligation Balances for sites

198

Entanglement concentration of three-partite states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the concentration of multiparty entanglement by focusing on a simple family of three-partite pure states, superpositions of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states and singlets. Despite the simplicity of the states, we show that they cannot be reversibly concentrated by the standard entanglement concentration procedure, to which they seem ideally suited. Our results cast doubt on the idea that for each N there might be a finite set of N-party states into which any pure state can be reversibly transformed. We further relate our results to the concept of locking of entanglement of formation.

Groisman, Berry [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Linden, Noah [Department of Mathematics, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TH (United Kingdom); Popescu, Sandu [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Stoke Gifford, Bristol BS12 6QZ (United Kingdom)

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

On the entanglement concentration of three-partite states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the concentration of multi-party entanglement by focusing on simple family of three-partite pure states, superpositions of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states and singlets. Despite the simplicity of the states, we show that they cannot be reversibly concentrated by the standard entanglement concentration procedure, to which they seem ideally suited. Our results cast doubt on the idea that for each N there might be a finite set of N-party states into which any pure state can be reversibly transformed. We further relate our results to the concept of locking of entanglement of formation.

Berry Groisman; Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu

2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Biased nonlocal quantum games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address the question of when quantum entanglement is a useful resource for information processing tasks by presenting a new class of nonlocal games that are simple, direct, generalizations of the Clauser Horne Shimony Holt game. For some ranges of the parameters that specify the games, quantum mechanics offers an advantage, while, surprisingly, for others quantum mechanics is no more powerful than classical mechanics in performing the nonlocal task. This sheds new light on the difference between classical, quantum and super-quantum correlations.

Thomas Lawson; Noah Linden; Sandu Popescu

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Superqubits  

SciTech Connect

We provide a supersymmetric generalization of n quantum bits by extending the local operations and classical communication entanglement equivalence group [SU(2)]{sup n} to the supergroup [uOSp(1|2)]{sup n} and the stochastic local operations and classical communication equivalence group [SL(2,C)]{sup n} to the supergroup [OSp(1|2)]{sup n}. We introduce the appropriate supersymmetric generalizations of the conventional entanglement measures for the cases of n=2 and n=3. In particular, super-Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states are characterized by a nonvanishing superhyperdeterminant.

Borsten, L.; Dahanayake, D.; Duff, M. J.; Rubens, W. [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Buildings for the 21st Century, Fall 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Buildings for the 21st Century newsletter is produced by the Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs and contains information on building programs, events, products, and initiatives, with a focus on energy efficiency and renewable energy. The fall issue includes information on weatherization, Boise's geothermal heating system, the BTS Core Databook, the Solar Decathlon, a Rebuild America partnership, the BigHorn Home Improvement Center, AIA's Top Ten Buildings, a sub-CFL procurement program, the U.S. investment in energy efficient research, new efficiency standards, PNNL's building software, and a calendar of meetings and conferences.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

An Entangled Web of Crime: Bell's Theorem as a Short Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-locality of the type first elucidated by Bell in 1964 is a difficult concept to explain to non-specialists and undergraduates. Here we attempt this by showing how such non-locality can be used to solve a problem in which someone might find themselves as the result of a collection of normal, even if somewhat unlikely, events. Our story is told in the style of a Sherlock Holmes mystery, and is based on Mermin's formulation of the "paradoxical" illustration of quantum non-locality discovered by Greenberger, Horne and Zeilinger.

Jacobs, K; Jacobs, Kurt; Wiseman, Howard

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

An Entangled Web of Crime: Bell's Theorem as a Short Story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-locality of the type first elucidated by Bell in 1964 is a difficult concept to explain to non-specialists and undergraduates. Here we attempt this by showing how such non-locality can be used to solve a problem in which someone might find themselves as the result of a collection of normal, even if somewhat unlikely, events. Our story is told in the style of a Sherlock Holmes mystery, and is based on Mermin's formulation of the "paradoxical" illustration of quantum non-locality discovered by Greenberger, Horne and Zeilinger.

Kurt Jacobs; Howard Wiseman

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Trial Protocol: Using genotype to tailor prescribing of nicotine replacement therapy: a randomised controlled trial assessing impact of communication upon adherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and research 2003, 27:205-222. 21. Marteau T, Senior V, Humphries SE, Bobrow M, Cranston T, Crook MA, Day L, Fernandez M, Horne R, Iversen A, Jackson Z, Lynas J, Middleton- Price H, Savine R, Sikorski J, Watson M, Weinman, J, Wierzbicki AS, Wray R... , Biomarkers & Prevention 2002, 11:521-528. 25. Wu JR, Moser DK, Lennie TA, Burkhart PV: Medication adherence in patients who have heart failure: A review of the literature. Nursing Clinics of North America 2008, 43:133-153. 26. Shiffman S: Use of more nicotine...

Marteau, Theresa M; Munafo, Marcus R; Aveyard, Paul; Hill, Chloe; Whitwell, Sophia C L; Willis, Thomas A; Crockett, Rachel A; Hollands, Gareth J; Johnstone, Elaine C; Wright, Alison J; Prevost, A Toby; Armstrong, David; Sutton, Stephen; Kinmonth, Ann Louise

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electron beam collector for a microwave power tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a cylindrical, electron beam collector that efficiently couples the microwave energy out of a high power microwave source while stopping the attendant electron beam. The interior end walls of the collector are a pair of facing parabolic mirrors and the microwave energy from an input horn is radiated between the two mirrors and reassembled at the entrance to the output waveguide where the transmitted mode is reconstructed. The mode transmission through the collector of the present invention has an efficiency of at least 94%.

Dandl, Raphael A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Violation of Bell-like Inequality for spin-energy entanglement in neutron polarimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Violation of a Bell-like inequality for a spin-energy entangled neutron state has been confirmed in a polarimetric experiment. The proposed inequality, in Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) formalism, relies on correlations between the spin and energy degree of freedom in a single-neutron system. The entangled states are generated utilizing a suitable combination of two radio-frequency fields in a neutron polarimeter setup. The correlation function S is determined to be 2.333+/-0.005, which violates the Bell-like CHSH inequality by more than 66 standard deviations.

S. Sponar; J. Klepp; C. Zeiner; G. Badurek; Y. Hasegawa

2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Scanning and Mapping Strategies for CMB Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CMB anisotropy experiments seeking to make maps with more pixels than the 6144 pixels used by the COBE DMR need to address the practical issues of the computer time and storage required to make maps. A simple, repetitive scan pattern reduces these requirements but leaves the experiment vulnerable to systematic errors and striping in the maps. In this paper I give a time-ordered method for map-making with one-horned experiments that has reasonable memory and CPU needs but can handle complex COBE-like scans paths and 1/f noise.

Edward L. Wright

1996-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Plasma Lens for Muon and Neutrino Beams  

SciTech Connect

The plasma lens is examined as an alternate to focusing horns and solenoids for use in a neutrino or muon beam facility. The plasma lens concept is based on a combined high-energy lens/target configuration. The current is fed at electrodes located upstream and downstream from the target where pion capturing is needed. The current flows primarily in the plasma, which has a lower resistivity than the target. A second plasma lens section, with an additional current feed, follows the target to provide shaping of the plasma for optimum focusing. The plasma lens is immersed in an additional solenoid magnetic field to facilitate the plasma stability. The geometry of the plasma is shaped to provide optimal pion capture. Simulations of this plasma lens system have shown a 25% higher neutrino production than the horn system. Plasma lenses have the additional advantage of negligible pion absorption and scattering by the lens material and reduced neutrino contamination during anti-neutrino running. Results of particle simulations using plasma lens will be presented.

Kahn,S.A.; Korenev, S.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.; Gallardo, J.C.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be Tcmbr = 2.730 +- .014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with statistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument comprises a cooled corrugated horn antenna coupled to a total-power radiometer. A cryogenic mechanical waveguide switch alternately connects the radiometer to the horn and to an internal reference load. The small measured temperature difference (load in conjunction with the use of a cold front end keeps systematic instrumental corrections small. Atmospheric and window emission are minimized by flying the instrument at 24 km altitude. A large outer ground screen and smaller inner screen shield the instrument from stray radiation from the ground and the balloon. In-flight tests constrain the magnitude of ground radiation contamination, and low level interference is monitored through observations in several narrow frequency bands.

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Recent mophologic changes at Dog Keys Pass, Mississippi: formation and disappearance of Isle of Caprice  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 70 years ago the Isle of Caprice, originally known as Dog Island, emerged on the northern margin of an interchannel shoals in Dog Keys Pass, located between Horn and Ship Islands, 18 km southeast of Biloxi, Mississippi. The island was emergent for less than 15 years. The Isle of Caprice was not a true barrier island like neighboring Horn and Ship Islands, but rather an emergent shoal that developed from the coalescence of several small ephemeral sand keys known locally as the Dog Keys. The island formed and grew rapidly between 1917 and 1924, reaching a length of nearly 3000 m and a width of 400 m by 1924. Low dunes developed on the island, which were reportedly thinly vegetated with Uniola paniculata (sea oats). The sediment supply needed to nourish the Isle of Caprice diminished as the secondary channel reached equilibrium. The island then began to erode gradually in response to the normal effects of winds, waves, and tides. By 1931, the island was reduced to a duneless sand bar; a year later it was completely awash.

Rucker, J.B.; Snowden, J.O.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Attractor mechanism as a distillation procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent paper it was shown that for double extremal static spherical symmetric BPS black hole solutions in the STU model the well-known process of moduli stabilization at the horizon can be recast in a form of a distillation procedure of a three-qubit entangled state of a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger type. By studying the full flow in moduli space in this paper we investigate this distillation procedure in more detail. We introduce a three-qubit state with amplitudes depending on the conserved charges, the warp factor, and the moduli. We show that for the recently discovered non-BPS solutions it is possible to see how the distillation procedure unfolds itself as we approach the horizon. For the non-BPS seed solutions at the asymptotically Minkowski region we are starting with a three-qubit state having seven nonequal nonvanishing amplitudes and finally at the horizon we get a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state with merely four nonvanishing ones with equal magnitudes. The magnitude of the surviving nonvanishing amplitudes is proportional to the macroscopic black hole entropy. A systematic study of such attractor states shows that their properties reflect the structure of the fake superpotential. We also demonstrate that when starting with the very special values for the moduli corresponding to flat directions the uniform structure at the horizon deteriorates due to errors generalizing the usual bit flips acting on the qubits of the attractor states.

Levay, Peter; Szalay, Szilard [Department of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Gas breakdown driven by L band short-pulse high-power microwave  

SciTech Connect

High power microwave (HPM) driven gas breakdown is a major factor in limiting the radiation and transmission of HPM. A method that HPM driven gas breakdown could be obtained by changing the aperture of horn antenna is studied in this paper. Changing the effective aperture of horn antenna can adjust the electric field in near field zone, leading to gas breakdown. With this method, measurements of air and SF{sub 6} breakdowns are carried out on a magnetically insulated transmission-line oscillators, which is capable of generating HPM with pulse duration of 30 ns, and frequency of 1.74 GHz. The typical breakdown waveforms of air and SF{sub 6} are presented. Besides, the breakdown field strengths of the two gases are derived at different pressures. It is found that the effects of air and SF{sub 6} breakdown on the transmission of HPM are different: air breakdown mainly shortens the pulse width of HPM while SF{sub 6} breakdown mainly reduces the peak output power of HPM. The electric field threshold of SF{sub 6} is about 2.4 times larger than that of air. These differences suggest that gas properties have a great effect on the transmission characteristic of HPM in gases.

Yang Yiming; Yuan Chengwei; Qian Baoliang [College of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Neutrino beams using the main injector  

SciTech Connect

TM-1946 summarizes the status of the NuMI project. This note presents more details on the technical design of the various NUMI beams. Several beam]Line options are investigated for producing neutrinos--(l) a wide-band beam(WBB) using horns, (2) a beam using a single lithium Lens, and (3) a two stage narrow-band beam(NBB) using a Lithium Lens, quadrupoles and dipoles. The first two are designed to maximize the muon neutrino event rate; the third is designed to have a tunable range of parent momenta from 5-60 GeV/c. In the context of NuMI, the Double Horns-and its target were concepts first described in 1991. The lithium Lens has been used at Fermilab for pbar production for several years. With recent upgrades, it forms the basis of what will be used by NuMI. Narrow band beams using conventional dipoles and quadrupoles have been studied, but have less acceptance than one using a lithium lens. The following practical limits are imposed on each of the systems: (1) Horns: The necks will not have a smaller radius than 1 cm; the maximum current will not exceed 170 kAmp. Keeping the inside diameter large allows the primary proton beam to vary in position, yet not strike the fragile neck. In addition, there is a trade-off between decreasing the radius and increasing the wall thickness to maintain the required strength in the conductor material. (2) Magnets: Reasonable conventional designs are used. The maximum gradient for quadrupoles is 12 kG/half-aperture; the maximum field for dipoles is about 16 kG; larger apertures scale the gradients and fields downward. Although not a primary consideration, optically it is desirable for the magnification in each plane to be comparable (within a factor of 2 or 3 is OK). (3) Lithium Lens: The maximum radius is 1.0 cm with a maximum gradient of 100 kG/cm. (4) Dumps: At the place where the primary protons are absorbed, the transverse beam center is {approx} 1 inch off the edge of the acceptance.

Malensek, A.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Owl Predators Owl Predators Name: Mia Status: student Grade: K-3 Location: MN Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: What are the predators of a owl? Replies: Mia: Our largest adult owls have few predators. Smaller owls may be prey of other owls, long-eared owls are sometimes eaten by great horned owls, for example. Ground nesting owls, like short-eared owls, and especially nestlings, may be hunted by many predators, coyotes and other hawks and owls most likely. Nestlings of all birds, including owls may be hunted by other birds, raccoons, snakes and other animals that can climb trees. J. Elliott Hi Mia Predators of owls include: Opossums Racoons Hawks, Eagles and other raptors Other owls House cats Snakes that raid nests Accidents such as falling out of a nest, colliding with a tree, and electric power lines also contribute to owl mortality.

216

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 2006 , 2006 Calendar Monday, May 1 11:00 a.m. Academic Lecture Series - Curia II Speaker: S. Dodelson, Fermilab Title: The Clumpy Universe - Course 6b (3rd Lecture) 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: G. Steigman, Ohio State University Title: Schrammfest: BBN: Successes and Challenges 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4:00 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Special Topics: Recent Activity at the Test Beam; NuMI Horn Repair Tuesday, May 2 12:30 p.m. Lunchtime Video Presentation - Curia II Chernobyl: A BBC Dramatization 2:00 p.m. Research Techniques Seminar - West Wing (WH-10NW) Speaker: G. Deptuch, Brookhaven National Laboratory Title: Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for Not Visible Light Applications: Advantages and Limitations

217

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

218

One West Third Street Tulsa Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conley Jennings Conley Jennings Lineman Springfield, MO Special thanks to: Marshall Boyken Mike Deihl Ruben Garcia Bethel Herrold William Hiller Beth Nielsen George Robbins Gary Swartzlander Cris Van Horn Rutha Williams Jan Woolverton U P D AT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J U LY - S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 5 Strategic Workshop Unites Hydropower Community At the invitation of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), Federal power customers joined representatives of the Corps, the Power Marketing Administrations, and national Federal power customer associations in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on August 9-10, 2005, for the second Hydropower Strategic Workshop. Nearly 100 people, including those involved in the daily operation of Corps hydropower projects and powerplants, managers and technical staff of Federal power customers, and

219

CX-005367: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5367: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5367: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005367: Categorical Exclusion Determination Project T-222 Hazardous Materials Management Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Facility Water Main Extension for Fire Protection CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.15 Date: 03/01/2011 Location(s): Richland, Washington Office(s): Office of River Protection-Richland Office The proposed project is located at the Hazardous Materials Management Emergency Response Training (HAMMER) Facility situated in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington. The proposed action will excavate a trench and install a water pipeline to connect the City of Richland water main (located south of Horn Rapids Road) with the existing HAMMER water system. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

220

Barred Owl Hooting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barred Owl Hooting Barred Owl Hooting Name: ray Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: have barred owls ever been known to hoot during the daylight hours? Replies: I spent two years researching barred and horned owls when I was a graduate student and these owls are often found to call during daylight hours. I found both species fairly active at about 3pm and sometimes as late as 10am. The fledglings may be active anytime day and night. Parents are most vocal in the spring when trying to locate young and in the pre-nesting season during January-March. However, the barred owl is most active during the night and many times the calling is dependent upon the time of year [breeding season of November through April is more active for adults in particular]. Yearlings can make calls, noise anytime during the day.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Why sequence desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria)?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria)? desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria)? Desert locusts are a species of short-horned grasshopper that can form highly mobile swarms and spread over as much as 20 percent of the world's land mass. Comprised of more than 30 million locusts per square mile, locust swarms can travel up to 80 miles a day and impact the livelihoods of up to 10 percent of the world's population in 60 countries by eating same amount of food in a day as several thousand people. desert locust Photo: istockphoto Researchers are interested in sequencing the locust's gut wall as well as the microbial community inside the desert locust's gut to better understand how the insect can break down plant mass. The work will determine whether or not the ability to break down lignocellulose is

222

High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders Periodic Inspection and End of Life Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6/2010 6/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 High Pressure Fuel Storage Cylinders Periodic Inspection and End of Life Issues DOE Vehicular Tank Workshop April 29, 2010 Douglas Horne, PE The Facts  High pressure Type 4 gaseous fuel tanks are now designed under standards that specify finite lifetimes of 15, 20 and 25 years based on specific design and testing (the HGV2 standard under development had a life as short as 10 years as an option)  It is unique within the transportation industry to have a critical device (the fuel tank) with a designated life that may be shorter than the vehicle itself  Although vehicle owners are told up front of the limited life fuel storage cylinders some tend to forget after 15 years  A parallel concern is the requirement for these fuel tanks

223

Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2010 5/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 1 Lessons Learned from Practical Field Experience with High Pressure Gaseous Fuels DOE - DOT CNG - H 2 Workshop December 10, 2009 Douglas Horne, PE - CVEF President Rob Adams, P.Eng. - Marathon Technical Services The Facts  NGVs have been used in North America for over 30 years  Codes and Standards (C&S) provide opportunity for safe reliable operation of NGVs  C&S evolve with new technology and field experience  People make mistakes, continuous training is critical for safe operations  Cylinders have a limited life -track your cylinders! 2/25/2010 www.cleanvehicle.org 2 Incidents in North America  Since 1984 CVEF has recorded 97 incidents of which 67 involved CNG vehicles - 37 incidents involve either a CNG leak (15) or a

224

General Category  

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Noise and Hearing Noise and Hearing Name: Florence Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: Outside U.S. Country: Australia Date: Spring 2012 Question: Why does noise damage our hearing? Replies: Hi Florence, The principal mechanism for hearing loss due to noise, whether chronic or acute, is through damage to the stereocilia possessing sense cells of the cochlea in the inner ear compartment. The cochlea is a fluid filled organ that is lined with sensing cells possessing stereocilia(little hairs) that vibrate in response to sound. The cochlea is horn shaped so that the vibrations of the cilia reflect the frequency of the sound perceived. Vibrating stereocilia are attached to the sensing cell which converts the vibrations to a neural signal and that impulse is sent on to the brain through cochlear nerve fibers.

225

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_Gary and Brian_Wednesday 5-22 Transit Matching.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Matching Matching Brian Horn, NRC Gary Hirsch, PSI  What is Transit Matching - Defines IAEA activities to maintain information on the transit accounts of safeguarded nuclear material reported to the Agency. - It is performed on inventory changes which indicate increases, decreases and adjustments to nuclear material balances. - The IAEA receives 2 million nuclear material accounting records a year, in 2012 the US reported 5069 under the voluntary offer (INFCIRC/207) 2 US Documented 1,859 Exports to 23 Countries 2,684 Imports from 19 Countries 3  The IAEA Tracks 7 material types - Depleted Uranium (MT 10) - Enriched Uranium (MT 20) - Plutonium (MT 50) - Uranium-233 (MT 70) - Normal Uranium (MT 81) - Plutonium-238 (MT 83) - Thorium (MT 88) 4 Enriched Uranium Imports  Austria

226

US5587038.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ceeehi et a]. Ceeehi et a]. llllllIllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll US005587038A 5,587,038 Dec. 24, 1996 [11] Patent Number: [45] Date of Patent: 1541 [731 I221 [51] [52] [581 [561 APPARATUS AND PROCESS FOR 5,397,962 3/1995 Moslehi ........................... .. 315/11151 PRODUCING HIGH DENSITY AXLALLY 5,421,891 6/1995 Campbell etal. .. 156/345 5,433,812 7/1995 CUOIIIO 61. a1. ........................ .. 156/345 _ FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS Inventors: Joseph L. Cecchr; James E. Stevens, both of Albuquerque, N_M, 379828 8/1990 European Pat. O11. . 01130531 5/1989 Japan . Assignee: Princeton University, Princeton, N .J . OTHER PUBLICATIONS APPL No. 261,853 M. W. Horn et al.; A Comparison of Etching Tools for Resist _ Pattern Transfer (1992); SPIE vol. 1672 Advances in Resist

227

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Montana Montana based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Montana and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Montana, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 6 Beaverhead Granite Powell Big Horn Hill Prairie Blaine Jefferson Ravalli Broadwater Judith Basin Richland Carbon Lake Roosevelt Carter Lewis & Clark Rosebud Cascade Liberty Sanders Chouteau Lincoln Sheridan

228

Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

@ @ Printed with soy ink on recycled paper. ,, ,, This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors horn the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; telephone (423) 576-8401 for prices, Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Copies of this document are available (while supplies last) upon written request to: Office of Fissile Materials Disposition, MD-4 ' Forrestal Building United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 June 1996 Dear hterested Party: The Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium Final Environmental Impact Statemnt is enclosed for your information. This document has been prepared in accordance

229

Publications from Research Conducted at CTAX | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at CTAX Publications from Research Conducted at CTAX 2013 Publications Hong T., Zhu L. Y., Ke X., Garlea V. O., Qiu Y., Nambu Y., Yoshizawa H., Zhu M., Granroth G. E., Savici A. T., Gai Z., Zhou and H.D., "Structural and magnetic properties in the quantum S=1/2 dimer system Ba3(Cr1-xVx)2O8 with site disorder", Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics 87, 144427 (2013). Ma J., Delaire O., May A. F., Carlton C. E., McGuire M. A., VanBebber L. H., Abernathy D. L., Ehlers G., Hong T., Huq A., Tian W., Keppens V. M., Shao-Horn Y., Sales B. C., "Glass-like phonon scattering from a spontaneous nanostructure in AgSbTe2", Nature Nanotechnology , (2013). Minnich A. J., "Naturally glassy crystals", Nature Nanotechnology 8, 392-393 (2013).

230

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-56): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS 4/9/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09, 2002 09, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-56) 2ULRQ $OEUR 2O\PSLD 5HJLRQDO 0DQDJHU Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the following electric yards located in the Ross District: Cape Horn North Bonneville Stevenson Carson Underwood Troutdale Cascade Locks Acton Ross 345kV and J.D. Alcoa Sifton St. Johns Ostrander McLoughlin Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to maintain a weed-free environment in the electrical substations located within the Olympia Region's Ross District. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to manage vegetation inside and around electrical

231

file:///E|/ev/test/evasc.shtml  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Auxiliary Systems Impacts Auxiliary Systems Impacts As with gasoline-powered vehicles, electric vehicles have a number of auxiliary systems. Some systems, such as the radio/tape player, lights, and horn, operate the same way as they do on a gasoline- powered vehicle. Other systems, such as the power steering and power brakes, require an additional small electric motor and have minor impact on the vehicle range. However, the air conditioning and heating systems on electric vehicles are different and can have a dramatic impact on the range. Federal safety standards require all vehicles to have adequate heating and defrosting systems. The heater/defroster system is easily operated in a conventional gasoline-powered vehicle because a supply of heated water from the engine cooling system is readily available. Electric vehicles do not have this

232

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2013 7, 2013 spacer Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO spacer Calendar Have a safe day! Monday, Oct. 7 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - WH6W Speaker: Pat Seitzer, University of Michigan Title: Applied Astronomy: Optical Studies of Space Debris at Geosynchronous Orbit 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Tuesday, Oct. 8 11 a.m. Academic Lecture Series - One West Speaker: Roni Harnik, Fermilab Title: Theory of Charged Lepton Flavor Violation 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Accelerator Physics and Technology Seminar - One West Speaker: Jim Hylen and Patrick Hurh, Fermilab Title: NuMI Horns and Targets and the Ongoing FNAL High Power Target R&D Program

233

Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy January 7, 2010 - 1:44pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this project do? More than 400 Austin, Texas, students have enrolled in a course to become skill workers in the solar energy field. The course helps Austin achieve its ambitious goal, producing enough solar energy to power about 17,000 homes in Austin a year by 2020. Austin, Texas, is always looking for new ways to 'hook 'em by the horns' and keep up the city's trademark quote of 'weirdness.' Austinites aren't necessarily strange people, but the folks there like preserving their local flair and forward-thinking ideas. One new way of being unique and working for a brighter future is coming straight from the sun.

234

Susan Martindale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMER 2001 MEETING SUMMER 2001 MEETING CINCINNATI, OHIO JULY 17-19, 2001 John F. Angil, II Director, Barnwell County EMA 57 Wall Street Barnwell, SC 29812 (803) 259-7013 Fax: (803) 250-1759 TEPP Region 3 jangil@mindspring.com Richard Arnold Executive Director Las Vegas Indian Center Native American Program/YMSCO 2300 W. Bonanza Road Las Vegas, NV 89106 (702) 647-5842 Fax: (702) 646-0254 Mark Askey TEPP Training Coordinator HAMMER Training and Education Center 2890 Horn Rapids Road Richland, WA 99352 (509) 376-8594 Fax: (509) 373-6070 mark_k_askey@rl.gov Anna Bachicha-Reynolds TEPP Program Coordinator, Region 4 U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 (505) 845-5653 Fax: (505) 845-4457 abachicha@doeal.gov

235

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Understanding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Understanding the glue that binds us all White Paper Writing Committee Elke C. Aschenauer Brookhaven National Laboratory William Brooks Universidad T´ ecnica Federico Santa Maria Abhay Deshpande 1 Stony Brook University Markus Diehl Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY Haiyan Gao Duke University Roy Holt Argonne National Laboratory Tanja Horn The Catholic University of America Andrew Hutton Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Yuri Kovchegov The Ohio State University Krishna Kumar University of Massachusetts, Amherst Zein-Eddine Meziani 1 Temple University Alfred Mueller Columbia University Jianwei Qiu 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory Michael Ramsey-Musolf University of Wisconsin Thomas Roser Brookhaven National Laboratory 1 Co-Editor 1 Franck Sabati´ e Commissariat ` a l' ´ Energie Atomique-Saclay

236

Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy Austin Educating Workforce in Renewable Energy January 7, 2010 - 1:44pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this project do? More than 400 Austin, Texas, students have enrolled in a course to become skill workers in the solar energy field. The course helps Austin achieve its ambitious goal, producing enough solar energy to power about 17,000 homes in Austin a year by 2020. Austin, Texas, is always looking for new ways to 'hook 'em by the horns' and keep up the city's trademark quote of 'weirdness.' Austinites aren't necessarily strange people, but the folks there like preserving their local flair and forward-thinking ideas. One new way of being unique and working for a brighter future is coming straight from the sun.

237

Part III - List of Documents, Exhibits, and Other Attachments  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

D D KEY PERSONNEL TITLE NAME Laboratory Director George Miller, Ph.D Deputy Director Steven Liedle, D. Env. Laboratory Counsel Melissa Allain, J.D. Associate Director, Facilities and Infrastructure Harold Conner, Jr. Associate Director, Computation and Simulation Dona Crawford Associate Director, Chemistry, Materials, and Life Sciences Tomás Díaz de la Rubia, Ph.D. Principal Associate Director, Global Security John Doesburg, Major General (Ret.) Associate Director, Physical Sciences William Goldstein, Ph.D. Principal Associate Director, Weapons and Complex Integration Bruce Goodwin, Ph.D. Associate Director, Nuclear Operations Pamela Horning Associate Director, Strategic Human Capital Management Tamara Jernigan, Ph.D. Contractor Assurance Kirkland Jones, Ph.D.

238

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3_Obligations case study May 23 2013 - Brian Pete Jessica.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Foreign Obligations Case Foreign Obligations Case Study Thursday May 23rd Pete Dessaules Brian Horn Jessica Norles Background * On several occasions, we have been asked to participate in some discussion on tracking and reporting of nuclear materials * Some of the discussions have included speaking with working staff in other countries 2 Export observations * Variations in how export data is reported to NMMSS by U.S. industry 3 Simple case, #1 * Exporter statement - one fuel assembly #0001 - 350 kgs EU / 15kgs U-235 - No foreign obligations exported * Importer view - One fuel assembly #0001 - 350 kgs EU / 15 kgs U-235 - No foreign obligations on material 4 Simple case, #2 * Exporter statement - One fuel assembly, #0002 - 350 kgs EU / 15kgs U-235 - 15 kgs U-235 Obligated to Australia (#31) * Importer view

239

Susan Martindale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WINTER 2002 MEETING WINTER 2002 MEETING NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA JANUARY 28-30, 2002 Stan Anderson Emergency Program Specialist U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office- Region 4 TEPP P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (505) 845-6661 Fax: (505) 284-7155 sanderson@doeal.gov Richard Arnold, Tribal Liaison Native American Interactions 1180 Town Center Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 89144 (702) 339-7200 Fax: (702) 646-0254 Richard_Arnold@ymp.gov Mark Askey, Program Manager HAMMER Training and Education Center 2890 Horn Rapids Road Richland, Washington 99352 (509) 376-8594 Fax: (509) 373-6070 mark_k_askey@rl.gov Rich Baker Emergency Response Coordinator Arizona Radiation Regulatory Agency 4814 South 40 th Street Phoenix, Arizona 85040 (602) 255-4845 Fax: (602) 437-0704

240

Primitive Fishing Tackle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fishing Tackle Fishing Tackle Nature Bulletin No. 752-A April 19, 1980 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRIMITlVE FISHING TACKLE Fishing is one of man's oldest occupations and the gear used for catching fish has changed but little over the ages. The basic methods in use today -- spearing, trapping, netting and angling -- had their origin among primitive peoples back in prehistoric times. Our modern steel fishhooks have gradually evolved from early crude hooks made from flint, bone, ivory, shell, horn or wood. Thousands of years ago, the Swiss Lake Dwellers and the ancient Egyptians used bronze wire bent into a shape like a youngster's pin hook. Much later some inventive fisherman added a barb to those bronze hooks to hold the fish more securely.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Bobolink  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bobolink Bobolink Nature Bulletin No. 496-A June 2, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BOBOLINK Most of our songbirds nest and find their food in woodlands, along woodland borders, or in old orchards. Some, like the robins, house wrens, martins and bluebirds, usually prefer to live near human habitations -- even in villages and cities. Others, notably the redwing blackbird, are found only around marshes and swampy places. But there is a small group of songbirds which are seen and heard only in open country: prairies, meadows, hayfields and abandoned farm lands. In addition to some native sparrows, the horned lark, the killdeer and the familiar meadow larks, this group includes that happy-go-lucky "harlequin of the meadows": the Bobolink.

242

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability Low-Cost Supports - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Radoslav Adzic (Primary Contact), Miomir Vukmirovic, Kotaro Sasaki, Jia Wang, Yang Shao-Horn 1 , Rachel O'Malley 2 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Bldg. 555 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Phone: (631) 344-4522 Email: adzic@bnl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: 1 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge MA 2 Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells (JMFC), London, England Project Start Date: July 1, 2009 Project End Date: September 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Developing high-performance fuel cell electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) comprising contiguous Pt monolayer (ML) on stable, inexpensive metal

243

Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded Number  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded Number Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded Number of employees Number of employees Telephone number Website Coordinates Region ABS Alaskan Inc Van Horn Rd Fairbanks Alaska Gateway Solar Wind energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Solar PV Solar thermal Wind Hydro Small scale wind turbine up to kW and solar systems distributor http www absak com United States AER NY Kinetics LLC PO Box Entrance Avenue Ogdensburg Marine and Hydrokinetic United States AW Energy Lars Sonckin kaari Espoo FI Marine and Hydrokinetic http www aw energy com Finland AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Redshank House Alness Point Business Park Alness Ross shire IV17 UP Marine and Hydrokinetic http www awsocean com United Kingdom Able Technologies Audubon Road Englewood Marine and Hydrokinetic http

244

STAT~MENJ OF CONSltlE]:UTIQNS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAT~MENJ OF CONSltlE]:UTIQNS STAT~MENJ OF CONSltlE]:UTIQNS R(;Q'(J~.&t ':l3Yo :;RQNAL.'.b " CLA~HORN FOR W:f\IVE:R OF u..s, AND ···~· ·~~~~ '." ·.' ·AsS~RTCOPYRIGHtrNASSOClATEDSOF1WARE ~ ;'; ~ "· · JCt{;(l)~O~:-_D.9$,:J'.'~8~143~f···:;/, :· : .. ; . . . ... . .. ··. . . · ·.: ·. " ' ;-~ : : ·:· ... t: .,'._.,.. .. ' .. ~··.* · ·<:· · Jfh¢.;'P,8,fit100~~ .. '$ohalc( Claghorn·(the tnYentor), has re<:Jde~t~d" a · waiver of ·dom~stic,~h~ fofeign'.~t>~t~rlt rr~~tsJn ·s-.110,868, ''.Document o,evelopment and

245

Overview of the LBNE Neutrino Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab. The facility is designed to aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined by an amalgam of the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW.

Moore, C.D.; He, Yun; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Lundberg, Byron; McGee, Mike; Misek, Joel; Mokhov, Nikolai V.; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Plunkett, Rob; Schultz, Ryan; /Fermilab

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

246

Arbitrarily little knowledge can give a quantum advantage for nonlocal tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has previously been shown that quantum nonlocality offers no benefit over classical correlations for performing a distributed task known as nonlocal computation. This is where separated parties must compute the value of a function without individually learning anything about the inputs. We show that giving the parties some knowledge of the inputs, however small, is sufficient to unlock the power of quantum mechanics to out-perform classical mechanics. This role of information held locally gives new insight into the general question of when quantum nonlocality gives an advantage over classical physics. Our results also reveal a novel feature of the nonlocality embodied in the celebrated task of Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt.

Jonathan Allcock; Harry Buhrman; Noah Linden

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast. Final report, Phase I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As an extension of its efforts in the development of the geopressured resources of the Gulf Coast, the Division of Geothermal Energy of the US Department of Energy is interested in determining the extent and characteristics of geopressured occurrences in areas outside the Gulf Coast. The work undertaken involved a literature search of available information documenting such occurrences. Geopressured reservoirs have been reported from various types of sedimentary lithologies representing virtually all geologic ages and in a host of geologic environments, many of which are unlike those of the Gulf Coast. These include many Rocky Mountain basins (Green River, Big Horn, Powder River, Wind River, Uinta, Piceance, Denver, San Juan), Mid-Continent basins (Delaware, Anadorko, Interior Salt, Williston, Appalachian), California basins (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura, Coast Ranges), Alaskan onshore and offshore basins, Pacific Coast offshore basins, and other isolated occurrences, both onshore and offshore.

Strongin, O.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Session: Offshore wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Evaluation of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Containing Metallic Solutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Room temperature cavitation tests of vacuum annealed type 316LN stainless steel were performed in pure Hg and in Hg with various amounts of metallic solute to evaluate potential mitigation of erosion/wastage. Tests were performed using an ultrasonic vibratory horn with specimens attached at the tip. All of the solutes examined, which included 5 wt% In, 10 wt% In, 4.4 wt% Cd, 2 wt% Ga, and a mixture that included 1 wt% each of Pb, Sn, and Zn, were found to increase cavitation-erosion as measured by increased weight loss and/or surface profile development compared to exposures for the same conditions in pure Hg. Qualitatively, each solute appeared to increase the post-test wetting tenacity of the Hg solutions and render the Hg mixture susceptible to manipulation of droplet shape.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Cavitation-erosion resistance of 316LN stainless steel in mercury containing metallic solutes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Room temperature cavitation tests of vacuum annealed type 316LN stainless steel were performed in pure mercury and in mercury with various amounts of metallic solute to evaluate potential mitigation of erosion/wastage. Tests were performed using an ultrasonic vibratory horn with specimens attached at the tip. All of the solutes examined, which included 5 wt% In, 10 wt% In, 4.4 wt% Cd, 2 wt% Ga, and a mixture that included 1 wt% each of Pb, Sn, and Zn, were found to increase cavitation-erosion as measured by increased weight loss and/or surface profile development compared to exposures for the same conditions in pure mercury. Qualitatively, each solute appeared to increase the tenacity of the post-test wetting of the Hg solutions and render the Hg mixture susceptible to manipulation of droplet shape. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Comparison of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Carburized and Carburized-Plus-Nitrided 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Annealed type 316LN stainless steel in the (1) carburized and the (2) carburized plus nitrided conditions was evaluated for cavitation-erosion resistance in ambient temperature mercury using a vibratory horn method. The results indicated that, relative to the specimens receiving only the carburizing treatment, the specimens that received both surface treatments exhibited substantially greater weight loss, general thinning, and profile development as a function of sonication time - with all observed degradation limited to the nitrided layer. Further, the nitride layer was observed to be susceptible to extensive cracking (occasionally leading to spallation), but the cracking was never observed to penetrate into the carburized layer. These screening test results suggest there is no improvement in cavitation-erosion resistance associated with augmentation of the carburizing treatment with plasma nitriding.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of 316LN Stainless Steel Following a Nitro-Carburizing Surface Treatment  

SciTech Connect

A nitro-carburizing surface treatment known domestically as the Melonite process was applied to type 316LN stainless steel test pieces and exposed to sonication conditions in mercury using a vibratory horn technique. Cavitation-erosion damage was evaluated for extended exposures and compared to other surface treatments on the same substrate alloy. The results indicate that the Melonite process substantially retards weight loss and crater development for extended periods, but gradually is eroded/destroyed leading to exposure of the substrate and cavitation-erosion behavior similar to untreated specimens. Compared with other surface treatments, cavitation-erosion results indicate that specimens treated with Melonite perform similarly to specimens treated with a simple nitriding process. Neither the simple nitriding nor the Melonite treatment is quite as effective as a previously evaluated low temperature carburizing treatment, the latter being about a factor of three better than Melonite in terms of weight loss during sonication in mercury.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Potential Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

Using a standard vibratory horn apparatus, the relative cavitation-erosion resistance of a number of cast alloys in mercury was evaluated to facilitate material selection decisions for Hg pumps. The performance of nine different alloys - in the as-cast condition as well as following a case-hardening treatment intended to increase surface hardness - was compared in terms of weight loss and surface profile development as a function of sonication time in Hg at ambient temperature. The results indicated that among several potentially suitable alloys, CD3MWCuN perhaps exhibited the best overall resistance to cavitation in both the as-cast and surface treated conditions while the cast irons examined were found unsuitable for service of this type. However, other factors, including cost, availability, and vendor schedules may influence a material selection among the suitable alloys for Hg pumps.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemical freeze-outs of strange and non-strange particles and residual chemical non-equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an elaborate version of the hadron resonance gas model with the combined treatment of separate chemical freeze-outs for strange and non-strange hadrons and with an additional \\gamma_{s} factor which accounts for the remaining strange particle non-equilibration. Two sets of chemical freeze-outs parameters are connected by the conservation laws of entropy, baryonic charge, isospin projection and strangeness. The developed approach enables us to perform a high-quality fit of the hadron multiplicity ratios for AGS, SPS and RHIC energies with total \\chi^2/dof \\simeq 1.05. A special attention is paid to a complete description of the Strangeness Horn. A well-known \\bar p, \\bar \\Lambda and \\bar \\Xi selective suppression problem is also discussed.

K. A. Bugaev; D. R. Oliinychenko; V. V. Sagun; A. I. Ivanytskyi; J. Cleymans; E. G. Nikonov; G. M. Zinovjev

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Subtraction of ``accidentals'' and the validity of Bell tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In some key Bell experiments, including two of the well-known ones by Alain Aspect, 1981-2, it is only after the subtraction of ``accidentals'' from the coincidence counts that we get violations of Bell tests. The data adjustment, producing increases of up to 60% in the test statistics, has never been adequately justified. Few published experiments give sufficient information for the reader to make a fair assessment. There is a straightforward and well known realist model that fits the unadjusted data very well. In this paper, the logic of this realist model and the reasoning used by experimenters in justification of the data adjustment are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence from all Bell experiments is in urgent need of re-assessment, in the light of all the known ``loopholes''. Invalid Bell tests have frequently been used, neglecting improved ones derived by Clauser and Horne in 1974. ``Local causal'' explanations for the observations have been wrongfully neglected.

Caroline H. Thompson

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

Efficient multipartite entanglement purification with the entanglement link from a subspace  

SciTech Connect

We present an efficient multipartite entanglement purification protocol (MEPP) for N-photon systems in a Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state with parity-check detectors. It contains two parts. One is the conventional MEPP with which the parties can obtain a high-fidelity N-photon ensemble directly, similar to the MEPP with controlled-not gates. The other is our recycling MEPP in which the entanglement link is used to produce some N-photon entangled systems from entangled N{sup '}-photon subsystems (2{<=}N{sup '}

Deng Fuguo [Department of Physics, Applied Optics Beijing Area Major Laboratory, Beijing Conventional University, Beijing 100875 (China)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Method of producing monolithic ceramic cross-flow filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ceramic filter of various configuration have been used to filter particulates from hot gases exhausted from coal-fired systems. Prior ceramic cross-flow filters have been favored over other types, but those previously horn have been assemblies of parts somehow fastened together and consequently subject often to distortion or delamination on exposure hot gas in normal use. The present new monolithic, seamless, cross-flow ceramic filters, being of one-piece construction, are not prone to such failure. Further, these new products are made by novel casting process which involves the key steps of demolding the ceramic filter green body so that none of the fragile inner walls of the filter is cracked or broken.

Larsen, David A. (Clifton Park, NY); Bacchi, David P. (Schenectady, NY); Connors, Timothy F. (Watervliet, NY); Collins, III, Edwin L. (Albany, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES  

SciTech Connect

This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

259

Random multiparty entanglement distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe various results related to the random distillation of multiparty entangled states - that is, conversion of such states into entangled states shared between fewer parties, where those parties are not predetermined. In previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 260501 (2007)] we showed that certain output states (namely Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs) could be reliably acquired from a prescribed initial multipartite state (namely the W state) via random distillation that could not be reliably created between predetermined parties. Here we provide a more rigorous definition of what constitutes ``advantageous'' random distillation. We show that random distillation is always advantageous for W-class three-qubit states (but only sometimes for Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)-class states). We show that the general class of multiparty states known as symmetric Dicke states can be readily converted to many other states in the class via random distillation. Finally we show that random distillation is provab...

Fortescue, Ben

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

EUROv Super Beam Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

Dracos, Marcos [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Realistic limits on the nonlocality of an N-partite single-photon superposition  

SciTech Connect

A recent paper [L. Heaney, A. Cabello, M. F. Santos, and V. Vedral, New J. Phys. 13, 053054 (2011)] revealed that a single quantum symmetrically delocalized over N modes, namely a W state, effectively allows for all-versus-nothing proofs of nonlocality in the limit of large N. Ideally, this finding opens up the possibility of using the robustness of the W states while realizing the nonlocal behavior previously thought to be exclusive to the more complex class of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. We show that in practice, however, the slightest decoherence or inefficiency of the Bell measurements on W states will degrade any violation margin gained by scaling to higher N. The nonstatistical demonstration of nonlocality is thus proved to be impossible in any realistic experiment.

Laghaout, Amine [Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Building 309, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Bjoerk, Gunnar [Department of Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); NORDITA, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Andersen, Ulrik L. [Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Building 309, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); NORDITA, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Session: Offshore wind  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest.  

SciTech Connect

Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.

Horn, Scott; Hanula, James L.; Ulyshen, Michael D.; Kilgo, John C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Property:EIA/861/IsoOther | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IsoOther IsoOther Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ISO_OTHER Property Type Boolean Description Indicates that the organization conducts operations in another ISO region other than choices listed. [1] References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - 861 Webfile Layout for 2010.doc" Pages using the property "EIA/861/IsoOther" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Access Energy Coop + true + Aiken Electric Coop Inc + true + Akiachak Native Community Electric Co + true + Atchison-Holt Electric Coop + true + B Big Horn County Elec Coop, Inc + true + Brigham City Corporation (Utility Company) + true + Broad River Electric Coop, Inc + true + C Canby Utility Board + true + City of Bandon, Oregon (Utility Company) + true +

265

Reply to comment | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reply to comment Reply to comment Slide18 Submitted by gibsone on Thu, 2013-09-12 12:38 quicktabs-title FY2006-grc Slide18 Acknowledgements This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program through the following contract vehicles: DOE Funding Directly to OSTI: Contract DE-AT05-01TE30204 DOE Funding to PERI via OSTI: Task Order IIA-9000-032 The authors gratefully acknowledge significant help from the following people: Dr. Allan Jelacic, Dr. Roy Mink, and Jay Nathwani of the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program, Ed Eugeni, Shehrazade Mazari, and Jim McVeigh of PERI, Patty Simmons and the crew at OSTI, and Roland Horne and Bill Cummings, consultants to the Geothermal Legacy Project Add new comment Thumbnail Mobile_320x340 Icon_64x64 Reply (If you're a human, don't change the following field)

266

A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

Forcey, Greg, M.

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Wyoming and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Wyoming, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 7 Lincoln Sublette Teton CLIMATE ZONE 6 Albany Fremont Park Big Horn Hot Springs Sheridan Campbell Johnson Sweetwater Carbon Laramie Uinta Converse Natrona Washakie Crook Niobrara Weston CLIMATE ZONE 5

268

The Deepwater Horizon Disaster: What Happened and Why  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deepwater Horizon disaster was the largest oil spill in US history, and the second largest spill in the world. 11 men lost their lives in the explosion and fire. Although the impacts of the spill were evident to large numbers of people, its causes were harder to see. This lecture will focus on the technical aspects of the events that led to the spill itself: what happened on the rig before, during and after the event, up to the time the rig sank. As with many engineering disasters, the accident was due to a sequence of failures, including both technical systems and procedural issues. Although the causes were complex and interacting, the lecture will focus on four main problems: (1) the failure of the cement and casing seal, (2) the failure to recognize and respond to hydrocarbon flow into the riser, (3) the ignition of hydrocarbons on the rig, and (4) the failure of the blow-out preventer (BOP) to seal the well. The lecture will conclude with some suggestions as to how events such as the Deepwater Horizon disaster can be avoided in the future. (Roland N. Horne is the Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, and was the Chairman of Petroleum Engineering from 1995 to 2006. He holds BE, PhD and DSc degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, all in Engineering Science. Horne is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and is also an Honorary Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers.)

Horne, Roland N. (Stanford University)

2011-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

269

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

SRS Environmental Report 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Environmental Report Summary Environmental Report - 2012 Environmental Data / Maps - 2012 EMS Description Manual Environmental Dose Assessment Manual Environmental Policy SRAP SREL SRNS Annual Report Savannah River Remediation USFS-SR References SRS spacer Bottomland Hardwood Forest bottomland hardwood/floodplain forest Front Cover - David Scott of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) provided this year's cover photo. The photo was taken in the Mixed Swamp Forest Set-Aside, which is part of the Savannah River swamp. This Set-Aside is one of the original ten SREL habitat reserve areas selected in 1968 to represent a diversity of bottomland hardwood/floodplain forest communities of a southern river swamp system. Represented are aquatic, semi-aquatic, and terrestrial habitats associated with cypress-tupelo ponds, mixed hardwood sloughs, and mixed hardwood ridges. This Set-Aside is important because seasonally flooded hardwood forests are becoming increasingly rare habitats that are particularly vulnerable to habitat destruction and/or alteration due to drainage, water control projects, industrial or urban waste discharge, or power plant cooling effluents. The flower in the foreground is called Lizard's Tail (Latin name Saururus cernuus). It grows in a variety of aquatic habitats, but on SRS it can be particularly abundant in some of the swamp forests

271

1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sulimar Queen environmental restoration project closure package Sandia environmental stewardship exemplar.  

SciTech Connect

In March 2008, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia), in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management, Roswell Field Office, completed its responsibilities to plug and abandon wells and restore the surface conditions for the Sulimar Queens Unit, a 2,500 acre oil field, in Chaves County, Southeast New Mexico. Sandia assumed this liability in an agreement to obtain property to create a field laboratory to perform extensive testing and experimentation on enhanced oil recovery techniques for shallow oil fields. In addition to plugging and abandoning 28 wells, the project included the removal of surface structures and surface reclamation of disturbed lands associated with all plugged and abandoned wells, access roads, and other auxiliary facilities within unit boundaries. A contracting strategy was implemented to mitigate risk and reduce cost. As the unit is an important wildlife habitat for prairie chickens, sand dune lizards, and mule deer, the criteria for the restoration and construction process were designed to protect and enhance the wildlife habitat. Lessons learned from this project include: (1) extreme caution should be exercised when entering agreements that include future liabilities, (2) partnering with the regulator has huge benefits, and (3) working with industry experts, who were familiar with the work, and subcontractors, who provided the network to complete the project cost effectively.

Tillman, Jack B.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four catalysts to be tested in that unit were ordered. The pilot unit was started up with two of the four catalysts in service late in August, and initial catalyst activity results were measured in late September. The other two catalysts will not become available for testing until sometime in October. This technical progress report details these efforts at both sites.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

ABS Alaskan Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ABS Alaskan Inc ABS Alaskan Inc Jump to: navigation, search Logo: ABS Alaskan, Inc. Name ABS Alaskan, Inc. Address 2130 Van Horn Rd. Place Fairbanks, Alaska Zip 99701 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic, Solar, Wind energy Product Solar PV, Solar thermal, Wind, Hydro, Small scale wind turbine (up to 1kW) and solar systems distributor. Year founded 1990 Phone number (800) 235-0689 Website http://www.absak.com/ Coordinates 64.813322°, -147.768685° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.813322,"lon":-147.768685,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

The Prairie Chicken  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Chicken Prairie Chicken Nature Bulletin No. 99 January 18, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE PRAIRIE CHICKEN In late January the prairie chicken cocks begin to "boom". Feeble and infrequent at first, booming increases as winter merges into spring and continues until June. The cocks gather in groups, regularly, before sunrise and again at sunset, on open ridges or slight rises in the prairie. Year after year they come to the same locations where each male establishes a "territory" which he defends fiercely. Fights are frequent. As a prelude to booming, the cock runs forward a short distance, stops, stamps his feet rapidly and pivots in a half or full circle. As he dances, the two brilliant orange air sacs -- one on each side of his neck -- are inflated, his long horn-like neck feathers are erected, the fleshy orange eyebrows are also inflated and his tail spread fanwise, snaps with a loud click. Then comes the boom.

277

010203-DRAFT-FINAL2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Voice 918-595-6600 Fax 918-595-6656 www.swpa.gov The UPDATE is published by and for customers, retirees, and employees of Southwestern Power Administration like: Ross Murray Electrician Jonesboro Sub Crew Special thanks to: SWPA Marshall Boyken Ashley Corker Larry Harp Scott Holland Harry Mardirosian Beth Nielsen Carrie Quick George Robbins Dave Sargent Donna Short Gary Swartzlander Kathy Tyer Cris Van Horn Aleta Wallace CNI/Bearskin Vicki Clarke Ruben Garcia William Hiller Kathy O'Neal Mistie Yost WAPA/PMLO Leslie Kerr Shellie Scott U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N J A N U A R Y - M A R C H 2 0 1 0 Hydropower - The Original Renewable CONTINUED ON PAGE 2 Green energy is emerging as a National priority, and the future of electric generation is becoming focused on integrating renewable resources into the grid to reduce

278

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sound Pitch and Distance Travelled Sound Pitch and Distance Travelled Name: Chris Status: educator Grade: 4-5 Location: MI Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Do high pitched sounds travel farther than low pitched sounds? Replies: Sorry Chris, it is the other way around. If you are near lightening you hear a crack or bang which is a high frequency sound. But far away from the lightening you hear thunder as a low pitch, rolling, boom. The high frequency sound from the crack you hear close up does not made it very far from the lightening (which is the cause of the noise). Hope this helps. R. W. "Mr. A." Avakian Quite the opposite. Low pitched sounds attenuate more slowly with distance. Fog-horns are an evolutionary example of the point. Of course, they are meant to operate in elevated humidity, which adds another loss factor. I will try to tell you more later. On the other hand, it is quite possible for high-pitched sounds to be _more_noticeable_ to a given being in a given noise background.

279

Data:E1039a95-3b6c-438b-bdcb-3259aaa1c0fa | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

039a95-3b6c-438b-bdcb-3259aaa1c0fa 039a95-3b6c-438b-bdcb-3259aaa1c0fa No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Big Horn Rural Electric Co (Montana) Effective date: 2010/05/01 End date if known: Rate name: Commercial and Industrial (CI)- Industrial Sector: Industrial Description: The greater of 45kW or 50 kVA Additional kVA chg/per kVA $1.00 Source or reference: http://www.bighornrea.com/rates.htm Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

280

The Musk Ox  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Musk Ox Musk Ox Nature Bulletin No. 740 January 25, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE MUSK OX Why are bones of the arctic musk ox found here in Illinois? The evidence shows that these remains date back to the Ice Age when mile- deep ice sheets covered Canada and large parts of the United States, Europe and Asia. At that time the musk ox was one of the few hardy animals that thrived along the edges of these ice sheets. Then, for thousands of years, as the climate warmed and the glaciers melted, the musk oxen followed the retreating glaciers northward. Today, they survive only on the bleak tundras of Alaska, northern Canada and the coast of Greenland . The musk ox looks somewhat like a small, unusually shaggy buffalo. It is built and upholstered for life in the most rugged climate on earth, where blizzards howl and temperatures 50 degrees below zero are common. Adult bulls weigh 500 pounds or more but appear heavier because of their thick padding of hair and wool. Cows are smaller. The dark brown to black hair -- two feet or longer on the neck, chest, sides and hind quarters -- hangs like an ankle-length skirt. The horns of both sexes are sharp, vicious weapons.

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281

SNAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expansion Discovered Expansion Discovered - The Big Bang, Modified - Dark Energy - How Will SNAP do it? - Why Do This From Space? - Why Do We Want to Know? - Detailed Overview - Spacecraft / Instruments - Resources Dark Energy Expansion Discovered Astronomers in the early 20th Century got the shocks of their lives when they discovered that galaxies appeared to be rushing away from us. They did this by taking spectra of the galaxies, and then measuring the shift in their spectrum due to their motion. diagram of red shift from astronomynotes.com Credit: Astronomynotes.com You're probably already familiar with this phenomenon, called the Doppler Shift -it's the same principle that makes a car horn change in pitch from high to low as it approaches and passes you. The sound waves are compressed as the car approaches you (resulting in a higher pitch) and are stretched as it recedes (which lowers the pitch). With light, an object approaching you has its light waves compressed, shortening the wavelength. This is called a blue shift ("blue" in this sense doesn't necessarily mean the object gets bluer; astronomers the word as a kind of shorthand, since in visible light the shorter wavelengths are blue). If the object is moving away, the wavelengths are stretched, resulting in a red shift of the spectrum.

282

Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Collider: Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Understanding the glue that binds us all Electron Ion Collider: The Next QCD Frontier Understanding the glue that binds us all BNL-98815-2012-JA JLAB-PHY-12-1652 arXiv:1212.1701 Authors A. Accardi 14,28 , J. L. Albacete 16 , M. Anselmino 29 , N. Armesto 36 , E. C. Aschenauer 3,† , A. Bacchetta 35 , D. Boer 33 , W. Brooks 37,† , T. Burton 3 , N.-B. Chang 23 , W.-T. Deng 13,23 , A. Deshpande 25,∗,† , M. Diehl 11,† , A. Dumitru 2 , R. Dupr´ e 7 , R. Ent 28,‡ , S. Fazio 3 , H. Gao 12,† , V. Guzey 28 , H. Hakobyan 37 , Y. Hao 3 , D. Hasch 15 , R. Holt 1,† , T. Horn 5,† , M. Huang 23 , A. Hutton 28,† , C. Hyde 20 , J. Jalilian-Marian 2 , S. Klein 17 , B. Kopeliovich 37 , Y. Kovchegov 19,† , K. Kumar 24,† , K. Kumeriˇ cki 40 , M. A. C. Lamont 3 , T. Lappi 34 , J.-H. Lee 3 , Y. Lee 3 , E. M. Levin 26,37 , F.-L. Lin 28 , V. Litvinenko 3 , T. W. Ludlam 3,‡ , C. Marquet

283

Hair, Hides and Tallow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hair, Hides and Tallow Hair, Hides and Tallow Nature Bulletin No. 589-A January 31, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation HAIR, HIDES AND TALLOW Since prehistoric times, especially in cold and temperate climates, mankind has depended upon hairy mammals for food and for materials to fashion clothing, shelters, weapons, implements and ornaments. Some of our American Indians had not progressed much beyond that when the white man came. They were Stone Age people. For example, the Dakota or Sioux were nomads who roamed the Great Plains, attempted no agriculture, and depended entirely upon the millions of bison. (See Bulletin No. 324-A). Their only domestic animal and beast of burden was the dog. Their portable tipi (See No. 555-A) was a conical framework of slender poles covered with hides of the buffalo. Its flesh was their chief food. Surplus meat was dried into "jerky" to be eaten in emergencies, or -- pulverized and mixed with tallow, marrow, and berries -- to make pemmican. (See No. 257-A). They used every part of the animal, including its horns, bones, sinews and hoofs. Brains and tallow were used in preparing skins for robes, shirts, moccasins, leggings, pouches, parfleches, etc. Raw hides were stretched over the frames of shields, saddles, and the tub-like bullboats for crossing streams. Buffalo droppings or "chips" were the only fuel on those treeless plains.

284

Data:3a567bc0-1b15-4443-9aa1-23d977436f69 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a567bc0-1b15-4443-9aa1-23d977436f69 a567bc0-1b15-4443-9aa1-23d977436f69 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Big Horn Rural Electric Co Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Montana - Commercial and Industrial (CI)- Commercial Sector: Commercial Description: The greater of 45kW or 50 kVA Source or reference: http://www.bighornrea.com/content/rates-january-1-2013 Source Parent: Comments Additional kVA chg/per kVA $1.00 Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V):

285

September 11 - 13, 2012 HAMMER Steering Committee Meeting - Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAMMER STEERING COMMITTEE CALENDAR OF EVENTS HAMMER STEERING COMMITTEE CALENDAR OF EVENTS The Fall 2012 - HAMMER Steering Committee and Subcommittee meetings will be held once again, at the Volpentest HAMMER Training and Education Center, 2890 Horn Rapids Road in Richland, WA. The schedule for the two days is as follows: Wednesday, September 12, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Medical Surveillance Subcommittee Meeting - located in the HAMMER Admin Bldg/classrooms 10/11/12 1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Labor Subcommittee Meeting - located in the HAMMER Admin Bldg/classrooms 10/11/12 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. NIEHS Grantee Meeting - located in the HAMMER Admin Bldg/classrooms 10/11/12 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. HAMMER Steering Committee Reception hosted by MSA at the Red Lion Hotel/Hanford House, 802 George Washington Way in Richland, WA

286

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Preparation and Measurement of Three-Qubit Entanglement in a Superconducting Circuit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally, quantum entanglement has played a central role in foundational discussions of quantum mechanics. The measurement of correlations between entangled particles can exhibit results at odds with classical behavior. These discrepancies increase exponentially with the number of entangled particles. When entanglement is extended from just two quantum bits (qubits) to three, the incompatibilities between classical and quantum correlation properties can change from a violation of inequalities involving statistical averages to sign differences in deterministic observations. With the ample confirmation of quantum mechanical predictions by experiments, entanglement has evolved from a philosophical conundrum to a key resource for quantum-based technologies, like quantum cryptography and computation. In particular, maximal entanglement of more than two qubits is crucial to the implementation of quantum error correction protocols. While entanglement of up to 3, 5, and 8 qubits has been demonstrated among spins, photons, and ions, respectively, entanglement in engineered solid-state systems has been limited to two qubits. Here, we demonstrate three-qubit entanglement in a superconducting circuit, creating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states with fidelity of 88%, measured with quantum state tomography. Several entanglement witnesses show violation of bi-separable bounds by 830\\pm80%. Our entangling sequence realizes the first step of basic quantum error correction, namely the encoding of a logical qubit into a manifold of GHZ-like states using a repetition code. The integration of encoding, decoding and error-correcting steps in a feedback loop will be the next milestone for quantum computing with integrated circuits.

L. DiCarlo; M. D. Reed; L. Sun; B. R. Johnson; J. M. Chow; J. M. Gambetta; L. Frunzio; S. M. Girvin; M. H. Devoret; R. J. Schoelkopf

2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

288

Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance of fish-eating birds, primarily ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California (L. californicus) gulls and monitored their behavior at two man-made structures within the Yakima River in eastern Washington: Horn Rapids Dam, a low-head irrigation dam, and the return pipe for the Chandler Juvenile Fish Handling Facility. Earlier observations of congregations of gulls at these structures suggested an increased likelihood of predation of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. We estimated the number of fish consumed and examined the relationship between river flow and gull numbers and fish taken. Numbers of gulls at the structures varied daily between their arrival in Late March-early April and departure in late June (mean ({+-}SE) - Horn Rapids: 11.7 ({+-}2.0), Chandler: 20.1 ({+-}1.5) ). During the 4-yr study, numbers at Horn Rapids peaked dramatically during the last 2 weeks in May (between 132.9 ({+-}4.2) to 36.6 ({+-}2.2) gulls/day) and appeared to the associated with the release of > 1-mil hatchery juvenile fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) above the 2 study sites. A comparable peak in gull abundance was not observed at Chandler. Diurnal patterns of gull abundance also varied among years and sites. The relationship between foraging efficiency and gull numbers was not consistent among years or sites. Gull numbers were not correlated with river flow when year was considered. However, variations in flow among years appeared to be associated with average gull numbers at each site, but trends were not consistent between sites. Low seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Chandler, whereas high seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Horn Rapids. Assuming all fish taken were salmonids, we estimate gulls consumed between 0.1-10.3 % of the juvenile salmonids passing or being released from the Chandler Juvenile Fish Monitoring Facility located above the two structures. Staggered releases of hatchery fish, nocturnal releases of fish entrained in the Chandler facility, changes in the orientation of the outflow from the f

Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, Quantitive Ecology Program, Seattle, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Baseline avian use and behavior at the CARES wind plant site, Klickitat County, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a literature review on avian-wind turbine interactions and the results of a one-year avian baseline study conducted in 1998 at the proposed Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) wind development site in Klickitat County, Washington. Avian use of the site ranged from 1.11/survey in the winter to 5.69/survey in the spring. Average use by passerines in the study plots ranged from 1.15 minutes/survey in the winter to 40.98 minutes/survey in the spring. Raptors spent much less time within plots than other groups, ranging from 0.05 minutes/survey in the winter to 0.77 minutes/survey during the fall. Thirteen percent of all flying birds were within the rotor-swept height (25 to 75 m); 41.6% of all raptors were flying at this height. Raptors with the greatest potential turbine exposure are red-tailed hawks and golden eagles. Passerines with the highest turbine exposure are common ravens, American robins, and horned larks. Spatial use data for the site indicate that avian use tends to be concentrated near the rim, indicating that placing turbines away from the rim may reduce risk. Avian use data at the CARES site indicate that if a wind plant is constructed in the future, avian mortality would likely be relatively low.

Erickson, W.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Strickland, M.D.; Kronner, K.; Becker, P.S.; Orloff, S.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

290

Existence and uniqueness for shape from shading around critical points: theory and an algorithm  

SciTech Connect

To approach the difficult question of existence and uniqueness of solutions for the shape-from-shading problem, the authors have examined the image irradiance equation using notation and concepts from dynamic systems theory. The method of characteristic strips used by Horn (1975) defines a dynamic system on a four-dimensional space. Using modern methods for analyzing the behavior of dynamic systems, general uniqueness results and a new shape-from-shading algorithm emerge based on the image dynamic system. Solution surfaces for the shape-from-shading problem are invariant manifolds of the flow generated by the image dynamic system. The stable and unstable manifolds associated with certain critical points in the image determine locally unique solution surfaces. A theorem about unstable manifolds (the Lambda Lemma) suggests a class of computational methods for finding stable and unstable manifolds around these critical points. A simple example of such a method is described and found to be robust in the presence of image noise and errors in assumptions about the light source.

Saxberg, V.H. (McKinsey and Company, Inc., New York, NY (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline  

SciTech Connect

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Assessment of End-of-Life Behavior of the Surface Modification to Improve Cavitation-Erosion Resistance in the Mercury Target at the Spallation Neutron Source  

SciTech Connect

The cavitation-erosion resistance of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer on annealed or cold-worked substrates of 316LN stainless steel has been examined in mercury using a vibratory horn technique and extended exposure periods intended to expose 'end-of-life' performance characteristics. The Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer tends to remain protective--as evidenced by modest steady-state weight loss and surface roughness increases, only isolated pitting, and limited wetting by mercury--until the protective layer has been thinned by general erosion to about 15-20 {micro}m. Prior to that amount of erosion, the cavitation-erosion resistance of both types of specimens appears defined by the properties of the protective layer. However, after thinning to such a degree, initial breakdown of the protective layer is characterized by increases in both the surface roughness and the number/depth of individual pits across the surface at a rate that is strongly dependent on the substrate condition, with annealed substrates significantly more prone to damage. However, even as the protective properties of the Kolsterised{reg_sign} layer decrease, both weight change and profile development as a function of sonication time suggest a gradual reversion to cavitation-erosion behavior similar to that of untreated substrates.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The Robinson Gravitational Wave Background Telescope (BICEP): a bolometric large angular scale CMB polarimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Robinson Telescope (BICEP) is a ground-based millimeter-wave bolometric array designed to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) and galactic foreground emission. Such measurements probe the energy scale of the inflationary epoch, tighten constraints on cosmological parameters, and verify our current understanding of CMB physics. Robinson consists of a 250-mm aperture refractive telescope that provides an instantaneous field-of-view of 17 degrees with angular resolution of 55 and 37 arcminutes at 100 GHz and 150 GHz, respectively. Forty-nine pair of polarization-sensitive bolometers are cooled to 250 mK using a 4He/3He/3He sorption fridge system, and coupled to incoming radiation via corrugated feed horns. The all-refractive optics is cooled to 4 K to minimize polarization systematics and instrument loading. The fully steerable 3-axis mount is capable of continuous boresight rotation or azimuth scanning at speeds up to 5 deg/s. Robinson has begun its first season of observation at the South Pole. Given the measured performance of the instrument along with the excellent observing environment, Robinson will measure the E-mode polarization with high sensitivity, and probe for the B-modes to unprecedented depths. In this paper we discuss aspects of the instrument design and their scientific motivations, scanning and operational strategies, and the results of initial testing and observations.

K. W. Yoon; P. A. R. Ade; D. Barkats; J. O. Battle; E. M. Bierman; J. J. Bock; J. A. Brevik; H. C. Chiang; A. Crites; C. D. Dowell; L. Duband; G. S. Griffin; E. F. Hivon; W. L. Holzapfel; V. V. Hristov; B. G. Keating; J. M. Kovac; C. L. Kuo; A. E. Lange; E. M. Leitch; P. V. Mason; H. T. Nguyen; N. Ponthieu; Y. D. Takahashi; T. Renbarger; L. C. Weintraub; D. Woolsey

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Barchan dune corridors: field characterization and investigation of control parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the barchan field located between Tarfaya and Laayoune (Atlantic Sahara, Morocco) is quantitatively investigated and compared to that in La Pampa de la Joya (Arequipa, Peru). On the basis of field measurements, we show how the volume, the velocity and the output sand flux of a dune can be computed from the value of its body and horn widths. The dune size distribution is obtained from the analysis of aerial photographs. It shows that these fields are in a statistically homogeneous state along the wind direction and present a `corridor' structure in the transverse direction, in which the dunes have a rather well selected size. Investigating the possible external parameters controlling these corridors, we demonstrate that none among topography, granulometry, wind and sand flux is relevant. We finally discuss the dynamical processes at work in these fields (collisions and wind fluctuations), and investigate the way they could regulate the size of the dunes. Furthermore we show that the overall sand flux transported by a dune field is smaller than the maximum transport that could be reached in the absence of dunes, i.e. in saltation over the solid ground.

Hicham Elbelrhiti; Bruno Andreotti; Philippe Claudin

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

296

Low cost impulse compatible wideband antenna  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An antenna apparatus and method for building the antenna is disclosed. Impulse signals travel through a feed point of the antenna with respect to a ground plane. A geometric fin structure is connected to the feed point, and through a termination resistance to the ground plane. A geometric ridge structure connected to the ground is positioned with respect to the fin in order to receive and radiate electromagnetic energy from the impulse signal at a predetermined impedance and over a predetermined set of frequencies. The fin and ridge can be either a wire or a planar surface. The fin and ridge may be disposed within a radiation cavity such as a horn. The radiation cavity is constructed of stamped and etched metal sheets bent and then soldered together. The fin and ridge are also formed from metal sheets or wires. The fin is attached to the feed point and then to the cavity through a termination resistance. The ridge is attached to the cavity and disposed with respect to the fin in order to achieve a particular set of antenna characteristics.

Rosenbury, Erwin T. (Livermore, CA); Burke, Gerald J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Tracy, CA); Stever, Robert D. (Lathrop, CA); Governo, George K. (Livermore, CA); Mullenhoff, Donald J. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Strings, black holes, and quantum information  

SciTech Connect

We find multiple relations between extremal black holes in string theory and 2- and 3-qubit systems in quantum information theory. We show that the entropy of the axion-dilaton extremal black hole is related to the concurrence of a 2-qubit state, whereas the entropy of the STU black holes, Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) as well as non-BPS, is related to the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state. We relate the 3-qubit states with the string theory states with some number of D-branes. We identify a set of large black holes with the maximally entangled Greenberger, Horne, Zeilinger (GHZ) class of states and small black holes with separable, bipartite, and W states. We sort out the relation between 3-qubit states, twistors, octonions, and black holes. We give a simple expression for the entropy and the area of stretched horizon of small black holes in terms of a norm and 2-tangles of a 3-qubit system. Finally, we show that the most general expression for the black hole and black ring entropy in N=8 supergravity/M theory, which is given by the famous quartic Cartan E{sub 7(7)} invariant, can be reduced to Cayley's hyperdeterminant describing the 3-tangle of a 3-qubit state.

Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tuning into UHE Neutrinos in Antarctica - The ANITA Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) experiment is being developed to search for ultra-high-energy (UHE) neutrino interactions ($>3\\times10^{18}$ eV) in the Antarctic ice cap. A neutrino interaction in the ice will produce a radio pulse by the means of the Askaryan effect. The large radio transparency of ice allows for such a pulse to be recorded by a cluster of balloon-borne antennas. The details of the ANITA instrument, now in a construction phase, and the science we hope to achieve is discussed. In order to prepare for the main mission, we have flown ANITA-lite during the 2003/04 austral season. ANITA-lite consisted of two quad-ridge horn antennas and a prototype RF (radio frequency) triggering and recording system. Here we present the results of an impulsive RF background survey of Antarctica, as well as proof-of-principle gain, tracking, and timing calibrations conducted by observing solar radio emissions and calibration radio-pulses. A preliminary UHE neutrino flux limit based on ANITA-lite data is also presented.

P. Miocinovic; S. W. Barwick; J. J. Beatty; D. Z. Besson; W. R. Binns; B. Cai; J. M. Clem; A. Connolly; S. Coutu; D. F. Cowen; P. F. Dowkontt; M. A. DuVernois; P. A. Evenson; D. Goldstein; P. W. Gorham; C. L. Hebert; M. H. Israel; J. G. Learned; K. M. Liewer; J. T. Link; S. Matsuno; J. W. Nam; C. J. Naudet; R. Nichol; K. J. Palladino; M. Rosen; D. Saltzberg; D. Seckel; A. Silvestri; G. S. Varner; D. Williams

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Microcomputer-based monitoring and control system with uranium mining application. Information circular  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines investigated a microprocessor-based real-time control and monitoring system for uranium mining applications. The system is capable of controlling and monitoring up to 768 stations within 3 km of the central processor on a common four-wire cable. It can be used in conjunction with detectors to continuously monitor and display radiation working levels at points throughout the mine. Surface alarms are sounded for critical situations such as rapid radiation buildup, loss of power to monitors or fans, and changes in air door position. Permanent records of all changes are automatically printed out with their time of occurrence. Printouts can also be obtained for shift reports or trend logs. The system can be used to remotely control fan startup and shutdown, and also can alert miners of underground conditions by blowing horns or turning on lights. Battery backup keeps the system operative for up to 4 h in case of a mine power outage. A special software feature permits automatic, time-delayed, sequential restart of fans.

Sheeran, C.T.; Franklin, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evidence of Pressure Dependent Permeability in Long-Term Shale Gas Production and Pressure Transient Responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current state of shale gas reservoir dynamics demands understanding long-term production, and existing models that address important parameters like fracture half-length, permeability, and stimulated shale volume assume constant permeability. Petroleum geologists suggest that observed steep declining rates may involve pressure-dependent permeability (PDP). This study accounts for PDP in three potential shale media: the shale matrix, the existing natural fractures, and the created hydraulic fractures. Sensitivity studies comparing expected long-term rate and pressure production behavior with and without PDP show that these two are distinct when presented as a sequence of coupled build-up rate-normalized pressure (BU-RNP) and its logarithmic derivative, making PDP a recognizable trend. Pressure and rate field data demonstrate evidence of PDP only in Horn River and Haynesville but not in Fayetteville shale. While the presence of PDP did not seem to impact the long term recovery forecast, it is possible to determine whether the observed behavior relates to change in hydraulic fracture conductivity or to change in fracture network permeability. As well, it provides insight on whether apparent fracture networks relate to an existing natural fracture network in the shale or to a fracture network induced during hydraulic fracturing.

Vera Rosales, Fabian 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Subject no.: 1.4 Policies and Programmes LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT FOR WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: Tech-wise A/S has conducted a life cycle assessment of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. A life cycle assessment (LCA), also known as a cradle to grave analysis, is an inventory of all environmental impact of a product, process or service within its complete lifecycle. An LCA includes a recovery of the resources used in the production through the utilisation to the dismantling and disposal of the product. As sample wind turbine a 2 MW offshore wind turbine placed at Horns Rev in the North Sea has been used, since this project is under development and Tech-wise A/S is the main consultant to this project. In this LCA assumptions have been made where there is information about certain materials. The assessment revealed- as expected- that the environmental impact is concentrated in the production and disposal phase. Mainly the use of normal and high-strength steel are contributors. This means that the main impact is found to come from the nacelle and the foundation. Keywords: Environmental Aspects, Off-shore, Materials, Life Cycle Assessment, EDIP-method The results of this LCA will be used to identify the most essential environmental impact in all life phases of a 2 MW offshore wind turbine. This project is the first step in an examination of the possible improvement of the environmental performance of that particular wind turbine and was finalised in spring 2001. The plan is to finalise the next project by the end of 2001.

Henriette Hassing; Sren Varming

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Exact Fourier expansion in cylindrical coordinates for the three-dimensional Helmholtz Green function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method is presented for Fourier decomposition of the Helmholtz Green Function in cylindrical coordinates, which is equivalent to obtaining the solution of the Helmholtz equation for a general ring source. The Fourier coefficients of the Helmholtz Green function are split into their half advanced+half retarded and half advanced-half retarded components. Closed form solutions are given for these components in terms of a Horn function and a Kampe de Feriet function, respectively. The systems of partial differential equations associated with these two-dimensional hypergeometric functions are used to construct a fourth-order ordinary differential equation which both components satisfy. A second fourth-order ordinary differential equation for the general Fourier coefficent is derived from an integral representation of the coefficient, and both differential equations are shown to be equivalent. Series solutions for the various Fourier coefficients are also given, mostly in terms of Legendre functions and Bessel/Hankel functions. These are derived from the closed form hypergeometric solutions or an integral representation, or both. Numerical calculations comparing different methods of calculating the Fourier coefficients are presented.

John T. Conway; Howard S. Cohl

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alternative Scenarios of Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions: II. Particle Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle production in relativistic collisions of heavy nuclei is analyzed in a wide range of incident energies 2.7 GeV $\\le \\sqrt{s_{NN}}\\le$ 62.4 GeV. The analysis is performed within the three-fluid model employing three different equations of state (EoS): a purely hadronic EoS, an EoS with the first-order phase transition and that with a smooth crossover transition. It is found that the hadronic scenario fails to reproduce experimental yields of antibaryons (strange and nonstrange), starting already from lower SPS energies, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 5 GeV. Moreover, at energies above the top SPS one, i.e. $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}>$ 17.4 GeV, the mid-rapidity densities predicted by the hadronic scenario considerably exceed the available RHIC data on all species. At the same time the deconfinement-transition scenarios reasonably agree (to a various extent) with all the data. The present analysis demonstrates certain advantage of the deconfinement-transition EoS's. However, all scenarios fail to reproduce the strangeness enhancement in the incident energy range near 30A GeV (i.e. a horn anomaly in the $K^+/\\pi^+$ ratio) and yields of $\\phi$-mesons at 20A--40A GeV.

Yu. B. Ivanov

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

304

Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix for providing simultaneous heat transfer and mass transfer at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, whereby the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process is significantly improved. The small channel heat exchange matrix is comprised of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 mm. The channels are connected to an inlet header for supplying a two-phase coolant to the channels and an outlet header for receiving the coolant horn the channels. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within a separation column, whereby liquid descends along the exterior surfaces of the cooling channels and vapor ascends between adjacent channels within the matrix. Preferably, a perforated and concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel, such that liquid further descends along the concave surfaces of the sheets and the vapor further ascends through the perforations in the sheets. The size and configuration of the small channel heat exchange matrix allows the heat and mass transfer device to be positioned within the separation column, thereby allowing precise control of the local operating conditions within the column and increasing the energy efficiency of the process.

Tran, Thanh Nhon

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Key Distribution based on Three Player Quantum Games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a new QKD that is different from the scheme proposed by \\cite{Ramz2}, though it essentially takes our ground on three-player quantum games and Greenberg-Horne-Zeilinger triplet entangled state (GHZ state) \\cite{Gree} is used. In the scheme proposed in this paper, players in the game, Bob and Charlie (and Alice also) can get some common key or information (applied strategies and their payoffs in the game), when Alice informs Bob and Charlie about some results of the measurement made by her. Even if somebody else knows the public information, he/she can not get any key information. There is not any arbiter in our scheme, since existence of an arbiter increases the risk of wiretapping. Lastly we discuss robustness of the proposed QKD method for eavesdrop. We show that though maximally entangled case and non-entangled case essentially provide an equivalent way as QKD, the latter is not available in the case where there are some eavesdroppers. At the same time, we point put that the entanglement of the initial state is crucial when a partially entangled state is used.

Norihito Toyota

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

National Academy of Sciences. Biographical Memoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eorge pake was a brilliant scientist, a devoted teacher, a wise and strong academic leader, and an exceptional director of industrial research who brought to life a remarkable, highly creative industrial research laboratory. His accomplishments affect the lives of millions of people all over the world in numerous ways. I met George in 1947 when we were graduate students doing our doctoral research with Edward Purcell. We maintained c lose scientific contact through the early 1960s and professional contact into the early 1970s, but our contacts became more sporadic as his enormous responsibilities at Xerox grew in scope and intensity. Nevertheless, any occasion on which I saw George was a delight. We picked up where we left off with no sense of intervening time. I feel especially fortunate since I saw close up his ability as a scientist, as a teacher, as someone who could bridge disciplines, and as someone others sought to be their leader. George grew up in Kent, Ohio, where his father taught English at Kent State University. George loved baseball, remaining a fan all his life. He also learned to play the French horn, deriving great pleasure from it for many years. Pearl Harbor marked his senior year in high school. Interested in science or engineering, he was thrilled when he learned?

unknown authors

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

INTENSE NEUTRINO BEAMS AND LEPTONIC CP VIOLATION.  

SciTech Connect

Effects of the Leptonic CP violating phase, {delta}, on 3 generation neutrino oscillation rates and asymmetries are discussed. A figure of merit argument is used to show that our ability to measure the phase 6 is rather insensitive to the value of {theta}{sub 13} (for sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} {approx}> 0.01) as well as the detector distance (for very long oscillation baselines). Using a study of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations for BNL-Homestake (2540 km) we show that a conventional horn focused wide band neutrino beam generated by an intense 1-2 MW proton source combined with a very large water Cherenkov detector (250-500 kton) should be able to determine {delta} to about {+-}15{sup o} in 5 x 10{sup 7} sec. of running. In addition, such an effort would also measure the other oscillation parameters ({theta}{sub ij}, {Delta}m{sub ij}{sup 2}) with high precision. Similar findings apply to a Fermilab-Homestake (1280 km) baseline. We also briefly discuss features of Superbeams, Neutrino Factories and Beta-Beams.

MARCIANO, W.; PARSA, Z.

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

309

STATUS OF THE US LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT STUDY.  

SciTech Connect

The US Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study was commissioned jointly by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to investigate the potential for future U.S. based long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments beyond the currently planned program. The Study focused on MW class convention at neutrino beams that can be produced at Fermilab or BNL. The experimental baselines are based on two possible detector locations: (1) off-axis to the existing Fermilab NuMI beamline at baselines of 700 to 810 km and (2) NSF's proposed future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at baselines greater than 1000 km. Two detector technologies are considered: a megaton class Water Cherenkov detector deployed deep underground at a DUSEL site, or a 100kT Liquid Argon Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) deployed on the surface at any of the proposed sites. The physics sensitivities of the proposed experiments are summarized. We find that conventional horn focused wide-band neutrino beam options from Fermilab or BNL aimed at a massive detector with a baseline of > 1000 km have the best sensitivity to CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy for values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} down to 2.2{sup o}.

BISHAI,M.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Random multiparty entanglement distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe various results related to the random distillation of multiparty entangled states - that is, conversion of such states into entangled states shared between fewer parties, where those parties are not predetermined. In previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 260501 (2007)] we showed that certain output states (namely Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs) could be reliably acquired from a prescribed initial multipartite state (namely the W state) via random distillation that could not be reliably created between predetermined parties. Here we provide a more rigorous definition of what constitutes ``advantageous'' random distillation. We show that random distillation is always advantageous for W-class three-qubit states (but only sometimes for Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)-class states). We show that the general class of multiparty states known as symmetric Dicke states can be readily converted to many other states in the class via random distillation. Finally we show that random distillation is provably not advantageous in the limit of multiple copies of pure states.

Ben Fortescue; Hoi-Kwong Lo

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Screech Owl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Screech Owl Screech Owl Nature Bulletin No. 100 January 25, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation THE SCREECH OWL At the foot of a dead oak where we hoped to find some winter mushrooms beneath the grass and fallen leaves, we spied several pellets about the size and shape of the end of your thumb. They were clean and odorless, each containing the skull and bones of a mouse tightly wrapped in a layer of the animal's fur. Owls and hawks swallow their prey whole or in large pieces and later spit out the indigestible matter in the form of pellets. Up in this tree was a woodpecker hole from which the round unwinking yellow eyes of a screech owl glared at us. A screech owl, about the size of a robin but much chunkier, is our only small owl with ear tufts like "horns". They prey on mice, chipmunks and ground squirrels, fish, crayfish, amphibians, small snakes, angleworms, and large insects. When other food is scarce, and their fuzzy white young -- usually four in number -- require much food, they frequently kill birds but apparently not enough to seriously affect the bird population. No owl, of any species, should be killed.

312

Larks and Meadowlarks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Larks and Meadowlarks Larks and Meadowlarks Nature Bulletin No. 195-A June 5, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LARKS AND MEADOWLARKS Our common names for many birds are confusing. Our robin is really a thrush Its young have speckled breasts like other thrushes, including the bluebird. The European robin belongs to a different family and is a much smaller bird with a brighter orange-red breast. The English sparrow is not a sparrow. Our native sparrows belong to the Finch family which includes the cardinal, grosbeak, towhee, crossbills, buntings and finches. These misleading common names probably originated from resemblances to birds our early colonists had known in Europe. The Meadowlark is not a lark at all, although it nests on the ground in lark-fashion, but is close kin to the bobolinks, orioles and blackbirds. The Horned lark is the only American member of the lark family, otherwise found in northern Europe, Africa, Asia and India. To that family belongs the poet's bird, the Skylark, of which Shakespeare wrote: "Hark! hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings." The second stanza of Shelley's Ode to a Skylark -- which begins: "Hail to thee, blithe spirit ! " -- is typical.

313

Correlated Errors in the COBE DMR Sky Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The {\\it COBE} DMR sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions, and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1\\%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of $60 \\deg$ due to the $60 \\deg$ separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at $60 \\deg$ is $0.45\\% ^{+0.18}_{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is $0.7\\%$ greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Auto-correlation functions suffer from a $\\sim 1.5\\; \\sigma$ positive bias at $60 \\deg$ while cross-correlations have no bias. Published {\\it COBE} DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise. COBE pre-print 94-

C. H. Lineweaver; G. F. Smoot; C. L. Bennett; E. L. Wright; L. Tenorio; A. Kogut; P. B. Keegstra; G. Hinshaw; A. J. Banday

1994-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

314

Grasshoppers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grasshoppers Grasshoppers Nature Bulletin No. 23 July 14, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation GRASSHOPPERS The grasshopper is the clown of the insect world. He does not "chew tobacco", as most boys think, but ejects a dark-brown digestive juice from his crop when captured and held. He is quite an athlete. If a man could leap as big and far, in proportion to his size, a man could jump over an eight-story building. Once in the air, the grasshopper can scar like an airplane with his stiff upper pair of wings, or fly considerable distances by rapidly vibrating his delicate lower pair. He has five eyes. The two big ones are each compounded of thousands of little eyes for seeing distant objects from any angle. The three small eyes, one of them in the middle of his forehead, are for seeing tiny details at close range. His "ears" are on the sides of his stomach just behind the thorax or chest. He has two short "horns" or antennae.

315

Microsoft Word - Final CSERD Ch 5.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-1 5-1 5.0 SUBJECT INDEX A Acid Mine Drainage, 4-35 Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 4-60, 4-61, 4-64 Allison Unit, 2-53, 2-54, 2-58, 3-55, 3-56 American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA), 3-87, 4-60, 4-63 Archeological Resources Protection Act of 1979, 3-87, 4-60, 4-62, 4-63, 4-65 B Basalt Formations, 2-1, 2-9, 2-26, 2-77, 2-78, 2-80, 3-31, 4-9, 4-21, 4-34, 4-35, 4-48, 4-68, 4-69, 4-76, 4- 79, 4-86, 4-90, 4-98, 4-110, 4-120, 4-127 Best Available Control Technology, 4-7, 4-8, 4-9, 4-13, 4-14 Best Management Practices, 3-32, 4-1, 4-2, 4-13, 4-16, 4-17, 4-18, 4-19, 4-20, 4-21, 4-22, 4-23, 4-25, 4- 26, 4-27, 4-32, 4-33, 4-34, 4-35, 4-36, 4-41, 4-42, 4-48, 4-49, 4-51, 4-52, 4-57, 4-76, 4-88, 4-89, 4-122, 4- 123 Big Horn, 3-57 Black Warrior Basin, 3-57

316

B  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B l a c k H i l l s R e g io n Northern Anthracite Field S o u t h e r n A n t h r a c i t e F i e l d E. Middle Anthracite F ield Rhode Island Meta-Anthrac ite Terling ua Coal Field Coos Bay Coal Field Turtle Montain Coal Field North Central Coal Region San Juan Basin G u l f C o a s t C o a l R e g i o n Ft. Union Coal Re gion (Willist on Basin) Northern Appalachian Ba sin Powder Rive r Ba sin Uinta Basin Cheroke e P la tform Ce nt ra l Appalachian Ba sin Gr ea te r Gr ee n Ri ve r Ba si n T e r t i a r y L a k e B e d s R e g i o n Arkom a Ba sin Pic eance Ba sin Big Horn Ba sin Wind River Ba sin R a to n B as in Black Mesa Basin Taylorville Basin D e e p R i v e r B a s i n N. & Mid. Park Basins C u l p e p p e r B a s in Ha nna -Carbon Ba sin J a c k s o n H o le C o a l F ie ld He nr y Mo u nta ins Co al F iel d Rock Creek Coal Field Glacier Coal Field Goshen Hole Coal Field D a n R i v e r - D a n v i l l e B a s i n Goose Creek Field

317

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

318

Quantitative study of rectangular waveguide behavior in the THz.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes our efforts to quantify the behavior of micro-fabricated THz rectangular waveguides on a configurable, robust semiconductor-based platform. These waveguides are an enabling technology for coupling THz radiation directly from or to lasers, mixers, detectors, antennas, and other devices. Traditional waveguides fabricated on semiconductor platforms such as dielectric guides in the infrared or co-planar waveguides in the microwave regions, suffer high absorption and radiative losses in the THz. The former leads to very short propagation lengths, while the latter will lead to unwanted radiation modes and/or crosstalk in integrated devices. This project exploited the initial developments of THz micro-machined rectangular waveguides developed under the THz Grand Challenge Program, but instead of focusing on THz transceiver integration, this project focused on exploring the propagation loss and far-field radiation patterns of the waveguides. During the 9 month duration of this project we were able to reproduce the waveguide loss per unit of length in the waveguides and started to explore how the loss depended on wavelength. We also explored the far-field beam patterns emitted by H-plane horn antennas attached to the waveguides. In the process we learned that the method of measuring the beam patterns has a significant impact on what is actually measured, and this may have an effect on most of the beam patterns of THz that have been reported to date. The beam pattern measurements improved significantly throughout the project, but more refinements of the measurement are required before a definitive determination of the beam-pattern can be made.

Rowen, Adam M.; Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Experimental Three-Particle Quantum Nonlocality under Strict Locality Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum correlations are critical to our understanding of nature, with far-reaching technological and fundamental impact. These often manifest as violations of Bell's inequalities, bounds derived from the assumptions of locality and realism, concepts integral to classical physics. Many tests of Bell's inequalities have studied pairs of correlated particles; however, the immense interest in multi-particle quantum correlations is driving the experimental frontier to test systems beyond just pairs. All experimental violations of Bell's inequalities to date require supplementary assumptions, opening the results to one or more loopholes, the closing of which is one of the most important challenges in quantum science. Individual loopholes have been closed in experiments with pairs of particles and a very recent result closed the detection loophole in a six ion experiment. No experiment thus far has closed the locality loopholes with three or more particles. Here, we distribute three-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states using optical fibre and free-space links to independent measurement stations. The measured correlations constitute a test of Mermin's inequality while closing both the locality and related freedom-of-choice loopholes due to our experimental configuration and timing. We measured a Mermin parameter of 2.77 +/- 0.08, violating the inequality bound of 2 by over 9 standard deviations, with minimum tolerances for the locality and freedom-of-choice loopholes of 264 +/- 28 ns and 304 +/- 25 ns, respectively. These results represent a significant advance towards definitive tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics and practical multi-party quantum communications protocols.

C. Erven; E. Meyer-Scott; K. Fisher; J. Lavoie; B. L. Higgins; Z. Yan; C. J. Pugh; J. -P. Bourgoin; R. Prevedel; L. K. Shalm; L. Richards; N. Gigov; R. Laflamme; G. Weihs; T. Jennewein; K. J. Resch

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Very Intense Neutrino Super Beam Experiment for Leptonic CP Violation Discovery based on the European Spallation Source Linac: A Snowmass 2013 White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very intense neutrino beams and large neutrino detectors will be needed in order to enable the discovery of CP violation in the leptonic sector. We propose to use the proton linac of the European Spallation Source currently under construction in Lund, Sweden to deliver, in parallel with the spallation neutron production, a very intense, cost effective and high performance neutrino beam. The baseline program for the European Spallation Source linac is that it will be fully operational at 5 MW average power by 2022, producing 2 GeV 2.86 ms long proton pulses at a rate of 14 Hz. Our proposal is to upgrade the linac to 10 MW average power and 28 Hz, producing 14 pulses/s for neutron production and 14 pulses/s for neutrino production. Furthermore, because of the high current required in the pulsed neutrino horn, the length of the pulses used for neutrino production needs to be compressed to a few $\\mu$s with the aid of an accumulator ring. A long baseline experiment using this Super Beam and a megaton underground Water Cherenkov detector located in existing mines 300-600 km from Lund will make it possible to discover leptonic CP violation at 5 $\\sigma$ significance level in up to 50% of the leptonic Dirac CP-violating phase range. This experiment could also determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at a significance level of more than 3 $\\sigma$ if this issue will not already have been settled by other experiments by then. The mass hierarchy performance could be increased by combining the neutrino beam results with those obtained from atmospheric neutrinos detected by the same large volume detector. This detector will also be used to measure the proton lifetime, detect cosmological neutrinos and neutrinos from supernova explosions. Results on the sensitivity to leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy are presented.

E. Baussan; M. Blennow; M. Bogomilov; E. Bouquerel; J. Cederkall; P. Christiansen; P. Coloma; P. Cupial; H. Danared; C. Densham; M. Dracos; T. Ekelof; M. Eshraqi; E. Fernandez Martinez; G. Gaudiot; R. Hall-Wilton; J. -P. Koutchouk; M. Lindroos; R. Matev; D. McGinnis; M. Mezzetto; R. Miyamoto; L. Mosca; T. Ohlsson; H. Ohman; F. Osswald; S. Peggs; P. Poussot; R. Ruber; J. Y. Tang; R. Tsenov; G. Vankova-Kirilova; N. Vassilopoulos; E. Wildner; J. Wurtz

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Optical Nonlinearities and Ultrafast Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots  

SciTech Connect

Low-dimensional semiconductors have attracted great interest due to the potential for tailoring their linear and nonlinear optical properties over a wide-range. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NC's) represent a class of quasi-zero-dimensional objects or quantum dots. Due to quantum cordhement and a large surface-to-volume ratio, the linear and nonlinear optical properties, and the carrier dynamics in NC's are significantly different horn those in bulk materials. napping at surface states can lead to a fast depopulation of quantized states, accompanied by charge separation and generation of local fields which significantly modifies the nonlinear optical response in NC's. 3D carrier confinement also has a drastic effect on the energy relaxation dynamics. In strongly confined NC's, the energy-level spacing can greatly exceed typical phonon energies. This has been expected to significantly inhibit phonon-related mechanisms for energy losses, an effect referred to as a phonon bottleneck. It has been suggested recently that the phonon bottleneck in 3D-confined systems can be removed due to enhanced role of Auger-type interactions. In this paper we report femtosecond (fs) studies of ultrafast optical nonlinearities, and energy relaxation and trap ping dynamics in three types of quantum-dot systems: semiconductor NC/glass composites made by high temperature precipitation, ion-implanted NC's, and colloidal NC'S. Comparison of ultrafast data for different samples allows us to separate effects being intrinsic to quantum dots from those related to lattice imperfections and interface properties.

Klimov, V.; McBranch, D.; Schwarz, C.

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

Greenhorn engineering: How to avoid environmental quicksand and other mistakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a new awareness in business and industry. It has to do with how one approaches responsibilities toward the environment. In the past, a responsible company made efforts to learn the environmental laws/regulations and comply with them. People were hired to keep up with changing rules. If errors were made, fines were paid and due diligence was given to future compliance. Much money was spent fixing old problems and complying with tighter standards. It was expensive and difficult to stay out of trouble--i.e., living on quicksand--and it was easy to make mistakes. Now, an increasing number of companies are going beyond compliance and becoming proactive in their approach to environmental issues. Efforts are made to prevent pollution, save energy, minimize waste and emissions, reuse/recycle old products, etc. Employees at all levels are being educated and empowered to make proactive environmental decisions. In the Old West, greenhorns were cattle with young -- i.e., green -- horns. The word has evolved to mean a raw, inexperienced person. In companies being environmentally proactive, everyone is, to some extent, a greenhorn. Even those that have been proactive for several years find they are pioneers. There is a lack of data on many impacts materials have on the environment throughout their lifetime. There is a lack of agreement on what impacts are better or worse than others. The field is new, all the data are not available, and all are greenhorns in proactivity. There are, however, many compelling reasons for business and industry to become involved now.

Young, W. [IBM, San Jose, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Barrier island evolution and reworking by inlet migration along the Mississippi-Alabama gulf coast  

SciTech Connect

The five barrier islands along the Mississippi-Alabama coast are located 10 to 14 mi (16 to 23 km) offshore and separate Mississippi Sound from the Gulf of Mexico. The barrier islands in the chain are, from east to west: Dauphin Island, Petit Bois Island, Horn Island, Ship Island, and Cat Island. The islands are low sand bodies situated on a relatively broad Holocene sand platform that extends 70 mi (113 km) from Dauphin Island on the east to Cat Island on the west. The platform varies in thickness from 25 to 75 ft (7.6 to 23 m) and rests on Holocene marine clays or on Pleistocene sediments. The barrier island chain predates the St. Bernard lobe of the Mississippi delta complex, which began to prograde about 3,000 years ago, and continued until it was abandoned approximately 1,500 years ago. In contrast to the other islands, Cat Island at the western down-drift end of the Mississippi-Alabama barrier island chain is characterized by more than 12 prominent east west-oriented progradational linear ridges. The ridge system of Cat Island is interpreted as a relict of an earlier stage in the life cycle of the barrier platform when there was a more robust littoral drift system and an abundant sediment supply During the Pre-St. Bernard Delta period of vigorous sedimentation, all of the islands in the barrier chain probably exhibited progradational ridges similar to those now found only on Cat Island. Presently, only vestigial traces of these progradational features remain on the islands to the east of Cat Island. Unlike Cat Island, which has been protected and preserved by the St. Bernard Delta, the other barrier islands have been modified and reworked during the past 1,500 years by processes of island and tidal inlet migration, accompanied by a general weakening of the littoral drift and a reduction of the available sediment supply.

Rucker, J.B.; Snowden, J.O. (Univ. of New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

None

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fermilab Colloquium Lectures: September 2010 through August 2011 (Videos)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Fermilab has been making its Colloquium presentations available as online videos for ten years. Many of them are also available as PowerPoint slides or PDF documents. Abstracts are provided, along with information on the presenter and links to his or her home page when possible. Some titles for the 2010 - 2011 time period include: 1) Warped Dimensions, Raman Sundrum; 2) Fundamental Physics at Low Energies, Joerg Jaeckel; 3) Physics as Information Theory, Giacomo Mauro DAriano; 4) Introducing C++0x, Bjarne Stroustrup; 5) The New Era of Sub-millimeter Cosmology: First Results from Herschel Space Observatory, Asantha Cooray; 6) The Deepwater Horizon Disaster: What Happened and Why, Roland N. Horne; 7) High-resolution and Adaptive Methods for Plasma Physics, Phillip Colella; 8) First Results of the CMS Experiment at the LHC, Gigi Rolandi; 9) Frontiers in X-ray Science, Linda Young; 9) The Quest for Ultra-Short X-Ray Pulses, Anlexander Zholents; 10) The Search for Dark Matter with the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope, Elliott Bloom; 11) Fossils, Genes, and the Origins of Organs, Neil Shubin; 12) The Path to Magnetic Fusion Energy, Stewart Prager; 13) High-Energy X-ray Studies of Real Materials Under Real Conditions and in Real Time, Jonathan Almer; 14) The Fukushima Nuclear Event and its Implications for Nuclear Power, Michael Golay; 15) Laser Wakefield Acceleration and Fundamental Physics, Toshiki Tajiima; 16) Accelerators for Subcritical Molten-Salt Reactors, Roland Johnson; 17) The Energy Challenge: The Current and Future Role of Solar Energy, Ewa Rondio.

328

Pigmented Creatine Deposits in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Central Nervous System Tissues Identified by Synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Spectromicroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is an untreatable, neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons characterized by progressive muscle atrophy, limb paralysis, dysarthria, dysphagia, dyspnae and finally death. Large motor neurons in ventral horns of spinal cord and motor nuclei in brainstem, large pyramidal neurons of motor cortex and/or large myelinated axons of corticospinal tracts are affected. In recent synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy (sFTIR) studies of ALS CNS autopsy tissue, we discovered a small deposit of crystalline creatine, which has a crucial role in energy metabolism. We have now examined unfixed, snap frozen, post-autopsy tissue sections of motor cortex, brain stem, spinal cord, hippocampus and substantia nigra from six ALS and three non-degenerated cases with FTIR and micro-X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Heterogeneous pigmented deposits were discovered in spinal cord, brain stem and motor neuron cortex of two ALS cases. The FTIR signature of creatine has been identified in these deposits and in numerous large, non-pigmented deposits in four of the ALS cases. Comparable pigmentation and creatine deposits were not found in controls or in ALS hippocampus and substantia nigra. Ca, K, Fe, Cu and Zn, as determined by XRF, were not correlated with the pigmented deposits; however, there was a higher incidence of hot spots (Ca, Zn, Fe and Cu) in the ALS cases. The identity of the pigmented deposits remains unknown, although the absence of Fe argues against both erythrocytes and neuromelanin. We conclude that elevated creatine deposits may be indicators of dysfunctional oxidative processes in some ALS cases.

Kastyak, M.; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M; Adamek, D; Tomik, B; Lankosz, M; Gough, K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report (Part Two of Two)  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect

The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1987 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The smelt outmigration was monitored at wapatox on the Naches River and Prosser on the lower Yakima. The spring outmigration at Wapatox was estimated to be 16,141 smolts. The 1987 spring outmigration of wild spring chinook from the Yakima Basin was estimated to be 251,975 smolts at Prosser. The survival from egg to smelt was calculated using the 1985 redd counts and the 1987 smolt outmigration at Prosser. The estimated survival was 4.16%, which gives a mean egg to smolt survival over four years of 6.32%. In 1987 a total of 3,683 adult and 335 jack spring chinook salmon returning to the Yakima River were counted at Prosser fish ladder. This gives a total of 4,018 salmon returning to Prosser Dam. The median dates of passage were May 12 and May 16 for adults and jacks respectively. An additional 372 fish were estimated to have been caught in the Yakima River subsistence dipnet fishery below Horn Rapids and Prosser Dams. Therefore, total return to the Yakima system was 4,390 spring chinook salmon. Spring chinook were counted at Roza Dam from May 1 to September 30, 1987. Passage at Roza Dam was 1,610 adult and 67 jack spring chinook for a total of 1,677 wild fish. The median dates of passage at Roza Dam were May 29 and May 26 for spring chinook adults and jacks respectively. The smolt to adult (S{sub sa}) survival was calculated based on the 1983 smelt outmigration estimated at Prosser and the 1984 return of jacks (3 year old fish) the 1985 return of four year old adults, and the 1986 return of five year old fish to the Yakima River. It was estimated that 6,012 wild three, four, and five year old fish returned from an estimated smolt outmigration of 135,548 fish in 1983. This gives an estimated survival from smolt to adult of 4.4%. The smolt to adult survival for the 1984 smolt outmigration was 5.3% with 423 jacks returning in 1985, 5,163 four year old adults returning in 1986, and 983 five year old fish returning in 1987 fran an estimated 123,732 smolts in 1984. Spring chinook adults from fourteen different hatchery release groups were recovered in 1987. A total of 211 coded wire tags were recovered and these were expanded to an estimated 253 returning hatchery fish in 1987. Nine of these fish were jacks.

Fast, David E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada with ROTC 1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report provides the documentation for closure of the Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench Comective Action Unit (CAU) 404. CAU 404 consists of the Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons (Corrective Action Site [CAS] TA-03-O01-TA-RC) and the North Disposal Trench (CAS TA-21-001-TA-RC). The site is located on the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest ofLas Vegas, Nevada. . The sewage lagoons received ~quid sanitary waste horn the Operation Roller Coaster Man Camp in 1963 and debris from subsequent range and construction cleanup activities. The debris and ordnance was subsequently removed and properly dispos~, however, pesticides were detected in soil samples born the bottom of the lagoons above the U,S. Environmental Protection Agency Region IX Prelimimuy Remediation Goals (EPA 1996). . The North Disposal Trench was excavated in 1963. Debris from the man camp and subsequent range and construction cleanup activities was placed in the trench. Investigation results indicated that no constituents of concern were detected in soil samples collected from the trench. Remedial alternative proposed in the Comctive Action Decision Document (CADD) fm the site was Covering (DOE, 1997a). The Nevada Division ofEnviromnental Protection (NDEP)-approved Correction Action Plan (CAP) proposed the Covering niethodology (1997b). The closure activities were completed in accorhce with the approwil CAP and consisted of baclctllling the sewage lagoons and disposal trench, constructing/planting an engineered/vegetative cover in the area of the sewage lagoons and dikposal trencQ installing a perimeter fence and signs, implementing restrictions on fi~e use, and preparing a Post-Closure Monitoring Plan. Since closure activities. for CAU 404 have been completed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved CAP (DOE, 1997b) as documented in this Closure Report, the U.S. Department of Energy, NevadaOperations Office (DOE/NV) requests: CAU 404 be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. NDEP provide a Notice of Completion to the DOE/NV.

Lynn Kidman

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

THE AGS-BASED SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM FACILITY CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After more than 40 years of operation, the AGS is still at the heart of the Brookhaven hadron accelerator complex. This system of accelerators presently comprises a 200 MeV linac for the pre-acceleration of high intensity and polarized protons, two Tandem Van der Graaffs for the pre-acceleration of heavy ion beams, a versatile Booster that allows for efficient injection of all three types of beams into the AGS and, most recently, the two RHIC collider rings that produce high luminosity heavy ion and polarized proton collisions. For several years now, the AGS has held the world intensity record with more than 7 x 10{sup 13} protons accelerated in a single pulse. The requirements for the proton beam for the super neutrino beam are summarized and a schematic of the upgraded AGS is shown. Since the present number of protons per fill is already close to the required number, the upgrade is based on increasing the repetition rate and reducing beam losses (to avoid excessive shielding requirements and to maintain activation of the machine components at workable level). It is also important to preserve all the present capabilities of the AGS, in particular its role as injector to RHIC. The AGS Booster was built not only to allow the injection of any species of heavy ion into the AGS but to allow a fourfold increase of the AGS intensity. It is one-quarter the circumference of the AGS with the same aperture. However, the accumulation of four Booster loads in the AGS takes about 0.6 s, and is therefore not well suited for high average beam power operation. To minimize the injection time to about 1 ms, a 1.2 GeV linac will be used instead. This linac consists of the existing warm linac of 200 MeV and a new superconducting linac of 1.0 GeV. The multi-turn H{sup -} injection from a source of 30 mA and 720 {micro}s pulse width is sufficient to accumulate 9 x 10{sup 13} particle per pulse in the AGS[10]. The minimum ramp time of the AGS to full energy is presently 0.5 s; this must be upgraded to 0.2 s to reach the required repetition rate of 2.5 Hz. The required upgrade of the AGS power supply, the rf system, and other rate dependent accelerator issues is discussed. The design of the target/horn configuration is shown. The material selected for the proton target is a Carbon-Carbon composite. It is a 3-dimensional woven material that exhibits extremely low thermal expansion for temperatures up to 1000 C; for higher temperatures it responds like graphite. This property is important for greatly reducing the thermo-elastic stresses induced by the beam, thereby extending the life of the target. The target consists of a 80 cm long cylindrical rod of 12 mm diameter. The target intercepts a 2 mm rms proton beam of 10{sup 14} protons/pulse. The total energy deposited as heat in the target is 7.3 kJ with peak temperature rise of about 280 C. Heat will be removed from the target through forced convection of helium gas across its outside surface. The extracted proton beam uses an existing beamline at the AGS, but is then directed to a target station atop a constructed earthen hill. The target is followed by a downward slopping pion decay channel. This vertical arrangement keeps the target and decay pipe well above the water table in this area. The 11.3 degrees slope aims the neutrino beam at a water Cerenkov neutrino detector to be located in the Homestake mine at Lead, South Dakota. A 3-dimensional view of the beam transport line, target station, and decay tunnel is provided.

WENG,W.T.; DIWAN,M.; RAPARIA,D.

2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flat-tailed horned lizard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gopherus Agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Predation/Mountain Lions (Pre-Print)  

SciTech Connect

During a long-term study on tortoise growth within 3 fenced 9-ha enclosures in Rock Valley, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, USA, tortoises have been captured annually since 1964 (Medica et al. 1975. Copeia 1975:630-643; Turner et al. 1987. Copeia 1987:974-979). Between early August and mid October 2003 we observed a significant mortality event. The Rock Valley enclosures were constructed of 6 x 6 mm mesh 1.2 m wide hardware cloth, buried 0.3 m in the soil with deflective flashing on both sides on the top to restrict the movement of small mammals and lizards from entering or leaving the enclosures (Rundel and Gibson 1996, Ecological communities and process in a Mojave Desert ecosystem: Rock Valley, Nevada, Cambridge University Press, Great Britain. 369 pp.). On August 6, 2003, the carcass of an adult female Desert Tortoise No.1411 (carapace length 234 mm when alive) was collected while adult male tortoise No.4414 (carapace length 269 mm) was observed alive and in good health on the same day. Subsequently the carcass of No.4414 was found on October 16, 2003. Between October 16-17, 2003, the remains of 6 (5 adult and 1 juvenile) Desert Tortoises were found, some within each of the 3 enclosures in Rock Valley. A seventh adult tortoise was found on September 26, 2006, its death also attributed to the 2003 mortality event based upon the forensic evidence. Each of the 7 adult Desert Tortoises had the central portion of their carapace broken open approximately to the dorsal portion of the marginal scutes while the plastron was still intact (Figure 1A). Adjacent to 7 of the 8 remains we located numerous bone fragments including parts of the carapace and limbs as well as dried intestines in a nearby Range Rhatany (Krameria parvifolia) shrub. The significance of the frequent use of this shrub is puzzling. Three of the Desert Tortoise shell remains possessed distinctive intercanine punctures measuring 55-60 mm center to center indicating that this was an adult sized Mountain Lion. By comparison, a 2 year old male Mountain Lion salvaged on NTS had an upper intercanine bite width of 45 mm, and a 6 month old kitten measured 35mm respectively. The Mountain Lion (Puma concolor) is the only predator that exists in southern Nevada that could possibly have a bite with a gap between its upper canine teeth that large (Murmann et al. 2006. J. Forensic Sci. 51:846-860). The appearance of the shell remains in Figure 1A is similar to that depicting Jaguar (Panthera onca) predation, on the Amazonian Tortoise (Geochelone denticulata) as illustrated by Emmons (1989. J. Herpetol. 23:311-314) with the majority of the carapace broken open and the plastron still intact. Predation of Desert Tortoises by Mountain Lions was also documented in 1993 in southern Arizona (Little Shipp Wash Plot), where 7 of 8 carcasses found were attributed to Mountain Lion predation (Averill-Murray et al. 2002. In. T.R.Van Devender [ed.], The Sonoran Desert Tortoise: Natural History, Biology, and Conservation, pp.109-134. University of Arizona Press and Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, Arizona). Similarly, predation by a Mountain Lion has been reported on the Argentine Tortoise (Chelonoidis chilensis) in Argentina (Acosta et al. 2004. Herpetol. Review 35:53-54), and a Mountain Lion kitten was observed to kill and consume a portion of the carapace of a Texas Tortoise (Gopherus berlandieri) in west Texas (Adams et al. 2006. Southwestern Nat. 51:581-581). Over the past 45 years this Desert Tortoise population has been monitored yearly, with no prior evidence of predation to tortoises within the fenced enclosures. On several occasions other predators such as Bobcats (Lynx rufus) have been observed within the study enclosures for as long as a week. Evidence of Kit Fox (Vulpes macrotus) sign has been observed on numerous occasions, and a Spotted Skunk (Spilogale putorius) and Longtail Weasels (Mustela frenata) have been captured and released (B.G. Maza, pers. comm.; Medica 1990. Great Basin Nat. 50:83-84), while Coyotes (Canis latrans) were never observed within th

Paul D. Greger and Philip A. Medica

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

Acoustic Energy: An Innovative Technology for Stimulating Oil Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the effectiveness of sonication in reducing the viscosity of heavy crude oils. Sonication is the use of acoustic or sound energy to produce physical and/or chemical changes in materials, usually fluids. The goal of the first project phase was to demonstrate a proof of concept for the project objective. Batch tests of three commercially available, single-weight oils (30-, 90-, and 120-wt) were performed in the laboratory. Several observations and conclusions were made from this series of experiments. These include the following: (1) In general, the lower the acoustic frequency, the greater the efficiency in reducing the viscosity of the oils; (2) Sonication treatment of the three oils resulted in reductions in viscosity that ranged from a low of 31% to a high of 75%; and (3) The results of the first phase of the project successfully demonstrated that sonication could reduce the viscosity of oils of differing viscosity. The goal of the second project phase was to demonstrate the ability of sonication to reduce the viscosity of three crude oils ranging from a light crude to a heavy crude. The experiments also were designed to examine the benefits of two proprietary chemical additives used in conjunction with sonication. Acoustic frequencies ranging from 800 Hz to 1.6 kHz were used in these tests, and a reactor chamber was designed for flow-through operation with a capacity of one gallon (3.8 liters). The three crude oils selected for use in the testing program were: (1) a heavy crude from California with a viscosity of approximately 65,000 cP (API gravity about 12{sup o}), (2) a crude from Alabama with a significant water content and a viscosity of approximately 6,000 cP (API gravity about 22 {sup o}), and (3) a light crude from the Middle East with a viscosity of approximately 700 cP (API gravity about 32{sup o}). The principal conclusions derived from the second project phase include the following: (1) The application of acoustic energy (sonication) significantly reduced the viscosity of crude oils, and the amount of viscosity reduction resulting is greater for more viscous, heavy crude oils than it is for less viscous, light crude oils. (2) Test results showed that after being heated, resulting viscosity reductions were not sustained following treatment to the extent that post-sonication reductions were sustained. (3) The maximum viscosity reductions in Oils 1, 2, and 3 due to sonication were 43%, 76%, and 6%, respectively. Samples of Oil 2 associated with larger viscosity reductions often exhibited a definite water separation layer follow the tests, whereas reductions of approximately 23% were measured when this separation was not observed. (4) It was observed that neither horn design nor the reduction of input power by 25% had very little effect on the ability of sonication to alter crude oil viscosity. (5) The chemical additives produced a range of viscosity reduction from 37% to a maximum of 94% with the largest reductions being facilitated by the abundant water present Oil 2. If the Oil 2 results are not considered, the maximum reduction was 73%. The effects of the additives and sonication are enhanced by each other. (6) In only one test did the viscosity return to as much as 50% of the pre-treatment value during a period of 30 days following treatment; recovery was much less in all other cases. Therefore, more than half of the viscosity reduction was maintained for a month without additional treatment. (7) Possible applications, market potential, and economic value of the implementation of a mature sonication technology within the petroleum industry were identified, and it was estimated that the potential exists that more than a billion barrels of oil could be upgraded or produced annually as a result. The project results successfully demonstrated that sonication alone and in combination with chemical additives can effectively reduce the viscosity of crude oils having a broad range of viscosity/API gravity values. Several recommendations are made for follow-on

Edgar, Dorland E.; Peters, Robert W.; Johnson, Donald O.; Paulsen, P. David; Roberts, Wayne

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98% elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, but declined to 79% oxidation after nearly 13 months in service. The other two catalysts, an SCR-type catalyst (titanium/vanadium) and an experimental fly-ash-based catalyst, were significantly less active. The palladium-based and SCR-type catalysts were effectively regenerated at the end of the long-term test by flowing heated air through the catalyst overnight. The carbon-based catalyst was not observed to regenerate, and no regeneration tests were conducted on the fourth, fly-ash-based catalyst. Preliminary process economics were developed for the palladium and carbon-based catalysts for a scrubbed, North Dakota lignite application. As described above, the pilot-scale results showed the catalysts could not sustain 90% or greater oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas for a period of two years. Consequently, the economics were based on performance criteria in a later DOE NETL solicitation, which required candidate mercury control technologies to achieve at least a 55% increase in mercury capture for plants that fire lignite. These economics show that if the catalysts must be replaced every two years, the catalytic oxidation process can be 30 to 40% less costly than conventional (not chemically treated) activated carbon injection if the plant currently sells their fly ash and would lose those sales with carbon injection. If the plant does not sell their fly ash, activated carbon injection was estimated to be slightly less costly. There was little difference in the estimated cost for palladium versus the carbon-based catalysts. If the palladium-based catalyst can be regenerated to double its life to four years, catalytic oxidation process economics are greatly improved. With regeneration, the catalytic oxidation process shows over a 50% reduction in mercury control cost compared to conventional activated carbon injection for a case where the plant sells its fly ash. At Spruce Plant, mercury oxidation catalyst testing began in September 2003 and continued through the end of April 2005, interrupted only by a

Richard Rhudy

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence: Synthesis and Processing of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to exploit the unique morphology, tunable porosity and excellent metal supportability of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) to optimize hydrogen uptake and binding energy through an understanding of metal-carbon interactions and nanoscale confinement. SWNHs provided a unique material to understand these effects because they are carbon nanomaterials which are synthesized from the 'bottom-up' with well-defined, sub-nm pores and consist of single-layer graphene, rolled up into closed, conical, horn-shaped units which form ball-shaped aggregates of {approx}100-nm diameter. SWNHs were synthesized without metal catalysts by the high-temperature vaporization of solid carbon, so they can be used to explore metal-free hydrogen storage. However, SWNHs can also be decorated with metal nanoparticles or coatings in post-processing treatments to understand how metals augment hydrogen storage. The project first explored how the synthesis and processing of SWNHs could be modified to tailor pore sizes to optimal size ranges. Nanohorns were rapidly synthesized at 20g/hr rates by high-power laser vaporization enabling studies such as neutron scattering with gram quantities. Diagnostics of the synthesis process including high-speed videography, fast pyrometry of the graphite target, and differential mobility analysis monitoring of particle size distributions were applied in this project to provide in situ process control of SWNH morphology, and to understand the conditions for different pore sizes. We conclude that the high-temperature carbon-vaporization process to synthesize SWNHs is scalable, and can be performed by electric arc or other similar techniques as economically as carbon can be vaporized. However, the laser vaporization approach was utilized in this project to permit the precise tuning of the synthesis process through adjustment of the laser pulse width and repetition rate. A result of this processing control in the project was to eliminate the large (2-3 nm) internal pores of typical SWNHs which were found not to store hydrogen effectively. Post processing treatments of the as-synthesized SWNHs focused on pore size, surface area, and metal decoration in order to understand the effects of each on measured hydrogen uptake. Wet chemistry and gas-phase oxidation treatments were developed throughout the life of the project to adjust the interstitial and slit pore sizes of the as-produced SWNHs, and increase the surface area to a maximum value of 2200 m2/g. In addition, wet chemistry approaches were used to develop methods to decorate the nanohorns with small Pt and Pd nanoparticles for metal-assisted hydrogen storage. Finally, oxygen-free decoration of SWNHs with alkaline earth metals (Ca) was developed using pulsed laser deposition and vacuum evaporation in order to produce surface coatings with high static electric fields sufficient to polarize and bind dihydrogen. Decoration of SWNHs with Pt and Pd nanoparticles resulted in enhanced binding energy (NREL, 36 kJ/mol), as well as enhancement in the room temperature uptake of 0.6 wt.% (for undecorated, oxidized, pure-C SWNHs at 20 bar), to 1.6 wt% for Pt- and Pd-decorated SWNHs at 100 bar, comparable to MOF-177 materials. NIST neutron scattering on gram quantity Pt- and Pd-decorated SWNHs showed clear evidence for 'spillover' type losses of molecular hydrogen and determined the onset temperature for this effect to be between 150K < T < 298K.High (2142 m2/g) surface area SWNH materials with variable pore sizes and metal-decorated SWNHs were demonstrated with metals (Pt, Pd) resulting in increased excess storage (3.5 wt. % at 77K). Compression results in bulk SWNH samples with density 1.03 g/cm3, and 30 g/L volumetric capacity. In summary, SWNHs were found to be unique carbon nanomaterials which can be produced continuously at high rates from vaporization of pure carbon. Their inherent pore structure exhibits significant room temperature hydrogen storage in sub-nm pores, and their morphology serves as an excellent metal catalyst support for

David B. Geohegan; Hui Hu; Mina Yoon; Alex A. Puretzky; Christopher M. Rouleau; Norbert Thonnard; Gerd Duscher; Karren More

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

An Optical Streaking Method for Measuring Femtosecond Electron Bunches  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of the ultra-short electron bunch length on the femtosecond time scale constitutes a very challenging problem. In the x-ray free electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, generation of a sub-ten femtoseconds electron beam with 20pC charge is possible, but direct measurements are very difficult due to the resolution limit of the present diagnostics. We propose a new method here based on the measurement of the electron beam energy modulation induced from laser-electron interaction in a short wiggler. A typical optical streaking method requires a laser wavelength much longer than the electron bunch length. In this paper a laser with its wavelength shorter than the electron bunch length has been adopted, while the slope on the laser intensity envelope is used to distinguish the different periods. With this technique it is possible to reconstruct the bunch longitudinal profile from a single shot measurement. Generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses at femtoseconds (fs) scale is of great interest within synchrotron radiation and free electron laser (FEL) user community. One of the simple methods is to operate the FEL facility at low charge. At the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we have demonstrated the capability of generating ultrashort electron-beam (e-beam) with a duration of less than 10 fs fwhm using 20 pC charge. The x-ray pulses have been delivered to the x-ray users with a similar or even shorter pulse duration. However, The measurement of such short electron or x-ray pulse length at the fs time-scale constitutes a challenging problem. A standard method using an S-band radio-frequency (rf) transverse deflector has been established at LCLS, which works like a streak camera for electrons and is capable of resolving bunch lengths as short as 25 fs fwhm. With this device, the electrons are transversely deflected by the high-frequency time-variation of the deflecting fields. Increasing the deflecting voltage and rf frequency are the right direction to achieve a better resolution. For example, by choosing an X-band transverse deflecting cavity, the expected resolution for LCLS beam with 4.3 GeV is about 1 fs rms. Typically the rf breakdown threshold and the power source availability prevent going to even higher voltage and frequency. With the highly-developed laser techniques, we can choose to streak the beam at optical frequencies. By jumping from rf to optical frequency, the wavelength is shortening by 4 to 5 orders. With an electron bunch length shorter than half period of the laser, we can apply the similar rf deflecting or zero-phasing method for e-beam bunch length measurements using a high-power laser. A short wiggler is required to provide interaction between the electron and the laser. For example, to measure the e-beam at the order of 1 m rms length, a laser with its wavelength of 10 {mu}m may be considered. For a typical few GeV e-beam, the wiggler period has to be large to satisfy the resonance condition. Also, if the e-beam is longer than one laser period, the different modulation periods will overlap and we cannot distinguish them. So this method is so far limited by the achievable long-wavelength laser power. To get an effective modulation on an e-beam of 4.3 GeV, the required laser power is about a few tens GW. In this paper we propose to adopt a high-power Ti:Sapphire laser (wavelength of 800 nm), and use the slope in the intensity envelope to distinguish the different modulation periods. First an ultrashort electron beam interacts with the Ti:Sapphire laser in a wiggler, where the electron energy is modulated at the same periods of the laser. If the laser pulse is long and the short electron bunch is overlapped (in time) with the middle part of the laser, such as the setup at LCLS laser heater, the different energy modulation periods on the electron beam will be overlapped on the energy profile. In this conditionwe typically have a double-horn distribution of the energy profile, and the electron-bunch length information cannot be retrieved. But if the laser pulse (

Ding, Yuantao; Bane, Karl L.F.; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence: Synthesis and Processing of Single-Walled Carbon Nanohorns for Hydrogen Storage and Catalyst Supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to exploit the unique morphology, tunable porosity and excellent metal supportability of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWNHs) to optimize hydrogen uptake and binding energy through an understanding of metal-carbon interactions and nanoscale confinement. SWNHs provided a unique material to understand these effects because they are carbon nanomaterials which are synthesized from the 'bottom-up' with well-defined, sub-nm pores and consist of single-layer graphene, rolled up into closed, conical, horn-shaped units which form ball-shaped aggregates of {approx}100-nm diameter. SWNHs were synthesized without metal catalysts by the high-temperature vaporization of solid carbon, so they can be used to explore metal-free hydrogen storage. However, SWNHs can also be decorated with metal nanoparticles or coatings in post-processing treatments to understand how metals augment hydrogen storage. The project first explored how the synthesis and processing of SWNHs could be modified to tailor pore sizes to optimal size ranges. Nanohorns were rapidly synthesized at 20g/hr rates by high-power laser vaporization enabling studies such as neutron scattering with gram quantities. Diagnostics of the synthesis process including high-speed videography, fast pyrometry of the graphite target, and differential mobility analysis monitoring of particle size distributions were applied in this project to provide in situ process control of SWNH morphology, and to understand the conditions for different pore sizes. We conclude that the high-temperature carbon-vaporization process to synthesize SWNHs is scalable, and can be performed by electric arc or other similar techniques as economically as carbon can be vaporized. However, the laser vaporization approach was utilized in this project to permit the precise tuning of the synthesis process through adjustment of the laser pulse width and repetition rate. A result of this processing control in the project was to eliminate the large (2-3 nm) internal pores of typical SWNHs which were found not to store hydrogen effectively. Post processing treatments of the as-synthesized SWNHs focused on pore size, surface area, and metal decoration in order to understand the effects of each on measured hydrogen uptake. Wet chemistry and gas-phase oxidation treatments were developed throughout the life of the project to adjust the interstitial and slit pore sizes of the as-produced SWNHs, and increase the surface area to a maximum value of 2200 m2/g. In addition, wet chemistry approaches were used to develop methods to decorate the nanohorns with small Pt and Pd nanoparticles for metal-assisted hydrogen storage. Finally, oxygen-free decoration of SWNHs with alkaline earth metals (Ca) was developed using pulsed laser deposition and vacuum evaporation in order to produce surface coatings with high static electric fields sufficient to polarize and bind dihydrogen. Decoration of SWNHs with Pt and Pd nanoparticles resulted in enhanced binding energy (NREL, 36 kJ/mol), as well as enhancement in the room temperature uptake of 0.6 wt.% (for undecorated, oxidized, pure-C SWNHs at 20 bar), to 1.6 wt% for Pt- and Pd-decorated SWNHs at 100 bar, comparable to MOF-177 materials. NIST neutron scattering on gram quantity Pt- and Pd-decorated SWNHs showed clear evidence for 'spillover' type losses of molecular hydrogen and determined the onset temperature for this effect to be between 150K < T < 298K.High (2142 m2/g) surface area SWNH materials with variable pore sizes and metal-decorated SWNHs were demonstrated with metals (Pt, Pd) resulting in increased excess storage (3.5 wt. % at 77K). Compression results in bulk SWNH samples with density 1.03 g/cm3, and 30 g/L volumetric capacity. In summary, SWNHs were found to be unique carbon nanomaterials which can be produced continuously at high rates from vaporization of pure carbon. Their inherent pore structure exhibits significant room temperature hydrogen storage in sub-nm pores, and their morphology serves as an excellent metal catalyst support for

David B. Geohegan; Hui Hu; Mina Yoon; Alex A. Puretzky; Christopher M. Rouleau; Norbert Thonnard; Gerd Duscher; Karren More

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z