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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Michigan Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from...

2

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

3

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

4

Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 513 491 515 539 557 534 541 579 574 585 558 573 1998 578 536 591 581 517 456 486 486 471 477 457 468 1999 466 438 489 495 499 510 547 557 544 555 541 579 2000 587 539 605 587 615 570 653 629 591 627 609 611 2001 658 591 677 690 718 694 692 679 686 697 688 700 2002 639 591 587 621 622 605 654 639 649 650 623 638 2003 689 624 649 676 702 691 733 732 704 734 719 748 2004 741 697 727 692 692 688 718 729 706 723 711 718

5

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

6

Illinois Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Colorado Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

8

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9030SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0

9

,"Ohio Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030oh2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030OH2" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0

10

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0

11

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030tn2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030tn2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 35611,0 35976,0 37802,0 38898,0

12

,"Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030va2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0

13

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 35611,0 35976,0 37802,0

14

,"Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030va2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030va2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 35611,0 35976,0 37802,0 38898,0

15

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:26 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9030PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0

16

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

17

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1-2013 1-2013 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Mississippi NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Missouri NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Montana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Nebraska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Nevada NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013

18

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-2013 6-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Texas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Wyoming NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Other States Other States Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Maryland

19

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

661,168 718,674 721,507 836,698 867,922 761,836 1973-2012 661,168 718,674 721,507 836,698 867,922 761,836 1973-2012 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2012 Louisiana 0 0 0 0 1996-2010 Louisiana Onshore NA NA NA NA NA NA 2003-2012 Louisiana State Offshore NA NA NA NA NA NA 2003-2012 New Mexico 28,962 32,444 33,997 40,191 39,333 38,358 1980-2012 Oklahoma 0 0 0 0 1996-2010 Texas 254,337 241,626 240,533 279,981 284,557 183,118 1980-2012 Texas Onshore 254,337 241,626 240,533 279,981 284,557 183,118 1992-2012 Texas State Offshore NA 0 0 0 0 0 2003-2012 Wyoming 154,157 161,952 155,366 164,221 152,421 151,288 1980-2012 Other States Other States Total 223,711 282,651 291,611 352,304 1994-2010 Alabama 16,529 17,394 16,658 14,418 18,972 NA 1980-2012

20

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013...

22

Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61,168 718,674 721,507 836,698 867,922 761,836 1973-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2012 Alabama 16,529 17,394 16,658 14,418 18,972 NA 1980-2012 Alaska 0 0 0...

23

Cycling with air and other nonhydrocarbon gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injecting lean gas into condensate reservoirs is a practice currently used to increase recovery. The process reduces condensation and increases liquid recovery by revaporization. However, delaying natural gas sales for long periods of time is economically unattractive. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effectiveness of nonhydrocarbon gases (i.e., air, N/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/) for improving recovery from retrograde condensate reservoirs. A compositional model that uses the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS) was developed to evaluate condensate reservoir performance. A 15-component hydrocarbon system and extensive experimental data were used in the study. The simulator was tuned to match the available experimental data. The model shows that nonhydrocarbon gases can vaporize hydrocarbon liquids effectively, with CO/sub 2/ the most effective nonhydrocarbon for vaporizing heavy fractions.

Striefel, M.A.; Ahmed, T.H.; Cady, G.V.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Mississippi Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 4,713 4,103 4,177 3,429 3,291 3,200 3,548 3,901 3,708 4,067 3,907 3,971 1992 3,944 3,653 3,861 3,656 3,806 4,011 4,105 4,107 2,254 4,223 4,138 4,015 1993 4,031 3,622 3,992 3,857 4,043 4,213 4,447 4,201 4,173 4,150 3,845 3,441 1994 3,468 3,196 3,665 3,492 3,683 3,619 3,903 3,999 3,578 4,030 3,792 3,920 1995 810 747 857 816 861 846 912 935 836 942 886 916 1996 829 744 786 751 808 750 776 725 326 427 693 701 1997 718 631 684 659 641 598 633 677 752 775 723 676 1998 734 676 691 696 727 713 720 746 685 716 705 711 1999 697 637 667 553 559 532 537 516 490 525 498 493 2000 487 1,362 1,346 1,380 1,545 1,453 1,616 1,565 1,526 1,608 1,546 1,558

25

Louisiana Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

26

Oklahoma Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

27

Kansas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

28

Florida Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 51 49 45 45 48 50 81 65 68 63 66 69 1997 69 66 79 72 70 58 67 65 67 59 57 64 1998 62 56 60 62 66 55 65 69 58 61 69 67 1999 67 58 64 59 55 51 65 74 68 68 73 65 2000 64 62 73 64 69 61 68 68 68 66 58 66 2001 59 51 56 64 57 61 71 68 63 90 49 46 2002 44 33 50 38 38 37 34 31 32 31 27 35 2003 30 26 30 27 27 36 35 30 35 38 34 37 2004 37 25 35 36 34 36 42 35 13 33 37 40 2005 43 31 37 33 36 27 12 19 26 26 25 23 2006 21 20 24 23 24 26 30 29 29 39 24 16 2007 15 15 17 17 17 19 22 21 21 29 17 12 2008 21 20 24 23 24 26 30 29 29 40 24 16 2009 2 2 3 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 2

29

Oregon Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 35 22 31 35 20 19 20 16 19 19 16 14 1997 15 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 12 14 13 14 1998 13 11 14 13 13 13 13 13 13 12 12 12 1999 12 12 20 19 19 19 18 13 15 21 22 23 2000 20 17 17 16 17 15 15 16 16 18 16 15 2001 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

30

Nevada Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

31

Utah Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's - 0 0 0 2000's 9,329 15,086 15,219 13,810 10,592 8,883 6,116 6,205 5,177 3,343 2010's 1,573 778...

32

California Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 71 76 80 78 78 76 80 79 77 79 78 80 1997 20 18 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 1998 62 56 62 60 62 60 62 62 60 62 60 62 1999 18 16 18 17 18 17 18 18 17 18 17 18 2000 22 20 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 2001 21 19 21 20 21 20 21 21 20 21 20 21 2002 224 203 227 211 219 217 217 410 274 304 330 299 2003 309 277 304 289 307 293 298 285 279 281 276 281 2004 284 260 273 270 278 269 278 275 270 279 272 277 2005 104 250 276 272 280 267 282 289 280 288 281 283 2006 277 256 293 283 293 280 283 286 269 284 275 285 2007 261 242 277 268 277 264 268 270 254 268 260 269

33

Alabama Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,825 1,776 1,759 1,668 1,765 1,492 1,869 1,541 2,011 857 1,610 1,972 1992 2,247 1,940 1,988 2,248 2,249 2,233 2,381 2,259 2,222 2,290 2,277 2,387 1993 2,340 1,872 2,111 1,945 1,407 1,747 2,269 2,331 2,270 2,338 2,232 2,457 1994 2,473 2,025 2,223 2,147 1,562 1,554 2,551 2,616 2,287 2,375 2,593 2,575 1995 2,412 2,008 2,181 2,136 1,597 1,475 2,496 2,591 2,213 2,314 2,581 2,576 1996 2,211 2,030 2,287 2,270 2,346 2,216 2,232 2,297 2,257 2,293 2,292 2,275 1997 2,336 2,076 2,333 2,284 2,206 1,787 2,210 2,225 2,387 2,564 2,349 2,447 1998 2,281 2,028 2,282 2,245 2,151 1,732 2,162 2,156 2,342 2,519 2,310 2,404

34

Louisiana Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

35

North Dakota Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 18 12 17 15 21 64 67 60 36 32 9 8 1997 6 6 8 6 5 5 10 24 47 13 28 5 1998 5 4 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 6 5 5 1999 5 6 7 7 7 8 6 8 6 6 5 5 2000 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 8 8 8 9 2001 9 7 7 6 7 6 9 8 8 8 7 7 2002 9 10 15 14 12 13 14 13 9 10 10 10 2003 11 10 10 10 11 11 11 12 9 10 9 9 2004 10 10 12 12 18 13 14 11 7 8 5 6 2005 6 6 7 6 7 8 9 8 8 8 7 7 2006 8 5 5 5 3 4 4 4 5 4 3 3 2007 6 4 4 4 2 3 3 3 4 3 2 2 2008 567 495 642 623 697 761 801 818 853 935 931 920 2009 614 540 589 564 544 513 535 536 497 479 483 349 2010 431 467 513 478 560 682 626 760 660 733 777 761

36

Montana Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 134 102 102 102 24 20 27 7 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

37

Missouri Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

38

Wyoming Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,374 2,117 2,567 2,440 2,313 2,308 2,342 2,478 2,317 2,472 2,521 2,381 1992 2,015 1,452 1,893 1,823 1,717 1,841 2,042 2,024 1,919 2,008 2,039 2,020 1993 13,055 11,433 13,119 12,645 13,201 6,119 12,956 13,525 13,301 13,884 14,076 13,925 1994 12,654 11,498 12,761 12,155 10,841 6,002 12,042 12,022 11,700 12,648 11,857 11,877 1995 13,054 11,340 12,181 12,297 12,586 12,154 12,287 10,493 12,228 12,613 12,100 12,391 1996 12,895 12,028 13,010 12,512 12,728 5,106 12,415 12,604 12,006 13,039 12,740 13,111 1997 13,025 11,329 13,134 12,620 12,437 9,809 12,318 12,317 11,967 12,304 12,546 12,607 1998 12,808 11,567 12,745 12,011 8,083 11,668 11,325 12,323 12,368 13,077 12,714 12,051

39

Utah Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 730 790 769 1,205 963 766 715 704 861 583 478 765 2001 852 765 1,053 957 1,104 1,086 1,925 1,935 1,418 1,469 1,570 951 2002 1,221 1,265 1,334 1,269 1,197 1,224 1,354 1,285 1,259 1,525 1,172 1,115 2003 1,184 1,146 1,278 1,218 1,081 1,186 1,205 1,134 1,181 1,070 1,091 1,036 2004 991 932 942 895 880 864 744 961 883 886 823 790 2005 941 861 805 815 809 731 782 764 626 627 589 533 2006 695 479 534 493 469 447 463 485 497 555 530 469 2007 500 409 462 478 548 538 563 565 563 635 540 404

40

Maryland Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Arizona Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

42

Utah Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 730 790 769 1,205 963 766 715 704 861 583 478 765 2001 852 765 1,053 957 1,104 1,086 1,925 1,935 1,418 1,469 1,570 951 2002 1,221 1,265 1,334 1,269 1,197 1,224 1,354 1,285 1,259 1,525 1,172 1,115 2003 1,184 1,146 1,278 1,218 1,081 1,186 1,205 1,134 1,181 1,070 1,091 1,036 2004 991 932 942 895 880 864 744 961 883 886 823 790 2005 941 861 805 815 809 731 782 764 626 627 589 533 2006 695 479 534 493 469 447 463 485 497 555 530 469 2007 500 409 462 478 548 538 563 565 563 635 540 404

43

Texas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 13,942 13,557 14,940 12,971 14,588 14,028 14,816 14,906 15,187 15,171 14,489 14,803 1992 15,418 14,446 14,043 15,744 15,716 14,929 15,203 15,313 14,243 15,567 14,513 14,868 1993 15,307 13,813 15,250 14,590 15,480 14,914 15,983 16,468 14,486 15,673 15,868 16,426 1994 16,557 15,133 16,303 16,449 16,781 16,234 14,410 15,490 16,853 17,348 17,080 17,827 1995 16,874 15,423 16,615 16,765 17,103 16,545 14,686 15,787 17,177 17,681 17,408 18,169 1996 18,965 18,527 19,905 18,331 17,193 19,390 18,370 21,654 21,126 20,005 23,391 22,041 1997 21,201 19,430 21,726 19,323 22,294 21,770 23,348 23,536 21,611 22,478 23,411 23,268

44

California Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 71 76 80 78 78 76 80 79 77 79 78 80 1997 20 18 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 1998 62 56 62 60 62 60 62 62 60 62 60 62 1999 18 16 18 17 18 17 18 18 17 18 17 18 2000 22 20 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 2001 21 19 21 20 21 20 21 21 20 21 20 21 2002 224 203 227 211 219 217 217 410 274 304 330 299 2003 309 277 304 289 307 293 298 285 279 281 276 281 2004 284 260 273 270 278 269 278 275 270 279 272 277 2005 104 250 276 272 280 267 282 289 280 288 281 283 2006 277 256 293 283 293 280 283 286 269 284 275 285 2007 261 242 277 268 277 264 268 270 254 268 260 269

45

Wyoming Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,374 2,117 2,567 2,440 2,313 2,308 2,342 2,478 2,317 2,472 2,521 2,381 1992 2,015 1,452 1,893 1,823 1,717 1,841 2,042 2,024 1,919 2,008 2,039 2,020 1993 13,055 11,433 13,119 12,645 13,201 6,119 12,956 13,525 13,301 13,884 14,076 13,925 1994 12,654 11,498 12,761 12,155 10,841 6,002 12,042 12,022 11,700 12,648 11,857 11,877 1995 13,054 11,340 12,181 12,297 12,586 12,154 12,287 10,493 12,228 12,613 12,100 12,391 1996 12,895 12,028 13,010 12,512 12,728 5,106 12,415 12,604 12,006 13,039 12,740 13,111 1997 13,025 11,329 13,134 12,620 12,437 9,809 12,318 12,317 11,967 12,304 12,546 12,607 1998 12,808 11,567 12,745 12,011 8,083 11,668 11,325 12,323 12,368 13,077 12,714 12,051

46

Alaska Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

47

New Mexico Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 8,529 7,949 8,687 8,339 8,740 8,289 7,875 7,987 7,677 7,773 7,824 8,089 1997 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 1998 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 1999 12,787 11,548 12,722 12,443 12,412 12,599 12,654 12,926 12,327 12,927 12,633 11,671 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 2,219 1,984 2,391 2,117 2,392 2,251 2,373 2,639 2,554 2,728 2,619 2,696

48

Kentucky Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

49

Montana Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 134 102 102 102 24 20 27 7 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

50

California Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 349 371 540 437 95 127 5 3 832 1,103 1990's 849 788 1,142 1,130 1,126 920 932 239 726 208 2000's...

51

North Dakota Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 18 12 17 15 21 64 67 60 36 32 9 8 1997 6 6 8 6 5 5 10 24 47 13 28 5 1998 5 4 5 3 5 5 5 5 5 6 5 5 1999 5 6 7 7 7 8 6 8 6 6 5 5 2000 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 8 8 8 9 2001 9 7 7 6 7 6 9 8 8 8 7 7 2002 9 10 15 14 12 13 14 13 9 10 10 10 2003 11 10 10 10 11 11 11 12 9 10 9 9 2004 10 10 12 12 18 13 14 11 7 8 5 6 2005 6 6 7 6 7 8 9 8 8 8 7 7 2006 8 5 5 5 3 4 4 4 5 4 3 3 2007 6 4 4 4 2 3 3 3 4 3 2 2 2008 567 495 642 623 697 761 801 818 853 935 931 920 2009 614 540 589 564 544 513 535 536 497 479 483 349 2010 431 467 513 478 560 682 626 760 660 733 777 761

52

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

53

Arkansas Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

54

Michigan Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

55

West Virginia Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

56

Nebraska Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

57

Arizona Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

58

Oklahoma Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

59

New Mexico Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 8,529 7,949 8,687 8,339 8,740 8,289 7,875 7,987 7,677 7,773 7,824 8,089 1997 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 12,133 1998 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 11,177 1999 12,787 11,548 12,722 12,443 12,412 12,599 12,654 12,926 12,327 12,927 12,633 11,671 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 2,219 1,984 2,391 2,117 2,392 2,251 2,373 2,639 2,554 2,728 2,619 2,696

60

Alabama Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,825 1,776 1,759 1,668 1,765 1,492 1,869 1,541 2,011 857 1,610 1,972 1992 2,247 1,940 1,988 2,248 2,249 2,233 2,381 2,259 2,222 2,290 2,277 2,387 1993 2,340 1,872 2,111 1,945 1,407 1,747 2,269 2,331 2,270 2,338 2,232 2,457 1994 2,473 2,025 2,223 2,147 1,562 1,554 2,551 2,616 2,287 2,375 2,593 2,575 1995 2,412 2,008 2,181 2,136 1,597 1,475 2,496 2,591 2,213 2,314 2,581 2,576 1996 2,211 2,030 2,287 2,270 2,346 2,216 2,232 2,297 2,257 2,293 2,292 2,275 1997 2,336 2,076 2,333 2,284 2,206 1,787 2,210 2,225 2,387 2,564 2,349 2,447 1998 2,281 2,028 2,282 2,245 2,151 1,732 2,162 2,156 2,342 2,519 2,310 2,404

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Illinois Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0...

62

New Mexico Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,695 2,047 1,599 1,884 2,016 40 38 2,430 1,408 1,942 1990's 1,772 1,876 2,751 2,753 3,164 3,282...

63

Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG...

64

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed Extraction Loss Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports...

65

U.S. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1976 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1977 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1978 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1979 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1980 18,000 16,000 17,000 16,000 17,000 16,000 17,000 17,000 17,000 15,000 17,000 18,000 1981 20,000 18,000 18,000 18,000 18,000 19,000 20,000 18,000 18,000 18,000 17,000 20,000 1982 19,000 18,000 19,000 18,000 17,000 16,000 15,000 18,000 16,000 16,000 18,000 19,000 1983 19,994 16,995 17,995 15,995 16,995 18,995 17,995 19,994 18,995 17,995 18,995 20,994

66

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases...

67

Predict flare noise and spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting flare combustion noise is important to ensure the flare is a certain distance from inhabited areas. Generally, it not feasible to increase the stack height to lower the overall noise at a particular point. This article shows how to calculate flare noise including spectrum considerations. Depending on the spectrum, a lower power noise source may sound louder than a higher power source.

Leite, O.C. (Pilgrim Steel Co., Glassboro, NJ (US))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Interferometric at-wavelength flare characterization of EUV optical systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) provides the high-accuracy wavefront characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Enhancing the implementation of the PS/PDI can significantly extend its spatial-frequency measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wavefront and flare. The enhanced technique employs a hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI. Using the dual-domain technique in combination with a flare-measurement-optimized mask and an iterative calculation process for removing flare contribution caused by higher order grating diffraction terms, the enhanced PS/PDI can be used to simultaneously measure both figure and flare in optical systems.

Naulleau, Patrick P. (Oakland, CA); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (Berkeley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Enclosed ground-flare incinerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved ground flare is provided comprising a stack, two or more burner assemblies, and a servicing port so that some of the burner assemblies can be serviced while others remain in operation. The burner assemblies comprise a burner conduit and nozzles which are individually fitted to the stack's burner chamber and are each removably supported in the chamber. Each burner conduit is sealed to and sandwiched between a waste gas inlet port and a matching a closure port on the other side of the stack. The closure port can be opened for physically releasing the burner conduit and supplying sufficient axial movement room for extracting the conduit from the socket, thereby releasing the conduit for hand removal through a servicing port. Preferably, the lower end of the stack is formed of one or more axially displaced lower tubular shells which are concentrically spaced for forming annular inlets for admitting combustion air. An upper tubular exhaust stack, similarly formed, admits additional combustion air for increasing the efficiency of combustion, increasing the flow of exhausted for improved atmospheric dispersion and for cooling the upper stack.

Wiseman, Thomas R. (Calgary, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

SATURATION LEVELS FOR WHITE-LIGHT FLARES OF FLARE STARS: VARIATION OF MINIMUM FLARE DURATION FOR SATURATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taking into account results obtained from models and from statistical analyses of obtained parameters, we discuss flare activity levels and flare characteristics of five UV Ceti stars. We present the parameters of unpublished flares detected over two years of observations of V1005 Ori. We compare parameters of the U-band flares detected over several seasons of observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, V1054 Oph, and V1005 Ori. Flare frequencies calculated for all program stars and maximum energy levels of the flares are compared, and we consider which is the most correct parameter as an indicator of flare activity levels. Using the One Phase Exponential Association function, the distributions of flare equivalent duration versus flare total duration are modeled for each program star. We use the Independent Samples t-Test in the statistical analyses of the parameters obtained from the models. The results reveal some properties of flare processes occurring on the surfaces of UV Ceti type stars. (1) Flare energies cannot be higher than a specific value regardless of the length of the flare total duration. This must be a saturation level for white-light flares occurring in flare processes observed in the U band. Thus, for the first time it is shown that white-light flares have a saturation in a specific energy range. (2) The span values, which are the difference between the equivalent durations of flares with the shortest and longest total durations, are almost equal for each star. (3) The half-life values, minimum flare durations for saturation, increase toward the later spectral types. (4) Both maximum total durations and maximum rise times computed from the observed flares decrease toward the later spectral types among the UV Ceti stars. According to the maximum energy levels obtained from the models, both EV Lac and EQ Peg are more active than the other three program stars, while AD Leo is the most active flare star according to the flare frequencies.

Dal, H. A.; Evren, S., E-mail: ali.dal@ege.edu.tr [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, University of Ege, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE  

SciTech Connect

The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

Phillips, K. J. H. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking RH6 5NT (United Kingdom); Dennis, B. R., E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

Earth Planets Space, , , Flares and the Chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radiative energy of a solar flare appears mainly in the optical and UV continuum, which form in the lower,631-14,659 (1997). Obayashi, T., Energy Build-up and Release Mechanisms in Solar and Auro- ral Flares, Solar Phys produces in the photospheric magnetic field. Key words: Solar flares, Solar chromosphere, Solar corona

Hudson, Hugh

73

Detecting Solar Neutrino Flares and Flavors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intense solar flares originated in sun spots produce high energy particles (protons, $\\alpha$) well observable by satellites and ground-based detectors. The flare onset produces signals in different energy bands (radio, X, gamma and neutrons). The most powerful solar flares as the ones occurred on 23 February 1956, 29 September 1989 and the more recent on October 28th, and the 2nd, 4th, 13th of November 2003 released in sharp times the largest flare energies (${E}_{FL} \\simeq {10}^{31}\\div {10}^{32} erg). The high energy solar flare protons scatter within the solar corona and they must be source of a prompt neutrino burst through the production of charged pions. Later on, solar flare particles hitting the atmosphere may marginally increase the atmospheric neutrino flux. The prompt solar neutrino flare may be detected in the largest underground $\

D. Fargion

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Correction of SOHO CELIAS/SEM EUV Measurements saturated by extreme solar flare events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar irradiance in the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spectral bands has been observed with a 15 sec cadence by the SOHO Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) since 1995. During remarkably intense solar flares the SEM EUV measurements are saturated in the central (zero) order channel (0.1 -- 50.0 nm) by the flare soft X-ray and EUV flux. The first order EUV channel (26 -- 34 nm) is not saturated by the flare flux because of its limited bandwidth, but it is sensitive to the arrival of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). While both channels detect nearly equal SEP fluxes, their contributions to the count rate is sensibly negligible in the zero order channel but must be accounted for and removed from the first channel count rate. SEP contribution to the measured SEM signals usually follows the EUV peak for the gradual solar flare events. Correcting the extreme solar flare SEM EUV measurements may reveal currently unclear relations between the flare magnitude, dynamics observed in different EUV spectral bands, and the measured Ea...

Didkovsky, L V; Jones, A R; Wieman, S; Tsurutani, B T; McMullin, D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Correction of SOHO CELIAS/SEM EUV Measurements saturated by extreme solar flare events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar irradiance in the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) spectral bands has been observed with a 15 sec cadence by the SOHO Solar EUV Monitor (SEM) since 1995. During remarkably intense solar flares the SEM EUV measurements are saturated in the central (zero) order channel (0.1 -- 50.0 nm) by the flare soft X-ray and EUV flux. The first order EUV channel (26 -- 34 nm) is not saturated by the flare flux because of its limited bandwidth, but it is sensitive to the arrival of Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). While both channels detect nearly equal SEP fluxes, their contributions to the count rate is sensibly negligible in the zero order channel but must be accounted for and removed from the first channel count rate. SEP contribution to the measured SEM signals usually follows the EUV peak for the gradual solar flare events. Correcting the extreme solar flare SEM EUV measurements may reveal currently unclear relations between the flare magnitude, dynamics observed in different EUV spectral bands, and the measured Earth atmosphere response. A simple and effective correction technique based on analysis of SEM count-rate profiles, GOES X-ray, and GOES proton data has been developed and used for correcting EUV measurements for the five extreme solar flare events of July 14, 2000, October 28, November 2, November 4, 2003, and January 20, 2005. Although none of the 2000 and 2003 flare peaks were contaminated by the presence of SEPs, the January 20, 2005 SEPs were unusually prompt and contaminated the peak. The estimated accuracy of the correction is about 7.5% for large X-class events.

L. V. Didkovsky; D. L. Judge; A. R. Jones; S. Wieman; B. T. Tsurutani; D. McMullin

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Recovering Flare Gas Energy - A Different Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most petrochemical complexes and oil refineries have systems to collect and dispose of waste gases. Usually this is done by burning in a flare. Some installations recover these gases by compressing them into their fuel system. Because SunOlin shares its flare system with a neighboring oil refinery, changes to the flare system operation could have far-reaching impact on both plants. Therefore, a flare gas recovery system was designed and installed so that waste gases can be burned directly in a steam boiler. This was done for both safety and operational reasons. This presented a number of interesting design and operating problems which are discussed in this paper.

Brenner, W.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: 9302013 Next Release Date: 10312013 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Ohio Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Natural Gas Vented and Flared...

78

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade...

79

CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS  

SciTech Connect

Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

Wang Haimin; Liu Chang, E-mail: haimin.wang@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Laboratory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Solar Flares STFC Advanced Summer School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Flares STFC Advanced Summer School in Solar Physics H. S. Hudson Space Sciences Laboratory University of California, Berkeley and University of Glasgow Glasgow Summerschool 2011 Part 1: Introduction · A solar flare is, strictly speaking, the electromagnetic radiation from a coronal magnetic energy release

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara [Space Research Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kopernika 11, 51-622 Wroclaw (Poland); Cirtain, Jonathan, E-mail: aengell@cfa.harvard.edu [Marshall Space Flight Center NASA, Mail Code: VP62, Marshall Space Flight Center, AL 35812 (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

FLARING SOLAR HALE SECTOR BOUNDARIES  

SciTech Connect

The sector structure that organizes the magnetic field of the solar wind into large-scale domains has a clear pattern in the photospheric magnetic field as well. The rotation rate, 27-28.5 days, implies an effectively rigid rotation originating deeper in the solar interior than the sunspots. The photospheric magnetic field is known to be concentrated near that portion (the Hale boundary) in each solar hemisphere, where the change in magnetic sector polarity matches that between the leading and following sunspot polarities in active regions in the respective hemispheres. We report here that flares and microflares also concentrate at the Hale boundaries, implying that flux emergence and the creation of free magnetic energy in the corona also have a direct cause in the deep interior.

Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94304 (United States); Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S., E-mail: leif@leif.org [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two of Shell Canada's refineries have logged about six years total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery facilities. The flare gas recovery systems were designed to recover the normal continuous flare gas flow for use in the refinery fuel gas system. The system consists of liquid knock-out, compression, and liquid seal facilities. Now that the debugging-stage challenges have been dealt with, Shell Canada is more than satisfied with the system performance. A well-thought-out installation can today be safe, trouble-free, and attractive from an economic and environmental viewpoint. This paper highlights general guidelines for the sizing, design and operation of a refinery flare gas recovery facility.

Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Sauget Plant Flare Gas Reduction Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical analysis of stack gas heating value allowed the Afton Chemical Corporation Sauget Plant to reduce natural gas flow to its process flares by about 50% while maintaining the EPA-required minimum heating value of the gas streams.

Ratkowski, D. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS  

SciTech Connect

Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

Ryutova, M. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory/IGPP, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Frank, Z.; Hagenaar, H.; Berger, T., E-mail: ryutova1@llnl.gov, E-mail: zoe@lmsal.com, E-mail: hagenaar@lmsal.com, E-mail: berger@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wellhead Value & Marketed Production Wellhead Value & Marketed Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Marketed Production Gross withdrawals less gas used for repressuring, quantities vented and flared, and nonhydrocarbon gases removed in treating or processing operations. Includes all quantities of gas used in field and processing plant operations. Production The volume of natural gas withdrawn from reservoirs less (1) the volume returned to such reservoirs in cycling, repressuring of oil reservoirs, and conservation operations; less (2) shrinkage resulting from the removal of lease condensate; and less (3) nonhydrocarbon gases where they occur in sufficient quantity to render the gas unmarketable. Volumes of gas withdrawn from gas storage reservoirs and native gas, which has been transferred to the storage category, are not considered production. Flared and vented gas is also considered production. (This differs from "Marketed Production" which excludes flared and vented gas.)

87

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0...

88

Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

89

Solar flares as harbinger of new physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work provides additional evidence on the involvement of exotic particles like axions and/or other WISPs, following recent measurements during the quietest Sun and flaring Sun. Thus, SPHINX mission observed a minimum basal soft X-rays emission in the extreme solar minimum in 2009. The same scenario (with ~17 meV axions) fits also the dynamical behaviour of white-light solar flares, like the measured spectral components in the visible and in soft X-rays, and, the timing between them. Solar chameleons remain a viable candidate, since they may preferentially convert to photons in outer space.

Zioutas, K; Semertzidis, Y; Papaevangelou, T; Georgiopoulou, E; Gardikiotis, A; Dafni, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A NEW METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING FLARES OF UV Ceti TYPE STARS: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLOW AND FAST FLARES  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

Dal, H. A.; Evren, S., E-mail: ali.dal@ege.edu.t [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, University of Ege, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Statistical Solar Flare Forecast Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Bayesian approach to solar flare prediction has been developed, which uses only the event statistics of flares already observed. The method is simple, objective, and makes few ad hoc assumptions. It is argued that this approach should be used to provide a baseline prediction for certain space weather purposes, upon which other methods, incorporating additional information, can improve. A practical implementation of the method for whole-Sun prediction of Geostationary Observational Environment Satellite (GOES) events is described in detail, and is demonstrated for 4 November 2003, the day of the largest recorded GOES flare. A test of the method is described based on the historical record of GOES events (1975-2003), and a detailed comparison is made with US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions for 1987-2003. Although the NOAA forecasts incorporate a variety of other information, the present method out-performs the NOAA method in predicting mean numbers of event days, for both M-X and X events. Skill scores and other measures show that the present method is slightly less accurate at predicting M-X events than the NOAA method, but substantially more accurate at predicting X events, which are important contributors to space weather.

M. S. Wheatland

2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

92

Initial Observations of Sunspot Oscillations Excited by Solar Flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of a large solar flare of December 13, 2006, using Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode spacecraft revealed high-frequency oscillations excited by the flare in the sunspot chromosphere. These oscillations are observed in the region of strong magnetic field of the sunspot umbra, and may provide a new diagnostic tool for probing the structure of sunspots and understanding physical processes in solar flares.

Kosovichev, A G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Flare-gas recovery success at Canadian refineries  

SciTech Connect

It appears that some North American refining companies still cling to an old philosophy that flare gas recovery systems are unsafe, unreliable, uneconomic, or unnecessary. Shell Canada's recent experience with two modern systems has proven otherwise. Two of Shell Canada's refineries, at Sarnia, Ont., and Montreal East, Que., have now logged about 6 years' total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery units. The compression facilities in each utilize a two-stage reciprocating machine, one liquid seal drum per flare stack, and an automated load control strategy. The purpose was to recover the normal continuous flow of refinery flare gas for treatment and use in the refinery fuel gas system.

Allen, G.D.; Chan, H.H.; Wey, R.E.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

TOWARD RELIABLE BENCHMARKING OF SOLAR FLARE FORECASTING METHODS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar flares occur in complex sunspot groups, but it remains unclear how the probability of producing a flare of a given magnitude relates to the characteristics of the sunspot group. Here, we use Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X-ray flares and McIntosh group classifications from solar cycles 21 and 22 to calculate average flare rates for each McIntosh class and use these to determine Poisson probabilities for different flare magnitudes. Forecast verification measures are studied to find optimum thresholds to convert Poisson flare probabilities into yes/no predictions of cycle 23 flares. A case is presented to adopt the true skill statistic (TSS) as a standard for forecast comparison over the commonly used Heidke skill score (HSS). In predicting flares over 24 hr, the maximum values of TSS achieved are 0.44 (C-class), 0.53 (M-class), 0.74 (X-class), 0.54 ({>=}M1.0), and 0.46 ({>=}C1.0). The maximum values of HSS are 0.38 (C-class), 0.27 (M-class), 0.14 (X-class), 0.28 ({>=}M1.0), and 0.41 ({>=}C1.0). These show that Poisson probabilities perform comparably to some more complex prediction systems, but the overall inaccuracy highlights the problem with using average values to represent flaring rate distributions.

Bloomfield, D. Shaun; Higgins, Paul A.; Gallagher, Peter T. [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2 (Ireland); McAteer, R. T. James, E-mail: shaun.bloomfield@tcd.ie [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geomagnetic storm dependence on the solar flare class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Content. Solar flares are often used as precursors of geomagnetic storms. In particular, Howard and Tappin (2005) recently published in A&A a dependence between X-ray class of solar flares and Ap and Dst indexes of geomagnetic storms which contradicts to early published results. Aims. We compare published results on flare-storm dependences and discuss possible sources of the discrepancy. Methods. We analyze following sources of difference: (1) different intervals of observations, (2) different statistics and (3) different methods of event identification and comparison. Results. Our analysis shows that magnitude of geomagnetic storms is likely to be independent on X-ray class of solar flares.

Yermolaev, Y I; Yermolaev, Yu. I.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

X-ray Flares in Gamma-Ray Bursts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Data from the Swift mission have now shown that flares are a common component of Gamma-Ray Burst afterglows, appearing in roughly 50% of GRBs to (more)

Morris, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ion Removal  

INLs ion removal technology leverages the ability of phosphazene polymers discriminate between water and metal ions, which allows water to pass ...

98

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 66  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 28. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 8 7 9 6 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 305 300 443 331 233 From Oil Wells .................................................. 1 * * * * Total................................................................... 307 301 443 331 233 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .............................................. * 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 307 301 443 331 233 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed......................

99

STATISTICAL ANALYSES ON THERMAL ASPECTS OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

The frequency distribution of flare energies provides a crucial diagnostic to calculate the overall energy residing in flares and to estimate the role of flares in coronal heating. It often takes a power law as its functional form. We have analyzed various variables, including the thermal energies E{sub th} of 1843 flares at their peak time. They were recorded by both Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites and Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the time period from 2002 to 2009 and are classified as flares greater than C 1.0. The relationship between different flare parameters is investigated. It is found that fitting the frequency distribution of E{sub th} to a power law results in an index of -2.38. We also investigate the corrected thermal energy E{sub cth}, which represents the flare total thermal energy including the energy loss in the rising phase. Its corresponding power-law slope is -2.35. Compilation of the frequency distributions of the thermal energies from nanoflares, microflares, and flares in the present work and from other authors shows that power-law indices below -2.0 have covered the range from 10{sup 24} to 10{sup 32} erg. Whether this frequency distribution can provide sufficient energy to coronal heatings in active regions and the quiet Sun is discussed.

Li, Y. P.; Gan, W. Q.; Feng, L., E-mail: wqgan@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 210008 Nanjing (China)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

YOHKOH remnants: partially occulted flares in hard X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flares being partially occulted by the solar limb, are the best reservoir of our knowledge about hard X-ray loop-top sources. Recently, the survey of partially occulted flares observed by the RHESSI has been published (Krucker & Lin 2008). The extensive YOHKOH database still awaits such activities. This work is an attempt to fill this gap. Among from 1286 flares in the YOHKOH Hard X-ray Telescope Flare Catalogue, for which the hard X-ray images had been enclosed, we identified 98 events that occurred behind the solar limb. We investigated their hard X-ray spectra and spatial structure. We found that in most cases the hard X-ray spectrum of partially occulted flares consists of two components, non-thermal and thermal, which are co-spatial. The photon energy spectra of the partially occulted flares are systematically steeper than spectra of the non-occulted flares. Such a difference we explain as a consequence of intrinsically dissimilar conditions ruling in coronal parts of flares, in comparison with the f...

Tomczak, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geomagnetic storm dependence on the solar flare class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare published results on flare-storm dependences and discuss possible sources of the discrepancy. We analyze following sources of difference: (1) different intervals of observations, (2) different statistics and (3) different methods of event identification and comparison. Our analysis shows that magnitude of geomagnetic storms is likely to be independent on X-ray class of solar flares.

Yu. I. Yermolaev; M. Yu. Yermolaev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Summarizing FLARE assay images in colon carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intestinal tract cancer is one of the more common cancers in the United States. While in some individuals a genetic component causes the cancer, the rate of cancer in the remainder of the population is believed to be affected by diet. Since cancer usually develops slowly, the amount of oxidative damage to DNA can be used as a cancer biomarker. This dissertation examines effective ways of analyzing FLARE assay data, which quanti?es oxidative damage. The statistical methods will be implemented on data from a FLARE assay experiment, which examines cells from the duodenum and the colon to see if there is a difference in the risk of cancer due to corn or ?sh oil diets. Treatments of the oxidizing agent dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), DSS with a recovery period, as well as a control will also be used. Previous methods presented in the literature examined the FLARE data by summarizing the DNA damage of each cell with a single number, such as the relative tail moment (RTM). Variable skewness is proposed as an alternative measure, and shown to be as effective as the RTM in detecting diet and treatment differences in the standard analysis. The RTM and skewness data is then analyzed using a hierarchical model, with both the skewness and RTM showing diet/treatment differences. Simulated data for this model is also considered, and shows that a Bayes Factor (BF) for higher dimensional models does not follow guidelines presented by Kass and Raftery (1995). It is hypothesized that more information is obtained by describing the DNA damage functions, instead of summarizing them with a single number. From each function, seven points are picked. First, they are modeled independently, and only diet effects are found. However, when the correlation between points at the cell and rat level is modeled, much stronger diet and treatment differences are shown both in the colon and the duodenum than for any of the previous methods. These results are also easier to interpret and represent graphically, showing that the latter is an effective method of analyzing the FLARE data.

Leyk Williams, Malgorzata

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Flares as fingerprints of inner solar darkness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Xray flares and other much weaker solar brightenings have their roots in magnetized regions. Until now, such a solar Xray emission had been discarded as potential axion signature, as it did not match the expectations of the standard axion model: signal must appear exclusively near disk centre and its analog spectrum must peak at 4.2 keV. We argue how to reconcile model with observation. This work is in support of previous claims about the axion origin of specific solar observations.

Zioutas, K; Semertzidis, Y; Papaevangelou, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Remote Oscillatory responses to a solar flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes governing energy storage and release in the Sun are both related to the solar magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of a magnetic connection between energy released caused by a flare and increased oscillatory power in the lower solar atmosphere. The oscillatory power in active regions tends to increase in response to explosive events at a different location, but not in the region itself. We carry out timing studies and show that this is probably caused by a large scale magnetic connection between the regions, and not a globally propagating wave. We show that oscillations tend to exist in longer lived wave trains at short periods (Psolar atmosphere.

Andic, Aleksandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65{sup 0} of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of {approx}10 G to as high as {approx}450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65{sup 0} of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sudol, J. J. [West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

X-ray Flares in Orion Low Mass Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. X-ray flares are common phenomena in pre-main sequence stars. Their analysis gives insights into the physics at work in young stellar coronae. The Orion Nebula Cluster offers a unique opportunity to study large samples of young low mass stars. This work is part of the Chandra Orion Ultradeep project (COUP), an ~10 day long X-ray observation of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). Aims. Our main goal is to statistically characterize the flare-like variability of 165 low mass (0.1-0.3 M_sun) ONC members in order to test and constrain the physical scenario in which flares explain all the observed emission. Methods. We adopt a maximum likelihood piece-wise representation of the observed X-ray light curves and detect flares by taking into account both the amplitude and time derivative of the count-rate. We then derive the frequency and energy distribution of the flares. Results. The high energy tail of the energy distribution of flares is well described by a power-law with index 2.2. We test the hypothesis that light curves are built entirely by overlapping flares with a single power law energy distribution. We constrain the parameters of this simple model for every single light curve. The analysis of synthetic light curves obtained from the model indicates a good agreement with the observed data. Comparing low mass stars with stars in the mass interval (0.9-1.2M_sun), we establish that, at ~1 Myr, low mass and solar mass stars of similar X-ray luminosity have very similar flare frequencies. Conclusions. Our observational results are consistent with the following model/scenario: the light curves are entirely built by over- lapping flares with a power-law intensity distribution; the intense flares are individually detected, while the weak ones merge and form a pseudo-quiescent level, which we indicate as the characteristic level.

M. Caramazza; E. Flaccomio; G. Micela; F. Reale; S. J. Wolk; E. D. Feigelson

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An advanced process control application, using DMCplus (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system pressure required changes in C3/C4 make-up gas usage. These changes led, in turn, to some instability in the fuel gas system that sometimes required purge to the safety flare system to stabilize. As the composition of the fuel gas supply changed, so did its heating value, which caused fluctuations in the control of various fuel gas consumers. The DMCplus application now controls fuel gas pressure tightly and also stabilizes the fuel gas heating value. The understanding of each fuel gas provider and user was essential to the success of this application, as was the design of the DMCplus application. SmartStepTM (Aspen Technology, Inc.) - automated testing software - was used to efficiently develop the DMCplus models; however, a number of models were developed prior to the plant test period using long-term plant history data.

Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

LETTER Earth Planets Space, 61, 577580, 2009 Flares and the chromosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanism remains an open problem. Consideration of wave transport of energy in solar flares and CMEs seems. Melrose, D. B., Energy propagation into a flare kernel during a solar flare, ApJ, 387, 403­413, 1992 magnetic field. Key words: Solar flares, solar chromosphere, solar corona, Alfv´en waves. 1. Introduction

California at Berkeley, University of

109

HEATING OF FLARE LOOPS WITH OBSERVATIONALLY CONSTRAINED HEATING FUNCTIONS  

SciTech Connect

We analyze high-cadence high-resolution observations of a C3.2 flare obtained by AIA/SDO on 2010 August 1. The flare is a long-duration event with soft X-ray and EUV radiation lasting for over 4 hr. Analysis suggests that magnetic reconnection and formation of new loops continue for more than 2 hr. Furthermore, the UV 1600 Angstrom-Sign observations show that each of the individual pixels at the feet of flare loops is brightened instantaneously with a timescale of a few minutes, and decays over a much longer timescale of more than 30 minutes. We use these spatially resolved UV light curves during the rise phase to construct empirical heating functions for individual flare loops, and model heating of coronal plasmas in these loops. The total coronal radiation of these flare loops are compared with soft X-ray and EUV radiation fluxes measured by GOES and AIA. This study presents a method to observationally infer heating functions in numerous flare loops that are formed and heated sequentially by reconnection throughout the flare, and provides a very useful constraint to coronal heating models.

Qiu Jiong; Liu Wenjuan; Longcope, Dana W. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

RAPID TRANSITION OF UNCOMBED PENUMBRAE TO FACULAE DURING LARGE FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past two decades, the complex nature of sunspots has been disclosed with high-resolution observations. One of the most important findings is the 'uncombed' penumbral structure, where a more horizontal magnetic component carrying most of Evershed flows is embedded in a more vertical magnetic background. The penumbral bright grains are locations of hot upflows and dark fibrils are locations of horizontal flows that are guided by a nearly horizontal magnetic field. On the other hand, it was found that flares may change the topology of sunspots in {delta} configuration: the structure at the flaring polarity inversion line becomes darkened while sections of peripheral penumbrae may disappear quickly and permanently associated with flares. The high spatial and temporal resolution observations obtained with the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope provide an excellent opportunity to study the evolution of penumbral fine structures associated with major flares. Taking advantage of two near-limb events, we found that in sections of peripheral penumbrae swept by flare ribbons the dark fibrils completely disappear, while the bright grains evolve into faculae that are signatures of vertical magnetic flux tubes. The corresponding magnetic fluxes measured in the decaying penumbrae show stepwise changes temporally correlated with the flares. These observations suggest that the horizontal magnetic field component of the penumbra could be straightened upward (i.e., turning from horizontal to vertical) due to magnetic field restructuring associated with flares, which results in the transition of penumbrae to faculae.

Wang Haimin; Deng Na; Liu Chang, E-mail: haimin.wang@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR FLARES AND SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We suggest that the flatter size distribution of solar energetic proton (SEP) events relative to that of flare soft X-ray (SXR) events is primarily due to the fact that SEP flares are an energetic subset of all flares. Flares associated with gradual SEP events are characteristically accompanied by fast ({>=}1000 km s{sup -1}) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that drive coronal/interplanetary shock waves. For the 1996-2005 interval, the slopes ({alpha} values) of power-law size distributions of the peak 1-8 A fluxes of SXR flares associated with (a) >10 MeV SEP events (with peak fluxes {>=}1 pr cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}) and (b) fast CMEs were {approx}1.3-1.4 compared to {approx}1.2 for the peak proton fluxes of >10 MeV SEP events and {approx}2 for the peak 1-8 A fluxes of all SXR flares. The difference of {approx}0.15 between the slopes of the distributions of SEP events and SEP SXR flares is consistent with the observed variation of SEP event peak flux with SXR peak flux.

Cliver, E. W. [Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Ling, A. G. [Atmospheric Environmental Research, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Belov, A. [IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation); Yashiro, S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

PROPERTIES OF SEQUENTIAL CHROMOSPHERIC BRIGHTENINGS AND ASSOCIATED FLARE RIBBONS  

SciTech Connect

We report on the physical properties of solar sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs) observed in conjunction with moderate-sized chromospheric flares with associated Coronal mass ejections. To characterize these ephemeral events, we developed automated procedures to identify and track subsections (kernels) of solar flares and associated SCBs using high-resolution H{alpha} images. Following the algorithmic identification and a statistical analysis, we compare and find the following: SCBs are distinctly different from flare kernels in their temporal characteristics of intensity, Doppler structure, duration, and location properties. We demonstrate that flare ribbons are themselves made up of subsections exhibiting differing characteristics. Flare kernels are measured to have a mean propagation speed of 0.2 km s{sup -1} and a maximum speed of 2.3 km s{sup -1} over a mean distance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km. Within the studied population of SCBs, different classes of characteristics are observed with coincident negative, positive, or both negative and positive Doppler shifts of a few km s{sup -1}. The appearance of SCBs precedes peak flare intensity by Almost-Equal-To 12 minutes and decay Almost-Equal-To 1 hr later. They are also found to propagate laterally away from flare center in clusters at 45 km s{sup -1} or 117 km s{sup -1}. Given SCBs' distinctive nature compared to flares, we suggest a different physical mechanism relating to their origin than the associated flare. We present a heuristic model of the origin of SCBs.

Kirk, Michael S.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Jackiewicz, Jason; McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Milligan, Ryan O., E-mail: mskirk@nmsu.edu [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Methodology for estimating volumes of flared and vented natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common perception in the United States that natural gas produced with oil is a valuable commodity probably dates from the 1940's. Before that time, most operators regarded natural gas associated with or dissolved in oil as a nuisance. Indeed, most associated/dissolved natural gas produced in the United States before World War II probably was flared or vented to the atmosphere. This situation has changed in the United States, where flaring and venting have decreased dramatically in recent years, in part because of environmental concerns, but also because of the changing view of the value of natural gas. The idea that gas is a nuisance is beginning to change almost everywhere, as markets for gas have developed in Europe, Japan, and elsewhere, and as operators have increasingly utilized or reinjected associated-dissolved gas in their oil-production activities. Nevertheless, in some areas natural gas continues to be flared or vented to the atmosphere. Gas flares in Russia, the Niger Delta, and the Middle East are some of the brightest lights on the nighttime Earth. As we increasingly consider the global availability and utility of natural gas, and the environmental impacts of the consumption of carbon-based fuels, it is important to know how much gas has been flared or vented, how much gas is currently being flared or vented, and the distribution of flaring or venting through time. Unfortunately, estimates of the volumes of flared and vented gas are generally not available. Despite the inconsistency and inavailability of data, the extrapolation method outlined provides a reliable technique for estimating amounts of natural gas flared and vented through time. 36 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Terrestrial Response To Eruptive Solar Flares: Geomagnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the interval of August 1978- December 1979, 56 unambiguous fast forward shocks were identified using magnetic field and plasma data collected by the spacecraft. Because this is at a solar maximum we assume the streams causing these shocks are associated coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares. For these shocks we shall describe the shock- storm relationship for the level of intense storms storms. We will also present for the solar physicist a summary of the interplanetary /magnetosphere functions, based on the reconnection process. We will d by giving an overview of the long-term evolution of geomagnetic storms such those associated with the seasonal and solar cycle distributions. 1. Introduction Because the em...

Walter Gonzalez Instituto; Walter D. Gonzalez; Bruce T. Tsurutani

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Power of Turbulent Reconnection: Star Formation, Acceleration of Cosmic Rays, Heat Transfer, Flares and Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence is ubiquitous in astrophysical fluids. Therefore it is necessary to study magnetic reconnection in turbulent environments. The model of fast turbulent reconnection proposed in Lazarian & Vishniac 1999 has been successfully tested numerically and it suggests numerous astrophysical implications. Those include a radically new possibility of removing magnetic field from collapsing clouds which we termed "reconnection diffusion", acceleration of cosmic rays within shrinking filaments of reconnected magnetic fields, flares of reconnection, from solar flares to much stronger ones which can account for gamma ray bursts. In addition, the model reveals a very intimate relation between magnetic reconnection and properties of strong turbulence, explaining how turbulent eddies can transport heat in magnetized plasmas. This is a small fraction the astrophysical implications of the quantitative insight into the fundamental process of magnetic reconnection in turbulent media.

Lazarian, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

WAS AN OUTBURST OF AQUILA X-1 A MAGNETIC FLARE?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I point to an interesting similarity in the radio and the soft X-ray light curves between the 2009 November outburst of the X-ray binary Aquila X-1 and some solar flares. The ratio of the soft X-ray and radio luminosities of Aquila X-1 in that outburst is also similar to some weak solar flares, as is the radio spectrum near 8 GHz. Based on these as well as on some other recent studies that point to some similar properties of accretion disk coronae and stellar flares, such as the ratio of radio to X-ray luminosities, I speculate that the soft X-ray outburst of Aquila X-1 was related to a huge magnetic flare from its disk corona.

Soker, Noam, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i [Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 1,861: 1,120: 808 ...

118

Lifetime of solar flare particles in coronal storage regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most discussions of lifetime of flare particles in the solar corona have ... However, it is quite possible that the solar cosmic rays are not imbedded in I0 a K coronal.

119

Flare Noise Reduction Exxon Chemical- Baytown Olefins Plant: 1994 CMA Energy Efficiency Award for "Flare Noise Reduction" in the category of "Public Outreach/Plant Site"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerous community complaints were received because of what nearby residents perceived as excessive noise from BOP's elevated flares. Representatives from the Baytown Olefins Plant met with community residents to better understand their concerns. This qualitative data helped identify the flare noise problem to which BOP responded. BOP continued to solicit community feedback as various flare noise tests were conducted. Of particular concern to the community were low frequency rumbling noise and a higher frequency noise that resembles the sound of a jet plane passing overhead. To supplement the qualitative data received from the community, quantitative noise data was collected at various flaring conditions, wind conditions, and steam rates. Additional testing was performed to determine optimum steam rates for flaring events that could eliminate smoking and minimize noise. These tests concluded that reducing steam to the flare could reduce flare noise without jeopardizing smokeless operation. High intensity, low frequency rumbling noise (0-10 Hz), was rattling the windows and doors in the nearby community. It is typically generated by flame instability. Flame instability was occurring at BOP at fairly low flaring rates, and has been attributed to changes in the flare gas heating value and flare steam rates. Although a moderate amount of center steam lifts the flame off the top of the flare tip and prevents backburning (another source of flare noise), too much center steam makes a flame even less stable. This instability essentially causes a series of small explosions at the flare tip that generate low frequency noise. Combustion noise and steam injection noise contributed to the jet engine sound that was objectionable to the community. Steam injection noise increases as the amount of hydrocarbon burned in the flare increases, and noise increases as both hydrocarbon and steam injection increase. Although it is difficult to minimize the hydrocarbon to the flare, the steam to hydrocarbon ratio can be controlled to a minimum amount required for smokeless operation. Additionally, BOP can optimize the use of its two flares to reduce noise.

Bradham, S.; Stephan, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

TRANSITION REGION EMISSION FROM SOLAR FLARES DURING THE IMPULSIVE PHASE  

SciTech Connect

There are relatively few observations of UV emission during the impulsive phases of solar flares, so the nature of that emission is poorly known. Photons produced by solar flares can resonantly scatter off atoms and ions in the corona. Based on off-limb measurements by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer, we derive the O VI {lambda}1032 luminosities for 29 flares during the impulsive phase and the Ly{alpha} luminosities of 5 flares, and we compare them with X-ray luminosities from GOES measurements. The upper transition region and lower transition region luminosities of the events observed are comparable. They are also comparable to the luminosity of the X-ray emitting gas at the beginning of the flare, but after 10-15 minutes the X-ray luminosity usually dominates. In some cases, we can use Doppler dimming to estimate flow speeds of the O VI emitting gas, and five events show speeds in the 40-80 km s{sup -1} range. The O VI emission could originate in gas evaporating to fill the X-ray flare loops, in heated chromospheric gas at the footpoints, or in heated prominence material in the coronal mass ejection. All three sources may contribute in different events or even in a single event, and the relative timing of UV and X-ray brightness peaks, the flow speeds, and the total O VI luminosity favor each source in one or more events.

Johnson, H.; Raymond, J. C.; Murphy, N. A.; Suleiman, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giordano, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Ko, Y.-K. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ciaravella, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ANATOMY OF A SOLAR FLARE: MEASUREMENTS OF THE 2006 DECEMBER 14 X-CLASS FLARE WITH GONG, HINODE, AND RHESSI  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most challenging observations to explain in the context of existing flare models are those related to the lower atmosphere and below the solar surface. Such observations, including changes in the photospheric magnetic field and seismic emission, indicate the poorly understood connections between energy release in the corona and its impact in the photosphere and the solar interior. Using data from Hinode, TRACE, RHESSI, and GONG we study the temporal and spatial evolution of the 2006 December 14 X-class flare in the chromosphere, photosphere, and the solar interior. We investigate the connections between the emission at various atmospheric depths, including acoustic signatures obtained by time-distance and holography methods from the GONG data. We report the horizontal displacements observed in the photosphere linked to the timing and locations of the acoustic signatures we believe to be associated with this flare, their vertical and horizontal displacement velocities, and their potential implications for current models of flare dynamics.

Matthews, S. A.; Zharkov, S. [UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT UK (United Kingdom); Zharkova, V. V. [Horton D Building, Department of Mathematics, University of Bradford, Bradford, BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Product transfer service chosen over LPG flaring  

SciTech Connect

Seadrift Pipeline Corp. recently decommissioned its Ella Pipeline, an 108-mile, 8-in. line between the King Ranch and a Union Carbide plant at Seadrift, Texas. The pipeline company opted for the product transfer services of pipeline Dehydrators Inc. to evacuate the ethane-rich LPG mixture from the pipeline instead of flaring the LPG or displacing it with nitrogen at operating pressures into another pipeline. The product transfer system of Pipeline Dehydrators incorporates the use of highly specialized portable compressors, heat exchangers and interconnected piping. The product transfer process of evacuating a pipeline is an economically viable method that safely recovers a very high percentage of the product while maintaining product purity. Using positive-displacement compressors, PLD transferred the LPG from the idled 8-in. Ella line into an adjacent 12-in. ethane pipeline that remained in service at approximately 800 psig. Approximately 4.3 million lb of LPG (97% ethane, 2.7% methane and 0.3% propane) were transferred into the ethane pipeline, lowering the pressure on the Ella Pipeline from 800 psig to 65 psig.

Horn, J.; Powers, M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Low-energy cutoffs in electron spectra of solar flares: statistical survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) X-ray data base (February 2002 -- May 2006) has been searched to find solar flares with weak thermal components and flat photon spectra. Using a regularised inversion technique, we determine the mean electron flux distribution from count spectra of a selection of events with flat photon spectra in the 15--20 keV energy range. Such spectral behaviour is expected for photon spectra either affected by photospheric albedo or produced by electron spectra with an absence of electrons in a given energy range, e.g. a low-energy cutoff in the mean electron spectra of non-themal particles. We have found 18 cases which exhibit a statistically significant local minimum (a dip) in the range of 10--20 keV. The positions and spectral indices of events with low-energy cutoff indicate that such features are likely to be the result of photospheric albedo. It is shown that if the isotropic albedo correction was applied, all low-energy cutoffs in the mean electron spectrum were removed and hence the low energy cutoffs in the mean electron spectrum of solar flares above $\\sim$12 keV cannot be viewed as real features in the electron spectrum. If low-energy cutoffs exist in the mean electron spectra, the energy of low energy cutoffs should be less than $\\sim$12 keV.

E. P. Kontar; E. Dickson; J. Kasparova

2008-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

125

NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell [Space Sciences Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mariska, John; Warren, Harry [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Schrijver, Carolus J. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Webb, David F. [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Bailey, Scott [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tobiska, W. Kent, E-mail: tom.woods@lasp.colorado.edu [Space Environment Technologies, Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

OPTICAL DISCOVERY OF PROBABLE STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and observed peak luminosities of M{sub g} = -18.3 and -20.4 ({nu}L{sub {nu}} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42}, 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, in the rest frame); their cooling rates are very low, qualitatively consistent with expectations for tidal disruption flares. The properties of the TDE candidates are examined using (1) SDSS imaging to compare them to other flares observed in the search, (2) UV emission measured by GALEX, and (3) spectra of the hosts and of one of the flares. Our pipeline excludes optically identifiable AGN hosts, and our variability monitoring over nine years provides strong evidence that these are not flares in hidden AGNs. The spectra and color evolution of the flares are unlike any SN observed to date, their strong late-time UV emission is particularly distinctive, and they are nuclear at high resolution arguing against these being first cases of a previously unobserved class of SNe or more extreme examples of known SN types. Taken together, the observed properties are difficult to reconcile with an SN or an AGN-flare explanation, although an entirely new process specific to the inner few hundred parsecs of non-active galaxies cannot be excluded. Based on our observed rate, we infer that hundreds or thousands of TDEs will be present in current and next-generation optical synoptic surveys. Using the approach outlined here, a TDE candidate sample with O(1) purity can be selected using geometric resolution and host and flare color alone, demonstrating that a campaign to create a large sample of TDEs, with immediate and detailed multi-wavelength follow-up, is feasible. A by-product of this work is quantification of the power spectrum of extreme flares in AGNs.

Van Velzen, Sjoert; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, NY 10003 (United States); Gezari, Suvi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morrell, Nidia [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casillas 601, La Serena (Chile); Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oestman, Linda [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Smith, Mathew [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); Gelfand, Joseph [New York University-Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Drake, Andrew J., E-mail: s.vanvelzen@astro.ru.nl [Center for Advance Computing Research, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States)

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

128

Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar neutrino flares and mixing are considered. Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The observed and estimated total flare energy should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with, gamma,radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold of 113 MeV. The rarest tau appearence will be possible only for hardest solar neutrino energies above 3.471 GeV

D. Fargion; F. Moscato

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

129

Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MNRAS, 148, 17 Kane, S. R. , et al. 1980, in Solar Flares: AMonograph from SKYLAB Solar Workshop II, ed. P. A.Moore, R. , et al. 1980, in Solar Flares: A Monograph from

Caspi, Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 408 1992 501 530 501 1993 501 522 515 533 536 531 583 546 1994 533 616 623 620 629 654 1995 667 594 663 634 643 626 643 663 603 553 567 578 1996 549 538 625 620 693 703 709 715 676 708 682 690 1997 133 124 135 142 147 142 149 177 160 150 159 161 1998 147 134 150 148 132 117 126 132 124 121 121 123 1999 754 406 686 588 693 611 708 340 590 811 785 592 2000 147 135 152 163 175 159 187 180 175 179 176 183 2001 166 149 171 206 224 208 221 218 229 222 222 238 2002 172 163 176 196 185 177 191 184 188 180 157 165

131

Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2 and Bruce J; published 17 June 2003) We argue that Earth's short-term temperature anomalies and the solar flare data sets that corresponds to the one that would be induced by the solar flare intermittency. The mean

Scafetta, Nicola

132

Multi-wavelength analysis of high energy electrons in solar flares: a case study of August 20, 2002 flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multi-wavelength spatial and temporal analysis of solar high energy electrons is conducted using the August 20, 2002 flare of an unusually flat (gamma=1.8) hard X-ray spectrum. The flare is studied using RHESSI, Halpha, radio, TRACE, and MDI observations with advanced methods and techniques never previously applied in the solar flare context. A new method to account for X-ray Compton backscattering in the photosphere (photospheric albedo) has been used to deduce the primary X-ray flare spectra. The mean electron flux distribution has been analysed using both forward fitting and model independent inversion methods of spectral analysis. We show that the contribution of the photospheric albedo to the photon spectrum modifies the calculated mean electron flux distribution, mainly at energies below 100 keV. The positions of the Halpha emission and hard X-ray sources with respect to the current-free extrapolation of the MDI photospheric magnetic field and the characteristics of the radio emission provide evidence of the closed geometry of the magnetic field structure and the flare process in low altitude magnetic loops. In agreement with the predictions of some solar flare models, the hard X-ray sources are located on the external edges of the Halpha emission and show chromospheric plasma heated by the non-thermal electrons. The fast changes of Halpha intensities are located not only inside the hard X-ray sources, as expected if they are the signatures of the chromospheric response to the electron bombardment, but also away from them.

J. Kasparova; M. Karlicky; E. P. Kontar; R. A. Schwartz; B. R. Dennis

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 3,000: 2,906: 2,802 ...

134

OBSERVATIONS OF RECONNECTING FLARE LOOPS WITH THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect

Perhaps the most compelling evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares comes from the supra-arcade downflows that have been observed above many post-flare loop arcades. These downflows are thought to be related to highly non-potential field lines that have reconnected and are propagating away from the current sheet. We present new observations of supra-arcade downflows taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The morphology and dynamics of the downflows observed with AIA provide new evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares. With these new observations we are able to measure downflows originating at larger heights than in previous studies. We find, however, that the initial velocities measured here ({approx}144 km s{sup -1}) are well below the Alfven speed expected in the lower corona, and consistent with previous results. We also find no evidence that the downflows brighten with time, as would be expected from chromospheric evaporation. These observations suggest that simple two-dimensional models cannot explain the detailed observations of solar flares.

Warren, Harry P.; Sheeley, Neil R. Jr. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); O'Brien, Casey M. [Also at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Asai, A., E-mail: kusano@nagoya-u.jp [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, 17 Kitakazan Ohmine-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

136

Electric Field Perturbations in Terrestrial Clouds and Solar Flare Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric electrical data taken on 3744 m high Niwot Ridge, Colorado, during 1966, 1967 and 1968 are reexamined for evidence of a solar-weather link between the earths electric field and solar flare events. The onset of the response of the ...

Doyne Sartor

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A STATISTICAL STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE TRANSPORT RATE OF MAGNETIC HELICITY AND SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

We present a statistical study which is aimed at understanding the fact that some flares (type I flare) are associated with sharp variations of the transport rate of magnetic helicity (dH/dt) while others are not (type II flare). The sample consists of 49 M-class and X-class flares which were produced by nine isolated active regions. Using high temporal magnetograms obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, we calculate the temporal variation of dH/dt during the flaring time, and compare its profile with the soft X-ray flux. We find that type I flares have longer duration and higher peak flux in soft X-ray than type II flares. Furthermore, the ratio of the total unsigned magnetic flux of the host active region to that of the visible solar disk is also higher for type I flares, while the total flux itself is independent of the flare type. Our results show that whether the flare is associated with sharp variations of dH/dt depends on the properties of the flare and of its host active region. The relationship between dH/dt and microwave bursts is also discussed.

Zhang Yin; Tan Baolin; Yan Yihua, E-mail: zhangyin@bao.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100012 (China)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

PRODUCTIVITY OF SOLAR FLARES AND MAGNETIC HELICITY INJECTION IN ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this study is to better understand how magnetic helicity injection in an active region (AR) is related to the occurrence and intensity of solar flares. We therefore investigate the magnetic helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux, as a reference. In total, 378 ARs are analyzed using SOHO/MDI magnetograms. The 24 hr averaged helicity injection rate and unsigned magnetic flux are compared with the flare index and the flare-productive probability in the next 24 hr following a measurement. In addition, we study the variation of helicity over a span of several days around the times of the 19 flares above M5.0 which occurred in selected strong flare-productive ARs. The major findings of this study are as follows: (1) for a sub-sample of 91 large ARs with unsigned magnetic fluxes in the range from (3-5) x 10{sup 22} Mx, there is a difference in the magnetic helicity injection rate between flaring ARs and non-flaring ARs by a factor of 2; (2) the GOES C-flare-productive probability as a function of helicity injection displays a sharp boundary between flare-productive ARs and flare-quiet ones; (3) the history of helicity injection before all the 19 major flares displayed a common characteristic: a significant helicity accumulation of (3-45) x 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2} during a phase of monotonically increasing helicity over 0.5-2 days. Our results support the notion that helicity injection is important in flares, but it is not effective to use it alone for the purpose of flare forecast. It is necessary to find a way to better characterize the time history of helicity injection as well as its spatial distribution inside ARs.

Park, Sung-hong; Wang Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, 101 Tiernan Hall, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Chae, Jongchul, E-mail: sp295@njit.ed [Astronomy Program and FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE PROTON EFFECTS ON CYTOKINE/CHEMOKINE EXPRESSION AFTER WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION Asma Rizvi 2 , George Coutrakon 1 , James M. Slater 1 , Michael J. Pecaut 1,2 and Daila S. Gridley 1,2 Departments. of 1 Radiation Medicine and 2 Biochemistry & Microbiology Loma Linda University & Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354 Astronauts are exposed to low dose/low dose rate radiation (LDR) and may also be acutely irradiated during a solar particle event (SPE). The biological effects of LDR alone and when combined with a solar particle event, are not yet clearly understood. Previous studies have shown that irradiation can have adverse effects on T cells. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced as a result of radiation can alter or damage the

140

The Acceleration of Ions in Solar Flares During Magnetic Reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The acceleration of solar flare ions during magnetic reconnection is explored via particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently follow the motions of both protons and $\\alpha$ particles. We demonstrate that the dominant ion heating during reconnection with a guide field (a magnetic component perpendicular to the reconnection plane) results from pickup behavior during the entry into reconnection exhausts. In contrast with anti-parallel reconnection, the temperature increment is dominantly transverse, rather than parallel, to the local magnetic field. The comparison of protons and alphas reveals a mass-to-charge ($M/Q$) threshold in pickup behavior that favors heating of high $M/Q$ ions over protons, which is consistent with impulsive flare observations.

Knizhnik, Kalman; Drake, James F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

THE ACCELERATION OF IONS IN SOLAR FLARES DURING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The acceleration of solar flare ions during magnetic reconnection is explored via particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently and simultaneously follow the motions of both protons and {alpha} particles. We show that the dominant heating of thermal ions during guide field reconnection, the usual type in the solar corona, results from pickup behavior during the entry into reconnection exhausts. In contrast to anti-parallel reconnection, the temperature increment is dominantly transverse, rather than parallel, to the local magnetic field. A comparison of protons and {alpha} reveals a mass-to-charge (M/Q) threshold in pickup behavior that favors the heating of high-M/Q ions, which is consistent with impulsive flare observations.

Knizhnik, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F., E-mail: kknizhni@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: swisdak@umd.edu, E-mail: drake@umd.edu [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

GENERIC MODEL FOR MAGNETIC EXPLOSIONS APPLIED TO SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accepted model for magnetospheric substorms is proposed as the basis for a generic model for magnetic explosions and is applied to solar flares. The model involves widely separated energy-release and particle-acceleration regions, with energy transported Alfvenically between them. On a global scale, these regions are coupled by a large-scale current that is set up during the explosion by redirection of pre-existing current associated with the stored magnetic energy. The explosion-related current is driven by an electromotive force (EMF) due to the changing magnetic flux enclosed by this current. The current path and the EMF are identified for an idealized quadrupolar model for a flare.

Melrose, D. B. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

COMPTEL Observation of the Flaring Quasar PKS0528+134  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With a direct demodulation method, we have reanalyzed the data from COMPTEL/CGRO observation of PKS0528+134 during the 1993 March flare in gamma-rays. Our results show that during the flare gamma-rays were detected at a level approximately 2.4-3.8 times greater than the observed intensity in two earlier COMPTEL observations VP 0 and VP 1 in the energy range 3 MeV to 30 MeV. The 3-30 MeV time variability of the flux follows well the trend as observed by EGRET/CGRO at higher energies. No convincing excess can be found around the position of PKS0528+134 in the energy range 0.75 MeV to 3 MeV, which indicates a spectral break around 3 MeV. The detections and non-detections in the four standard COMPTEL energy bands are consistent with the earlier reports given by Collmar et al., while the feature that gamma-rays of the quasar still kept on flaring at energies down to 3 MeV is clearly found.

S. Zhang; T. P. Li; M. Wu

1998-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF CONFINED AND ERUPTIVE FLARES IN NOAA AR 10720  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the distinct properties of two types of flares: eruptive flares associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and confined flares without CMEs. Our study sample includes nine M- and X-class flares, all from the same active region (AR), six of which are confined and three others which are eruptive. The confined flares tend to be more impulsive in the soft X-ray time profiles and show slenderer shapes in the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope 195 A images, while the eruptive ones are long-duration events and show much more extended brightening regions. The location of the confined flares is closer to the center of the AR, while the eruptive flares are at the outskirts. This difference is quantified by the displacement parameter, which is the distance between the AR center and the flare location; the average displacement of the six confined flares is 16 Mm, while that of the eruptive ones is as large as 39 Mm. Further, through nonlinear force-free field extrapolation, we find that the decay index of the transverse magnetic field in the low corona ({approx}10 Mm) is larger for eruptive flares than for confined ones. In addition, the strength of the transverse magnetic field over the eruptive flare sites is weaker than it is over the confined ones. These results demonstrate that the strength and the decay index of the background magnetic field may determine whether or not a flare is eruptive or confined. The implication of these results on CME models is discussed in the context of torus instability of the flux rope.

Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, J. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Su, J. T., E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

TESTING AUTOMATED SOLAR FLARE FORECASTING WITH 13 YEARS OF MICHELSON DOPPLER IMAGER MAGNETOGRAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flare occurrence is statistically associated with changes in several characteristics of the line-of-sight magnetic field in solar active regions (ARs). We calculated magnetic measures throughout the disk passage of 1075 ARs spanning solar cycle 23 to find a statistical relationship between the solar magnetic field and flares. This expansive study of over 71,000 magnetograms and 6000 flares uses superposed epoch (SPE) analysis to investigate changes in several magnetic measures surrounding flares and ARs completely lacking associated flares. The results were used to seek any flare associated signatures with the capability to recover weak systematic signals with SPE analysis. SPE analysis is a method of combining large sets of data series in a manner that yields concise information. This is achieved by aligning the temporal location of a specified flare in each time series, then calculating the statistical moments of the 'overlapping' data. The best-calculated parameter, the gradient-weighted inversion-line length (GWILL), combines the primary polarity inversion line (PIL) length and the gradient across it. Therefore, GWILL is sensitive to complex field structures via the length of the PIL and shearing via the gradient. GWILL shows an average 35% increase during the 40 hr prior to X-class flares, a 16% increase before M-class flares, and 17% increase prior to B-C-class flares. ARs not associated with flares tend to decrease in GWILL during their disk passage. Gilbert and Heidke skill scores are also calculated and show that even GWILL is not a reliable parameter for predicting solar flares in real time.

Mason, J. P.; Hoeksema, J. T., E-mail: JMason86@sun.stanford.ed, E-mail: JTHoeksema@sun.stanford.ed [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

xi Chapter 1: The Sun and Solarexpress. xi Chapter 1: The Sun and Solar Flares Introductionand release. 1.1 Solar structure The Sun, as any other star,

Caspi, Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Detecting giant solar flares based on sunspot parameters using bayesian networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of Bayesian Networks (BN) in a new area, the detection of solar flares. The paper describes how to learn a Bayesian Network (BN) using a set of variables representing sunspots parameters such that the BN can detect and classify ... Keywords: bayesian networks, forecast systems, fusion of information, solar flares, sunspot

Tatiana Raffaelli; Adriana V. R. Silva; Maurcio Marengoni

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Quasi-periodic flares in EXO 2030+375 observed with INTEGRAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: Episodic flaring activity is a common feature of X-ray pulsars in HMXBs. In some Be/X-ray binaries flares were observed in quiescence or prior to outbursts. EXO 2030+375 is a Be/X-ray binary showing "normal" outbursts almost every ~46 days, near periastron passage of the orbital revolution. Some of these outbursts were occasionally monitored with the INTEGRAL observatory. Aims: The INTEGRAL data revealed strong quasi-periodic flaring activity during the rising part of one of the system's outburst. Such activity has previously been observed in EXO 2030+375 only once, in 1985 with EXOSAT. (Some indications of single flares have also been observed with other satellites.) Methods: We present the analysis of the flaring behavior of the source based on INTEGRAL data and compare it with the flares observed in EXO 2030+375 in 1985. Results: Based on the observational properties of the flares, we argue that the instability at the inner edge of the accretion disk is the most probable cause of the flaring activ...

Klochkov, D; Santangelo, A; Staubert, R; Kretschmar, P; Caballero, I; Postnov, K; Wilson-Hodge, C A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Overview of the Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this introductory chapter, we provide a brief summary of the successes and remaining challenges in understanding the solar flare phenomenon and its attendant implications for particle acceleration mechanisms in astrophysical plasmas. We also provide a brief overview of the contents of the other chapters in this volume, with particular reference to the well-observed flare of 2002 July 23

Dennis, Brian R; Hudson, Hugh S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reducing flare emissions from chemical plants and refineries through the application of fuzzy control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing legislative requirements on a global basis are driving the development of solutions to reduce emission. Flaring and venting of waste hydrocarbon gases is a known contributor to pollution and increasing pressure is being exerted onto operators ... Keywords: air assist, combustion, combustion efficiency, emissions, flare, fuzzy control, member ship function, steam injection, toxic gas

A. Alizadeh-Attar; H. R. Ghoohestani; I. Nasr Isfahani

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reducing flare emissions from chemical plants and refineries through the application of fuzzy control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing legislative requirements on a global basis are driving the development of solutions to reduce emission. Flaring and venting of waste hydrocarbon gases is a known contributor to pollution and increasing pressure is being exerted onto operators ... Keywords: air assist, combustion, combustion efficiency, emissions, flare, fuzzy control, member ship function, steam injection, toxic gas

A. Alizadeh-Attar; H. R. Ghoohestani; I. Nasr Isfahani

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

153

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

154

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

155

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

156

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

157

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

158

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

159

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 240 251 316 316 316 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 169 165 E 161 E 165 E 164 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 Total............................................................... 174 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 174 E 170 E 166 E 170 E 169 Extraction Loss...............................................

160

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 142  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

162

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

163

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

164

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

165

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

166

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................ 6 7 7 6 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 233 611 654 523 711 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * From Coalbed Wells .................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells ................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 233 611 655 523 712 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.................

167

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 48 34 46 48 35 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 48 34 46 48 35 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

168

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

169

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Massachusetts, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

170

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

171

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

172

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 96 98 96 106 109 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,040 869 886 R 904 1,187 From Oil Wells.................................................. 356 349 322 R 288 279 Total................................................................... 1,395 1,218 1,208 R 1,193 1,466 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 R 5 12 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,395 1,218 1,208 R 1,188 1,454 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

173

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 74  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 32. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

174

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

175

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 15 14 18 21 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 454 621 409 778 821 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 454 621 409 778 821 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

176

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

177

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 225 240 251 316 E 316 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 174 169 165 E 161 E 165 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 5 E 5 E 5 Total............................................................... 180 174 170 E 166 E 170 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 180 174 170 166 170 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

178

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

179

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

180

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 15 15 15 14 18 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 731 467 454 621 409 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 731 467 454 621 409 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss..................................................

182

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

183

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

184

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

185

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

186

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

187

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8 7 7 6 6 Total................................................................... 8 7 7 6 6 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8 7 7 6 6 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

188

Microsoft Word - Table_68_2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 420 380 350 400 430 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,230 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 Total................................................................... 1,230 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,230 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

189

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

190

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

191

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 136  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 20 18 15 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,112 837 731 467 454 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,112 837 731 467 454 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,112 837 731 467 454 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

192

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

193

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

194

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 8 7 7 5 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 18 34 32 22 48 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 18 34 32 22 48 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 18 34 32 22 48 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

195

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

196

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

197

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

198

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

199

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 66  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 28. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year............................... 7 9 6 6 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 300 443 331 233 611 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * Total.............................................................. 301 443 331 233 611 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation........................... 301 443 331 233 611 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production......................................

200

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

202

Average Commercial Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

203

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

204

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

205

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 48 35 28 43 43 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 48 35 28 43 43 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

206

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 120  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

207

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

208

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

209

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Massachusetts, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

210

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

211

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

212

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

213

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 134  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

214

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

215

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

216

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

217

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.....................

218

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

219

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 128  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 58. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

220

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 19 17 20 18 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,555 1,412 1,112 837 731 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,555 1,412 1,112 837 731 Repressuring ...................................................... 50 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,505 1,412 1,112 837 731 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 214 198 3 0 0 Marketed Production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Washington, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

222

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

223

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 142  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 14 18 21 24 26 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 621 409 778 821 1,407 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 621 409 778 821 1,407 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

224

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

225

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 158  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

226

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 46 48 35 28 43 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 46 48 35 28 43 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

227

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

228

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 5 5 4 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 5 5 5 5 4 Extraction Loss...............................................

229

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

230

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

231

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

232

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nebraska, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 106 109 111 114 114 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 904 1,187 1,229 943 1,033 From Oil Wells.............................................. 288 279 269 258 185 Total............................................................... 1,193 1,466 1,499 1,201 1,217 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 5 12 23 29 17 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 1,188 1,454 1,476 1,172 1,200 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

233

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,954 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 2,954 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

234

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Iowa, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

235

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 6 6 5 5 5 Total............................................................... 6 6 5 5 5 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 6 6 5 5 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

236

Microsoft Word - Table_40_2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,498 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 855 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 855 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 855 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

237

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Iowa, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

238

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

239

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 148  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

240

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

242

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

243

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

244

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

245

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

246

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

247

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

248

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

249

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 4 4 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 4 4 4 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5 5 4 4 4 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

250

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

251

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

252

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

253

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

254

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 160  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................

255

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

256

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

257

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

258

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 6 5 5 5 5 Total............................................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 6 5 5 5 5 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

259

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 132  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

260

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

262

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

263

Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

264

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

265

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 76  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

266

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

267

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

268

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

269

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year . 9 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 443 331 233 611 654 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * Total.............................................................. 443 331 233 611 655 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production...................................... 443 331 233 611 655 Extraction Loss .............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production

270

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

271

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total Dry Production ....................................

272

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

273

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

274

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 114  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

275

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 152  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

276

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

277

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

278

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

279

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Extraction Loss...............................................

280

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 166  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

282

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 6 6 5 5 Total................................................................... 7 6 6 5 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 6 6 5 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

283

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

284

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 128  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

285

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

286

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

287

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

288

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

289

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

290

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

291

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

292

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

293

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

294

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 8 9 8 7 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 471 368 305 300 443 From Oil Wells.................................................. 3 1 1 0 0 Total................................................................... 474 368 307 301 443 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 474 368 307 301 443 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

295

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 300 280 300 225 240 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 189 183 180 174 169 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6 6 6 5 5 Total................................................................... 195 189 185 180 174 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 195 189 185 180 174 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

296

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

297

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 72  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 611 654 523 711 183 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * 0 From Coalbed Wells .................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells ................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 611 655 523 712 183 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.................

298

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

299

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

300

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

302

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 160  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year .................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production .........................................

303

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

304

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

305

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 102  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 5 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 32 22 48 34 46 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 32 22 48 34 46 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 32 22 48 34 46 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

306

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

307

Average Residential Price  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

308

Topological changes of the photospheric magnetic field inside active regions: a prelude to flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The observations of magnetic field variations as a signature of flaring activity is one of the main goal in solar physics. Some efforts in the past give apparently no unambiguous observations of changes. We observed that the scaling laws of the current helicity inside a given flaring active region change clearly and abruptly in correspondence with the eruption of big flares at the top of that active region. Comparison with numerical simulations of MHD equations, indicates that the change of scaling behavior in the current helicity, seems to be associated to a topological reorganization of the footpoint of the magnetic field loop, namely to dissipation of small scales structures in turbulence. It is evident that the possibility of forecasting in real time high energy flares, even if partially, has a wide practical interest to prevent the effects of big flares on Earth and its environment.

L. Sorriso-Valvo; V. Carbone; V. Abramenko; V. Yurchyshyn; A. Noullez; H. Politano; A. Pouquet; P. Veltri

2002-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P. [Astronomical Institute, University of Wroclaw, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland); Siarkowski, M., E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: ms@cbk.pan.wroc.pl [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

310

Turbomachinery debris remover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Solar X-ray Flare Hazards on the Surface of Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Putative organisms on the Martian surface would be exposed to potentially high doses of ionizing radiation during strong solar X-ray flares. We extrapolate the observed flare frequency-energy release scaling relation to releases much larger than seen so far for the sun, an assumption supported by observations of flares on other solar- and subsolar-mass main sequence stars. We calculate the surficial reprocessed X-ray spectra using a Monte Carlo code we have developed. Biological doses from indirect genome damage are calculated for each parameterized flare spectrum by integration over the X-ray opacity of water. We estimate the mean waiting time for solar flares producing a given biological dose of ionizing radiation on Mars and compare with lethal dose data for a wide range of terrestrial organisms. These timescales range from decades for significant human health risk to 0.5 Myr for D. radiodurans lethality. Such doses require total flare energies of 10^33--10^38 erg, the lower range of which has been observed for other stars. Flares are intermittent bursts, so acute lethality will only occur on the sunward hemisphere during a sufficiently energetic flare, unlike low-dose-rate, extended damage by cosmic rays. We estimate the soil and CO_2 ice columns required to provide 1/e shielding as 4--9 g cm^-2, depending on flare mean energy and atmospheric column density. Topographic altitude variations give a factor of two variation in dose for a given flare. Life in ice layers that may exist ~ 100 g cm^-2 below the surface would be well protected.

David S. Smith; John M. Scalo

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

SIMULATING THE EFFECTS OF INITIAL PITCH-ANGLE DISTRIBUTIONS ON SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we model both the thermal and non-thermal components of solar flares. The model we use, HYLOOP, combines a hydrodynamic equation solver with a non-thermal particle tracking code to simulate the thermal and non-thermal dynamics and emission of solar flares. In order to test the effects of pitch-angle distribution on flare dynamics and emission, a series of flares is simulated with non-thermal electron beams injected at the loop apex. The pitch-angle distribution of each beam is described by a single parameter and allowed to vary from flare to flare. We use the results of these simulations to generate synthetic hard and soft X-ray emissions (HXR and SXR). The light curves of the flares in Hinode's X-ray Telescope passbands show a distinct signal that is highly dependent on pitch-angle distribution. The simulated HXR emission in the 3-6 keV bandpass shows the formation and evolution of emission sources that correspond well to the observations of pre-impulsive flares. This ability to test theoretical models of thermal and non-thermal flare dynamics directly with observations allows for the investigation of a wide range of physical processes governing the evolution of solar flares. We find that the initial pitch-angle distribution of non-thermal particle populations has a profound effect on loop top HXR and SXR emission and that apparent motion of HXR is a natural consequence of non-thermal particle evolution in a magnetic trap.

Winter, Henry D.; Reeves, Katharine K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Martens, Petrus, E-mail: hwinter@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173840, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

314

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

315

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

316

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

317

Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

318

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

319

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

320

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

322

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

323

New waste-heat refrigeration unit cuts flaring, reduces pollution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planetec Utility Services Co. Inc. and Energy Concepts Co. (ECC), with the help of the US Department of Energy (DOE), developed and commissioned a unique waste-heat powered LPG recovery plant in August 1997 at the 30,000 b/d Denver refinery, operated by Ultramar Diamond Shamrock (UDS). This new environmentally friendly technology reduces flare emissions and the loss of salable liquid-petroleum products to the fuel-gas system. The waste heat ammonia absorption refrigeration plant (Whaarp) is the first technology of its kind to use low-temperature waste heat (295 F) to achieve sub-zero refrigeration temperatures ({minus}40 F) with the capability of dual temperature loads in a refinery setting. The ammonia absorption refrigeration is applied to the refinery`s fuel-gas makeup streams to condense over 180 b/d of salable liquid hydrocarbon products. The recovered liquid, about 64,000 bbl/year of LPG and gasoline, increases annual refinery profits by nearly $1 million, while substantially reducing air pollution emissions from the refinery`s flare.

Brant, B.; Brueske, S. [Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc., Evergreen, CO (United States); Erickson, D.; Papar, R. [Energy Concepts Co., Annapolis, MD (United States)

1998-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

324

SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE MICROWAVE EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 A channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: sjkim@nro.nao.ac.jp [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN TWO-RIBBON FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate that disturbances observed to propagate along the axis of the arcade in two-ribbon solar flares at the speed of a few tens of km s{sup -1}, well below the Alfven and sound speeds, can be interpreted in terms of slow magnetoacoustic waves. The waves can propagate across the magnetic field, parallel to the magnetic neutral line, because of the wave-guiding effect due to the reflection from the footpoints. The perpendicular group speed of the perturbation is found to be a fraction of the sound speed, which is consistent with observations. The highest value of the group speed grows with the increase in the ratio of the sound and Alfven speeds. For a broad range of parameters, the highest value of the group speed corresponds to the propagation angle of 25 deg. - 28 deg. to the magnetic field. This effect can explain the temporal and spatial structure of quasi-periodic pulsations observed in two-ribbon flares.

Nakariakov, V. M. [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Zimovets, I. V., E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya Street 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The emission measure distribution of impulsive phase flare footpoints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature distribution of the emitting plasma is a crucial constraint when studying the heating of solar flare footpoints. However, determining this for impulsive phase footpoints has been difficult in the past due to insufficient spatial resolution to resolve the footpoints from the loop structures, and a lack of spectral and temporal coverage. We use the capabilities of Hinode/EIS to obtain the first emission measure distributions (EMDs) from impulsive phase footpoints in six flares. Observations with good spectral coverage were analysed using a regularized inversion method to recover the EMDs. We find that the EMDs all share a peak temperature of around 8 MK, with lines formed around this temperature having emission measures peaking between 10^28 and 10^29 cm^-5, indicating a substantial presence of plasma at very high temperatures within the footpoints. An EMD gradient of EM(T) ~ T is found in all events. Previous theoretical work on emission measure gradients shows this to be consistent with a scen...

Graham, D R; Fletcher, L; Milligan, R O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Interruption of Tidal Disruption Flares By Supermassive Black Hole Binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are products of galaxy mergers, and are important in testing Lambda cold dark matter cosmology and locating gravitational-wave-radiation sources. A unique electromagnetic signature of SMBHBs in galactic nuclei is essential in identifying the binaries in observations from the IR band through optical to X-ray. Recently, the flares in optical, UV, and X-ray caused by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) tidally disrupting nearby stars have been successfully used to observationally probe single SMBHs in normal galaxies. In this Letter, we investigate the accretion of the gaseous debris of a tidally disrupted star by a SMBHB. Using both stability analysis of three-body systems and numerical scattering experiments, we show that the accretion of stellar debris gas, which initially decays with time $\\propto t^{-5/3}$, would stop at a time $T_{\\rm tr} \\simeq \\eta T_{\\rm b}$. Here, $\\eta \\sim0.25$ and $T_{\\rm b}$ is the orbital period of the SMBHB. After a period of interruption, the accretion recurs discretely at time $T_{\\rm r} \\simeq \\xi T_b$, where $\\xi \\sim 1$. Both $\\eta$ and $\\xi$ sensitively depend on the orbital parameters of the tidally disrupted star at the tidal radius and the orbit eccentricity of SMBHB. The interrupted accretion of the stellar debris gas gives rise to an interrupted tidal flare, which could be used to identify SMBHBs in non-active galaxies in the upcoming transient surveys.

F. K. Liu; S. Li; Xian Chen

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

329

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

330

Graphitic packing removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Survey on solar X-ray flares and associated coherent radio emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radio emission during 201 X-ray selected solar flares was surveyed from 100 MHz to 4 GHz with the Phoenix-2 spectrometer of ETH Zurich. The selection includes all RHESSI flares larger than C5.0 jointly observed from launch until June 30, 2003. Detailed association rates of radio emission during X-ray flares are reported. In the decimeter wavelength range, type III bursts and the genuinely decimetric emissions (pulsations, continua, and narrowband spikes) were found equally frequently. Both occur predominantly in the peak phase of hard X-ray (HXR) emission, but are less in tune with HXRs than the high-frequency continuum exceeding 4 GHz, attributed to gyrosynchrotron radiation. In 10% of the HXR flares, an intense radiation of the above genuine decimetric types followed in the decay phase or later. Classic meter-wave type III bursts are associated in 33% of all HXR flares, but only in 4% they are the exclusive radio emission. Noise storms were the only radio emission in 5% of the HXR flares, some of them with extended duration. Despite the spatial association (same active region), the noise storm variations are found to be only loosely correlated in time with the X-ray flux. In a surprising 17% of the HXR flares, no coherent radio emission was found in the extremely broad band surveyed. The association but loose correlation between HXR and coherent radio emission is interpreted by multiple reconnection sites connected by common field lines.

Arnold O. Benz; Paolo Grigis; Andre Csillagy; Pascal Saint-Hilaire

2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Impulsive phase flare energy transport by large-scale Alfven waves and the electron acceleration problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impulsive phase of a solar flare marks the epoch of rapid conversion of energy stored in the pre-flare coronal magnetic field. Hard X-ray observations imply that a substantial fraction of flare energy released during the impulsive phase is converted to the kinetic energy of mildly relativistic electrons (10-100 keV). The liberation of the magnetic free energy can occur as the coronal magnetic field reconfigures and relaxes following reconnection. We investigate a scenario in which products of the reconfiguration - large-scale Alfven wave pulses - transport the energy and magnetic-field changes rapidly through the corona to the lower atmosphere. This offers two possibilities for electron acceleration. Firstly, in a coronal plasma with beta energies on the order of 10 keV and above, including by repeated interactions between electrons and wavefronts. Secondly, when they reflect and mode-convert in the chromosphere, a cascade to high wavenumbers may develop. This will also accelerate electrons by turbulence, in a medium with a locally high electron number density. This concept, which bridges MHD-based and particle-based views of a flare, provides an interpretation of the recently-observed rapid variations of the line-of-sight component of the photospheric magnetic field across the flare impulsive phase, and offers solutions to some perplexing flare problems, such as the flare "number problem" of finding and resupplying sufficient electrons to explain the impulsive-phase hard X-ray emission.

L. Fletcher; H. S. Hudson

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSIONS ACCOMPANYING SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used Transition Region and Coronal Explorer 1600 A images and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) magnetograms to compare ultraviolet (UV) emissions from the chromosphere to longitudinal magnetic field changes in the photosphere during four X-class solar flares. An abrupt, significant, and persistent change in the magnetic field occurred across more than 10 pixels in the GONG magnetograms for each flare. These magnetic changes lagged the GOES flare start times in all cases, showing that they were consequences and not causes of the flares. Ultraviolet emissions were spatially coincident with the field changes. The UV emissions tended to lag the GOES start times for the flares and led the changes in the magnetic field in all pixels except one. The UV emissions led the photospheric field changes by 4 minutes on average with the longest lead being 9 minutes; however, the UV emissions continued for tens of minutes, and more than an hour in some cases, after the field changes were complete. The observations are consistent with the picture in which an Alfven wave from the field reconnection site in the corona propagates field changes outward in all directions near the onset of the impulsive phase, including downward through the chromosphere and into the photosphere, causing the photospheric field changes, whereas the chromosphere emits in the UV in the form of flare kernels, ribbons, and sequential chromospheric brightenings during all phases of the flare.

Johnstone, B. M.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Investigation of a combustion driven oscillation in a refinery flare. Part B: Visualisation of a periodic flow instability in a bifurcating duct following a contraction  

SciTech Connect

A flow visualisation study was performed to investigate a periodic flow instability in a bifurcating duct within the tip of the flares at the Shell refinery in Clyde, NSW, to verify the trigger of a combustion-driven oscillation proposed in Part A of this study, and to identify its features. The model study assessed only the flow instability, uncoupled from the acoustic resonance and the combustion that are also present in the actual flare. Three strong, coupled flow oscillations were found to be present in three regions of the fuel line in the flare tip model. A periodic flow separation was found to occur within the contraction at the inlet to the tip, a coupled, periodic flow oscillation was found in the two transverse ''cross-over ducts'' from the central pipe to the outer annulus and an oscillating flow recirculation was present in the ''end-cap'' region of the central pipe. The dimensionless frequency of these oscillations in the model was found to match that measured in the full-scale plant for high fuel flow rates. This, and the strength of these flow oscillations, gives confidence that they are integral to the full-scale combustion-driven oscillation and most likely the primary trigger. The evidence indicates that the periodic flow instability is initiated by the separation and roll-up of the annular boundary layer at the start of the contraction in the fuel section of the flare tip. The separation generates an annular vortex which interacts with the blind-ended pipe downstream, leading to a pressure wave which propagates back upstream, initiating the next separation event and repeating the cycle. The study also investigated flow control devices with a view to finding a practical approach to mitigate the oscillations. The shape of these devices was constrained to allow installation without removing the tip of the flare. This aspect of the study highlighted the strength and nature of the coupled oscillation, since it proved to be very difficult to mitigate the oscillation in this way. An effective configuration is presented, comprising of three individual components, all three of which were found to be necessary to eliminate the oscillation completely. (author)

Riese, M.; Kelso, R.M.; Nathan, G.J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Mullinger, P.J. [School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C. [Solar Physics Laboratory (Code 671), Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

337

A NEW CORRELATION BETWEEN GRB X-RAY FLARES AND THE PROMPT EMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi and Swift missions, we have extracted the minimum variability timescales for temporal structures in the light curves associated with the prompt emission and X-ray flares. A comparison of this variability timescale with pulse parameters such as rise times, determined via pulse-fitting procedures, and spectral lags, extracted via the cross-correlation function, indicates a tight correlation between these temporal features for both the X-ray flares and the prompt emission. These correlations suggest a common origin for the production of X-ray flares and the prompt emission in GRBs.

Sonbas, E. [Department of Physics, University of Adiyaman, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); MacLachlan, G. A.; Shenoy, A.; Dhuga, K. S.; Parke, W. C., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Filament and Flare Detection in H{\\alpha} image sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar storms can have a major impact on the infrastructure of the earth. Some of the causing events are observable from ground in the H{\\alpha} spectral line. In this paper we propose a new method for the simultaneous detection of flares and filaments in H{\\alpha} image sequences. Therefore we perform several preprocessing steps to enhance and normalize the images. Based on the intensity values we segment the image by a variational approach. In a final postprecessing step we derive essential properties to classify the events and further demonstrate the performance by comparing our obtained results to the data annotated by an expert. The information produced by our method can be used for near real-time alerts and the statistical analysis of existing data by solar physicists.

Riegler, Gernot; Ptzi, Werner; Veronig, Astrid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Observing Lense-Thirring Precession in Tidal Disruption Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (SMBH), the streams of liberated gas form an accretion disk after their return to pericenter. We demonstrate that Lense-Thirring precession in the spacetime around a rotating SMBH can produce significant time evolution of the disk angular momentum vector, due to both the periodic precession of the disk and the nonperiodic, differential precession of the bound debris streams. Jet precession and periodic modulation of disk luminosity are possible consequences. The persistence of the jetted X-ray emission in the Swift J164449.3+573451 flare suggests that the jet axis was aligned with the spin axis of the SMBH during this event.

Nicholas Stone; Abraham Loeb

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

340

Device for removing blackheads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for removing blackheads from pores in the skin having a elongated handle with a spoon shaped portion mounted on one end thereof, the spoon having multiple small holes piercing therethrough. Also covered is method for using the device to remove blackheads.

Berkovich, Tamara (116 N. Wetherly Dr., Suite 115, Los Angeles, CA)

1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

342

Flare system for safe disposal of LNG from a disabled tanker  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a flare system for the rapid and safe incineration of the cargo of a disabled LNG tanker is evaluated. The project developed design parameters and proof-of-principle investigations of a system for off-loading and flaring LNG from a disabled LNG tanker. The system described offers enough promise to warrant additional investigation, if cargo burning is desired as a way of reducing other possible hazards.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

High-temperature phase transition in a plasma and the mechanism of powerful solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the high- temperature phase transition in a plasma gives the mechanism of transition from the highly conductive state to the highly resistive state of a plasma in the `electric circuit' model of solar flares which was first introduced by H.Alfven and P.Carlqvist in 1967. With this addendum, the modern version of the electric circuit model can explain both the fast dissipation of energy and the acceleration of particles in a solar flare.

Fedor V. Prigara

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

A MODEL FOR THE ESCAPE OF SOLAR-FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of how particles are accelerated by solar flares can escape into the heliosphere on timescales of an hour or less. Impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts are generally observed in association with so-called eruptive flares consisting of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a flare. These fast SEPs are believed to be accelerated directly by the flare, rather than by the CME shock. However, the precise mechanism by which the particles are accelerated remains controversial. Regardless of the origin of the acceleration, the particles should remain trapped in the closed magnetic fields of the coronal flare loops and the ejected flux rope, given the magnetic geometry of the standard eruptive-flare model. In this case, the particles would reach the Earth only after a delay of many hours to a few days (coincident with the bulk ejecta arriving at Earth). We propose that the external magnetic reconnection intrinsic to the breakout model for CME initiation can naturally account for the prompt escape of flare-accelerated energetic particles onto open interplanetary magnetic flux tubes. We present detailed 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a breakout CME/flare event with a background isothermal solar wind. Our calculations demonstrate that if the event occurs sufficiently near a coronal-hole boundary, interchange reconnection between open and closed fields can occur. This process allows particles from deep inside the ejected flux rope to access solar wind field lines soon after eruption. We compare these results to standard observations of impulsive SEPs and discuss the implications of the model on further observations and calculations.

Masson, S.; Antiochos, S. K. [Space Weather Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. R., E-mail: sophie.masson@nasa.gov [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

A STATISTICAL STUDY OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS  

SciTech Connect

Using hard X-ray observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we investigate the reliability of spectral hardening during solar flares as an indicator of related solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth. All RHESSI data are analyzed, from 2002 February through the end of Solar Cycle 23, thereby expanding upon recent work on a smaller sample of flares. Previous investigations have found very high success when associating soft-hard-harder (SHH) spectral behavior with energetic proton events, and confirmation of this link would suggest a correlation between electron acceleration in solar flares and SEPs seen in interplanetary space. In agreement with these past findings, we find that of 37 magnetically well-connected flares (W30-W90), 12 of 18 flares with SHH behavior produced SEP events and none of 19 flares without SHH behavior produced SEPs. This demonstrates a statistically significant dependence of SHH and SEP observations, a link that is unexplained in the standard scenario of SEP acceleration at the shock front of coronal mass ejections and encourages further investigation of the mechanisms which could be responsible.

Grayson, James A.; Krucker, Saem [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Lin, R. P., E-mail: jgrayson@berkeley.ed, E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed, E-mail: rlin@ssl.berkeley.ed [Also at Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Survey on solar X-ray flares and associated coherent radio emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radio emission during 201 X-ray selected solar flares was surveyed from 100 MHz to 4 GHz with the Phoenix-2 spectrometer of ETH Zurich. The selection includes all RHESSI flares larger than C5.0 jointly observed from launch until June 30, 2003. Detailed association rates of radio emission during X-ray flares are reported. In the decimeter wavelength range, type III bursts and the genuinely decimetric emissions (pulsations, continua, and narrowband spikes) were found equally frequently. Both occur predominantly in the peak phase of hard X-ray (HXR) emission, but are less in tune with HXRs than the high-frequency continuum exceeding 4 GHz, attributed to gyrosynchrotron radiation. In 10% of the HXR flares, an intense radiation of the above genuine decimetric types followed in the decay phase or later. Classic meter-wave type III bursts are associated in 33% of all HXR flares, but only in 4% they are the exclusive radio emission. Noise storms were the only radio emission in 5% of the HXR flares, some of them w...

Benz, A O; Csillagy, A; Saint-Hilaire, P; Benz, Arnold O.; Grigis, Paolo; Csillagy, Andre; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

THE ABRUPT CHANGES IN THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC AND LORENTZ FORCE VECTORS DURING SIX MAJOR NEUTRAL-LINE FLARES  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abrupt photospheric magnetic changes associated with six major flares using 12 minute, 0.''5 pixel{sup -1} vector magnetograms from NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite. The six major flares occurred near the main magnetic neutral lines of four active regions, NOAA 11158, 11166, 11283, and 11429. During all six flares the neutral-line field vectors became stronger and more horizontal, in each case almost entirely due to strengthening of the horizontal field components parallel to the neutral line. In all six cases the neutral-line pre-flare fields were more vertical than the reference potential fields, and collapsed abruptly and permanently closer to potential-field tilt angles during every flare, implying that the relaxation of magnetic stress associated with non-potential tilt angles plays a major role during major flares. The shear angle with respect to the reference potential field did not show such a pattern, demonstrating that flare processes do not generally relieve magnetic stresses associated with photospheric magnetic shear. The horizontal fields became significantly and permanently more aligned with the neutral line during the four largest flares, suggesting that the collapsing field is on average more aligned with the neutral line than the pre-flare neutral-line field. The vertical Lorentz force had a large, abrupt, permanent downward change during each of the flares, consistent with loop collapse. The horizontal Lorentz force changes acted mostly parallel to the neutral line in opposite directions on each side, a signature of the fields contracting during the flare, pulling the two sides of the neutral line toward each other. The greater effect of the flares on field tilt than on shear may be explained by photospheric line-tying.

Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

2 Solar flare signatures of the ionospheric GPS total electron content 3 J. Y. Liu,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Solar flare signatures of the ionospheric GPS total electron content 3 J. Y. Liu,1,2 C. H. Lin,1, ionospheric solar flare effects on the total electron content (TEC) and 7 associated time rate of change (r. The occurrence times and 9 locations of 11 solar flares are isolated from the 1­8 A° X-ray radiations of the 10

Chen, Yuh-Ing

349

Continuous sulfur removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

350

The evolution of the width of X-ray flares with time in Gamma-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

We present one of the most intriguing results obtained with an updated catalog of 113 early time (i.e. t{sub pk} < or approx. 1000 s) and 36 late time (i.e. t{sub pk} > or approx. 1000 s) X-ray flares detected by Swift in the afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB): the evolution of the width of the flares with time. This result, together with other properties investigated on early and late time flares and bright flares, provides a clear observational property that every model aiming at explaining the GRB emission has to face.

Bernardini, Maria Grazia [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); ICRANet, P.le della Repubblica 10, I-65100 Pescara (Italy); Chincarini, Guido; Margutti, Raffaella [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); University of Milano Bicocca, Physics Dept., P.zza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

CORONAL ELECTRON DISTRIBUTION IN SOLAR FLARES: DRIFT-KINETIC MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Using a model of particle acceleration and transport in solar flares, we investigate the height distribution of coronal electrons by focusing on the energy-dependent pitch-angle scattering. When pitch-angle scattering is not included, the peak heights of loop-top electrons are constant, regardless of their energy, owing to the continuous acceleration and compression of the electrons via shrinkage of magnetic loops. On the other hand, under pitch-angle scattering, the electron heights are energy-dependent: intermediate-energy electrons are at a higher altitude, whereas lower and higher energy electrons are at lower altitudes. This implies that the intermediate-energy electrons are inhibited from following the shrinking field lines to lower altitudes because pitch-angle scattering causes efficient precipitation of these electrons into the footpoint and their subsequent loss from the loop. This result is qualitatively consistent with the position of the above-the-loop-top hard X-ray (HXR) source that is located above coronal HXR loops emitted by lower energy electrons and microwaves emitted by higher energy electrons. Quantitative agreement with observations might be achieved by considering primary acceleration before the onset of loop shrinkage and additional pitch-angle scattering via wave-particle interactions.

Minoshima, Takashi; Kusano, Kanya [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25, Syowa-machi, Kanazawaku, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan); Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi, E-mail: minoshim@jamstec.go.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

THE SOLAR FLARE SULFUR ABUNDANCE FROM RESIK OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The RESIK instrument on CORONAS-F spacecraft observed several sulfur X-ray lines in three of its four channels covering the wavelength range 3.8-6.1 A during solar flares. The fluxes are analyzed to give the sulfur abundance. Data are chosen for when the instrument parameters were optimized. The measured fluxes of the S XV 1s{sup 2}-1s4p (w4) line at 4.089 A gives A(S) = 7.16 {+-} 0.17 (abundances on a logarithmic scale with A(H) = 12) which we consider to be the most reliable. Estimates from other lines range from 7.13 to 7.24. The preferred S abundance estimate is very close to recent photospheric abundance estimates and to quiet-Sun solar wind and meteoritic abundances. This implies no fractionation of sulfur by processes tending to enhance the coronal abundance from the photospheric that depend on the first ionization potential (FIP), or that sulfur, though its FIP has an intermediate value of 10.36 eV, acts like a 'high-FIP' element.

Sylwester, J.; Sylwester, B. [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622, Kopernika 11, Wroclaw (Poland); Phillips, K. J. H. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Kuznetsov, V. D., E-mail: js@cbk.pan.wroc.pl, E-mail: bs@cbk.pan.wroc.pl, E-mail: kjhp@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: kvd@izmiran.ru [Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism and Radiowave Propagation (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

FLARES IN THE CRAB NEBULA DRIVEN BY UNTWISTING MAGNETIC FIELDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent discovery of PeV electrons from the Crab Nebula, produced on rapid timescales of one day or less with a sharply peaked gamma-ray spectrum without hard X-rays, challenges traditional models of diffusive shock acceleration followed by synchrotron radiation. Here, we outline an acceleration model involving a DC electric field parallel to the magnetic field in a twisted toroidal field around the pulsar. Sudden developments of resistivity in localized regions of the twisted field are thought to drive the particle acceleration, up to PeV energies, resulting in flares. This model can reproduce the observed timescales of T Almost-Equal-To 1 day, the peak photon energies of U{sub {Phi},rr} Almost-Equal-To 1 MeV, maximum electron energies of U{sub e,rr} Almost-Equal-To 1 PeV, and luminosities of L Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}.

Sturrock, Peter [Center of Space Science and Astrophysics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Aschwanden, Markus J., E-mail: sturrock@stanford.edu, E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS  

SciTech Connect

During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

A CLASSIFICATION SCHEME FOR TURBULENT ACCELERATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

We establish a classification scheme for stochastic acceleration models involving low-frequency plasma turbulence in a strongly magnetized plasma. This classification takes into account both the properties of the accelerating electromagnetic field, and the nature of the transport of charged particles in the acceleration region. We group the acceleration processes as either resonant, non-resonant, or resonant-broadened, depending on whether the particle motion is free-streaming along the magnetic field, diffusive, or a combination of the two. Stochastic acceleration by moving magnetic mirrors and adiabatic compressions are addressed as illustrative examples. We obtain expressions for the momentum-dependent diffusion coefficient D(p), both for general forms of the accelerating force and for the situation when the electromagnetic force is wave-like, with a specified dispersion relation {omega} = {omega}(k). Finally, for models considered, we calculate the energy-dependent acceleration time, a quantity that can be directly compared with observations of the time profile of the radiation field produced by the accelerated particles, such as those occuring during solar flares.

Bian, Nicolas; Kontar, Eduard P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Emslie, A. Gordon, E-mail: n.bian@physics.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: eduard@astro.gla.ac.uk, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Plasma heating in the very early and decay phases of solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) on September 20, 2002 and March 17, 2002, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in non-thermal electron beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light-curves. We showed that energy delivered by non-thermal electrons was fully sufficient to fulfil the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad-hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by non-thermal electrons.

Falewicz, R; Rudawy, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

HARD X-RAY AND MICROWAVE EMISSIONS FROM SOLAR FLARES WITH HARD SPECTRAL INDICES  

SciTech Connect

We analyze 10 flare events that radiate intense hard X-ray (HXR) emission with significant photons over 300 keV to verify that the electrons that have a common origin of acceleration mechanism and energy power-law distribution with solar flares emit HXRs and microwaves. Most of these events have the following characteristics. HXRs emanate from the footpoints of flare loops, while microwaves emanate from the tops of flare loops. The time profiles of the microwave emission show delays of peak with respect to those of the corresponding HXR emission. The spectral indices of microwave emissions show gradual hardening in all events, while the spectral indices of the corresponding HXR emissions are roughly constant in most of the events, though rather rapid hardening is simultaneously observed in some for both indices during the onset time and the peak time. These characteristics suggest that the microwave emission emanates from the trapped electrons. Then, taking into account the role of the trapping of electrons for the microwave emission, we compare the observed microwave spectra with the model spectra calculated by a gyrosynchrotron code. As a result, we successfully reproduce the eight microwave spectra. From this result, we conclude that the electrons that have a common acceleration and a common energy distribution with solar flares emit both HXR and microwave emissions in the eight events, though microwave emission is contributed to by electrons with much higher energy than HXR emission.

Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nishizuka, N. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Oi, A. [College of Science, Ibaraki University, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Ohyama, M. [Faculty of Education, Shiga University, 2-5-1 Hiratsu, Otsu, Shiga 1-1, Baba Hikone city, Siga 522-8522 (Japan); Nakajima, H., E-mail: kawate@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory, NAOJ, Nobeyama, Minamisaku, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF CHANGING PHOTOSPHERIC VECTOR MAGNETIC FIELDS ASSOCIATED WITH SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations have provided evidence that the solar photospheric magnetic fields could have rapid and permanent changes in both longitudinal and transverse components associated with major flares. As a result, the Lorentz force (LF) acting on the solar photosphere and solar interior could be perturbed, and the change of LF is always nearly in the downward direction. However, these rapid and permanent changes have not been systematically investigated, yet, using vector magnetograms. In this paper, we analyze photospheric vector magnetograms covering five flares to study the evolution of photospheric magnetic fields. In particular, we investigate two-dimensional spatial distributions of the changing LF. Around the major flaring polarity inversion line, the net change of the LF is directed downward in an area of {approx}10{sup 19} cm{sup 2} for X-class flares. For all events, the white-light observations show that sunspots darken in this location after flares, and magnetic fields become more inclined, which is consistent with the ideas put forward by Hudson et al. and Fisher et al., and observations.

Su, J. T.; Jing, J.; Wang, H. M. [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Mao, X. J.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, H. Q.; Deng, Y. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, G. P., E-mail: sjt@bao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

PRIOR FLARING AS A COMPLEMENT TO FREE MAGNETIC ENERGY FOR FORECASTING SOLAR ERUPTIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From a large database of (1) 40,000 SOHO/MDI line-of-sight magnetograms covering the passage of 1300 sunspot active regions across the 30 Degree-Sign radius central disk of the Sun, (2) a proxy of each active region's free magnetic energy measured from each of the active region's central-disk-passage magnetograms, and (3) each active region's full-disk-passage history of production of major flares and fast coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find new statistical evidence that (1) there are aspects of an active region's magnetic field other than the free energy that are strong determinants of the active region's productivity of major flares and fast CMEs in the coming few days; (2) an active region's recent productivity of major flares, in addition to reflecting the amount of free energy in the active region, also reflects these other determinants of coming productivity of major eruptions; and (3) consequently, the knowledge of whether an active region has recently had a major flare, used in combination with the active region's free-energy proxy measured from a magnetogram, can greatly alter the forecast chance that the active region will have a major eruption in the next few days after the time of the magnetogram. The active-region magnetic conditions that, in addition to the free energy, are reflected by recent major flaring are presumably the complexity and evolution of the field.

Falconer, David A.; Moore, Ronald L.; Barghouty, Abdulnasser F. [ZP13 MSFC/NASA, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Khazanov, Igor [CSPAR, Cramer Hall/NSSTC, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Soot and SO[subscript 2] contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order ...

Molina, Luisa Tan

362

A new solar flare heavy ion model and its implementation through MACREE, an improved modeling tool to calculate single event effect rates in space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new solar flare heavy ion model has been developed to support Space Station Single Event Effects (SEE) evaluations. It shows good agreement with previous flare data, and is implemented through an improved version of the CREME code.

Majewski, P.P.; Normand, E.; Oberg, D.L. [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Spots, plages, and flares on lambda Andromedae and II Pegasi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a contemporaneous photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of lambda And and II Peg aimed at investigating the behavior of surface inhomogeneities in the atmospheres of these active stars which have nearly the same temperature but different gravity. The light curves and the modulation of the surface temperature, as recovered from LDRs, are used to map the photospheric spots, while the H-alpha emission has been used as an indicator of chromospheric inhomogeneities. The spot temperatures and sizes were derived from a spot model applied to the contemporaneous light and temperature curves. We find larger and cooler spots on II Peg (T_sp ~ 3600 K) compared to lambda And (T_sp ~ 3900 K); this could be the result of both the different gravity and the higher activity level of the former. Moreover, we find a clear anti-correlation between the H-alpha emission and the photospheric diagnostics. We have also detected a modulation of the intensity of the HeI D_3 line with the star rotation. A rough reconstruction of the 3D structure of their atmospheres has been also performed by applying a spot/plage model to the light and temperature curves and to the H-alpha flux modulation. A close spatial association of photospheric and chromospheric active regions has been found in both stars. Larger and cooler spots have been found on II Peg, the system with the active component of higher gravity and higher activity level. The area ratio of plages to spots seems to decrease when the spots get bigger. Moreover, with the present and literature data, a correlation between the temperature difference Delta_T = T_ph - T_sp and the surface gravity has been also suggested. In addition, a strong flare affecting the H-alpha, the HeI D_3, and the cores of NaI D_1,2 lines has been observed on II Peg.

A. Frasca; K. Biazzo; G. Tas; S. Evren; A. C. Lanzafame

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Detection of a proton beam during the impulsive phase of a stellar flare  

SciTech Connect

A transient event consistent with the predicted temporal and spectral signatures of an energetic proton beam was detected in the impulsive phase of a small flare on the red dwarf star AU Microscopii. It consisted of a prominent increase in the flux in the red wing of Lyman-alpha near 1223 A, simultaneously with the peak of a flare observed in the 1206 A transition region line of Si III. The probability that the red wing event was a chance fluctuation is one chance in 2.5 x 10 exp 4. This observation represents a confirmation of the prediction by Orrall and Zirker (1976) in which downstreaming protons accelerated during the impulsive phase of a flare charge exchange with ambient neutral hydrogen and emit Lyman-alpha radiation from 1 to 15 A redward of line center. 22 refs.

Woodgate, B.E.; Robinson, R.D.; Carpenter, K.G.; Maran, S.P.; Shore, S.N. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

DOE/EA-1745 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BLAST FURNACE GAS FLARE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BLAST FURNACE GAS FLARE CAPTURE PROJECT AT THE ARCELORMITTAL USA, INC. INDIANA HARBOR STEEL MILL, EAST CHICAGO, INDIANA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1745 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BLAST FURNACE GAS FLARE CAPTURE PROJECT AT THE ARCELORMITTAL USA, INC. INDIANA HARBOR STEEL MILL, EAST CHICAGO, INDIANA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1745 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Final Environmental Assessment for the Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture Project at the ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. Indiana Harbor Steel Mill, East Chicago, Indiana

366

TIME-DEPENDENT DENSITY DIAGNOSTICS OF SOLAR FLARE PLASMAS USING SDO/EVE  

SciTech Connect

Temporally resolved electron density measurements of solar flare plasmas are presented using data from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The EVE spectral range contains emission lines formed between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 7} K, including transitions from highly ionized iron ({approx}>10 MK). Using three density-sensitive Fe XXI ratios, peak electron densities of 10{sup 11.2}-10{sup 12.1} cm{sup -3} were found during four X-class flares. While previous measurements of densities at such high temperatures were made at only one point during a flaring event, EVE now allows the temporal evolution of these high-temperature densities to be determined at 10 s cadence. A comparison with GOES data revealed that the peak of the density time profiles for each line ratio correlated well with that of the emission measure time profile for each of the events studied.

Milligan, Ryan O.; Kennedy, Michael B.; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Keenan, Francis P. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

GAMMA-RAY ACTIVITY IN THE CRAB NEBULA: THE EXCEPTIONAL FLARE OF 2011 APRIL  

SciTech Connect

The Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite observed a gamma-ray flare in the Crab Nebula lasting for approximately nine days in April of 2011. The source, which at optical wavelengths has a size of Almost-Equal-To 11 lt-yr across, doubled its gamma-ray flux within eight hours. The peak photon flux was (186 {+-} 6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} above 100 MeV, which corresponds to a 30-fold increase compared to the average value. During the flare, a new component emerged in the spectral energy distribution, which peaked at an energy of (375 {+-} 26) MeV at flare maximum. The observations imply that the emission region was likely relativistically beamed toward us and that variations in its motion are responsible for the observed spectral variability.

Buehler, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Funk, S.; Kerr, M.; Massaro, F.; Romani, R. W. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Scargle, J. D. [Space Sciences Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States); Baldini, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Belfiore, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); D'Ammando, F. [IASF Palermo, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Dermer, C. D.; Grove, J. E. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Harding, A. K.; Hays, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mazziotta, M. N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, 70126 Bari (Italy); Tennant, A. F., E-mail: buehler@stanford.edu, E-mail: rdb3@stanford.edu, E-mail: Jeffrey.D.Scargle@nasa.gov [NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); and others

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evolution of the Loop-Top Source of Solar Flares--Heating and Cooling Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of the spatial and spectral evolution of the loop-top (LT) sources in a sample of 6 flares near the solar limb observed by {\\it RHESSI}. A distinct coronal source, which we identify as the LT source, was seen in each of these flares from the early ``pre-heating'' phase through the late decay phase. Spectral analyses reveal an evident steep power-law component in the pre-heating and impulsive phases, suggesting that the particle acceleration starts upon the onset of the flares. In the late decay phase the LT source has a thermal spectrum and appears to be confined within a small region near the top of the flare loop, and does not spread throughout the loop, as is observed at lower energies. The total energy of this source decreases usually faster than expected from the radiative cooling but much slower than that due to the classical Spitzer conductive cooling along the flare loop. These results indicate the presence of a distinct LT region, where the thermal conductivity is suppressed significantly and/or there is a continuous energy input. We suggest that plasma wave turbulence could play important roles in both heating the plasma and suppressing the conduction during the decay phase of solar flares. With a simple quasi-steady loop model we show that the energy input in the gradual phase can be comparable to that in the impulsive phase and demonstrate how the observed cooling and confinement of the LT source can be used to constrain the wave-particle interaction.

Yan Wei Jiang; Siming Liu; Wei Liu; Vahe Petrosian

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

369

PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT A FLARE TERMINATION SHOCK: EFFECT OF LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC TURBULENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the acceleration of charged particles (both electrons and protons) at collisionless shocks predicted to exist in the vicinity of solar flares. The existence of standing termination shocks has been examined by flare models and numerical simulations. We study electron energization by numerically integrating the equations of motion of a large number of test-particle electrons in the time-dependent two-dimensional electric and magnetic fields generated from hybrid simulations (kinetic ions and fluid electron) using parameters typical of the solar flare plasma environment. The shock is produced by injecting plasma flow toward a rigid piston. Large-scale magnetic fluctuations-known to exist in plasmas and known to have important effects on the nonthermal electron acceleration at shocks-are also included in our simulations. For the parameters characteristic of the flaring region, our calculations suggest that the termination shock formed in the reconnection outflow region (above post-flare loops) could accelerate electrons to a kinetic energy of a few MeV within 100 ion cyclotron periods, which is of the order of a millisecond. Given a sufficient turbulence amplitude level ({delta}B{sup 2}/B 2{sub 0} {approx} 0.3), about 10% of thermal test-particle electrons are accelerated to more than 15 keV. We find that protons are also accelerated, but not to as high energy in the available time and the energy spectra are considerably steeper than that of the electrons for the parameters used in our simulations. Our results are qualitatively consistent with the observed hard X-ray emissions in solar flares.

Guo Fan; Giacalone, Joe, E-mail: guofan@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

CALCULATING SEPARATE MAGNETIC FREE ENERGY ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE REGIONS PRODUCING MULTIPLE FLARES: NOAA AR11158  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C-class, two M-class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on 2011 February 12. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we propose a minimization algorithm for estimating the amount of reconnected flux and resulting drop in magnetic free energy during a flare. For the M6.6, M2.2, and X2.2 flares, we find a flux exchange of 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, and 21.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, respectively, resulting in free energy drops of 3.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, and 1.68 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg.

Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana; Millhouse, Margaret [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

SMALL-SCALE MICROWAVE BURSTS IN LONG-DURATION SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Solar small-scale microwave bursts (SMBs), including microwave dot, spike, and narrow-band type III bursts, are characterized by very short timescales, narrow frequency bandwidth, and very high brightness temperatures. Based on observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometer at Huairou with superhigh cadence and frequency resolution, this work presents an intensive investigation of SMBs in several flares that occurred in active region NOAA 10720 during 2005 January 14-21. Especially for long-duration flares, the SMBs occurred not only in the early rising and impulsive phase, but also in the flare decay phase and even after the end of the flare. These SMBs are strong bursts with inferred brightness temperatures of at least 8.18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11}-1.92 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} K, very short lifetimes of 5-18 ms, relative frequency bandwidths of 0.7%-3.5%, and superhigh frequency drifting rates. Together with their obviously different polarizations from background emission (the quiet Sun, and the underlying flaring broadband continuum), such SMBs should be individual, independent strong coherent bursts related to some non-thermal energy release and the production of energetic particles in a small-scale source region. These facts show the existence of small-scale strong non-thermal energy releasing activities after the flare maxima, which is meaningful for predicting space weather. Physical analysis indicates that a plasma mechanism may be the most favorable candidate for the formation of SMBs. From the plasma mechanism, the velocities and kinetic energy of fast electrons can be deduced and the region of electron acceleration can also be tracked.

Tan Baolin, E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

He I D3 OBSERVATIONS OF THE 1984 MAY 22 M6.3 SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect

The He I D3 line has a unique response to a flare impact on the low solar atmosphere and can be a powerful diagnostic tool for energy transport processes. Using images obtained from the recently digitized films of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report D3 observations of the M6.3 flare on 1984 May 22, which occurred in an active region with a circular magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL). The impulsive phase of the flare starts with a main elongated source that darkens in D3, inside of which bright emission kernels appear at the time of the initial small peak in hard X-rays (HXRs). These flare cores subsequently evolve into a sharp emission strand lying within the dark halo; this evolution occurs at the same time as the main peak in HXRs, reversing the overall source contrast from -5% to 5%. The radiated energy in D3 during the main peak is estimated to be about 10{sup 30} erg, which is comparable to that carried by nonthermal electrons above 20 keV. Afterward, the flare proceeds along the circular PIL in the counterclockwise direction to form a dark circular ribbon in D3, which apparently mirrors the bright ribbons in H{alpha} and He I 10830 A. All of these ribbons last for over one hour in the late gradual phase. We suggest that the present event resembles the so-called black-light flare that was proposed based on continuum images, and that D3 darkening and brightening features herein may be due to thermal conduction heating and the direct precipitation of high-energy electrons, respectively.

Liu Chang; Xu Yan; Deng Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Zhang Jifeng; Wang Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Prasad Choudhary, Debi, E-mail: chang.liu@njit.edu [Physics and Astronomy Department, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330-0001 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Center-to-Limb Variation of Radio Emissions from Thermal-Rich and Thermal-Poor Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A statistical analysis of radio flare events was performed by using the event list of Nobeyama Radioheliograph in 1996-2009. We examined center-to-limb variations of 17GHz and 34GHz flux by dividing the flare events into different groups with respect to the 'thermal plasma richness' (ratio of the peak flux of soft X-ray to non-thermal radio emissions) and the duration of radio bursts. It is found that peak flux of 17 and 34GHz tend to be higher toward the limb for thermal-rich flares with short durations. We propose that the thermal-rich flares, which are supposed to be associated with an efficient precipitation of high energy particles into the chromosphere, have a pitch angle distribution of non-thermal electrons with a higher population along the flare loop.

Kawate, Tomoko; Kiyoshi, Ichimoto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cosmic GRB energy-redshift relation and Primordial flares as possible energy source for the central engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By considering similar observed properties of gamma ray bursts (GRB) and solar flares with the prevailing physical conditions in the cosmic environment, the following study suggests that most likely and promising energy source for the central engine which triggers GRB may be due to primordial flares, solar flare like phenomena, at the sites of inter galactic or inter galactic clusters in the early universe. The derived energy-redshift relation, E = E_{0}{(1+z)}^3 (where E is the amount of energy released, z is the redshift of GRB and E_{0} is a constant which is estimated to be ~ 10^{52} ergs), from the simple flare mechanism, is confirmed from the least square fit with the observed energy-redshift relation. Some of the physical parameters like length scale, strength of magnetic field, etc., of the flaring region of the GRB are estimated.

Hiremath, K M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Lag-luminosity relation in gamma-ray burst X-ray flares  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In strict analogy to prompt pulses, X-ray flares observed by Swift-XRT in long Gamma-Ray Bursts define a lag-luminosity relation: L{sub p,iso}{sup 0.3-10} k{sup eV} {infinity}t{sub lag}{sup -0.95{+-}0.23}. The lag-luminosity is proven to be a fundamental law extending {approx}5 decades in time and {approx}5 in energy. This is direct evidence that GRB X-ray flares and prompt gamma-ray pulses are produced by the same mechanism.

Margutti, R.

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Search for correlations between solar flares and decay rate of radioactive nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deacay rate of three different radioactive sources 40K, 137Cs and natTh has been measured with NaI and Ge detectors. Data have been analyzed to search for possible variations in coincidence with the two strongest solar flares of the years 2011 and 2012. No significant deviations from standard expectation have been observed, with a few 10-4 sensitivity. As a consequence, we could not find any effect like that recently reported by Jenkins and Fischbach: a few per mil decrease in the decay rate of 54Mn during solar flares in December 2006.

E. Bellotti; C. Broggini; G. Di Carlo; M. Laubenstein; R. Menegazzo

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

377

DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Removes DOE Removes Brookhaven Contractor Peña sends a message to DOE facilities nationwide INSIDE 2 Accelerator Rx 4 FermiKids 6 Spring at Fermilab Photos courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory by Judy Jackson, Office of Public Affairs Secretary of Energy Federico Peña announced on Thursday, May 1, that the Department of Energy would immediately terminate the current management contract with Associated Universities, Inc. at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York. Peña said that he made the decision after receiving the results of a laboratory safety management review conducted by the independent oversight arm of DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. In addition, the Secretary said he found unacceptable "the continued on page 8 Volume 20 Friday, May 16, 1997

378

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

Neuhaus, J.E.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Helioseismic response to X2.2 solar flare of February 15, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The X2.2-class solar flare of February 15, 2011, produced a powerful sunquake event, representing a helioseismic response to the flare impact in the solar photosphere, which was observed with the HMI instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The impulsively excited acoustic waves formed a compact wavepacket traveling through the solar interior and appearing on the surface as expanding wave ripples. The initial flare impacts were observed in the form of compact and rapid variations of the Doppler velocity, line-of-sight magnetic field and continuum intensity. These variations formed a typical two-ribbon flare structure, and are believed to be associated with thermal and hydrodynamic effects of high-energy particles heating the lower atmosphere. The analysis of the SDO/HMI and X-ray data from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) shows that the helioseismic waves were initiated by the photospheric impact in the early impulsive phase, observed prior to the hard X-ray (50-100 keV) i...

Kosovichev, Alexander G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

A giant radio flare from Cygnus X-3 with associated Gamma-ray emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With frequent flaring activity of its relativistic jets, Cygnus X-3 is one of the most active microquasars and is the only Galactic black hole candidate with confirmed high energy Gamma-ray emission, thanks to detections by Fermi/LAT and AGILE. In 2011, Cygnus X-3 was observed to transit to a soft X-ray state, which is known to be associated with high-energy Gamma-ray emission. We present the results of a multi-wavelength campaign covering a quenched state, when radio emission from Cygnus X-3 is at its weakest and the X-ray spectrum is very soft. A giant (~ 20 Jy) optically thin radio flare marks the end of the quenched state, accompanied by rising non-thermal hard X-rays. Fermi/LAT observations (E >100 MeV) reveal renewed Gamma-ray activity associated with this giant radio flare, suggesting a common origin for all non-thermal components. In addition, current observations unambiguously show that the Gamma-ray emission is not exclusively related to the rare giant radio flares. A 3-week period of Gamma-ray emis...

Corbel, S; Tomsick, J A; Szostek, A; Corbet, R H D; Miller-Jones, J C A; Richards, J L; Pooley, G; Trushkin, S; Dubois, R; Hill, A B; Kerr, M; Max-Moerbeck, W; Readhead, A C S; Bodaghee, A; Tudose, V; Parent, D; Wilms, J; Pottschmidt, K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

COMPARISON OF SEISMIC SIGNATURES OF FLARES OBTAINED BY SOHO/MICHELSON DOPPLER IMAGER AND GONG INSTRUMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first observations of seismic responses to solar flares were carried out using time-distance (TD) and holography techniques applied to SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) Dopplergrams obtained from space and unaffected by terrestrial atmospheric disturbances. However, the ground-based network GONG is potentially a very valuable source of sunquake observations, especially in cases where space observations are unavailable. In this paper, we present an updated technique for pre-processing of GONG observations for the application of subjacent vantage holography. Using this method and TD diagrams, we investigate several sunquakes observed in association with M- and X-class solar flares and compare the outcomes with those reported earlier using MDI data. In both GONG and MDI data sets, for the first time, we also detect the TD ridge associated with the 2001 September 9 flare. Our results show reassuringly positive identification of sunquakes from GONG data that can provide further information about the physics of seismic processes associated with solar flares.

Zharkov, S.; Matthews, S. A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zharkova, V. V. [Horton D Building, Department of Mathematics, University of Bradford, Bradford, BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

Hudson, H. S. [SSL, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Woods, T. N., E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Dr., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

The short gamma-ray burst SGR giant flare connection Kevin Hurley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR SUBMILLIMETER AND GAMMA-RAY BURST EMISSION P. Kaufmann,1,2 J.-P. Raulin,1 A. M. Melo,1 E headings: gamma rays: bursts -- Sun: flares 1. INTRODUCTION The interaction of ultrarelativistic electrons observations of a burst in the submillimeter and gamma-ray ranges were obtained for the first time on 2001

California at Berkeley, University of

385

NO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW BLAST WAVES ENCOUNTERING SUDDEN CIRCUMBURST DENSITY CHANGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Afterglows of gamma-ray bursts are observed to produce light curves with the flux following power-law evolution in time. However, recent observations reveal bright flares at times on the order of minutes to days. One proposed explanation for these flares is the interaction of a relativistic blast wave with a circumburst density transition. In this paper, we model this type of interaction computationally in one and two dimensions, using a relativistic hydrodynamics code with adaptive mesh refinement called RAM, and analytically in one dimension. We simulate a blast wave traveling in a stellar wind environment that encounters a sudden change in density, followed by a homogeneous medium, and compute the observed radiation using a synchrotron model. We show that flares are not observable for an encounter with a sudden density increase, such as a wind termination shock, nor for an encounter with a sudden density decrease. Furthermore, by extending our analysis to two dimensions, we are able to resolve the spreading, collimation, and edge effects of the blast wave as it encounters the change in circumburst medium. In all cases considered in this paper, we find that a flare will not be observed for any of the density changes studied.

Gat, Ilana; Van Eerten, Hendrik; MacFadyen, Andrew [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Physics Department, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

POST-FLARE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT CURVES EXPLAINED WITH THERMAL INSTABILITY OF LOOP PLASMA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, we study the C8 flare that occurred on 2000 September 26 at 19:49 UT and observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation spectrometer from the beginning of the impulsive phase to well beyond the disappearance in the X-rays. The emission first decayed progressively through equilibrium states until the plasma reached 2-3 MK. Then, a series of cooler lines, i.e., Ca X, Ca VII, Ne VI, O IV, and Si III (formed in the temperature range log T = 4.3-6.3 under equilibrium conditions), are emitted at the same time and all evolve in a similar way. Here, we show that the simultaneous emission of lines with such a different formation temperature is due to thermal instability occurring in the flaring plasma as soon as it has cooled below {approx}2 MK. We can qualitatively reproduce the relative start time of the light curves of each line in the correct order with a simple (and standard) model of a single flaring loop. The agreement with the observed light curves is greatly improved, and a slower evolution of the line emission is predicted, if we assume that the model loop consists of an ensemble of subloops or strands heated at slightly different times. Our analysis can be useful for flare observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment.

Reale, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy); Landi, E. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Orlando, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

Bayesian decision tree averaging for the probabilistic interpretation of solar flare occurrences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bayesian averaging over Decision Trees (DTs) allows the class posterior probabilities to be estimated, while the DT models are understandable for domain experts. The use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique of stochastic approximation makes the ... Keywords: Bayesian averaging, Markov Chain Monte Carlo, decision tre, machine learning, solar flare, uncertainty

Vitaly Schetinin; Valentina Zharkova; Sergei Zharkov

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Results of the South African Cloud-Seeding Experiments Using Hygroscopic Flares  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of seeding convective clouds for the purpose of augmenting rainfall is being developed in South Africa. Flares that produce small salt particles (0.5-?m mean diameter) are attached to the trailing edge of the wings of seeding ...

G. K. Mather; D. E. Terblanche; F. E. Steffens; L. Fletcher

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

GEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II) Georgeta Maris the outer atmospheric layer to the ground. The energy source of all these geomagnetic disturbances of the Sun. This paper is part of a larger study concerning the geomagnetic effects produced by solar

390

Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sun offers a convenient nearby laboratory to study the physical processes of particle acceleration and impulsive energy release in magnetized plasmas that occur throughout the universe, from planetary magnetospheres to black hole accretion disks. Solar flares are the most powerful explosions in the solar system, releasing up to 10^32-10^33 ergs over only 100-1,000 seconds, accelerating electrons up to hundreds of MeV and heating plasma to tens of MK. The accelerated electrons and the hot plasma each contain tens of percent of the total flare energy, indicating an intimate link between particle acceleration, plasma heating, and flare energy release. The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observes the X-ray emission from these processes from ~3 keV to ~17 MeV with unprecedented spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution. RHESSI observations show that "super-hot" (>30 MK) plasma temperatures are achieved almost exclusively by intense, GOES X-class flares and appear to be strictly a...

Caspi, Amir

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

IMPULSIVE ACCELERATION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS. II. RELATION TO SOFT X-RAY FLARES AND FILAMENT ERUPTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Using high time cadence images from the STEREO EUVI, COR1, and COR2 instruments, we derived detailed kinematics of the main acceleration stage for a sample of 95 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in comparison with associated flares and filament eruptions. We found that CMEs associated with flares reveal on average significantly higher peak accelerations and lower acceleration phase durations, initiation heights, and heights, at which they reach their peak velocities and peak accelerations. This means that CMEs that are associated with flares are characterized by higher and more impulsive accelerations and originate from lower in the corona where the magnetic field is stronger. For CMEs that are associated with filament eruptions we found only for the CME peak acceleration significantly lower values than for events that were not associated with filament eruptions. The flare rise time was found to be positively correlated with the CME acceleration duration and negatively correlated with the CME peak acceleration. For the majority of the events the CME acceleration starts before the flare onset (for 75% of the events) and the CME acceleration ends after the soft X-ray (SXR) peak time (for 77% of the events). In {approx}60% of the events, the time difference between the peak time of the flare SXR flux derivative and the peak time of the CME acceleration is smaller than {+-}5 minutes, which hints at a feedback relationship between the CME acceleration and the energy release in the associated flare due to magnetic reconnection.

Bein, B. M.; Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Temmer, M. [Kanzelhoehe Observatory-IGAM, Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vrsnak, B. [Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Kaciceva 26, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. I. FLARES AND EARLY SHALLOW-DECAY COMPONENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well-sampled optical light curves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are compiled from the literature. By empirical fitting, we identify eight possible emission components and summarize the results in a 'synthetic' light curve. Both optical flare and early shallow-decay components are likely related to long-term central engine activities. We focus on their statistical properties in this paper. Twenty-four optical flares are obtained from 19 GRBs. The isotropic R-band energy is smaller than 1% of E{sub {gamma},iso}. The relation between the isotropic luminosities of the flares and gamma rays follows L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.11{+-}0.27}{sub {gamma},iso}. Later flares tend to be wider and dimmer, i.e., w{sup F} {approx} t{sup F}{sub p}/2 and L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}[t{sup F}{sub p}/(1 + z)]{sup -1.15{+-}0.15}. The detection probability of the optical flares is much smaller than that of X-ray flares. An optical shallow-decay segment is observed in 39 GRBs. The relation between the break time and break luminosity is a power law, with an index of -0.78 {+-} 0.08, similar to that derived from X-ray flares. The X-ray and optical breaks are usually chromatic, but a tentative correlation is found. We suggest that similar to the prompt optical emission that tracks {gamma}-rays, the optical flares are also related to the erratic behavior of the central engine. The shallow-decay component is likely related to a long-lasting spinning-down central engine or piling up of flare materials onto the blast wave. Mixing of different emission components may be the reason for the diverse chromatic afterglow behaviors.

Li Liang; Liang Enwei; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Xi Shaoqiang; Zhang Bing; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Lue Houjun; Gao He [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Yi Shuangxi, E-mail: lew@gxu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [College of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Nanning University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE SUDDEN CHANGE OF THE LORENTZ FORCE AND THE MAGNITUDE OF ASSOCIATED FLARES  

SciTech Connect

The rapid and irreversible change of photospheric magnetic fields associated with flares has been confirmed by many recent studies. These studies showed that the photospheric magnetic fields respond to coronal field restructuring and turn to a more horizontal state near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) after eruptions. Recent theoretical work has shown that the change in the Lorentz force associated with a magnetic eruption will lead to such a field configuration at the photosphere. The Helioseismic Magnetic Imager has been providing unprecedented full-disk vector magnetograms covering the rising phase of the solar cycle 24. In this study, we analyze 18 flares in four active regions, with GOES X-ray class ranging from C4.7 to X5.4. We find that there are permanent and rapid changes of magnetic field around the flaring PIL, the most notable of which is the increase of the transverse magnetic field. The changes of fields integrated over the area and the derived change of Lorentz force both show a strong correlation with flare magnitude. It is the first time that such magnetic field changes have been observed even for C-class flares. Furthermore, for seven events with associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we use an estimate of the impulse provided by the Lorentz force, plus the observed CME velocity, to estimate the CME mass. We find that if the timescale of the back reaction is short, i.e., in the order of 10 s, the derived values of CME mass ({approx}10{sup 15} g) generally agree with those reported in literature.

Wang Shuo; Liu Chang; Wang Haimin, E-mail: shuo.wang@njit.edu [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

THE MECHANISMS FOR THE ONSET AND EXPLOSIVE ERUPTION OF CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND ERUPTIVE FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the onset and acceleration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and eruptive flares. To isolate the eruption physics, our study uses the breakout model, which is insensitive to the energy buildup process leading to the eruption. We performed 2.5D simulations with adaptive mesh refinement that achieved the highest overall spatial resolution to date in a CME/eruptive flare simulation. The ultra-high resolution allows us to separate clearly the timing of the various phases of the eruption. Using new computational tools, we have determined the number and evolution of all X- and O-type nulls in the system, thereby tracking both the progress and the products of reconnection throughout the computational domain. Our results show definitively that CME onset is due to the start of fast reconnection at the breakout current sheet. Once this reconnection begins, eruption is inevitable; if this is the only reconnection in the system, however, the eruption will be slow. The explosive CME acceleration is triggered by fast reconnection at the flare current sheet. Our results indicate that the explosive eruption is caused by a resistive instability, not an ideal process. Moreover, both breakout and flare reconnections begin first as a form of weak tearing characterized by slowly evolving plasmoids, but eventually transition to a fast form with well-defined Alfvenic reconnection jets and rapid flux transfer. This transition to fast reconnection is required for both CME onset and explosive acceleration. We discuss the key implications of our results for CME/flare observations and for theories of magnetic reconnection.

Karpen, J. T.; Antiochos, S. K. [Code 674, NASA GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. R. [Code 6042, NRL, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

395

Engine Removal Projection Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion and the generation of electrical power. Past data is used to forecast the number of engine removals for the next ten years and determine engine down times between removals. Currently this is done via a FORTRAN program created in the early 1970s. This paper presents results of R&D associated with creating a new algorithm and software program. We tested over 60 techniques on data spanning 20 years from over 3100 engines and 120 ships. Investigated techniques for the forecast basis including moving averages, empirical negative binomial, generalized linear models, Cox regression, and Kaplan Meier survival curves, most of which are documented in engineering, medical and scientific research literature. We applied those techniques to the data, and chose the best algorithm based on its performance on real-world data. The software uses the best algorithm in combination with user-friendly interfaces and intuitively understandable displays. The user can select a specific engine type, forecast time period, and op-tempo. Graphical displays and numerical tables present forecasts and uncertainty intervals. The technology developed for the project is applicable to other logistic forecasting challenges.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Matzke, Brett D.; Wilson, John E.; Sharp, Julia L.; Greitzer, Frank L.

2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

Urban, P.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Pneumatic soil removal tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A soil tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator value mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

Neuhaus, J.F.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

398

OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE QUASI-PERIODIC FAST-PROPAGATING MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND THE ASSOCIATED FLARE ON 2011 MAY 30  

SciTech Connect

On 2011 May 30, quasi-periodic fast-propagating (QFP) magnetosonic waves accompanied by a C2.8 flare were directly imaged by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The QFP waves successively emanated from the flare kernel, they propagated along a cluster of open coronal loops with a phase speed of {approx}834 km s{sup -1} during the flare's rising phase, and the multiple arc-shaped wave trains can be fitted with a series of concentric circles. We generate the k - {omega} diagram of the Fourier power and find a straight ridge that represents the dispersion relation of the waves. Along the ridge, we find a lot of prominent nodes which represent the available frequencies of the QFP waves. On the other hand, the frequencies of the flare are also obtained by analyzing the flare light curves using the wavelet technique. The results indicate that almost all the main frequencies of the flare are consistent with those of the QFP waves. This suggests that the flare and the QFP waves were possibly excited by a common physical origin. On the other hand, a few low frequencies (e.g., 2.5 mHz (400 s) and 0.7 mHz (1428 s)) revealed by the k - {omega} diagram cannot be found in the accompanying flare. We propose that these low frequencies were possibly due to the leakage of the pressure-driven p-mode oscillations from the photosphere into the low corona, which should be a noticeable mechanism for driving the QFP waves observed in the corona.

Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

ABRUPT CHANGES OF THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD IN ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

We compared time profiles of changes of the unsigned photospheric magnetic flux in active regions with those of their associated soft X-ray (SXR) bursts for a sample of 75 {>=} M5 flares well observed by Global Oscillation Network Group longitudinal magnetographs. Sixty-six of these events had stepwise changes in the spatially integrated unsigned flux during the SXR flares. In superposed epoch plots for these 66 events, there is a sharp increase in the unsigned magnetic flux coincident with the onset of the flare impulsive phase while the end of the stepwise change corresponds to the time of peak SXR emission. We substantiated this result with a histogram-based comparison of the timing of flux steps (onset, midpoint of step, and end) for representative points in the flaring regions with their associated SXR event time markers (flare onset, onset of impulsive phase, time of peak logarithmic derivative, maximum). On an individual event basis, the principal part of the stepwise magnetic flux change occurred during the main rise phase of the SXR burst (impulsive phase onset to SXR peak) for {approx}60% of the 66 cases. We find a close timing agreement between magnetic flux steps and >100 keV emission for the three largest hard X-ray (>100 keV) bursts in our sample. These results identify the abrupt changes in photospheric magnetic fields as an impulsive phase phenomenon and indicate that the coronal magnetic field changes that drive flares are rapidly transmitted to the photosphere.

Cliver, E. W. [Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ling, A. G. [Atmospheric Environmental Research, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Preliminary summary of the observations of the 16 February 1984 solar flare (STIP interval XV, 12-21 February 1984)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar flare on 16 Feb. 1984 (0900 UT) and the associated photon and particle emissions were perhaps the most interesting solar and interplanetary phenomena during STIP Interval XV, 12 to 21 Feb. 1984. The x-ray and microwave radio emissions, as observed from the Earth, were relatively weak and no optical flare was reported. However, the hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray observations made with the Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft behind the west limb of the Sun indicate that the flare was, in reality, very intense. There is evidence that the flare was located approx 40 deg behind the west limb of the Sun and hence, for instruments located near the Earth, the most intense parts of the x-ray and microwave radio sources were occulted by the photosphere. However, the effect of occultation on the metric type II, type III, and type IV and decimetric (type DCIM) radio sources appeared to be relatively small. Following the flare, a large increase in the counting rates was recorded by several ground level neutron monitors and energetic particle detectors located in interplanetary space. A preliminary analysis of the 16 Feb. 1984 flare observations follows.

Kane, S.R.; Urbarz, H.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

The Role of Magnetic Fields in Transient Seismic Emission Driven by Atmospheric Heating in Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physics of transient seismic emission in flares remains largely mysterious. Its discoverers proposed that these "sunquakes" are the signature of a shock driven by "thick-target heating" of the flaring chromosphere. H-{\\alpha} observations show evidence for such a shock. However, simulations of shocks driven by impulsive chromospheric heating show withering radiative losses as the shock proceeds downward. The compression of the shocked gas heats and increases its density, making it more radiative. So, radiative losses increase radically with the strength of the shock. This has introduced doubt that sufficient energy from such a shock can penetrate into the solar interior to match that indicated by the helioseismic signatures. We point out that simulations of acoustic transients driven by impulsive heating have no account for magnetic fields characteristic of transient-seismic-source environments. These must have a major impact on the seismic flux conducted into the solar interior. A strong horizontal magne...

Lindsey, C; Oliveros, J C Martinez; Hudson, H S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Flare magnetic reconnection and relativistic particles in the 2003 October 28 event  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An X17.2 solar flare occurred on 2003 October 28, accompanied by multi-wavelength emissions and a high flux of relativistic particles observed at 1AU. We present the analytic results of the TRACE, SOHO, RHESSI, ACE, GOES, hard X-ray (INTEGRAL satellite), radio (Onderejov radio telescope), and neutron monitor data. It is found that the inferred magnetic reconnection electric field correlates well with the hard X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron emission at the Sun. Thus the flare's magnetic reconnection probably makes a crucial contribution to the prompt relativistic particles, which could be detected at 1 AU. Since the neutrons were emitted a few minutes before the injection of protons and electrons, we propose a magnetic-field evolution configuration to explain this delay. We do not exclude the effect of CME-driven shock, which probably plays an important role in the delayed gradual phase of solar energetic particles.

C. Li; Y. H. Tang; Y. Dai; C. Fang; J. -C. Vial

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Measuring parameters of AGN central engines with very high energy gamma-ray flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a "compact source" model of very high energy (VHE) emission from blazars in which the variability time is determined by the blazar central engine. In this model electron or proton acceleration close to the supermassive black hole is followed by the development of electromagnetic cascade in a radiatively inefficient accretion flow. Assuming such a model for the TeV blazar PKS 2155-304, we show that the variability properties of the TeV gamma-ray signal observed during a bright flare from this source, such as the minimal variability time scale and the recurrence period of the sub-flares, constrain the mass and the angular momentum of the supermassive black hole.

Neronov, A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Power Laws in Solar Flares: Self-Organized Criticality or Turbulence?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the time evolution of Solar Flares activity by looking at the statistics of quiescent times $\\tau_{L}$ between successive bursts. The analysis of 20 years of data reveals a power law distribution with exponent $\\alpha \\simeq 2.4$ which is an indication of complex dynamics with long correlation times. The observed scaling behavior is in contradiction with the Self-Organized Criticality models of Solar Flares which predict Poisson-like statistics. Chaotic models, including the destabilization of the laminar phases and subsequent restabilization due to nonlinear dynamics, are able to reproduce the power law for the quiescent times. In the case of the more realistic Shell Model of MHD turbulence we are able to reproduce all the observed distributions.

Guido Boffetta; Vincenzo Carbone; Paolo Giuliani; Pierluigi Veltri; Angelo Vulpiani

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

405

MICROWAVE QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATION WITH MILLISECOND BURSTS IN A SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 AUGUST 9  

SciTech Connect

A peculiar microwave quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) accompanying a hard X-ray (HXR) QPP of about 20 s duration occurred just before the maximum of an X6.9 solar flare on 2011 August 9. The most interesting aspect is that the microwave QPP consists of millisecond timescale superfine structures. Each microwave QPP pulse is made up of clusters of millisecond spike bursts or narrowband type III bursts. There are three different frequency drift rates: the global frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse group, the frequency drift rate of the microwave QPP pulse, and the frequency drift rate of individual millisecond spikes or type III bursts. The physical analysis indicates that the energetic electrons accelerating from a large-scale highly dynamic magnetic reconnecting current sheet above the flaring loop propagate downward, impact the flaring plasma loop, and produce HXR bursts. The tearing-mode (TM) oscillations in the current sheet modulate HXR emission and generate HXR QPP; the energetic electrons propagating downward produce Langmuir turbulence and plasma waves, resulting in plasma emission. The modulation of TM oscillation on the plasma emission in the current-carrying plasma loop may generate microwave QPP. The TM instability produces magnetic islands in the loop. Each X-point will be a small reconnection site and will accelerate the ambient electrons. These accelerated electrons impact the ambient plasma and trigger the millisecond spike clusters or the group of type III bursts. Possibly, each millisecond spike burst or type III burst is one of the elementary bursts (EBs). A large number of such EB clusters form an intense flaring microwave burst.

Tan Baolin; Tan Chengming, E-mail: bltan@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road A20, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

407

MAGNETAR GIANT FLARES AND THEIR PRECURSORS-FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS WITH CURRENT SHEETS  

SciTech Connect

We propose a catastrophic magnetospheric model for magnetar precursors and their successive giant flares. Axisymmetric models of the magnetosphere, which contain both a helically twisted flux rope and a current sheet, are established based on force-free field configurations. In this model, the helically twisted flux rope would lose its equilibrium and erupt abruptly in response to the slow and quasi-static variations at the ultra-strongly magnetized neutron star's surface. In a previous model without current sheets, only one critical point exists in the flux rope equilibrium curve. New features show up in the equilibrium curves for the flux rope when current sheets appear in the magnetosphere. The causal connection between the precursor and the giant flare, as well as the temporary re-entry of the quiescent state between the precursor and the giant flare, can be naturally explained. Magnetic energy would be released during the catastrophic state transitions. The detailed energetics of the model are also discussed. The current sheet created by the catastrophic loss of equilibrium of the flux rope provides an ideal place for magnetic reconnection. We point out the importance of magnetic reconnection for further enhancement of the energy release during eruptions.

Yu Cong [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Huang Lei, E-mail: cyu@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: muduri@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

MODELING OF GYROSYNCHROTRON RADIO EMISSION PULSATIONS PRODUCED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC LOOP OSCILLATIONS IN SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative study of the observable radio signatures of the sausage, kink, and torsional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillation modes in flaring coronal loops is performed. Considering first non-zero order effect of these various MHD oscillation modes on the radio source parameters such as magnetic field, line of sight, plasma density and temperature, electron distribution function, and the source dimensions, we compute time-dependent radio emission (spectra and light curves). The radio light curves (of both flux density and degree of polarization) at all considered radio frequencies are then quantified in both time domain (via computation of the full modulation amplitude as a function of frequency) and in Fourier domain (oscillation spectra, phases, and partial modulation amplitude) to form the signatures specific to a particular oscillation mode and/or source parameter regime. We found that the parameter regime and the involved MHD mode can indeed be distinguished using the quantitative measures derived in the modeling. We apply the developed approach to analyze radio burst recorded by Owens Valley Solar Array and report possible detection of the sausage mode oscillation in one (partly occulted) flare and kink or torsional oscillations in another flare.

Mossessian, George; Fleishman, Gregory D. [Center For Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

EVOLUTION OF CURRENTS OF OPPOSITE SIGNS IN THE FLARE-PRODUCTIVE SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of a time series of high spatial resolution vector magnetograms of the active region NOAA 10930 available from the Solar Optical Telescope SpectroPolarimeter on board Hinode revealed that there is a mixture of upward and downward currents in the two footpoints of an emerging flux rope. The flux emergence rate is almost the same in both the polarities. We observe that along with an increase in magnetic flux, the net current in each polarity increases initially for about three days after which it decreases. This net current is characterized by having exactly opposite signs in each polarity while its magnitude remains almost the same most of the time. The decrease of the net current in both the polarities is due to the increase of current having a sign opposite to that of the net current. The dominant current, with the same sign as the net current, is seen to increase first and then decreases during the major X-class flares. Evolution of non-dominant current appears to be a necessary condition for flare initiation. The above observations can be plausibly explained in terms of the superposition of two different force-free states resulting in a non-zero Lorentz force in the corona. This Lorentz force then pushes the coronal plasma and might facilitate the magnetic reconnection required for flares. Also, the evolution of the net current is found to follow the evolution of magnetic shear at the polarity inversion line.

Ravindra, B. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Bhattacharyya, R., E-mail: ravindra@iiap.res.in, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in, E-mail: tiwari@mps.mpg.de, E-mail: ramit@prl.res.in [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

Correlation between Flux and Spectral Index during Flares in Sagittarius A*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flares in Sagittarius A* are produced by hot plasmas within a few Schwarzschild radii of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center. The recent detection of a correlation between the spectral index and flux during a near infrared (NIR) flare provides a means to conduct detailed investigations of the plasma heating and radiation processes. We study the evolution of the electron distribution function under the influence of a turbulent magnetic field in a hot collisionless plasma. The magnetic field, presumably generated through instabilities in the accretion flow, can both heat the plasma via resonant wave-particle coupling and cool the electrons via radiation. The electron distribution can generally be approximated as relativistic Maxwellian. To account for the observed correlation, we find that the magnetic field needs to be anti-correlated with the electron ''temperature''. NIR and X-ray light curves are produced for a cooling and a heating phase. The model predicts simultaneous flare activity in the NIR and X-ray bands, which can be compared with observations. These results can be applied to MHD simulations to study the radiative characteristics of collisionless plasmas, especially accretion flows in low-luminosity AGNs.

Jonathan M. Bittner; Siming Liu; Christopher L. Fryer; Vahe Petrosian

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

86 GHz polarimetry of OVV1633+382 after a major mm flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 18 mag QSO 1633+382 (4C38.41, z=1.807) showed a very pronounced outburst in 2001/2002. With a peak amplitude of more than 9 Jy at 90GHz, this flare was brighter than any known previous flare in this source (data available since 1980).During onset, the mm-flare was particulary fast, with an increase of more than 2 Jy at 230 GHz in less than 8 days. Since January 2002, the mm-flux of 1633+382 is decaying. During this decline, however, local flux variations with amplitudes of 1-3 Jy were seen, indicative of underlying and more rapid source activity on time scales of 1-2 months. After the main peak occurring in 2001.99, the 90 GHz flux showed secondary maxima at approximately half year intervals in 2002.3, 2002.7 and 2003.13. This kind of periodicity might be explained via the lighthouse model (Camenzind and Krockenberger 1992), which is based on the magnetic accelerator of Blanford and Payne (1982). At present the millimeter flux is nearly back to its quiescent level of 2-2.5 Jy, which the source had before ...

Sohn, B W; Agudo, I; Witzel, A; Zensus, J A; Ungerechts, H; Terasranta, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

An Experiment to Locate the Site of TeV Flaring in M87  

SciTech Connect

We describe a Chandra X-ray target-of-opportunity project designed to isolate the site of TeV flaring in the radio galaxy M87. To date, we have triggered the Chandra observations only once (2010 April) and by the time of the first of our nine observations, the TeV flare had ended. However, we found that the X-ray intensity of the unresolved nucleus was at an elevated level for our first observation. Of the more than 60 Chandra observations we have made of the M87 jet covering nine years, the nucleus was measured at a comparably high level only three times. Two of these occasions can be associated with TeV flaring, and at the time of the third event, there were no TeV monitoring activities. From the rapidity of the intensity drop of the nucleus, we infer that the size of the emitting region is of order a few light days x the unknown beaming factor; comparable to the same sort of estimate for the TeV emitting region. We also find evidence of spectral evolution in the X-ray band which seems consistent with radiative losses affecting the non-thermal population of the emitting electrons within the unresolved nucleus.

Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Massaro, F.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Cheung, C.C.; /Natl. Acad. Sci. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Horns, D.; Raue, M.; /Hamburg U.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Wagner, S.; /Heidelberg Observ.; Colin, P.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Mazin, D.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Wagner, R.; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Beilicke, M.; /McDonnell Ctr. Space Sci.; LeBohec, S.; Hui, M.; /Utah U.; Mukherjee, R.; /Barnard Coll.

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

SHORT-TERM SOLAR FLARE LEVEL PREDICTION USING A BAYESIAN NETWORK APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

A Bayesian network approach for short-term solar flare level prediction has been proposed based on three sequences of photospheric magnetic field parameters extracted from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager longitudinal magnetograms. The magnetic measures, the maximum horizontal gradient, the length of neutral line, and the number of singular points do not have determinate relationships with solar flares, so the solar flare level prediction is considered as an uncertainty reasoning process modeled by the Bayesian network. The qualitative network structure which describes conditional independent relationships among magnetic field parameters and the quantitative conditional probability tables which determine the probabilistic values for each variable are learned from the data set. Seven sequential features-the maximum, the mean, the root mean square, the standard deviation, the shape factor, the crest factor, and the pulse factor-are extracted to reduce the dimensions of the raw sequences. Two Bayesian network models are built using raw sequential data (BN{sub R}) and feature extracted data (BN{sub F}), respectively. The explanations of these models are consistent with physical analyses of experts. The performances of the BN{sub R} and the BN{sub F} appear comparable with other methods. More importantly, the comprehensibility of the Bayesian network models is better than other methods.

Yu Daren; Huang Xin; Hu Qinghua; Zhou Rui [Harbin Institute of Technology, No. 92 West Da Zhi Street, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province 150001 (China); Wang Huaning [National Astronomical Observatories, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Cui Yanmei, E-mail: huangxinhit@yahoo.com.c [Center for Space Science and Applied Research, No. 1 Nanertiao, Zhongguancun, Haidian District, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

X-ray flares observed from six young stars located in the region of star clusters NGC 869 and IC 2602  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of seven intense X-ray flares observed from six stars (LAV 796, LAV 1174, SHM2002 3734, 2MASS 02191082+5707324, V553 Car, V557 Car) for the first time. These stars are located in the region of young open star clusters NGC 869 and IC 2602. These flares detected in the XMM-Newton data show a rapid rise (10-40 minutes) and a slow decay (20-90 minutes). The X-ray luminosities during the flares in the energy band 0.3-7.5 keV are in the range of $10^{29.9}$ to $10^{31.7}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The strongest flare was observed with the ratio $\\sim 13$ for count rates at peak of the flare to the quiescent intensity. The maximum temperature during the flares has been found to be $\\sim$100 MK. The semi loop lengths for the flaring loops are estimated to be of the order of $\\rm{10^{10}}$ cm. The physical parameters of the flaring structure, the peak density, pressure, and minimum magnetic field required to confine the plasma have been derived and found to be consistent with flares from pre-main sequence s...

Bhatt, Himali; Singh, K P; Sagar, Ram; Kumar, Brijesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

An Extreme Solar Event of 20 January 2005: Properties of the Flare and the Origin of Energetic Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extreme solar and SEP event of 20 January 2005 is analyzed from two perspectives. Firstly, we study features of the main phase of the flare, when the strongest emissions from microwaves up to 200 MeV gamma-rays were observed. Secondly, we relate our results to a long-standing controversy on the origin of SEPs arriving at Earth, i.e., acceleration in flares, or shocks ahead of CMEs. All emissions from microwaves up to 2.22 MeV line gamma-rays during the main flare phase originated within a compact structure located just above sunspot umbrae. A huge radio burst with a frequency maximum at 30 GHz was observed, indicating the presence of a large number of energetic electrons in strong magnetic fields. Thus, protons and electrons responsible for flare emissions during its main phase were accelerated within the magnetic field of the active region. The leading, impulsive parts of the GLE, and highest-energy gamma-rays identified with pi^0-decay emission, are similar and correspond in time. The origin of the pi^0-decay gamma-rays is argued to be the same as that of lower energy emissions. We estimate the sky-plane speed of the CME to be 2000-2600 km/s, i.e., high, but of the same order as preceding non-GLE-related CMEs from the same active region. Hence, the flare itself rather than the CME appears to determine the extreme nature of this event. We conclude that the acceleration, at least, to sub-relativistic energies, of electrons and protons, responsible for both the flare emissions and the leading spike of SEP/GLE by 07 UT, are likely to have occurred simultaneously within the flare region. We do not rule out a probable contribution from particles accelerated in the CME-driven shock for the leading GLE spike, which seemed to dominate later on.

V. V. Grechnev; V. G. Kurt; I. M. Chertok; A. M. Uralov; H. Nakajima; A. T. Altyntsev; A. V. Belov; B. Yu. Yushkov; S. N. Kuznetsov; L. K. Kashapova; N. S. Meshalkina; N. P. Prestage

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

CRBRP decay heat removal systems  

SciTech Connect

The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

Hottel, R.E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C.E.; Kiley, M.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

MAGNETIC NON-POTENTIALITY OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS AND PEAK X-RAY FLUX OF THE ASSOCIATED FLARES  

SciTech Connect

Predicting the severity of solar eruptive phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections remains a great challenge despite concerted efforts to do so over the past several decades. However, the advent of high-quality vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP) has increased the possibility of meeting this challenge. In particular, the spatially averaged signed shear angle (SASSA) seems to be a unique parameter for quantifying the non-potentiality of active regions. We demonstrate the usefulness of the SASSA for predicting flare severity. For this purpose, we present case studies of the evolution of magnetic non-potentiality using 115 vector magnetograms of four active regions, namely, ARs NOAA 10930, 10960, 10961, and 10963 during 2006 December 8-15, 2007 June 3-10, 2007 June 28-July 5, and 2007 July 10-17, respectively. The NOAA ARs 10930 and 10960 were very active and produced X and M class flares, respectively, along with many smaller X-ray flares. On the other hand, the NOAA ARs 10961 and 10963 were relatively less active and produced only very small (mostly A- and B-class) flares. For this study, we have used a large number of high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained from Hinode (SOT/SP). Our analysis shows that the peak X-ray flux of the most intense solar flare emanating from the active regions depends on the magnitude of the SASSA at the time of the flare. This finding of the existence of a lower limit of the SASSA for a given class of X-ray flares will be very useful for space weather forecasting. We have also studied another non-potentiality parameter called the mean weighted shear angle (MWSA) of the vector magnetograms along with the SASSA. We find that the MWSA does not show such distinction as the SASSA for upper limits of the GOES X-ray flux of solar flares; however, both the quantities show similar trends during the evolution of all active regions studied.

Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay, E-mail: pvk@prl.res.i, E-mail: sgosain@prl.res.i [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Article removal device for glovebox  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article removal device for a glovebox is described comprising a conduit extending through a glovebox wall which may be closed by a plug within the glovebox, and a fire-resistant container closing the outer end of the conduit and housing a removable container for receiving pyrophoric or otherwise hazardous material without disturbing the interior environment of the glovebox or adversely affecting the environment outside of the glovebox. (Official Gazette)

Guyer, R.H.; Leebl, R.G.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 1,994 1,804 1,837 1,504 1,798 1,541 1,890 1,954 1,742 2,018 1,823 1,711 2002 1,661 1,512 1,693 1,728 1,794 1,738 1,809 1,820 1,523 1,433 1,667 1,714 2003 1,728 1,590 1,801 1,753 1,774 1,675 1,639 1,702 1,612 1,661 1,555 1,617 2004 1,554 1,465 1,600 1,544 1,566 1,463 1,536 1,508 1,194 1,301 1,336 1,339 2005 1,368 1,266 1,430 1,362 1,429 1,351 1,291 1,204 609 607 862 1,021

420

SPONTANEOUS CURRENT-LAYER FRAGMENTATION AND CASCADING RECONNECTION IN SOLAR FLARES. I. MODEL AND ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic reconnection is commonly considered to be a mechanism of solar (eruptive) flares. A deeper study of this scenario reveals, however, a number of open issues. Among them is the fundamental question of how the magnetic energy is transferred from large, accumulation scales to plasma scales where its actual dissipation takes place. In order to investigate this transfer over a broad range of scales, we address this question by means of a high-resolution MHD simulation. The simulation results indicate that the magnetic-energy transfer to small scales is realized via a cascade of consecutively smaller and smaller flux ropes (plasmoids), analogous to the vortex-tube cascade in (incompressible) fluid dynamics. Both tearing and (driven) 'fragmenting coalescence' processes are equally important for the consecutive fragmentation of the magnetic field (and associated current density) into smaller elements. At the later stages, a dynamic balance between tearing and coalescence processes reveals a steady (power-law) scaling typical of cascading processes. It is shown that cascading reconnection also addresses other open issues in solar-flare research, such as the duality between the regular large-scale picture of (eruptive) flares and the observed signatures of fragmented (chaotic) energy release, as well as the huge number of accelerated particles. Indeed, spontaneous current-layer fragmentation and the formation of multiple channelized dissipative/acceleration regions embedded in the current layer appear to be intrinsic to the cascading process. The multiple small-scale current sheets may also facilitate the acceleration of a large number of particles. The structure, distribution, and dynamics of the embedded potential acceleration regions in a current layer fragmented by cascading reconnection are studied and discussed.

Barta, Miroslav; Buechner, Joerg [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Karlicky, Marian; Skala, Jan, E-mail: barta@mps.mpg.de [Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, CZ-25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic)

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ANALYSIS AND MODELING OF TWO FLARE LOOPS OBSERVED BY AIA AND EIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze and model an M1.0 flare observed by SDO/AIA and Hinode/EIS to investigate how flare loops are heated and evolve subsequently. The flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images. The UV 1600 A emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Such behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit and the subsequent response in overlying coronal loops that evolve through different temperatures. Using the method we recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treating them as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, reasonably agree with observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend and their magnitudes are comparable by within a factor of two. Furthermore, we also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shift measurements by EIS during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different loops with different heating functions as inferred from their footpoint UV emission, combined with their different lengths as measured from imaging observations, give rise to different coronal plasma evolution patterns captured both in the model and in observations.

Li, Y.; Ding, M. D. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Qiu, J. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

VLBI OBSERVATION OF MICROQUASAR CYG X-3 DURING AN X-RAY STATE TRANSITION FROM SOFT TO HARD IN THE 2007 MAY-JUNE FLARE  

SciTech Connect

We present a radio observation of microquasar Cyg X-3 during an X-ray state transition from ultrasoft to hard state in the 2007 May-June flare using the VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry at 22 GHz. During the transition, a short-lived mini-flare of {approx}< 3 hr was detected prior to the major flare. In such a transition, a jet ejection is believed to occur, but there have been no direct observations to support it. An analysis of Gaussian fits to the observed visibility amplitudes shows a time variation of the source axis, or a structural change, during the mini-flare. Our model fits, together with other multiwavelength observations in the radio, soft, and hard X-rays, and the shock-in-jet models for other flaring activities at GHz wavebands, suggest a high possibility of synchrotron flares during the mini-flare, indicative of a predominant contribution from jet activity. Therefore, the mini-flare with an associated structural change is indicative of a jet ejection event in the state transition from ultrasoft to hard state.

Kim, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sang Joon [School of Space Science, Kyunghee University, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon-Wook [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kurayama, Tomoharu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan); Honma, Mareki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sasao, Tetsuo, E-mail: evony@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: skim@kasi.re.kr [Yaeyama Star Club, Ookawa, Ishigaki, Okinawa 904-0022 (Japan)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Bayesian approach to comparing theoretic models to observational data: A case study from solar flare physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar flares are large-scale releases of energy in the solar atmosphere, which are characterized by rapid changes in the hydrodynamic properties of plasma from the photosphere to the corona. Solar physicists have typically attempted to understand these complex events using a combination of theoretical models and observational data. From a statistical perspective, there are many challenges associated with making accurate and statistically significant comparisons between theory and observations, due primarily to the large number of free parameters associated with physical models. This class of ill-posed statistical problem is ideally suited to Baysian methods. In this paper, the solar flare studied by Raftery et al. (2008) is reanalysed using a Baysian framework. This enables us to study the evolution of the flare's temperature, emission measure and energy loss in a statistically self-consistent manner. The Baysian-based techniques confirm that both conductive and non-thermal beam heating play important roles i...

Adamakis, S; Walsh, R W; Gallagher, P T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Constraints on a strong X-ray flare in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss implications of a strong flare event observed in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 assuming that the emission is due to localized magnetic reconnection. We conduct detailed radiative transfer modeling of the reprocessed radiation for a primary source that is elevated above the disk. The model includes relativistic effects and Keplerian motion around the black hole. We show that for such a model setup the observed time-modulation must be intrinsic to the primary source. Using a simple analytical model we then investigate time delays between hard and soft X-rays during the flare. The model considers an intrinsic delay between primary and reprocessed radiation, which measures the geometrical distance of the flare source to the reprocessing sites. The observed time delays are well reproduced if one assumes that the reprocessing happens in magnetically confined, cold clouds.

R. W. Goosmann; B. Czerny; V. Karas; M. Dovciak; G. Ponti; M. Mouchet

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

The energy spectrum, time history, and IPN error ellipse of GRB051103, a possible extragalactic SGR giant flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GRB051103 is considered to be a candidate soft gamma repeater (SGR) extragalactic giant magnetar flare by virtue of its time history, localization, and energy spectrum. We have derived a refined interplanetary network localization for this burst which reduces the size of the error box by over a factor of two. We examine its time history for evidence of a periodic component, which would be one signature of an SGR giant flare, and conclude that this component is neither detected nor detectable under reasonable assumptions. We analyze the time-resolved energy spectra of this event with improved time- and energy resolution, and conclude that although the spectrum is very hard, its temporal evolution at late times cannot be determined, which further complicates the giant flare association.

Hurley, K; Perley, D; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshmann, K; Ohno, M; Yamaoka, K; Nakagawa, Y E; Smith, D M; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D M; Duncan, R C; Wigger, C; Hajdas, W; Atteia, J -L; Ricker, G; Vanderspek, R; Rau, A; Von Kienlin, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Constraints on a strong X-ray flare in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss implications of a strong flare event observed in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 assuming that the emission is due to localized magnetic reconnection. We conduct detailed radiative transfer modeling of the reprocessed radiation for a primary source that is elevated above the disk. The model includes relativistic effects and Keplerian motion around the black hole. We show that for such a model setup the observed time-modulation must be intrinsic to the primary source. Using a simple analytical model we then investigate time delays between hard and soft X-rays during the flare. The model considers an intrinsic delay between primary and reprocessed radiation, which measures the geometrical distance of the flare source to the reprocessing sites. The observed time delays are well reproduced if one assumes that the reprocessing happens in magnetically confined, cold clouds.

Goosmann, R W; Karas, V; Dovciak, M; Ponti, G; Mouchet, M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Neupert effect in solar flares and implications for coronal heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on simultaneous observations of solar flares in hard and soft X-rays we studied several aspects of the Neupert effect. About half of 1114 analyzed events show a timing behavior consistent with the Neupert effect. For these events, a high correlation between the soft X-ray peak flux and the hard X-ray fluence is obtained, being indicative of electron-beam-driven evaporation. However, for about one fourth of the events there is strong evidence for an additional heating agent other than electron beams. We discuss the relevance of these findings with respect to Parker's idea of coronal heating by nanoflares.

A. Veronig; B. Vrsnak; B. R. Dennis; M. Temmer; A. Hanslmeier; J. Magdalenic

2002-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HARD X-RAY PULSE TIMINGS AND THE LOCATIONS OF FOOTPOINT SOURCES DURING SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

The cause of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar flares remains the subject of debate. Recently, Nakariakov and Zimovets proposed a new model suggesting that, in two-ribbon flares, such pulsations could be explained by propagating slow waves. These waves may travel obliquely to the magnetic field, reflect in the chromosphere, and constructively interfere at a spatially separate site in the corona, leading to quasi-periodic reconnection events progressing along the flaring arcade. Such a slow wave regime would have certain observational characteristics. We search for evidence of this phenomenon during a selection of two-ribbon flares observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, and Transition Region and Coronal Explorer; the flares of 2002 November 9, 2005 January 19, and 2005 August 22. We were not able to observe a clear correlation between hard X-ray footpoint separations and pulse timings during these events. Also, the motion of hard X-ray footpoints is shown to be continuous within the observational error, whereas a discontinuous motion might be anticipated in the slow wave model. Finally, we find that for a preferential slow wave propagation angle of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign that is expected for the fastest waves, the velocities of the hard X-ray footpoints lead to estimated pulse periods and ribbon lengths significantly larger than the measured values. Hence, for the three events studied, we conclude that the observational characteristics cannot be easily explained via the Nakariakov and Zimovets propagating slow wave model when only angles of 25 Degree-Sign -28 Degree-Sign are considered. We provide suggested flare parameters to optimize future studies of this kind.

Inglis, A. R.; Dennis, B. R. [Solar Physics Laboratory, Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

430

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Indiana - Table 55 I n d i a n a 587,213 319,890 3.56 855 0.00 48 0.84 151,529 3.21 7,655 0.25 73,643 2.42 552,765 2.78 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Indiana, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 249 360 526 615 855 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 249 360 526 615 855 Repressuring ................................................ NA NA NA NA NA Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............... NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation ......................... 249 360 526 615 855 Vented and Flared........................................

431

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 72  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arkansas, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 7,606 3,460 3,462 R 3,814 4,773 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 157,039 176,221 180,969 R 262,911 262,905 From Oil Wells.............................................. 12,915 11,088 9,806 R 7,833 7,509 Total............................................................... 169,953 187,310 190,774 R 270,744 270,414 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 439 516 Vented and Flared.......................................... 354 241 241 R 12 11 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

432

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2007 76  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 32. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Colorado, 2003-2007 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year..... 18,774 16,718 22,691 20,568 22,949 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 970,229 1,002,453 1,038,739 1,101,361 1,093,695 From Oil Wells................................................. 51,065 87,170 105,247 113,035 160,833 Total.................................................................. 1,021,294 1,089,622 1,143,985 1,214,396 1,254,529 Repressuring ..................................................... 8,885 9,229 9,685 10,285 10,625 Vented and Flared............................................. 1,123 1,158 1,215 1,291 1,333 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

433

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 72  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arkansas, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 3,460 3,462 3,814 4,773 5,592 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 176,221 180,969 262,911 259,708 437,006 From Oil Wells.............................................. 11,088 9,806 7,833 7,509 7,378 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA NA 3,198 2,698 Total............................................................... 187,310 190,774 270,744 270,414 447,082 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 439 516 511 Vented and Flared.......................................... 241 241 12 11 20 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

434

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Montana, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 4,971 5,751 6,578 6,925 7,095 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 87,292 91,833 93,759 84,460 82,400 From Oil Wells.............................................. 10,546 16,722 20,278 23,092 22,995 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA NA 13,022 14,004 Total............................................................... 97,838 108,555 114,037 120,575 119,399 Repressuring .................................................. 5 9 19 6 6 Vented and Flared.......................................... 1,071 629 1,173 3,721 6,863 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

435

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGAla1109.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Indiana - Table 56 I n d i a n a 561,632 312,222 3.28 899 0.00 50 0.60 160,027 3.21 7,754 0.25 90,378 2.81 570,431 2.75 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Indiana, 1996-2000 Table 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 1,502 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 360 526 615 855 899 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 360 526 615 855 899 Repressuring ................................................ NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared........................................ NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation ......................... 360 526 615 855 899 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............

436

Average Residential Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

437

Average Commercial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

438

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Tennessee, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 400 430 280 400 330 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 1,793 Total............................................................... 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 1,793 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.......................................... NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation............................ 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 1,793 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

439

Microsoft Word - Table_72_2.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 2,752 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 72,189 71,545 71,543 76,915 81,086 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 72,189 71,545 71,543 76,915 81,086 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 72,189 71,545 71,543 76,915 81,086 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

440

Net Withdrawals of Natural Gas from Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flaring removing nonhydrocarbon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 14,750 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 76,770 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 76,770 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 76,770 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

442

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60 71 68 69 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 702 648 563 531 550 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,637 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 Total................................................................... 9,340 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,555 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,785 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

443

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2008 154  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Utah, 2004-2008 Number of Wells Producing at End of Year.. 3,657 4,092 4,858 5,197 5,578 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 259,432 279,412 322,848 276,634 337,924 From Oil Wells.............................................. 31,153 32,583 33,472 35,104 36,056 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA NA 73,623 67,619 Total............................................................... 290,586 311,994 356,321 385,361 441,598 Repressuring .................................................. 1,337 1,294 1,300 1,742 1,571 Vented and Flared.......................................... 688 595 585 1,005 1,285 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

444

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 3,785 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 Total............................................................... 3,785 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 3,785 3,474 3,525 2,954 2,845 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

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C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NewNGA02.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Indiana - Table 40 I n d i a n a 509,215 250,766 3.41 1,064 0.01 310 2.52 147,338 3.08 17,572 0.33 78,479 2.58 494,465 2.41 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Indiana, 1997-2001 Table 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,458 1,479 1,498 1,502 1,533 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 526 615 855 899 1,064 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 526 615 855 899 1,064 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation ......................... 526 615 855 899 1,064 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............