National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for flared na na

  1. 20Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONeApril 30,University Turbine Systems55MgNa

  2. 20Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONeApril 30,University Turbine Systems55MgNa

  3. NA60 Status Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usai, G

    2010-01-01

    This report shortly summarizes the main results obtained from the analysis of the NA60 data during 2010, perspectives for the analysis activity during 2011 and the requests to CERN following from them. In addition, renewed interest is expressed for a possible continuation of NA60, including future running at lower SPS energies.

  4. Report from NA49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katarzyna Grebieszkow; for the NA49 Collaboration

    2011-12-04

    The signatures of the onset of deconfinement, found by the NA49 experiment at low SPS energies, are confronted with new results from the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program at BNL RHIC and CERN LHC results. Additionally, new NA49 results on chemical (particle ratio) fluctuations, azimuthal angle fluctuations, intermittency of di-pions, etc. are presented.

  5. NA57 main results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Bruno; for the NA57 Collaboration

    2007-10-15

    The CERN NA57 experiment was designed to study the production of strange and multi-strange particles in heavy ion collisions at SPS energies; its physics programme is essentially completed. A review of the main results is presented.

  6. 20Na.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. 20Na_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONeApril 30,University Turbine Systems55MgNa

  8. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2015 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2015 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Arizona NA NA NA NA...

  9. Challenges for Na-ion Negative Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevrier, Vincent L.

    Na-ion batteries have been proposed as candidates for replacing Li-ion batteries. In this paper we examine the viability of Na-ion negative electrode materials based on Na alloys or hard carbons in terms of volumetric ...

  10. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Ya; Yu, Xiqian; You, Ya; Yin, Yaxia; Nam, Kyung -Wan

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. The Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  11. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmospheremore »during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.« less

  12. Sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content as a Na-rich cathode material for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    You, Ya; Yu, Xi -Qian; Yin, Ya -Xia; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Guo, Yu -Guo

    2014-10-27

    Owing to the worldwide abundance and low-cost of Na, room-temperature Na-ion batteries are emerging as attractive energy storage systems for large-scale grids. Increasing the Na content in cathode material is one of the effective ways to achieve high energy density. Prussian blue and its analogues (PBAs) are promising Na-rich cathode materials since they can theoretically store two Na ions per formula. However, increasing the Na content in PBAs cathode materials is a big challenge in the current. Here we show that sodium iron hexacyanoferrate with high Na content could be obtained by simply controlling the reducing agent and reaction atmosphere during synthesis. The Na content can reach as high as 1.63 per formula, which is the highest value for sodium iron hexacyanoferrate. This Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate demonstrates a high specific capacity of 150 mA h g-1 and remarkable cycling performance with 90% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Furthermore, the Na intercalation/de-intercalation mechanism is systematically studied by in situ Raman, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis for the first time. As a result, the Na-rich sodium iron hexacyanoferrate could function as a plenteous Na reservoir and has great potential as a cathode material toward practical Na-ion batteries.

  13. NA-80 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Operations Media Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NA-80 NA-8...

  14. NA-40 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Operations Media Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NA-40 NA-4...

  15. NA1 Sept | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at NNSA Blog Home content Social Media NA1 Sept NA1 Sept .@FrankKlotzNNSA gives a shout out to programs contributing to NNSA's enduring mission http:1.usa.gov1mUBgrn...

  16. NA1 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Working at NNSA Blog Home content Social Media NA1 NA1 Administrator's message to NNSA workforce on another impressive achievement-full copy here: http:1.usa.gov1teEgRy...

  17. Workforce Statistics - NA SH | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Workforce Statistics - NA SH Workforce Statistics - NA SH NA SH FY14 Year End...

  18. Workforce Statistics - NA 00 | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Workforce Statistics - NA 00 Workforce Statistics - NA 00 NA 00 FY14 Semi Annual...

  19. Threshold electron excitation of Na

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, B.; Wang, P.; Gallagher, A. )

    1992-09-01

    Electron collisional excitation of the 4{ital D}, 5{ital D}, 4{ital P}, and 6{ital S} states of Na has been measured with about 30-meV energy resolution. Very rapid, unresolved threshold onsets are seen for all but the 4{ital P} state, and a near-threshold resonance is suggested by the 5{ital D} data. However, only weak undulations in the cross sections are observed above threshold.

  20. The NA62 Experiment at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martellotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The main physics goal of the NA62 experiment at CERN is to precisely measure the branching ratio of the Kaon rare decay $K^+\\rightarrow \\pi^+ \

  1. Um novo paradigma na medicina DESENVOLVEU UMA METODOLOGIA DISRUPTIVA BASEADA NA INTEGRAO DE AVANADAS TECNOLOGIAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    as empresas 'start-up' que actu- am na área da biotecnologia, é expectável que a HeartGenetics venha

  2. NA GC - Office of General Counsel | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Blog Home About Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA GC - Office of General Counsel NA GC - Office of General Counsel...

  3. NA EA - Associate Administrator for External Affairs | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA EA - Associate Administrator for External Affairs NA EA - Associate...

  4. NA 80 - Associate Administrator for Counterterrorism andCounterprolif...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 80 - Associate Administrator for Counterterrorism ... NA 80 - Associate...

  5. NA 1 - Immediate Office of the Administrator | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 1 - Immediate Office of the Administrator NA 1 - Immediate Office of the...

  6. NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs NA 10 - Deputy Administrator for...

  7. NA 15 - Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 15 - Assistant Deputy Administrator for ... NA 15 - Assistant Deputy...

  8. NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 70 - Associate Administrator for Defense ... NA 70 - Associate Administrator...

  9. NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for Defense ... NA 20 - Deputy Administrator for...

  10. NA 40 - Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics NA 40 - Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations NA 40 - Associate...

  11. $^{24}$Mg($p$, $?$)$^{21}$Na reaction study for spectroscopy of $^{21}$Na

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Cha; K. Y. Chae; A. Kim; E. J. Lee; S. Ahn; D. W. Bardayan; K. A. Chipps; J. A. Cizewski; M. E. Howard; B. Manning; P. D. O'Malley; A. Ratkiewicz; S. Strauss; R. L. Kozub; M. Matos; S. D. Pain; S. T. Pittman; M. S. Smith; W. A. Peters

    2015-08-10

    The $^{24}$Mg($p$, $\\alpha$)$^{21}$Na reaction was measured at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to better constrain spins and parities of energy levels in $^{21}$Na for the astrophysically important $^{17}$F($\\alpha, p$)$^{20}$Ne reaction rate calculation. 31 MeV proton beams from the 25-MV tandem accelerator and enriched $^{24}$Mg solid targets were used. Recoiling $^{4}$He particles from the $^{24}$Mg($p$, $\\alpha$)$^{21}$Na reaction were detected by a highly segmented silicon detector array which measured the yields of $^{4}$He particles over a range of angles simultaneously. A new level at 6661 $\\pm$ 5 keV was observed in the present work. The extracted angular distributions for the first four levels of $^{21}$Na and Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) calculations were compared to verify and extract angular momentum transfer.

  12. New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with the performance of the original equations. The errors in the use of the new NaK equation for temperatures ranging from 80 to 350C vary from about 19 to 34%, which is lower...

  13. $^{24}$Mg($p$, $\\alpha$)$^{21}$Na reaction study for spectroscopy of $^{21}$Na

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cha, S M; Kim, A; Lee, E J; Ahn, S; Bardayan, D W; Chipps, K A; Cizewski, J A; Howard, M E; Manning, B; O'Malley, P D; Ratkiewicz, A; Strauss, S; Kozub, R L; Matos, M; Pain, S D; Pittman, S T; Smith, M S; Peters, W A

    2015-01-01

    The $^{24}$Mg($p$, $\\alpha$)$^{21}$Na reaction was measured at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to better constrain spins and parities of energy levels in $^{21}$Na for the astrophysically important $^{17}$F($\\alpha, p$)$^{20}$Ne reaction rate calculation. 31 MeV proton beams from the 25-MV tandem accelerator and enriched $^{24}$Mg solid targets were used. Recoiling $^{4}$He particles from the $^{24}$Mg($p$, $\\alpha$)$^{21}$Na reaction were detected by a highly segmented silicon detector array which measured the yields of $^{4}$He particles over a range of angles simultaneously. A new level at 6661 $\\pm$ 5 keV was observed in the present work. The extracted angular distributions for the first four levels of $^{21}$Na and Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) calculations were compared to verify and extract angular momentum transfer.

  14. Influence of Salt Purity on Na+ and Palmitic Acid Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Salt Purity on Na+ and Palmitic Acid Interactions Zishuai Huang, Wei Hua, Dominique of salt purity on the interactions between Na+ ions and the carboxylate (COO- ) head group of palmitic frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Ultrapure (UP) and ACS grade NaCl salts are used for aqueous

  15. Topical Review Voltage Dependence of the Na/K Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadsby, David

    Topical Review Voltage Dependence of the Na/K Pump R.F. Rakowski1 , D.C. Gadsby2 , P. De Weer3 1, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA Received: 2 August 1996/Revised: 13 September 1996 Introduction Whether Na/K pump & Rakowski, 1988). While it follows from first principles that the rate of net forward Na/K pumping must

  16. Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol K.C.C. Tse, D Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Available online 13 May 2007 Abstract The bulk etch rate for CR-39 in NaOH/ethanol accumulates on the surface of CR-39 detector during etching in NaOH/ethanol, which is absent during etching

  17. Theoretical Study of the Structural Evolution of a Na2FeMn(CN)6 Cathode upon Na Intercalation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkelman, Graeme

    Blue analog, NaxFeMn(CN)6, is a potential new cathode material for Na-ion batteries. During Na-sharing tetrahedra. INTRODUCTION Cathode materials for Li and Na batteries have attracted a great deal of interest for renewable energy applications.1-3 They are also of interest scientifically, owing to the rich chemistry

  18. Crnica I Encontro Solar na UDC O pasado mrcores 24 de abril tivo lugar na Praza da Fraga (Campus da

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraguela, Basilio B.

    Crónica I Encontro Solar na UDC O pasado mércores 24 de abril tivo lugar na Praza da Fraga (Campus da Zapateira) a primeira edición do Encontro Solar na UDC. Esta era a terceira das actividades exposición de aparellos solares, un obradoiro de gastronomía solar, un Roteiro solar pola UDC e un mercadiño

  19. Energy landscape of the reactions governing the Na deeply occluded state of the NaK-ATPase in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezanilla, Francisco

    Energy landscape of the reactions governing the Na deeply occluded state of the Na ubiquitous membrane protein in animal cells that uses the free energy of ATP hydrolysis to alterna- tively export 3Na from the cell and import 2K per cycle. This ex- change of ions produces a steady

  20. A new low-voltage plateau of Na?V?(PO?)? as an anode for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jian, Zelang; Sun, Yang; Ji, Xiulei

    2015-04-04

    A low-voltage plateau at ~0.3 V is discovered during the deep sodiation of Na?V?(PO?)? by combined computational and experimental studies. This new low-voltage plateau doubles the sodiation capacity of Na?V?(PO?)?, turning it into a promising anode for Na-ion batteries.

  1. O Grotesco na Dramaturgia de Ariano Suassuna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telles, Narciso

    2002-04-01

    excluídos de nossa história. Arte Armoriai é o canto que vem do povo e que volta ao povo melhor do que veio."1 Como podemos notar, Ariano se baseia na ideia de circularidade cultural para sua elaboração estética onde o teatro torna-se porta voz do... partir do espaço onde a ação ocorre. A praça pede um vocabulário específico que nesta obra ganha mais vitalidade pelo uso de expressões grosseiras, libertadora do riso cómico que Suassuna maneja com extremo conhecimento. ANDREZA: Você vá pra merda...

  2. NaWoTec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation,MeregNIFE BateriasInternationalNTTEA-030-07-05NaWoTec Jump

  3. FEiNA SCP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbH EFCFBA Franco Brasileira SAFEiNA SCP

  4. Office of Nuclear Material Integration (ONMI), NA-73

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    U.S. as well as Imports and Exports Jointly funded by the NRC & NNSA - Managed by NA-73 Fuel Cycle Facilities Conversion Enrichment Fuel Fabrication Power Reactors,...

  5. Propagac ~ao acustica em aguas profundas na presenca de massas d'aguas de mesoescala na costa sudoeste de Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    Propagac¸ ~ao ac´ustica em ´aguas profundas na presenc¸a de massas d'´aguas de mesoescala na costa trabalho baseia-se no estudo da propagac¸ ~ao sonora em ´aguas oce^anicas profundas na costa Portuguesa massa d'´agua de mesosescala. Mostraremos que tal massa d'´agua d´a origem `a um acoplamento entre dois

  6. ARTIGO INTERNET Portugal participa na maior experincia de fuso nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    NewsSearch ARTIGO INTERNET Portugal participa na maior experiência de fusão nuclear in http experiência de fusão nuclear Portugal tem a quarta participação mais importante nas campanhas experimentais do maior reactor experimental de fusão nuclear actualmente em operação na Terra, o tokamak JET. A seguir à

  7. Analytical Potential Energy Surface for the Na + HF NaF + H reaction: Application of Conventional Transition-State Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analytical Potential Energy Surface for the Na + HF NaF + H reaction: Application of Conventional Transition-State Theory Alessandra F. A. Vilela, Ricardo Gargano a Patr´icia R.P. Barreto b a Instituto de from calculation of the rate constant using con- ventional Transition State Theory (TST

  8. Direct measurements of 22Na(p,g)23Mg resonances and consequences for 22Na production in classical novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Sallaska; C. Wrede; A. Garcia; D. W. Storm; T. A. D. Brown; C. Ruiz; K. A. Snover; D. F. Ottewell; L. Buchmann; C. Vockenhuber; D. A. Hutcheon; J. A. Caggiano

    2010-09-24

    The radionuclide 22Na is a potential astronomical observable that is expected to be produced in classical novae in quantities that depend on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Na(p,g)23Mg reaction. We have measured the strengths of low-energy 22Na(p,g)23Mg resonances directly and absolutely using a radioactive 22Na target. We find the strengths of resonances at E_p = 213, 288, 454, and 610 keV to be higher than previous measurements by factors of 2.4 to 3.2, and we exclude important contributions to the rate from proposed resonances at E_p = 198, 209, and 232 keV. The 22Na abundances expected in the ejecta of classical novae are reduced by a factor of ~ 2.

  9. Scintillation efficiency measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) below the DAMA/LIBRA energy threshold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingke; Calaprice, Frank; Westerdale, Shawn; Froborg, Francis; Suerfu, Burkhant; Alexander, Thomas; Aprahamian, Ani; Back, Henning O; Casarella, Clark; Fang, Xiao; Gupta, Yogesh K; Ianni, Aldo; Lamere, Edward; Lippincott, W Hugh; Liu, Qian; Lyons, Stephanie; Siegl, Kevin; Smith, Mallory; Tan, Wanpeng; Kolk, Bryant Vande

    2015-01-01

    The dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal depends on the NaI(Tl) scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils. Previous measurements for Na recoils have large discrepancies, especially in the DAMA/LIBRA modulation energy region. We report a quenching effect measurement of Na recoils in NaI(Tl) from 3keV$_{\\text{nr}}$ to 52keV$_{\\text{nr}}$, covering the whole DAMA/LIBRA energy region for light WIMP interpretations. By using a low-energy, pulsed neutron beam, a double time-of-flight technique, and pulse-shape discrimination methods, we obtained the most accurate measurement of this kind for NaI(Tl) to date. The results differ significantly from the DAMA reported values at low energies, but fall between the other previous measurements. We present the implications of the new quenching results for the dark matter interpretation of the DAMA modulation signal.

  10. On the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg thermonuclear rate for 22Na production in novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadya A. Smirnova; Alain Coc

    2000-08-16

    Classical novae are potential sources of gamma-rays, like the 1.275 MeV gamma emission following 22Na beta decay, that could be detected by appropriate instruments on board of future satellites like INTEGRAL. It has been shown that the production of 22Na by novae is affected by the uncertainty on the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg rate and in particular by the unknown partial widths of the Ex = 5.714 MeV, J^pi = 2^+, 22Mg level. To reduce these uncertainties, we performed shell model calculations with the OXBASH code, compared the results with available spectroscopic data and calculated the missing partial widths. Finally, we discuss the influence of these results on the 21Na(p,gamma)22Mg reaction rate and 22Na synthesis.

  11. O3-type Na(Mn?.??Fe?.??Co?.??Ni?.??)O?: a quaternary layered cathode compound for rechargeable Na ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xi; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Wu, Di; Liu, Lei; Ceder, Gerbrand; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2014-12-01

    We report a new layered Na(Mn?.??Fe?.??Co?.??Ni?.??)O? compound with O3 oxygen stacking. It delivers 180 mAh/g initial discharge capacity and 578 Wh/kg specific energy density with good cycling capability at high cutoff voltage. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows a reversible structure evolution of O3-P3-O3'-O3'' upon Na de-intercalation. The excellent capacity and cycling performance at high cutoff voltage make it an important model system for studying the general issue of capacity fading in layered Na cathode compounds.

  12. NaIrO3—A Pentavalent Post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Bremholm; S Dutton; P Stephens; R Cava

    2011-12-31

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides.

  13. Cvicen s Web of Science Nalezen odpovdi na danou otzku

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cvicení s Web of Science · Nalezení odpovdi na danou otázku · jaké jsou soucasné poznatky o dané metodikou? · zacínat úvodem? · abstrakt nakonec · hlavní je alespo nco napsat! · https://web

  14. NOVO CENTRO DE INVESTIGAO NA REA CENTRO DE OCEANOGRAFIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    , estuários e zonas costeiras, até ao oceano aberto e mar profundo. Segundo Henrique Cabral, professor com Henrique Cabral, Portugal tem tido notoriedade na investigação ligada ao mar, «mas muitas vezes

  15. Multi-Wavelength Study of Flow Fields in Flaring Super Active Region NOAA 10486 Na Deng1, Yan Xu1,4, Guo Yang1, Wenda Cao2, Chang Liu1, Thomas R. Rimmele3, Haimin Wang1,2, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracking (LCT) techniques from intensity images in three wavelengths regions, i.e., G-Band (GB), White diagnostic for the evolution of magnetic fields in solar active regions. Subject headings: Sun: activity -- Sun: magnetic fields -- Sun: flares -- Sun: infrared -- Sun: photosphere -- sunspots 1. Introduction

  16. Beyond Conventional Cathode Materials for Li-ion Batteries and Na-ion Batteries Nickel fluoride conversion materials and P2 type Na-ion intercalation cathodes /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dae Hoe

    2013-01-01

    graphite negative electrode for lithium-ion batteries.batteries. The Na anode materials must not be overlooked since graphite-

  17. A new low-voltage plateau of Na3V2(PO4)(3) as an anode for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian, ZL; Sun, Y; Ji, XL

    2015-01-01

    A low-voltage plateau at similar to 0.3 V is discovered for the deep sodiation of Na3V2(PO4)(3) by combined computational and experimental studies. This new low-voltage plateau doubles the sodiation capacity of Na3V2(PO4)(3), thus turning it into a promising anode for Na-ion batteries.

  18. Complex microwave conductivity of Na-DNA powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kitano; K. Ota; A. Maeda

    2006-08-01

    We report the complex microwave conductivity, $\\sigma=\\sigma_1-i\\sigma_2$, of Na-DNA powders, which was measured from 80 K to 300 K by using a microwave cavity perturbation technique. We found that the magnitude of $\\sigma_1$ near room temperature was much larger than the contribution of the surrounding water molecules, and that the decrease of $\\sigma_1$ with decreasing temperature was sufficiently stronger than that of the conduction of counterions. These results clearly suggest that the electrical conduction of Na-DNA is intrinsically semiconductive.

  19. Investigation of thermonuclear $^{18}$Ne($?$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate via resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Y. Zhang; J. J. He; A. Parikh; S. W. Xu; H. Yamaguchi; D. Kahl; S. Kubono; P. Mohr; J. Hu; P. Ma; S. Z. Chen; Y. Wakabayashi; H. W. Wang; W. D. Tian; R. F. Chen; B. Guo; T. Hashimoto; Y. Togano; S. Hayakawa; T. Teranishi; N. Iwasa; T. Yamada; T. Komatsubara; Y. H. Zhang; X. H. Zhou

    2014-03-19

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction is thought to be one of the key breakout reactions from the hot CNO cycles to the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. In this work, the resonant properties of the compound nucleus $^{22}$Mg have been investigated by measuring the resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$. An 89 MeV $^{21}$Na radioactive beam delivered from the CNS Radioactive Ion Beam Separator bombarded an 8.8 mg/cm$^2$ thick polyethylene (CH$_{2}$)$_{n}$ target. The $^{21}$Na beam intensity was about 2$\\times$10$^{5}$ pps, with a purity of about 70% on target. The recoiled protons were measured at the center-of-mass scattering angles of $\\theta_{c.m.}$$\\approx$175.2${^\\circ}$, 152.2${^\\circ}$, and 150.5${^\\circ}$ by three sets of $\\Delta E$-$E$ telescopes, respectively. The excitation function was obtained with the thick-target method over energies $E_x$($^{22}$Mg)=5.5--9.2 MeV. In total, 23 states above the proton-threshold in $^{22}$Mg were observed, and their resonant parameters were determined via an $R$-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. We have made several new $J^{\\pi}$ assignments and confirmed some tentative assignments made in previous work. The thermonuclear $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate has been recalculated based on our recommended spin-parity assignments. The astrophysical impact of our new rate has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing x-ray burst calculations. We find that the $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate significantly affects the peak nuclear energy generation rate, reaction fluxes, as well as the onset temperature of this breakout reaction in these astrophysical phenomena.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration NaNotechNology Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration · NaNotechNology Roadmap Technology Area 10 Michael A-27 #12;Foreword NASA's integrated technology roadmap, including both technology pull and technology push state of this effort is documented in NASA's DRAFT Space Technology Roadmap, an integrated set

  1. Branching ratios for the beta decay of Na-21 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Towner, I. S.

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the beta-decay branching ratio for the transition from Na-21 to the first excited state of Ne-21. A recently published test of the standard model, which was based on a measurement of the beta-nu correlation ...

  2. High precision measurements of Na-26 beta(-) decay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinyer, GF; Svensson, CE; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, AN; Austin, RAE; Ball, GC; Chakrawarthy, RS; Finlay, P.; Garrett, PE; Hackman, G.; Hardy, John C.; Hyland, B.; Iacob, VE; Koopmans, KA; Kulp, WD; Leslie, JR; Macdonald, JA; Morton, AC; Ormand, WE; Osborne, CJ; Pearson, CJ; Phillips, AA; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, MA; Scraggs, HC; Schwarzenberg, J.; Smith, MB; Valiente-Dobon, JJ; Waddington, JC; Wood, JL; Zganjar, EF.

    2005-01-01

    High-precision measurements of the half-life and beta-branching ratios for the beta(-) decay of Na-26 to Mg-26 have been measured in beta-counting and gamma-decay experiments, respectively. A 4 pi proportional counter and fast tape transport system...

  3. Tecnologia de Agentes na Convergncia das Telecomunicaes com a Computao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    Tecnologia de Agentes na Convergência das Telecomunicações com a Computação Joaquim Croca Eng desafios considera-se o paradigma e a tecnologia dos agentes de software como uma aproximação adequada, com de recentes desenvolvimentos de tecnologias como o TINA-C, CORBA ou Web Services. Alguns

  4. Optimization of Automated Float Glass Lines Byungsoo Na, Shabbir Ahmed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir

    Optimization of Automated Float Glass Lines Byungsoo Na, Shabbir Ahmed , George Nemhauser and Joel flat glass products being manufactured on float glass lines. New technologies are allowing float glass manufacturers to increase the level of automation in their plants, but the question of how to effectively use

  5. Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite Discusses the impact of Na in biodiesel...

  6. Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat storage system for supercritical CO2 power cycles for concentrated solar power Title Analysis of a graphite foam-NaCl latent heat...

  7. Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

    2009-03-31

    This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

  8. ?-NaMnO2: a High Performance Cathode for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billaud, Juliette; Clément, Raphaële J.; Armstrong, A. Robert; Canales-Vázquez, Jesús; Rozier, Patrick; Grey, Clare P.; Bruce, Peter G.

    2014-11-14

    Na RF pulses were assumed to be selective for the 23Na central transition. 2.8. Chemical Analyses. Chemical analyses were per- formed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) emission spectroscopy. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 3.1. Electrochemistry... collapses when Na is extracted, and is then recovered when Na is reinserted, but with an increase in the proportion of twin boundaries. Despite these changes the electrochemistry is very stable on cycling, as shown in Figure 2. This is in contrast...

  9. Nac onal~na akadem nauk Ukra ni KONDENSOVANIH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tral~nih atom v operator energ h vza mod vz ti u vigl d mul~tipol~nogo r du 1], to v me ah kvantovo-Oppenge mera voni potenc al~- no energ dl centr v mas atom v qi efektivno m atomno vza mod . Zastosovu qi danu prit gann energ proporc na do R 6 (R - v dstan~ m atomami). kwo atomi toto n perebuva t~ v stanah z r

  10. Cosmogenic radionuclide production in NaI(Tl) crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Amaré; S. Cebrián; C. Cuesta; E. García; C. Ginestra; M. Martínez; M. A. Oliván; Y. Ortigoza; A. Ortiz de Solórzano; C. Pobes; J. Puimedón; M. L. Sarsa; J. A. Villar; P. Villar

    2015-01-16

    The production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials due to the exposure to cosmic rays on Earth surface can be an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions, typically performed deep underground. Production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in all the materials present in the experimental set-up, as well as the corresponding cosmic rays exposure history, must be both well known in order to assess the relevance of this effect in the achievable sensitivity of a given experiment. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators are being used in experiments aiming at the direct detection of dark matter since the first nineties of the last century, very few data about cosmogenic isotopes production rates have been published up to date. In this work we present data from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed in the frame of the ANAIS project, which were installed inside a convenient shielding at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory just after finishing surface exposure to cosmic rays. The very fast start of data taking allowed to identify and quantify isotopes with half-lives of the order of tens of days. Initial activities underground have been measured and then production rates at sea level have been estimated following the history of detectors; values of about a few tens of nuclei per kg and day for Te isotopes and 22Na and of a few hundreds for I isotopes have been found. These are the first direct estimates of production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in NaI crystals. A comparison of the so deduced rates with calculations using typical cosmic neutron flux at sea level and a carefully selected description of excitation functions will be also presented together with an estimate of the corresponding contribution to the background at low and high energies, which can be relevant for experiments aiming at rare events searches.

  11. Modeling the diffusion of Na+ in compacted water-saturated Na-bentonite as a function of pore water ionic strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourg, I.C.

    2009-01-01

    diffusion in compacted water- saturated sodium bentonite at2000. QINS studies of water diffusion in Na-montmorillonite.1996. Thermodynamic properties of water in compacted sodium

  12. Fairytale Cynicism in the Kingdom of Plastic Bags: Mapping Power and Powerlessness in Chelnochovsk-na-Dniestre, Ukraine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blank, Diana R.

    2003-01-01

    Chelnochovsk-na-Dniestre, Ukraine Diana R. Blank Berkeley PChelnochovsk-na-Dniestre, Ukraine Diana R. Blank Spring 2003emerging ethnography on Ukraine is based, and perhaps, in

  13. Inelastic processes in Na$^{+}-$Ne, Ar and Ne$^{+},$ Ar$^{+}-$Na collisions in energy range $0.5-14$ keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lomsadze, R A; Kezerashvili, R Ya

    2015-01-01

    Absolute cross sections for charge-exchange, ionization and excitation in Na$% ^{+}-$Ne and Na$^{+}-$Ar collisions were measured in the ion energy range $% 0.5-10$ keV using a refined version of a capacitor method, and collision and optical spectroscopy methods simultaneously in the same experimental set-up. Ionization cross sections for Ne$^{+}-$Na and Ar$^{+}-$Na collisions are measured at the energies of $2-14$ keV using a crossed-beam spectroscopy method. The experimental data and the schematic correlation diagrams are used to analyze and determine the mechanisms for these processes. For the charge-exchange process in Na$^{+}$ $-$Ar collisions two nonadiabatic regions are revealed and mechanisms responsible for these regions are explained. Structural peculiarity on the excitation function for the resonance lines of argon atoms in Na$^{+}$ $-$Ar collisions are observed and the possible mechanisms of this phenomenon are explored. The measured ionization cross sections for Na$^{+}-$Ne and Ne$^{+}-$Na collisi...

  14. National Conference on Mechanisms and Machines (NaCoMM07), IISc, Bangalore, India, December 12-13, 2007 NaCoMM-2007-60

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    ). Rotational input is provided to the crankshaft of the machine by a flexible coupling connected to an electric13th National Conference on Mechanisms and Machines (NaCoMM07), IISc, Bangalore, India, December 12-13, 2007 NaCoMM-2007-60 Synthesis and Analysis of a New Mechanism for Sheep Shearing Machine Vineet

  15. Characterization of H, Na-Y using amine desorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biaglow, A.I.; Parrillo, D.J.; Gorte, R.J. )

    1993-11-01

    The authors have examined series of partially ion-exchanged H, Na-Y zeolites using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of isopropylamine and n-propylamine in order to examine the acid sites in H-Y zeolites as a function of Na poisoning. Both amines desorbed from Na-Y, unreacted, below 500 K; however, samples containing protonic sites exhibited two additional desorption features. First, unreacted amine molecules were observed leaving the samples between [approximately] 500 and 600 K. Second, reaction features appeared which were observed as the simultaneous desorption of propene and ammonia between 575 and 650 K for isopropylamine and between 625 and 700 K for n-propylamine. For a given sample, the number of both isopropylene and n-propylamine molecules which desorbed in both features was identical. Furthermore, the number of molecules desorbing from the two high-temperature features was found to be equal to the number of protonic sites for the entire series, which indicates that both desorption features are associated with protonic sites. This finding was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, which also demonstrated that the unreacting desorption feature was associated with the low-frequency, hydroxyl stretch at 3540 cm[sup [minus]1] and that the reacting amine molecules was adsorbed at the high-frequency, hydroxyl stretch near 3640 cm[sup [minus]1]. The implications of these results for understanding the use of TPD-TGA of amines for the characterization of acidity is discussed. 30 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Standard Model Tests at the NA62 CERN Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bifani, Simone

    2010-02-10

    The physics program of the NA62 experiment aims to search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model by measuring the ratio R{sub K} (GammaK->ev{sub e}(gamma))/GAMMA(K->muv{sub mu}{sub (gamma)}) and studying the ultra rare decay K{sup +}->pi{sup +}vv-bar. The status of the R{sub K} analysis based on approx40% of the data collected during 2007 and 2008 is summarized and the proposed detector layout to measure the branching ratio of the K{sup +}->pi{sup +}vv-bar decay is described.

  17. MINOS Calibration and NA49 Hadronic Production Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, Robert James

    2003-08-01

    An overview of the current status of the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is presented. MINOS is a long-baseline experiment with two detectors situated in North America. The near detector is based at the emission point of the NuMI beam at Fermilab, Chicago, the far detector is 735 km downstream in a disused iron mine in Soudan, Minnesota. A third detector, the calibration detector, is used to cross-calibrate these detectors by sampling different particle beams at CERN. A detailed description of the design and construction of the light-injection calibration system is included. Also presented are experimental investigations into proton-carbon collisions at 158 GeV/c carried out with the NA49 experiment at CERN. The NA49 experiment is a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) based experiment situated at CERN's North Area. It is a well established experiment with well known characteristics. The data gained from this investigation are to be used to parameterize various hadronic production processes in accelerator and atmospheric neutrino production. These hadronic production parameters will be used to improve the neutrino generation models used in calculating the neutrino oscillation parameters in MINOS.

  18. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na?Ti?Sb?O

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, S. Y. [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Lab., Mianyang (China); Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Jiang, J. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China); Ye, Z. R. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Niu, X. H. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China); Song, Y. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Zhang, C. L. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Dai, P. C. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Xie, B. P. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China); Lai, X. C. [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Lab., Mianyang (China); Feng, D. L. [Fundan Univ., Shanghai (China); Nanjing Univ., Nanjing (China)

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na?Ti?Sb?O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na?Ti?Sb?O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na?Ti?Sb?O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV at 7 K, indicating that Na?Ti?Sb?O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)

  19. Photoemission study of the electronic structure and charge density waves of Na?Ti?Sb?O

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, S. Y.; Jiang, J.; Ye, Z. R.; Niu, X. H.; Song, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Dai, P. C.; Xie, B. P.; Lai, X. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2015-04-30

    The electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O single crystal is studied by photon energy and polarization dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). The obtained band structure and Fermi surface agree well with the band structure calculation of Na?Ti?Sb?O in the non-magnetic state, which indicates that there is no magnetic order in Na?Ti?Sb?O and the electronic correlation is weak. Polarization dependent ARPES results suggest the multi-band and multi-orbital nature of Na?Ti?Sb?O. Photon energy dependent ARPES results suggest that the electronic structure of Na?Ti?Sb?O is rather two-dimensional. Moreover, we find a density wave energy gap forms below the transition temperature and reaches 65 meV atmore »7 K, indicating that Na?Ti?Sb?O is likely a weakly correlated CDW material in the strong electron-phonon interaction regime. (author)« less

  20. Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol K.F. Chan, F.M.F. Ng, D. described the use of NaOH/ethanol as an etchant for the CR-39 detector, and have determined the corre and track etch properties of CR- 39 in NaOH/ethanol were derived from direct measurements. The bulk etch

  1. Influence of NaA Zeolite Crystal Expansion/Contraction on Zeolite Membrane Separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorenson, Stephanie G; Payzant, E Andrew; Gibbons, Will T; Soydas, Belma; Kita, Hidetoshi; Noble, Richard D; Falconer, John L.

    2011-01-01

    In-situ powder XRD measurements showed that the NaA zeolite unit cell contracts and expands upon adsorption, and these changes in zeolite crystal size correlate with permeation changes through NaA zeolite membranes. These membranes had high pervaporation selectivities, even though gas permeation was mainly through defects, as indicated by Knudsen selectivities for gases. At 300 K and a thermodynamic activity of 0.03, water contracted the NaA crystals by 0.22 vol%, and this contraction increased the helium flux through two NaA membranes by approximately 80%. Crystal contraction also increased the fluxes of i-butane during vapor permeation and i-propanol (IPA) during pervaporation (~ 0.03 wt% water). At activities above 0.07, water expanded NaA crystals and correspondingly decreased the membrane fluxes of helium, i-butane, and IPA. Similarly, methanol contracted NaA crystals by 0.05 vol% at an activity of 0.02, and this contraction slightly increased the helium and i-butane fluxes through a NaA membrane. Above an activity of 0.06, methanol expanded the crystals, and the fluxes of helium and i-butane through a NaA membrane decreased. The adsorbate-induced changes explain some pervaporation behavior reported by others, and they indicate that crystal expansion and contraction may increase or decrease zeolite NaA membrane selectivity by changing the defect sizes.

  2. High Energy Density Na-S/NiCl2 Hybrid Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Kim, Jin Yong; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-02-15

    High temperature (250-350°C) sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are attractive energy storage devices for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications. Currently, two technologies are commercially available in NBBs, e.g., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. In this study, we investigated the combination of these two chemistries with a mixed cathode. In particular, the cathode of the cell consisted of molten NaAlCl4 as a catholyte and a mixture of Ni, NaCl and Na2S as active materials. During cycling, two reversible plateaus were observed in cell voltage profiles, which matched electrochemical reactions for Na-S and Na-NiCl2 redox couples. An irreversible reaction between sulfur species and Ni was identified during initial charge at 280°C, which caused a decrease in cell capacity. The final products on discharge included Na2Sn with 1< n < 3, which differed from Na2S3 found in traditional Na-S battery. Reduction of sulfur in the mixed cathode led to an increase in overall energy density over ZEBRA batteries. Despite of the initial drop in cell capacity, the mixed cathode demonstrated relatively stable cycling with more than 95% of capacity retained over 60 cycles under 10mA/cm2. Optimization of the cathode may lead to further improvements in battery performance.

  3. PERFORMANCE OF SODIUM-BETA ALUMINA SOLID ELECTROLYTE IN Na/S CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2014-01-01

    SODIUM-BETA ALUMINA SOLID ELECTROLYTE IN Na/S CELLS Lutgardium-be ta alumina type solid electrolytes i s limit ed by

  4. Electrochemical reactions in a pure Na2SO4 melt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, W.C.; Rapp, R.A.

    1983-12-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry were used to study the electrochemical reduction reactions of SO3 gas O2 and SO4S ions in a Na2SO4 melt at 900C. The reduction reaction of SO3 follows a ce mechanism: SO3 first reacts chemically with SO4S to form S2O7S and then proceeds via a one-electron electrochemical reduction reaction to form SO3 . The reduction of peroxide O2 ions forms either OS or both OS and superoxide O2S ions. Sulfate ions are subjected to decomposition at either very positive or very negative potentials. At very high positive potentials, sulfate ions decompose to evolve SO2 and O2 gases, in addition superoxide ions are also formed. At very negative potentials, sulfate ions decompose to form sulfide and peroxide. 24 references, 11 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Measurement of (n,a) reactions on 147 Sm using a lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Measurement of (n,a) reactions on 147 Sm and 149 Sm using a lead slowing-down spectrometer J December 2011 Accepted 4 January 2012 Available online 12 January 2012 Keywords: (n,a) Lead slowing-down spectrometer Digitizer Compensated detectors Samarium Sm-147 Sm-149 a b s t r a c t The lead slowing

  6. Prmyslov implikace vsledk projektu ,,Tvorba nanovrstev a nano-povlak na textilich s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savicky, Petr

    plazmových povrchových úprav za atmosférického tlaku" Mirko Cernák Regionální VaV centrum pro nízkonákladové za atmosférického tlaku pi nízkých cenách a krátkých expozicních casech (ádov 0,1 s) Kolektiv na plazmatu generovaného za atmosférického tlaku pro tvorbu nanovrstev a nanopovlak na povrchu textilních

  7. Na K -pump ligands modulate gating of palytoxin-induced ion channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadsby, David

    Na K -pump ligands modulate gating of palytoxin-induced ion channels Pablo Artigas and David C (received for review September 26, 2002) The Na K pump is a ubiquitous P-type ATPase that binds three -ion occlusion to phosphorylation of the pump by ATP and of K -ion occlusion to its dephosphorylation

  8. Astrocytes generate Na -mediated metabolic waves Yann Bernardinelli*, Pierre J. Magistretti*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eric A.

    Astrocytes generate Na -mediated metabolic waves Yann Bernardinelli*, Pierre J. Magistretti waves. Here we show that intercellular Na waves are also evoked by activation of single cultured cortical mouse astrocytes in parallel with Ca2 waves; however, there are spatial and temporal differences

  9. Hydrogen bond dynamics in aqueous NaBr solutions Sungnam Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen bond dynamics in aqueous NaBr solutions Sungnam Park and M. D. Fayer§ Department. D. Fayer, August 19, 2007 (sent for review July 27, 2007) Hydrogen bond dynamics of water in Na pump­probe experiments. The hydrogen bond structural dynamics are observed by measuring spectral

  10. Casos de Estudo com a Bolsa de Objectos de Aprendizagem: Anlise na Perspectiva da Computao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

    baseia-se na metáfora da "bolsa de valores" em que o valor dos OA pode variar consoante a suaCasos de Estudo com a Bolsa de Objectos de Aprendizagem: Análise na Perspectiva da Computação propor o sistema BOA (Bolsa de Objectos de Aprendizagem) como uma plataforma de Objectos de Aprendizagem

  11. A New Rhenanite ( -NaCaPO4) and Hydroxyapatite Biphasic Biomaterial for Skeletal Repair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    A New Rhenanite ( -NaCaPO4) and Hydroxyapatite Biphasic Biomaterial for Skeletal Repair Sahil Abstract: Biphasic -rhenanite ( -NaCaPO4)­hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) biomaterials were prepared% rhenanite) biomaterials, while retaining their submicron particle sizes and high surface areas. -rhenanite

  12. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, and scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.

  13. The (111) Surface of NaAu2. Structure, Composition, and Stability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kwolek, Emma J.; Widmer, Roland; Gröning, Oliver; Deniz, Okan; Walen, Holly; Yuen, Chad D.; Huang, Wenyu; Schlagel, Deborah L.; Wallingford, Mark; Thiel, Patricia A.

    2014-12-17

    The (111) surface of single-crystal NaAu2 is a model for catalytically active, powdered NaAu2. We prepare and characterize this surface with a broad suite of techniques. Preparation in ultrahigh vacuum consists of the traditional approach of ion bombardment (to remove impurities) and thermal annealing (to restore surface order). Both of these steps cause loss of sodium (Na), and repeated treatments eventually trigger conversion of the surface and near-surface regions to crystalline gold. The bulk has a limited ability to repopulate the surface Na. Under conditions where Na depletion is minimized, electron diffraction patterns are consistent with the bulk-terminated structure, andmore »scanning tunneling microscopy reveals mesa-like features with lateral dimensions of a few tens of nanometers. The tops of the mesas do not possess fine structure characteristic of a periodic lattice, suggesting that the surface layer is disordered under the conditions of these experiments.« less

  14. Electrochemistry of FeSO4-Na2S2O3 and CuSO4-Na2S2O3 Systems for Template-Assisted Nanowire Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brogan, Lee Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    3 Electrochemistry of Aqueous Na 2 S 2 O 3 Behavior ofElectrochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Electrochemistry of Aqueous CuSO 4 and Na 2 S 2 O 3

  15. Der Briefwechsel zwischen Sidonie Na?dherny? und Albert Bloch : September 1947-September 1950 : mit einer Einfu?hrung in die Widmungsgedichte von Karl Kraus an Sidonie Na?dherny?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champion, Elke Lorenz

    1998-01-01

    Die Aufgabe dieser Arbeit besteht darin, Sidonie Na?dherny? Einfluß auf das Werk von Karl Kraus, vor allem auf seine Lyrik, an Hand der Albert Bloch/Sidonie Na?dherny?-Korrespondenz auszuwerten. Neben den eigentlichen ...

  16. FY14 Annual Report for NA-22 Project LA14-FY14-027-PD2Jb "Developing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NA-22 Project LA14-FY14-027-PD2Jb "Developing Accurate Simulations of Correlated Data in Fission Events" Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FY14 Annual Report for NA-22...

  17. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  18. Continental outflow from the US to the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic during the NASA INTEX-NA Airborne Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S. Y; Talbot, R.; Mao, H.; Blake, D.; Vay, S.; Fuelberg, H.

    2008-01-01

    Flight 13 case study during the NASA INTEX-NA Campaign of13 case study during the NASA INTEX-NA Campaign phys. Res.13 case study during the NASA INTEX-NA Campaign Wang, C.

  19. A Parallel Programming Model for a Multi-FPGA Multiprocessor Manuel Alejandro Salda~na De Fuentes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshovos, Andreas

    A Parallel Programming Model for a Multi-FPGA Multiprocessor Machine by Manuel Alejandro Salda~na by Manuel Alejandro Salda~na De Fuentes #12;#12;A Parallel Programming Model for a Multi-FPGA Multiprocessor Machine Manuel Alejandro Salda~na De Fuentes Master of Applied Sciences Graduate Department of Electrical

  20. Non-oxidative reactions of propane on Zn/Na-ZSM5 Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Non-oxidative reactions of propane on Zn/Na-ZSM5 Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia* Department rates during propane conversion at 773 K on Zn/Na-ZSM5 are about ten times higher than on Zn/H-ZSM5 catalysts with similar Zn content. The total rate of propane conversion is also higher on Zn/Na-ZSM5

  1. MS SELECT na UK Compiled 22.5.2014 10:50:56 by Document Globe 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    158 00 Praha 5 Ing. Jií Dlouhý jiri.dlouhy(na)czp.cuni.cz 251 080 353 251 620 441 Centrum pro 220 653 CERGE Politických vz 7 111 21 Praha 1 Ing. Alexandr Krestovský alexandr.krestovsky(na)cerge-ei petr.heger(na)micr.cz 724 086 626 221 008 777 Fakulta humanitních studií U kíze 8 158 00 Praha 5

  2. ROLE OF THE Na,K-ATPase IN POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Anh-Nguyet Thi

    2008-07-31

    in exchange for 2 K + that are taken into the cell [2, 3]. The Na,K-ATPase plays a key role in numerous cell processes that depend directly or indirectly on the transmembrane gradients of Na + and K + . In this manner, the enzyme is essential... 5). 10 5. Establish the role of PC-1 in modulating the ouabain affinity and signaling function of the Na,K-ATPase (Chapter 6). 11 REFERENCES 1. Feraille, E. and A. Doucet, Sodium-potassium-adenosinetriphosphatase- dependent sodium transport...

  3. Tezaver slovenskega ljudskega jezika na Koroškem – dokaz živosti graške slavistike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karni?ar, Ludvik

    2010-02-01

    The article deals with the long-term dialectological project of creating a lexical inventory of the Slovene Volkssprache in Carinthia and presents some results of this project: the work on the Thesaurus (as of 2009 six volumes from A to K have been...Prispevek obravnava dolgoro?ni projekt inventarizacije slovenskega ljudskega jezika na avstrijskem Koroškem, ki je stekel pred tridesetimi leti na Inšitutu za slavistiko v Gradcu, in prikazuje v prvem delu napredovanje tezavra (do leta 2009 so bili izdani zvezki A do K, v pripravi je sedmi zvezek od L do M), v drugem pa kartografiranje posameznih diatopnih sinonimov na avstrijskem Koroškem....

  4. Recent results from NA44 and a review of HBT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacak, B.V.

    1995-04-01

    High energy heavy ion collisions provide the opportunity to create hadronic matter at high energy density and study its properties. In order to do this, one must characterize the collisions, ascertain the size and density of the hot system in the central region of the nucleus-nucleus system, and determine the energy density achieved. Furthermore, one needs to determine whether or not the system approaches equilibrium so thermodynamic descriptions may be used. One of the experimental tools available is the study of two-particle correlations to map the space-time extent of the system when the hadrons decouple. Other observables include the flow of energy and charged particles transverse to the beam and the rapidity distribution of protons to indicate the amount of stopping and randomization of the incoming energy. The transverse mass distributions of hadrons reflect the temperature of the system at freezeout and effects of radial expansion. The production ratios of different particles are related to the extent of chemical equilibrium reached in the collision and subsequent evolution of the hadron gas. The NA44 Experiment at CERN can address all of these observables, though here the author focus mainly on correlation measurements. Kaons and pions are emitted rather late in the evolution of a heavy ion collision, at the time of {open_quotes}freezeout{close_quotes} when the hadrons cease to interact. Their correlations reflect the space-time evolution of the later part of the collision. In addition to characterizing the collision, correlations can signal a phase transition as they measure the duration of hadronization and particle emission, which should be long in both a first- or second-order phase transition. Furthermore, correlation measurements offer an important tool to help disentangle effects of expansion from the freezeout temperature reflected in the single particle spectra.

  5. Course # Course Title Instructor Author (s) Title Edition Publisher ISBN MMAE100 Introduction to the Profession Clack, Gosz, Vural NO TEXT REQUIRED NO TEXT REQUIRED N/A N/A N/A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    or earlier Babcock & Wilcox Company 978-1-603-86021-5 (36th) MMAE426 (2) Nuclear, Fossil Fuel://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~kenneth-weston) 1st Free online N/A MMAE426 (3) Nuclear, Fossil Fuel, and Sustainable Energy Systems Ostrogorsky by Author Website Address TBD MMAE310 Fluid Mechanics with Lab Wark Munson, Young, Okiishi, & Huebach

  6. Multiwavelength monitoring of photofragment fluorescence after 193 nm photolysis of NaCl and NaOH. Application to measuring the sodium species released from coal at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, B.L.; Domazetis, G. (Herman Research Lab., Mulgrave (Australia)); Morrison, R.J.S. (Monash Univ., Clayton (Australia))

    1995-02-15

    Excimer laser photodissociation of gas-phase NaCl and NaOH, and monitoring of the subsequent Na photofragment fluorescence, are used to determine the concentration of the species in coal-derived gaseous environments. Detection limits lower than 1 ppb of NaCl have been achieved under atmospheric conditions using 193 nm photodissociation. It is shown that monitoring two Na emission wavelengths (at 819 and 589 nm) allows speciation between NaOH and NaCl in the gas phase. In particular, emission from the Na 3[sup 2]D levels (at 819 nm) has been unambiguously attributed to photodissociation of NaOH. This emission results from hot-band absorption of the excimer laser, and thus its intensity is temperature dependent and weaker than 3[sup 2]P (589 nm) emission. The technique has been applied to the detection of NaCl and NaOH released during the pyrolysis and gasification of samples of Loy Yang (Australian brown) coal. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Exploring the {sup 22}Ne(p,?){sup 23}Na reaction at LUNA and at HZDR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanna, Francesca [Dipartimento di fisica, Università di Genova, and INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 22}Ne(p,?){sup 23}Na reaction is involved in the hydrogen burning NeNa cycle. This determines the nucleosynthesis of the Ne and Na isotopes in the Red Giant Branch and Asymptotic Giant Branch phases of stellar evolution. In the energy range relevant for astrophysics (20 keV < E < 600 keV), the {sup 22}Ne(p,?){sup 23}Na reaction rate is highly uncertain because of the contribution of a large number of resonances never measured directly. A related study is under preparation at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, and it will cover the energy range 100 keV < E < 400 keV. Meanwhile, a measurement at higher energies (i.e. 436 keV) has been carried out at the Tandetron accelerator of the HZDR (Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf) in Germany. Some preliminary results will be presented.

  8. Esophageal desalination is mediated by Na+ exchanger-2 in the gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    Esophageal desalination is mediated by Na+ , H+ exchanger-2 in the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta Intestinal water transport Osmoregulation Chloride Esophageal desalination is a crucial step (-subunit), suggesting that esophageal desalination is less flexible in response to osmotic stress than

  9. Seismic Risk Assessment of Port Facilities Ung Jin Na, Samit Ray Chaudhuri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Seismic Risk Assessment of Port Facilities Ung Jin Na, Samit Ray Chaudhuri Faculty Advisor : Prof Estimation Methodology Applications (in progress) Port of Long Beach · Seismic Risk Assessment, Decision & Vertical movement, Settlement of Apron Seismic Vulnerability - quay Wall

  10. Supporting information for: Na-doped p-type ZnO , Faxian Xiu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zheng

    S1 Supporting information for: Na-doped p-type ZnO microwires Wei Liu1* , Faxian Xiu2 , Ke Sun1 flow was switched to argon followed by cooling to room temperature. After the growth, high-density Zn distribution of the Na Doped ZnO microwire 1.3 EDX line scans spectra #12;S3 Figure S3 a) a typical TEM image

  11. FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Goodman, Angela [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Ilton, Eugene [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Guthrie, George [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Bodnar, Robert [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2015-01-01

    Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) in saline reservoirs in sedimentary formations has the potential to reduce the impact of fossil fuel combustion on climate change by reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and storing the CO2 in geologic formations in perpetuity. At pressure and temperature (PT) conditions relevant to CCUS, CO2 is less dense than the pre-existing brine in the formation, and the more buoyant CO2 will migrate to the top of the formation where it will be in contact with cap rock. Interactions between clay-rich shale cap rocks and CO2 are poorly understood at PT conditions appropriate for CCUS in saline formations. In this study, the interaction of CO2 with clay minerals in the cap rock overlying a saline formation has been examined using Na+ exchanged montmorillonite (Mt) (Na+-STx-1) (Na+ Mt) as an analog for clay-rich shale. Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to discern mechanistic information for CO2 interaction with hydrated (both one- and two-water layers) and relatively dehydrated (both dehydrated layers and one-water layers) Na+-STx-1 at 35 C and 50 C and CO2 pressure from 0 5.9 MPa. CO2-induced perturbations associated with the water layer and Na+-STx-1 vibrational modes such as AlAlOH and AlMgOH were examined. Data indicate that CO2 is preferentially incorporated into the interlayer space, with relatively dehydrated Na+-STx-1 capable of incorporating more CO2 compared to hydrated Na+-STx-1. Spectroscopic data provide no evidence of formation of carbonate minerals or the interaction of CO2 with sodium cations in the Na+-STx-1 structure.

  12. Band gap engineering for graphene by using Na{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, S. J.; Lee, P. R.; Kim, J. G.; Ryu, M. T.; Park, H. M.; Chung, J. W., E-mail: jwc@postech.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-25

    Despite the noble electronic properties of graphene, its industrial application has been hindered mainly by the absence of a stable means of producing a band gap at the Dirac point (DP). We report a new route to open a band gap (E{sub g}) at DP in a controlled way by depositing positively charged Na{sup +} ions on single layer graphene formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface. The doping of low energy Na{sup +} ions is found to deplete the ?* band of graphene above the DP, and simultaneously shift the DP downward away from Fermi energy indicating the opening of E{sub g}. The band gap increases with increasing Na{sup +} coverage with a maximum E{sub g}?0.70?eV. Our core-level data, C 1s, Na 2p, and Si 2p, consistently suggest that Na{sup +} ions do not intercalate through graphene, but produce a significant charge asymmetry among the carbon atoms of graphene to cause the opening of a band gap. We thus provide a reliable way of producing and tuning the band gap of graphene by using Na{sup +} ions, which may play a vital role in utilizing graphene in future nano-electronic devices.

  13. Understanding internal backgrounds of NaI(Tl) crystals toward a 200~kg array for the KIMS-NaI experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adhikari, P; Choi, S; Ha, C; Hahn, I S; Jeon, E J; Joo, H W; Kang, W G; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, K W; Kim, N Y; Kim, S K; Kim, Y D; Kim, Y H; Lee, H S; Lee, J H; Lee, M H; Leonard, D S; Li, J; Oh, S Y; Olsen, S L; Park, H K; Park, H S; Park, K S; So, J H; Yoon, Y S

    2015-01-01

    The Korea Invisible Mass Search (KIMS) collaboration has developed low-background NaI(Tl) crystals that are suitable for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. With experience built on the KIMS-CsI programs, the KIMS-NaI experiment will consist of a 200~kg NaI(Tl) crystal array surrounded by layers of shielding structures and will be operated at the Yangyang underground laboratory. The goal is to provide an unambiguous test of the DAMA/LIBRA's annual modulation signature. Measurements of six prototype crystals show progress in the reduction of internal contaminations of radioisotopes. Based on our understanding of these measurements, we expect to achieve a background level in the final detector configuration that is less than 1~count/day/keV/kg for recoil energies around 2~keV. The annual modulation sensitivity for the KIMS-NaI experiment shows that an unambiguous 7$\\sigma$ test of the DAMA/LIBRA signature would be possible with a 600~kg$\\cdot$year exposure with this system.

  14. Magnetic structure of the low-dimensional magnet NaCu{sub 2}O{sub 2}: {sup 63,65}Cu and {sup 23}Na NMR studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadykov, A. F., E-mail: sadykov@imp.uran.ru; Gerashchenko, A. P.; Piskunov, Yu. V.; Ogloblichev, V. V.; Smol’nikov, A. G.; Verkhovskii, S. V.; Buzlukov, A. L.; Arapova, I. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Furukawa, Y. [Iowa State University, Ames Laboratory (United States); Yakubovskii, A. Yu. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Bush, A. A. [Moscow State Technical University of Radio Engineering, Electronics, and Automation (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-15

    The magnetic structure of a quasi-one-dimensional frustrated NaCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} magnet single crystal is studied by NMR. The spatial orientation of the planar spin spirals in the copper-oxygen Cu{sup 2+}-O chains is determined, and its evolution as a function of the applied magnetic field direction is analyzed.

  15. Ordered and disordered polymorphs of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O?: Honeycomb-ordered cathodes for Na-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Jeffrey; Wu, Lijun; Bo, Shou -Hang; Khalifah, Peter G.; Grey, Clare P.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-04-14

    Na-ion batteries are appealing alternatives to Li-ion battery systems for large-scale energy storage applications in which elemental cost and abundance are important. Although it is difficult to find Na-ion batteries which achieve substantial specific capacities at voltages above 3 V (vs Na?/Na), the honeycomb-layered compound Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? can deliver up to 130 mAh/g of capacity at voltages above 3 V with this capacity concentrated in plateaus at 3.27 and 3.64 V. Comprehensive crystallographic studies have been carried out in order to understand the role of disorder in this system which can be prepared in both “disordered” and “ordered” forms, depending onmore »the synthesis conditions. The average structure of Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? is always found to adopt an O3-type stacking sequence, though different structures for the disordered (R3?m, #166, a = b = 3.06253(3) Å and c = 16.05192(7) Å) and ordered variants (C2/m, #12, a = 5.30458(1) Å, b = 9.18432(1) Å, c = 5.62742(1) Å and ? = 108.2797(2)°) are demonstrated through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data. However, pair distribution function studies find that the local structure of disordered Na(Ni2/3Sb1/3)O? is more correctly described using the honeycomb-ordered structural model, and solid state NMR studies confirm that the well-developed honeycomb ordering of Ni and Sb cations within the transition metal layers is indistinguishable from that of the ordered phase. The disorder is instead found to mainly occur perpendicular to the honeycomb layers with an observed coherence length of not much more than 1 nm seen in electron diffraction studies. When the Na environment is probed through ²³Na solid state NMR, no evidence is found for prismatic Na environments, and a bulk diffraction analysis finds no evidence of conventional stacking faults. The lack of long range coherence is instead attributed to disorder among the three possible choices for distributing Ni and Sb cations into a honeycomb lattice in each transition metal layer. It is observed that the full theoretical discharge capacity expected for a Ni³?/²? redox couple (133 mAh/g) can be achieved for the ordered variant but not for the disordered variant (~110 mAh/g). The first 3.27 V plateau during charging is found to be associated with a two-phase O3 ? P3 structural transition, with the P3 stacking sequence persisting throughout all further stages of desodiation.« less

  16. Is FLARE for Solar flare?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion

    2005-12-07

    The Fermi Lab Liquid ARgon experiment, FLARE, a huge neutrino argon-liquid project detector of 50 kt mass, might in a near future enlarge the neutrino telescope accuracy revealing in detail solar, supernova, atmospheric as well as largest solar flares neutrino. Indeed the solar energetic (E_p > 100 MeVs) flare particles (protons, alpha) while scattering among themselves or hitting the solar atmosphere must produce on sun prompt charged pions, whose decay (as well as their sequent muon decays) into secondaries is source of a copious solar neutrino "flare" (at tens or hundreds MeV energy). These brief (minutes) neutrino "burst" at largest flare peak may overcome by three to five order of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, possibly leading to their emergence and detection above the thresholds. The largest prompt "burst" solar neutrino flare may be detected in future FLARE neutrino detectors both in electron and positron and possibly in its muon pair neutrino component. Our estimate for the recent and exceptional October - November 2003 solar flares and last January 20th 2005 exceptional flare might lead to a few events for future FLARE or near unity for present Super-KamiokandeII. The neutrino spectra may reflect the neutrino flavor oscillations and mixing in flight. In neutrino detectors a surprising (correlated) muon appearance may occur while a rarer tau appearance may even marginally take place. A comparison of the solar neutrino flare signal with other neutrino foreground is estimated: it offer the first opportunity for an independent road map to disentangle the neutrino flavor puzzles, as well a prompt alarm system for dangerous solar flare eruptions.

  17. Ata da reunio da Comisso Prpria de Avaliao, realizada em 13 de agosto1 de 2014, realizada na sala do Conselho do Setor de Artes, Comunicao e2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    Bioprocessos e Biotecnologia, cuja avaliação para reconhecimento do curso também21 ocorreu na primeira semana

  18. The chemical instability of Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krizan, J.W., E-mail: jkrizan@princeton.edu; Roudebush, J.H.; Fox, G.M.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} decomposes rapidly in laboratory air. • The decomposition requires the simultaneous presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. • Decomposition results in a dramatic change in the magnetic properties. • Second 5 K feature in magnetic susceptibility not previously reported. - Abstract: We report that Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}, which has a layered honeycomb iridium oxide sublattice interleaved by Na planes, decomposes in laboratory air while maintaining the same basic crystal structure. The decomposition reaction was monitored by time-dependent powder X-ray diffraction under different ambient atmospheres, through which it was determined that it occurs only in the simultaneous presence of both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. A hydrated sodium carbonate is the primary decomposition product along with altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}. The diffraction signature of the altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} is quite similar to that of the pristine material, which makes the detection of decomposition difficult in a sample handled under ordinary laboratory conditions. The decomposed samples show a significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility and the disappearance of the low temperature antiferromagnetic transition considered to be characteristic of the phase. Samples that have never been exposed to air after synthesis display a previously unreported magnetic transition at 5 K.

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the CO2 chemisorption mechanism on Na2TiO3: Experimental and theoretical evidences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Yuhua [U.S. DOE

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Sodium metatitanate (Na2TiO3) was successfully synthesized via a solid-state reaction. The Na2TiO3 structure and microstructure were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and N2 adsorption. Then, the CO2 chemisorption mechanism on Na2TiO3 was systematically analyzed to determine the influence of temperature. The CO2 chemisorption capacity of Na2TiO3 was evaluated both dynamically and isothermally, and the products were reanalyzed to elucidate the Na2TiO3?CO2 reaction mechanism. Different chemical species (Na2CO3, Na2O, and Na4Ti5O12 or Na16Ti10O28) were identified during the CO2 capture process in Na2TiO3. In addition, some CO2 chemisorption kinetic parameters were determined. The ?H? was found to be 140.9 kJ/mol, to the Na2TiO3?CO2 system, between 600 and 780 °C. Results evidenced that CO2 chemisorption on Na2TiO3 highly depends on the reaction temperature. Furthermore, the experiments were theoretically supported by different thermodynamic calculations. The calculated thermodynamic properties of CO2 capture reactions by (Na2TiO3, Na4Ti5O12, and Na16Ti10O28) sodium titanates were fully investigated.

  20. Impact of Biodiesel-Based Na on the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) of NOx Using Cu-zeolite

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses the impact of Na in biodiesel on three emission control devices: the diesel particulate filter, diesel oxidation catalyst, and zeolyte-based SCR catalyst

  1. Self-organized Models of Selectivity in Ca and Na Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bob Eisenberg

    2009-06-28

    A simple pillbox model with two adjustable parameters accounts for the selectivity of both DEEA Ca channels and DEKA Na channels in many ionic solutions of different composition and concentration. Only the side chains are different in the model of the Ca and Na channels. Parameters are the same for both channels in all solutions. 'Pauling' radii are used for ions. No information from crystal structures is used in the model. Side chains are grossly approximated as spheres. The predicted properties of the Na and Ca channels are very different. How can such a simple model give such powerful results when chemical intuition says that selectivity depends on the precise relation of ions and side chains? We use Monte Carlo simulations of this model that determine the most stable-lowest free energy-structure of the ions and side chains. Structure is the computed consequence of the forces in this model. The relationship of ions and side chains vary with ionic solution and are very different in simulations of the Na and Ca channels. Selectivity is a consequence of the 'induced fit' of side chains to ions and depends on the flexibility (entropy) of the side chains as well as their location. The model captures the relation of side chains and ions well enough to account for selectivity of both Na channels and Ca channels in the wide range of conditions measured in experiments. Evidently, the structures in the real Na and Ca channels responsible for selectivity are self-organized, at their free energy minimum. Oversimplified models are enough to account for selectivity if the models calculate the 'most stable' structure as it changes from solution to solution, and mutation to mutation.

  2. Search for correlations between solar flares and decay rate of radioactive nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bellotti; C. Broggini; G. Di Carlo; M. Laubenstein; R. Menegazzo

    2013-02-05

    The deacay rate of three different radioactive sources 40K, 137Cs and natTh has been measured with NaI and Ge detectors. Data have been analyzed to search for possible variations in coincidence with the two strongest solar flares of the years 2011 and 2012. No significant deviations from standard expectation have been observed, with a few 10-4 sensitivity. As a consequence, we could not find any effect like that recently reported by Jenkins and Fischbach: a few per mil decrease in the decay rate of 54Mn during solar flares in December 2006.

  3. POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

    2011-03-08

    At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

  4. AdvanceVT would like to thank the Na onal Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    The mission of AdvanceVT is to assist Virginia Tech in preparing, recrui ng, and retaining high quality Tech. Any opinions, findings, con clusions, or recommenda ons expressed are those of the authors at Virginia Tech through ins tu onal transforma on. Although grant funding from the Na onal Science Founda

  5. HOSSEINI et al Optimization of NaOH thermo-chemical pre-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A municipal solid waste produced in urban and rural communities is a serious pollution source of water; Response Surface Method; water resource; pollution INTRODUCTION Large amount of solid waste is producedHOSSEINI et al Optimization of NaOH thermo-chemical pre- treatment for enhancing solubilisation

  6. Study of the nanobubble phase of aqueous NaCl solutions by dynamic light scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunkin, N F; Shkirin, A V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Burkhanov, I S; Chaikov, L L [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lomkova, A K [N.E. Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    Aqueous NaCl solutions with different concentrations have been investigated by dynamic scattering of laser radiation. It is experimentally shown that these solutions contain scattering particles with a wide size distribution in a range of ?10 – 100 nm. The experimental results indirectly confirm the existence of quasi-stable gas nanobubbles in the bulk of aqueous ionic solutions. (light scattering)

  7. Osmotic Stimulation of the Na+ Exchanger NHE1: Relationship to the Activation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodgett, Jim

    Osmotic Stimulation of the Na+ /H+ Exchanger NHE1: Relationship to the Activation of Three MAPK the osmotic activation of Erk and p38 MAPK, respectively, it did not prevent the associated stimulation of NHE. Thus, Erk1/2 and/or p38 MAPK are unlikely to mediate the osmotic regulation of NHE. The kinetics of NHE

  8. LQ Optimal Control of Wind Turbines in Hybrid Power Systems N.A. Cutululis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LQ Optimal Control of Wind Turbines in Hybrid Power Systems N.A. Cutululis1 , H. Bindner1 , I. Munteanu2 , A. Bratcu2 , E. Ceanga2 , P. Soerensen1 1 Risø National Laboratory, Denmark Wind Energy Systems, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, "Dunrea de Jos" University of Galati, Abstract: Wind ­ diesel

  9. Visualizao da Disperso de Efluentes na Atmosfera ENI ALVIM DE OLIVEIRA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    vórtices [Blackadar (1988)]. Os algoritmos mais utilizados para a representação da dispersão na atmosfera topográficas locais. 3 Visualização da Dispersão de Efluentes 3.1 Algoritmos para a Visualização de Dados planas de um conjunto de dados. 3.2 Visualização da Dispersão 3.2.1 Algoritmo para Visualização

  10. Visualizao da Disperso de Efluentes na Atmosfera ENI ALVIM DE OLIVEIRA 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    vórtices [Blackadar (1988)]. Os algoritmos mais utilizados para a representação da dispersão na atmosfera topográficas locais. 3 Visualização da Dispersão de Efluentes 3.1 Algoritmos para a Visualização de Dados fatias planas de um conjunto de dados. 3.2 Visualização da Dispersão 3.2.1 Algoritmo para Visualização

  11. Upper limit on the cross section for reactor antineutrinos changing 22Na decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. de Meijer; S. W. Steyn

    2014-09-23

    In this paper we present results of a long-term observation of the decay of 22Na in the presence of a nuclear fission reactor. The measurements were made outside the containment wall of and underneath the Koeberg nuclear power plant near Cape Town, South Africa. Antineutrino fluxes ranged from ~5*10^11 to 1.6*10^13 cm^-2 s^-1 during this period. We show that the coincidence summing technique provides a sensitive tool to measure a change in the total decay constant as well as the branching ratio between EC and beta+ decay of 22Na to the first excited state in 22Ne. We observe a relative change in count rate between reactor-ON and reactor-OFF equal to (-0.51+/-0.11)*10^-4. After evaluating possible systematic uncertainties we conclude that the effect is either due to a hidden instrumental cause or due to an interaction between antineutrinos and the 22Na nucleus. An upper limit of ~0.03 barn has been deduced for observing any change in the decay rate of 22Na due to antineutrino interactions.

  12. Optimal control theory with continuously distributed target states: An application to NaK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röder, Beate

    Optimal control theory with continuously distributed target states: An application to NaK Andreas Laser pulse control of molecular dynamics is studied theoretically by using optimal control theory. The control theory is extended to target states which are distributed in time as well as in a space

  13. Super-Elastic and Plastic Shock Waves Generated by Lasers N.A. Inogamov a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Super-Elastic and Plastic Shock Waves Generated by Lasers N.A. Inogamov a,1 , V.V. Zhakhovsky b,3 away the elastic wave, instead of overrun it. Prior to that, people thought that the generated together there is an elastic shock wave (SW), which propagates before the strong plastic shock with plastic pressures of up

  14. Challenges for Na-ion Negative Electrodes V. L. Chevrier and G. Ceder*,z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    -ion batteries have been proposed as candidates for replacing Li-ion batteries. In this paper we examine obtainable with lithiated graphite. These findings highlight the need of novel ideas for Na-ion negative submitted May 10, 2011; revised manuscript received June 13, 2011. Published July 14, 2011. Li-ion batteries

  15. Pulse-shape discrimination between electron and nuclear recoils in a NaI(Tl) crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, H S; Adhikari, P; Choi, S; Hahn, I S; Jeon, E J; Joo, H W; Kang, W G; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, K W; Kim, N Y; Kim, S K; Kim, Y D; Kim, Y H; Lee, J H; Lee, M H; Leonard, D S; Li, J; Oh, S Y; Olsen, S L; Park, H K; Park, H S; Park, K S; Shim, J H; So, J H

    2015-01-01

    We report on the response of a high light-output NaI(Tl) crystal to nuclear recoils induced by neutrons from an Am-Be source and compare the results with the response to electron recoils produced by Compton scattered 662 keV $\\gamma$-rays from a $^{137}$Cs source. The measured pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) power of the NaI(Tl) crystal is found to be significantly improved because of the high light output of the NaI(Tl) detector. We quantify the PSD power with a quality factor and estimate the sensitivity to the interaction rate for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with nucleons, and the result is compared with the annual modulation amplitude observed by the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. The sensitivity to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions based on 100 kg$\\cdot$year of data from NaI detectors is estimated with simulated experiments, using the standard halo model.

  16. Pulse-shape discrimination between electron and nuclear recoils in a NaI(Tl) crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. S. Lee; G. Adhikari; P. Adhikari; S. Choi; I. S. Hahn; E. J. Jeon; H. W. Joo; W. G. Kang; G. B. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; K. W. Kim; N. Y. Kim; S. K. Kim; Y. D. Kim; Y. H. Kim; J. H. Lee; M. H. Lee; D. S. Leonard; J. Li; S. Y. Oh; S. L. Olsen; H. K. Park; H. S. Park; K. S. Park; J. H. Shim; J. H. So

    2015-08-26

    We report on the response of a high light-output NaI(Tl) crystal to nuclear recoils induced by neutrons from an Am-Be source and compare the results with the response to electron recoils produced by Compton scattered 662 keV $\\gamma$-rays from a $^{137}$Cs source. The measured pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) power of the NaI(Tl) crystal is found to be significantly improved because of the high light output of the NaI(Tl) detector. We quantify the PSD power with a quality factor and estimate the sensitivity to the interaction rate for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with nucleons, and the result is compared with the annual modulation amplitude observed by the DAMA/LIBRA experiment. The sensitivity to spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions based on 100 kg$\\cdot$year of data from NaI detectors is estimated with simulated experiments, using the standard halo model.

  17. Graduation/ Student assistent (9 months) combination: Gas production decline due to salt deposition (NaCl)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    (NaCl) Mentors: Hans Bruining1 (reactive flow, chemistry), Han Velthuis/Aris Twerda (TNO Oil & Gas: · The source of salt in the gas reservoir · The location, rate and field condition dependence of salt precipitation. · How to rinse the near-well bore reservoir efficiently (frequency and amount fresh water washes

  18. Sand column impact onto a Kolsky pressure bar , N.A. Fleck a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    Sand column impact onto a Kolsky pressure bar S. Park a , T. Uth a , N.A. Fleck a , H.N.G. Wadley b loading Sand-structure interaction a b s t r a c t A laboratory-based methodology to launch cylindrical sand slugs at high velocities is developed. The methodology generates well-characterised soil ejecta

  19. NA61-SHINE: Hadron Production Measurements for Cosmic Ray and Neutrino Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Abgrall

    2010-05-25

    As neutrino long baseline experiments enter a new domain of precision, important systematic errors due to poor knowledge of production cross-sections for pions and kaons require more dedicated measurements for precise neutrino flux predictions. The cosmic ray experiments require dedicated hadron production measurements to tune simulation models used to describe air shower profiles. Among other goals, the NA61-SHINE (SPS Heavy Ion and Neutrino Experiment) experiment at the CERN SPS aims at precision measurements (5% and below) for both neutrino and cosmic ray experiments: those will improve the prediction of the neutrino flux for the T2K experiment at J-PARC and the prediction of muon production in the propagation of air showers for the Auger and KASCADE experiments. Motivations for new hadron production measurements are briefly discussed. NA61-SHINE took data during a pilot run in 2007 and in 2009 with different Carbon targets. The NA61-SHINE setup and preliminary spectra for positive and negative pions obtained with the 2007 thin (4% interaction length) Carbon target data are presented. The use of the NA61 data for the T2K neutrino flux predictions is finally discussed in further details.

  20. Lista de revistas brasileiras na rea de design para publicao Cursos Recomendados e Reconhecidos pela CAPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanazaki, Natalia

    Lista de revistas brasileiras na área de design para publicação Cursos Recomendados e Reconhecidos pela CAPES UNESP (Universidade Estadual Paulista) Pós Graduação em Design [link] Revista Educação Gráfica [link] UERJ (Universidade Estadual do Rio de Janeiro) Mestrado em Design [link] Revista Arcos

  1. Experimental Study of the NaK 31 S. C. Webb,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    . J. Jabbour,4 R. K. Namiotka,5 and J. Huennekens Dept. of Physics, 16 Memorial Dr. East, Lehigh­optical double resonance experiment to determine the NaK 31 state poten- tial energy curve. In the first step (v, J) ro-vibrational energy levels. These energy levels are then fit to a Dunham expansion

  2. The effect of Na in polycrystalline and epitaxial single-crystal CuIn1xGaxSe2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockett, Angus

    online 15 December 2004 Abstract Na is found to improve the performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar the highest efficiency, exceeding 19%, of any thin film polycrystalline solar cell [1]. The diodes work well cells although the mechanism is not clear. This paper briefly reviews some of the observations on Na

  3. Calcite dissolution and Ca/Na ion-exchange reactions in columns with different flow rates through high ESR soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarre, Audrey

    1999-01-01

    min?¹ under conditions of saturated flow. Column eluate was monitored for pH, carbonate alkalinity, and Na, Ca and Cl concentrations to evaluate the elution of SAR 10 solution, dissolution of CaCO? and exchange of Na by Ca on the cation...

  4. Na-A (LTA) zeolite synthesis directly from alumatrane and silatrane by sol-gel microwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulari, Erdogan

    selectivity properties.1 Na-A zeolite has also been employed in gas separation membranes, to enhance membrane was produced on aAl2O3 support by dipping the support into the gel and then crystallizing the gel higher gas permeability with equal selectivity in permeation. A second technique of making Na-A zeolite

  5. Rapid formation of molecular bromine from deliquesced NaBr aerosol in the presence of ozone and UV light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Rapid formation of molecular bromine from deliquesced NaBr aerosol in the presence of ozone and UV deliquesced NaBr aerosols in the presence of OH radicals produced by ozone irradiated by UV light, depending on the availability of ozone and bromide in the system. Interface reactions, an important source

  6. First Detection of NaI D lines in High-Redshift Damped Lyman-alpha Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, S; Gässler, W; Hayano, Y; Iye, M; Kamata, Y; Kanzawa, T; Kobayashi, N; Minowa, Y; Nedachi, K; Oya, S; Pyo, T S; Saint-Jacques, D; Takami, H; Takato, N; Terada, H; Tokunaga, A; Tsujimoto, T; Churchill, Christopher W.; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Hayano, Yutaka; Iye, Masanori; Kamata, Yukiko; Kanzawa, Tomio; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kondo, Sohei; Minowa, Yosuke; Nedachi, Ko; Oya, Shin; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Takami, Hideki; Takato, Naruhisa; Terada, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Alan; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2006-01-01

    A Near-infrared (1.18-1.35 micron) high-resolution spectrum of the gravitationally-lensed QSO APM 08279+5255 was obtained with the IRCS mounted on the Subaru Telescope using the AO system. We detected strong NaI D 5891,5897 doublet absorption in high-redshift DLAs at z=1.062 and 1.181, confirming the presence of NaI, which was first reported for the rest-frame UV NaI 3303.3,3303.9 doublet by Petitjean et al. This is the first detection of NaI D absorption in a high-redshift (z>1) DLA. In addition, we detected a new NaI component in the z=1.062 DLA and four new components in the z=1.181 DLA. Using an empirical relationship between NaI and HI column density, we found that all "components" have large HI column density, so that each component is classified as DLA absorption. We also detected strong NaI D absorption associated with a MgII system at z=1.173. Because no other metal absorption lines were detected in this system at the velocity of the NaI absorption in previously reported optical spectra (observed 3.6...

  7. Dual acceptor doping and aging effect of p-ZnO:(Na, N) nanorod thin films by spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swapna, R., E-mail: swapna.ramella@yahoo.com, E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu; Amiruddin, R., E-mail: swapna.ramella@yahoo.com, E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu; Santhosh Kumar, M. C., E-mail: swapna.ramella@yahoo.com, E-mail: santhoshmc@nitt.edu [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli-620 015 (India)

    2014-01-28

    An attempt has been made to realize p-type ZnO by dual acceptor doping (Na-N) into ZnO thin films. Na and N doped ZnO thin films of different concentrations (0 to 8 at.%) have been grown by spray pyrolysis at 623 K. The grown films on glass substrate have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall measurement, UV-Vis spectrophotometer, Photoluminescence (PL) and Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to validate the p-type conduction. The surface morphology and roughness of the ZnO:(Na, N) films are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Hall measurement shows that all the films exhibit p-type conductivity except for 0 at.% Na-N doped ZnO film. The obtained resistivity (5.60×10{sup ?2} ? cm) and hole concentration (3.15×10{sup 18} cm{sup ?3}) for the best dual acceptor doped film is 6 at.%. It has been predicted that (Na{sub Zn}?N{sub O}) acceptor complex is responsible for the p-type conduction. The p-type conductivity of the ZnO:(Na, N) films is stable even after 6 months. The crystallinity of the films has been studied by XRD. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) confirms the presence of Na and N in 6 at.% ZnO:(Na, N) film. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnO:(Na, N) films show NBE and deep level emissions in the UV and visible regions, respectively. The ZnO:(Na, N) films exhibit a high transmittance about 90% in the visible region.

  8. Assessing out-of-band flare effects at the wafer level for EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Kemp, Charles; Denham, Paul; Rekawa, Senajith

    2010-01-25

    To accurately estimate the flare contribution from the out-of-band (OOB), the integration of a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Micro-field Exposure tool is proposed, enabling precisely controlled exposures along with the EUV patterning of resists in vacuum. First measurements evaluating the impact of bandwidth selected exposures with a table-top set-up and subsequent EUV patterning show significant impact on line-edge roughness and process performance. We outline a simulation-based method for computing the effective flare from resist sensitive wavelengths as a function of mask pattern types and sizes. This simulation method is benchmarked against measured OOB flare measurements and the results obtained are in agreement.

  9. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9}: The first osmium perovskites containing alkali cations at the 'A' site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogare, Kailash M.; Klein, Wilhelm; Jansen, Martin

    2012-07-15

    K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} and K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} were obtained from solid-state reactions of potassium superoxide, sodium peroxide and osmium metal at elevated oxygen pressures. K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} crystallizes as an oxygen-deficient cubic double perovskite in space group Fm3{sup Macron }m with a=8.4184(5) A and contains isolated OsO{sub 6} octahedra. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} crystallizes hexagonally in P6{sub 3}/mmc with a=5.9998(4) A and c=14.3053(14) A. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} consists of face sharing Os{sub 2}O{sub 9} pairs of octahedra. According to magnetic measurements K{sub 2}NaOsO{sub 5.5} is diamagnetic, whereas K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays strong antiferromagnetic coupling (T{sub N}=140 K), indicating enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair. - Graphical abstract: High oxidation states of Os, obtained by high oxygen pressure synthesis, are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New osmates containing highly oxidized Os were obtained by high O{sub 2} pressure synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High oxidation states of Os are accommodated in double and triple perovskite matrices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds represent the first Os perovskites with an alkali metal at the A site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 3}NaOs{sub 2}O{sub 9} displays enhanced magnetic interactions within the octahedral pair.

  10. Diagnstico das reas de Excluso/Incluso Social atravs de Sistema de Informao Geogrfica na rea Urbana de So Jos dos Campos SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    trabalho, adotamos uma unidade de análise diferente daquela adotada na experiência de São Paulo. A escala, a economia, etc. #12;2 Na metodologia desenvolvida em Sposati (1996), a definição de Exclusão está

  11. Scalable synthesis of Na3V2(PO4)(3)/C porous hollow spheres as a cathode for Na-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, JF; Luo, C; Gao, T; Fan, XL; Wang, CS

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2(PO4)(3) (NVP) has been considered as a very promising cathode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) due to its typical NASICON structure, which provides an open and three dimensional (3D) framework for Na+ migration. However, the low electronic conductivity of NVP limits its rate capability and cycling ability. In this study, carbon coated hollow structured NVP/C composites are synthesized via a template-free and scalable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process, where the carbon coated NVP particles are uniformly decorated on the inner and outer surfaces of the porous hollow carbon spheres. When evaluated as a cathode material for SIBs, the unique NVP/C porous hollow sphere cathode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 99.2 mA h g(-1) and retains 89.3 mA h g(-1) after 300 charge/discharge cycles with a very low degradation rate of 0.035% per cycle. For comparison, the NVP/C composite, prepared by the traditional sol-gel method, delivers a lower initial discharge capacity of 97.4 mA h g(-1) and decreases significantly to 71.5 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance of NVP/C porous hollow spheres is attributed to their unique porous, hollow and spherical structures, as well as the carbon-coating layer, which provides a high contact area between electrode/electrolyte, high electronic conductivity, and high mechanical strength.

  12. The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

    2012-08-29

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

  13. Groundwater quality assessment plan for the 1324-N/NA Site: Phase 1 (first determination)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1998-05-01

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond (1324-N/NA Site) are treatment/storage/disposal sites regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA). They are located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, and were used to treat and dispose of corrosive waste from a water treatment plant. Groundwater monitoring under an interim-status detection program compared indicator parameters from downgradient wells to background values established from an upgradient well. One of the indicator parameters, total organic carbon (TOC), exceeded its background value in one downgradient well, triggering an upgrade from a detection program to an assessment program. This plan presents the first phase of the assessment program.

  14. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  15. The 23Na(?,p) 26Mg reaction rate at astrophysically relevant energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Howard; M. Munch; H. O. U. Fynbo; O. S. Kirsebom; K. L. Laursen; C. Aa. Diget; N. J. Hubbard

    2015-06-23

    The production of 26 Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of 40. We present here differential cross sections for the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg reaction measured in the energy range E c.m. = 1.7 - 2.5 MeV. Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalisations which are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions were measured for both p 0 and p 1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates of a factor of 40, impacting on the 26 Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of three.

  16. Photoresponsive Release from Azobenzene-Modified Single Cubic Crystal NaCl/Silica Particles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Nanguo; Assink, Roger A.; Jiang, Yingbing; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Azobenzene ligands were uniformly anchored to the pore surfaces of nanoporous silica particles with single crystal NaCl using 4-(3-triethoxysilylpropylureido)azobenzene (TSUA). The functionalization delayed the release of NaCl significantly. The modified particles demonstrated a photocontrolled release by trans/cis isomerization of azobenzene moieties. The addition of amphiphilic solvents, propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol propyl ether (PGPE), and dipropylene glycol propyl ether (DPGPE) delayed the release in water, although the wetting behavior was improved and the delay is the most for the block molecules with the longest carbon chain. The speedup by UV irradiation suggests a strong dependence of diffusion on the switchablemore »pore size. TGA, XRD, FTIR, and NMR techniques were used to characterize the structures.« less

  17. Spectral Content of 22Na/44Ti Decay Data: Implications for a Solar Influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel O'Keefe; Brittany L. Morreale; Robert H. Lee; John B. Buncher; Ephraim Fischbach; Tom Gruenwald; Jere H. Jenkins; Daniel Javorsek II; Peter A. Sturrock

    2012-12-10

    We report a reanalysis of data on the measured decay rate ratio $^{22}$Na/$^{44}$Ti which were originally published by Norman et al., and interpreted as supporting the conventional hypothesis that nuclear decay rates are constant and not affected by outside influences. We find upon a more detailed analysis of both the amplitude and the phase of the Norman data that they actually favor the presence of an annual variation in $^{22}$Na/$^{44}$Ti, albeit weakly. Moreover, this conclusion holds for a broad range of parameters describing the amplitude and phase of an annual sinusoidal variation in these data. The results from this and related analyses underscore the growing importance of phase considerations in understanding the possible influence of the Sun on nuclear decays. Our conclusions with respect to the phase of the Norman data are consistent with independent analyses of solar neutrino data obtained at Super-Kamiokande-I and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO).

  18. The performance of thin NaI(Tl) scintillator plate for dark matter search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Fushimi; H. Kawasuso; E. Aihara; R. Hayami; M. Toi; K. Yasuda; S. Nakayama; N. Koori; M. Nomachi; K. Ichihara; R. Hazama; S. Yoshida; S. Umehara; K. Imagawa; H. Ito

    2006-04-15

    A thin (0.05cm) and wide area (5cmX5cm) NaI(Tl) scintillator was developed. The performance of the thin NaI(Tl) plate, energy resolution, single photoelectron energy and position sensitivity were tested. An excellent energy resolution of 20% (FWHM) at 60keV was obtained. The single photoelectron energy was calculated to be approximately 0.42 0.02keV. Position information in the 5cmx5cm area of the detector was also obtained by analyzing the ratio of the number of photons collected at opposite ends of the detector. The position resolution was obtained to be 1cm (FWHM) in the 5cmx5cm area.

  19. Defective graphene as promising anode material for Na-ion battery and Ca-ion battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Dibakar; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated adsorption of Na and Ca on graphene with divacancy (DV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect. Our results show that adsorption is not possible on pristine graphene. However, their adsorption on defective sheet is energetically favorable. The enhanced adsorption can be attributed to the increased charge transfer between adatoms and underlying defective sheet. With the increase in defect density until certain possible limit, maximum percentage of adsorption also increases giving higher battery capacity. For maximum possible DV defect, we can achieve maximum capacity of 1459 mAh/g for Na-ion batteries (NIBs) and 2900 mAh/g for Ca-ion batteries (CIBs). For graphene full of SW defect, we find the maximum capacity of NIBs and CIBs is around 1071 mAh/g and 2142 mAh/g respectively. Our results will help create better anode materials with much higher capacity and better cycling performance for NIBs and CIBs.

  20. Biomaterials 28 (2007) 49014911 Stresscorrosion crack growth of SiNaKMgCaPO bioactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Biomaterials 28 (2007) 4901­4911 Stress­corrosion crack growth of Si­Na­K­Mg­Ca­P­O bioactive the thermal expansion (in the range of 8.8­15.1 Â 10À6 1CÀ1 ) [19] ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials

  1. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2013-11-21

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl.

  2. Computational observation of enhanced solvation of the hydroxyl radical with increased NaCl concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2006-05-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with many-body potentials were carried out to quantitatively determine the effect of NaCl salt concentration on the aqueous solvation and surface concentration of hydroxyl radicals. The potential of mean force technique was used to track the incremental free energy of the hydroxyl radical from the vapor, crossing the air-water interface into the aqueous bulk. Results showed increased NaCl salt concentration significantly enhanced hydroxyl radical solvation, which should significantly increase its accommodation on water droplets. This has been experimentally observed for ozone aqueous accommodation with increased NaI concentration, but to our knowledge, no experimental study has probed this for hydroxyl radicals. The origin for this effect was found to be very favorable hydroxyl radical-chloride ion interactions, being stronger than for water-chloride. This work was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy. Battelle operates PNNL for the Department of Energy.

  3. Synthesis and crystal structure of the palladium oxides NaPd{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} and K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panin, Rodion V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119992, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: panin@icr.chem.msu.ru; Khasanova, Nellie R. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119992, Moscow (Russian Federation); Abakumov, Artem M. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119992, Moscow (Russian Federation); Antipov, Evgeny V. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119992, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tendeloo, Gustaaf van [EMAT University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Schnelle, Walter [Max-Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Street 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    NaPd{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} and K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been prepared by solid-state reaction of Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} or KO{sub 2} and PdO in sealed silica tubes. Crystal structures of the synthesized phases were refined by the Rietveld method from X-ray powder diffraction data. NaPd{sub 3}O{sub 4} (space group Pm3-barn, a=5.64979(6) A, Z=2) is isostructural to NaPt{sub 3}O{sub 4}. It consists of NaO{sub 8} cubes and PdO{sub 4} squares, corner linked into a three-dimensional framework where the planes of neighboring PdO{sub 4} squares are perpendicular to each other. Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} (space group C2/c, a=5.3857(1) A, b=9.3297(1) A, c=10.8136(2) A, {beta}=99.437(2){sup o}, Z=8) belongs to the Li{sub 2}RuO{sub 3}-structure type, being the layered variant of the NaCl structure, where the layers of octahedral interstices filled with Na{sup +} and Pd{sup 4+} cations alternate with Na{sub 3} layers along the c-axis. Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} exhibits a stacking disorder, detected by electron diffraction and Rietveld refinement. K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4}, prepared for the first time, crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm (a=6.1751(6) A, b=9.1772(12) A, c=11.3402(12) A, Z=4). Its structure is composed of planar PdO{sub 4} units connected via common edges to form parallel staggered PdO{sub 2} strips, where potassium atoms are located between them. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of K{sub 3}Pd{sub 2}O{sub 4} reveal a Curie-Weiss behavior in the temperature range above 80 K. - Graphical abstract: Na{sub 2}PdO{sub 3} (space group C2/c, a=5.3857(1) A, b=9.3297(1) A, c=10.8136(2) A, {beta}=99.437(2), Z=8) belongs to the Li{sub 2}RuO{sub 3}-structure type, being the layered variant of the NaCl structure, where the layers of octahedral interstices filled with Na{sup +} and Pd{sup 4+} cations (NaPd{sub 2}O{sub 6} slabs) alternate with Na{sub 3} layers along the c-axis.

  4. 18Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPO RetireesLecturersOThermal NeutronC7O(α,36MgNNa

  5. 19Na

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPO

  6. na-00

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46Afedkcp |field2/%2A en9/%2A en

  7. MembFac -Scoring Sheet 1. 12% MPD, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Sodium Chloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    Phosphate, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Lithium Sulfate 10. 12% PEG 6000, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 MMembFac - Scoring Sheet 1. 12% MPD, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Sodium Chloride 2. 12% PEG 4000, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.1 M Zinc Acetate 3. 10% PEG 4000, 0.1 M Na Acetate pH 4.6, 0.2 M Ammonium

  8. First Detection of NaI D lines in High-Redshift Damped Lyman-alpha Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohei Kondo; Naoto Kobayashi; Yosuke Minowa; Takuji Tsujimoto; Christopher W. Churchill; Naruhisa Takato; Masanori Iye; Yukiko Kamata; Hiroshi Terada; Tae-Soo Pyo; Hideki Takami; Yutaka Hayano; Tomio Kanzawa; D. Saint-Jacques; Wolfgang Gaessler; Shin Oya; Ko Nedachi; Alan Tokunaga

    2006-03-12

    A Near-infrared (1.18-1.35 micron) high-resolution spectrum of the gravitationally-lensed QSO APM 08279+5255 was obtained with the IRCS mounted on the Subaru Telescope using the AO system. We detected strong NaI D 5891,5897 doublet absorption in high-redshift DLAs at z=1.062 and 1.181, confirming the presence of NaI, which was first reported for the rest-frame UV NaI 3303.3,3303.9 doublet by Petitjean et al. This is the first detection of NaI D absorption in a high-redshift (z>1) DLA. In addition, we detected a new NaI component in the z=1.062 DLA and four new components in the z=1.181 DLA. Using an empirical relationship between NaI and HI column density, we found that all "components" have large HI column density, so that each component is classified as DLA absorption. We also detected strong NaI D absorption associated with a MgII system at z=1.173. Because no other metal absorption lines were detected in this system at the velocity of the NaI absorption in previously reported optical spectra (observed 3.6 years ago), we interpret this NaI absorption cloud probably appeared in the line of sight toward the QSO after the optical observation. This newly found cloud is likely to be a DLA based upon its large estimated HI column density. We found that the N(NaI)/N(CaII) ratios in these DLAs are systematically smaller than those observed in the Galaxy; they are more consistent with the ratios seen in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This is consistent with dust depletion generally being smaller in lower metallicity environments. However, all five clouds of the z=1.181 system have a high N(NaI)/N(CaII) ratio, which is characteristic of cold dense gas. We tentatively suggest that the host galaxy of this system may be the most significant contributor to the gravitational-lens toward APM 08279+5255.

  9. The electrochemical reactions of SnO2 with Li and Na: a study using thin films and mesoporous carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorka, Joanna [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In this work we have determined the room temperature electrochemical reactivity of SnO2 thin films and mesoporous carbons filled with SnO2 anodes with Na, and compare the results with those obtained during the reaction with Li. We show that SnO2 can reversibly deliver up to 6.2 Li/SnO2 whereas the reaction with Na is significantly limited. The initial discharge capacity is equivalent to less than 4 Na/SnO2, which is expected to correspond to the formation of 2 Na2O and Sn. This limited discharge capacity suggests the negative role of the formed Na2O matrix upon the reversible reaction of Sn clusters. Moreover, the reversible cycling of less than 1 Na/SnO2, despite the utilization of 6-7 nm SnO2 particles, is indicative of sluggish reaction kinetics. The origin of this significant capacity reduction is likely due to the formation of a diffusion limiting interface. Furthermore, there is a larger apparent hysteresis compared to Li. These results point to the need to design composite structures of SnO2 nanoparticles with suitable morphological and conductivity components.

  10. Non-thermal plasma-assisted NOx reduction over Na-Y zeolites: The promotional effect of acid sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2006-06-01

    The effect of acid sites on the catalytic activities of a series of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites was investigated in the non-thermal plasma assisted NOx reduction reaction using a simulated diesel engine exhaust gas mixture. The acid sites were formed by NH4+ ion exchange and subsequent heat treatment of a NaY zeolite. The catalytic activities of these H+-modified NaY zeolites significantly increased with the number of acid sites. This NOx conversion increase was correlated with the decrease in the amount of unreacted NO2. The increase in the number of acid sites did not change the NO level, it stayed constant. Temperature programmed desorption following NO2 adsorption showed the appearance of a high temperature desorption peak at 453 K in addition to the main desorption feature of 343 K observed for the base Na-Y. The results of both the IR and TPD experiments revealed the formation of crotonaldehyde, resulting from condensation reaction of adsorbed acetaldehyde. Strong adsorptions of both NOx and hydrocarbon species are proposed to be responsible for the higher catalytic activity of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites in comparison to the base NaY material

  11. Measurement of the $K_L$ nuclear interaction length in the NaI(Tl) calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achasov, M N; Berdyugin, A V; Bogdanchikov, A G; Vasiljev, A V; Golubev, V B; Dimova, T V; Druzhinin, V P; Korol, A A; Koshuba, S V; Pakhtusova, E V; Serednyakov, S I; Silagadze, Z K; Usov, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    In the study of the reaction $e^+e^-\\to K_{S}K_{L}$ at the VEPP-2M $e^+e^-$ collider with the SND detector the nuclear interaction length of $K_{L}$ meson in NaI(Tl) has been measured. Its value is found to be 30--50 cm in the $K_{L}$ momentum range 0.11--0.48 GeV/$c$. The results are compared with the values used in the simulation programs GEANT4 and UNIMOD.

  12. Magnetoelastic Coupling and Symmetry Breaking in the Frustrated Antiferromagnet {alpha}-NaMnO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giot, Maud; Chapon, Laurent C.; Radaelli, Paolo G.; Androulakis, John; Lappas, Alexandros; Green, Mark A.

    2007-12-14

    The magnetic and crystal structures of the {alpha}-NaMnO{sub 2} have been determined by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction. The system maps out a frustrated triangular spin lattice with anisotropic interactions that displays two-dimensional spin correlations below 200 K. Magnetic frustration is lifted through magneto-elastic coupling, evidenced by strong anisotropic broadening of the diffraction profiles at high temperature and ultimately by a structural phase transition at 45 K. In this low-temperature regime a three-dimensional antiferromagnetic state is observed with a propagation vector k=((1/2),(1/2),0)

  13. Introduction to the GiNaC Framework for Symbolic Computation within the C++ Programming Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Bauer; Alexander Frink; Richard Kreckel

    2001-07-10

    The traditional split-up into a low level language and a high level language in the design of computer algebra systems may become obsolete with the advent of more versatile computer languages. We describe GiNaC, a special-purpose system that deliberately denies the need for such a distinction. It is entirely written in C++ and the user can interact with it directly in that language. It was designed to provide efficient handling of multivariate polynomials, algebras and special functions that are needed for loop calculations in theoretical quantum field theory. It also bears some potential to become a more general purpose symbolic package.

  14. Generation of High Efficiency Longitudinally Polarized Beam using High NA Lens Axicon and Dedicated Phase Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajesh, K. B.; Mohankumar, R.; Prathibajanet, C. Amala; Pillai, T. V. S. [Department of Physics, Anna University of Technology Tirunelveli (India); Jaroszewicz, Z. [Institute of Applied Optics, Department of Physical Optics, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-10-20

    We propose to use pure phase filter in combination with high NA lens axicon to achieve high efficient longitudinally polarized beam with a subwavelength spot size and large depth of focus using hyper geometric Gaussian beam. Using this system, the spot size is reduced to 0.392 {lambda} and the depth of focus is increased to 7 {lambda}. The efficiency of such system is found to be 87%. This high efficient longitudinally polarized beam generated by hyper geometric Gaussian beam is useful for most of the near-field optics applications.

  15. Thermonuclear reaction rate of $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na from Monte-Carlo calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, P; Iliadis, C

    2014-01-01

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process in type I X-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte-Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  16. Thermonuclear reaction rate of $^{18}$Ne($?$,$p$)$^{21}$Na from Monte-Carlo calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mohr; R. Longland; C. Iliadis

    2014-12-14

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process in type I X-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte-Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  17. Controlling SEI Formation on SnSb-Porous Carbon Nanofibers for Improved Na Ion Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Liwen; Gu, Meng; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Arey, Bruce W.; Wang, Wei; Nie, Zimin; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-05-14

    Porous carbon nanofiber (CNF)-supported tin-antimony (SnSb) alloys is synthesized and applied as sodium ion battery anode. The chemistry and morphology of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film and its correlation with the electrode performance are studied. The addition of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) in electrolyte significantly reduces electrolyte decomposition and creates a very thin and uniform SEI layer on the cycled electrode surface which could promote the kinetics of Na-ion migration/transportation, leading to excellent electrochemical performance.

  18. NaRec New and Renewable Energy Centre | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures Ltd Jump to: navigation, search59 HazardousNaRec New and Renewable

  19. 3.04 DOE.NA-0014 Stockpile Stewardship Plan.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. Geographic TermsOVERVIEW DOE/NA-0014 November

  20. MHK Projects/Ocean Navitas NaREC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPTHalf|MyetteNavitas NaREC < MHK

  1. NaSt1: A Wolf-Rayet star cloaked by an eta Car--like nebula?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul A. Crowther; Linda J. Smith

    1999-03-26

    We present a study of the peculiar Galactic emission line object NaSt1 (WR122, IRAS 18497+0056) which has previously been classified as a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Our spectroscopic dataset comprises Keck I-HIRES, WHT-ISIS and UKIRT-CGS4 observations which show that NaSt1 has a highly reddened nebular spectrum with extremely strong permitted and forbidden lines covering a wide range in excitation. [OII-III] is unusually weak, with HeI-II and [NII] very strong, and carbon absent, suggestive of chemical peculiarities. Narrow-band WHT imaging reveals an elliptical nebula with an average diameter of 6.8arcsec. We measure an interstellar extinction of E(B-V)=2.1mag and estimate a distance of 1-3kpc, suggesting that NaSt1 is a luminous object, with 40.64, N enhanced by a factor of 20, O deficient by a factor of 140, while Ne, Ar and S are normal compared to average HII region abundances. This unusual abundance pattern suggests that the nebula consists of fully CNO-processed material. We compare the spectral appearance of NaSt1 with other luminous emission objects, and conclude that it is not an Ofpe/WN9, B[e] star or symbiotic nova although it does share several characteristics of these systems. We suggest instead that NaSt1 contains a massive evolved star that ejected its heavily CNO-processed outer layers a few thousand years ago. Although the stellar remnant is completely hidden from view by the dense nebula, we argue that the star must be an early-type WR star. The only object that shares some of the peculiarities of NaSt1 is eta Carinae. Whatever its true nature, NaSt1 should no longer be considered as a late-WN classification standard in the near-IR.

  2. Thin Porous Metal Sheet-Supported NaA Zeolite Membrane for Water/Ethanol Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Wei

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports preparation and separation testing results of water-selective zeolite membrane, such as NaA (or 4A-type), supported on a robust, porous metal sheet of 50um thickness. The thin sheet support is of large potential for development of a low-cost, inorganic membrane module of high surface area packing density. The porous Ni alloy sheet of micrometer or sub-micrometer mean pore size, which was prepared by a proprietary process, is used to evaluate different zeolite membrane deposition methods and conditions. The membranes are characterized by SEM, XRD and water/ethanol separation tests. Quality NaA zeolite membrane at thickness <2um is obtained with the secondary hydrothermal growth method. This membrane shows water/ethanol separation factor of >10,000 and water permeation flux of about 4 kg/(m2•h) at 75ºC with a feed of 10wt% water in ethanol. The membrane is also demonstrated with good stability in 66-hour continuous testing at 75ºC and 90ºC.

  3. Sub-THz complex dielectric constants of smectite clay thin samples with Na$^{+}$/Ca$^{++}$-ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezwanur Rahman; Douglas K. McCarty; Manika Prasad

    2015-07-28

    We implement a technique to characterize the electromagnetic properties at frequencies 100 to 165 GHz (3 cm$^{-1}$ to 4.95 cm$^{-1}$) of oriented smectite samples using an open cavity resonator connected to a sub-millimeter wave VNA (Vector Network Analyzer). We measured dielectric constants perpendicular to the bedding plane on oriented Na$^{+}$ and Ca$^{++}$-ion stabilized smectite samples deposited on a glass slide at ambient laboratory conditions (room temperature and room light). The clay layer is much thinner ($\\sim$ 30 $\\mu$m) than the glass substrate ($\\sim$ 2.18 mm). The real part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{re}$, is essentially constant over this frequency range but is larger in Na$^{+}$- than in Ca$^{++}$-ion infused clay. The total electrical conductivity (associated with the imaginary part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{im}$) of both samples increases monotonically at lower frequencies ($$ 110 GHz. The dispersion of the samples display a dependence on the ionic strength in the clay interlayers, i.e., $\\zeta$-potential in the Stern layers.

  4. Characterization of Na+- beta-Zeolite Supported Pd and Pd Ag Bimetallic Catalysts using EXAFS, TEM and Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang,W.; Lobo, R.; Chen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Flow reactor studies of the selective hydrogenation of acetylene in the presence of ethylene have been performed on Na+ exchanged {beta}-zeolite supported Pd, Ag and PdAg catalysts, as an extension of our previous batch reactor studies [W. Huang, J.R. McCormick, R.F. Lobo, J.G. Chen, J. Catal. 246 (2007) 40-51]. Results from flow reactor studies show that the PdAg/Na+-{beta}-zeolite bimetallic catalyst has lower activity than Pd/Na+-{beta}-zeolite monometallic catalyst, while Ag/Na+-{beta}-zeolite does not show any activity for acetylene hydrogenation. However, the selectivity for the PdAg bimetallic catalyst is much higher than that for either the Pd catalyst or Ag catalyst. The selectivity to byproduct (ethane) is greatly inhibited on the PdAg bimetallic catalyst as well. The results from the current flow reactor studies confirmed the pervious results from batch reactor studies [W. Huang, J.R. McCormick, R.F. Lobo, J.G. Chen, J. Catal. 246 (2007) 40-51]. In addition, we used transmission electron microscope (TEM), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and FTIR of CO adsorption to confirm the formation of Pd-Ag bimetallic alloy in the PdAg/Na+-{beta}-zeolite catalyst.

  5. Structural investigation and luminescence of nanocrystalline lanthanide doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pin, Sonia; Piccinelli, Fabio; Upendra Kumar, Kagola; Enzo, Stefano; Ghigna, Paolo; Cannas, Carla; Musinu, Anna; Mariotto, Gino; Bettinelli, Marco; Speghini, Adolfo

    2012-12-15

    Nd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} nanostructured multiferroics (nanoparticles or nanorods) were prepared by a sol-gel route. X-Ray powder diffraction results evidence that the sodium and mixed sodium-potassium niobates show orthorhombic (Pmc2{sub 1} space group), and monoclinic structure (Pm space group), respectively, confirmed by the Raman spectra. The local structure around the trivalent lanthanides was investigated with Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy at the Ln-K edge and luminescence spectroscopy. The Ln{sup 3+} ions enter the structure by substituting the alkali metals, with a 12-fold oxygen coordination, and inducing a large amount of static disorder. The visible emission bands of the Eu{sup 3+} ions indicate that multiple sites exist for the lanthanide ions, in agreement with the EXAFS results showing the largest amount of static disorder in these samples. A possible indication of clustering of oxygen vacancies around the Ln{sub Na} Double-Prime defect is obtained by VBS calculations. - Graphical Abstract: Ln{sup 3+} doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} nanoparticles or nanorods can be prepared by a simple sol-gel procedure. The synergy of X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and luminescence spectroscopy gives important information on the Ln{sup 3+} local environment. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nd{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} doped NaNbO{sub 3} and Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} nanoparticles or nanorods are prepared by sol-gel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EXAFS indicates that the Ln{sup 3+} ions substitutes the Na{sup +} and K{sup +} ions, inducing a large amount of static disorder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The visible emission bands of the Eu{sup 3+} ions confirm that multiple sites exist for the lanthanide ions.

  6. Phase diagram and electrostrictive properties of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3BaTiO3K0.5Na0.5NbO3 ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Phase diagram and electrostrictive properties of Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3­BaTiO3­K0.5Na0.5NbO3 ceramics Shan been analyzed and 0.94-x BNT­0.06BT­xKNN 0.15 x 0.30 ceramics have been prepared and investigated indicate electrostrictive behavior of all ceramics. The compositions with x =0.20 and 0.25 show pure

  7. Certificamos que Erik Q. Martini participou da palestra "Teste de Software", na data 06/03/2012 s 19h, com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paraná, Universidade Federal do

    Certificamos que Erik Q. Martini participou da palestra "Teste de Software", na data 06/03/2012 às;Certificamos que Rodrigo de Farias participou da palestra "Teste de Software", na data 06/03/2012 às 19h, com Salvador Chàvez participou da palestra "Teste de Software", na data 06/03/2012 às 19h, com duração de 2

  8. Coupled Nd and B' spin ordering in the double perovskites Nd2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, Adam A [ORNL; Bugaris, Dan [University of South Carolina; Yeon, Jeongho [University of South Carolina, Columbia; Dela Cruz, Clarina R [ORNL; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad [University of South Carolina; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    We present a neutron powder diffraction study of the monoclinic double perovskite systems Nd$_2$NaB$'$O$_6$ (B$'$~$=$~Ru, Os), with magnetic atoms occupying both the A and B$'$ sites. Our measurements reveal coupled spin ordering between the Nd and B$'$ atoms with magnetic transition temperatures of 14~K for Nd$_2$NaRuO$_6$ and 16~K for Nd$_2$NaOsO$_6$. There is a Type I antiferromagnetic structure associated with the Ru and Os sublattices, with the ferromagnetic planes stacked along the c-axis and [110] direction respectively, while the Nd sublattices exhibit complex, canted antiferromagnetism with different spin arrangements in each system.

  9. An experimental investigation of the solubility and complexing of nickel in the system NiO-HCl-H?O-NaCl 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlquist, Lynne Shirley

    1987-01-01

    AND CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES . VITA Page . 1V V . Vl Vll . . 15 26 . . 36 . . . 42 . . 49 LIST OF TABLES Table 1, List of equations used for determination of NaCI' and Cl . . Table 2. Data sources for eH20, i H20, and equilibrium constants. . . Table... such as NaCl. Henley and McNabb (1978) have discussed the possibility of transport of transition metals in geothermal systems by means of complex neutral halide species such as NaMC13' or Na2MC14' based on knowledge of vapor transport processes, Transport...

  10. On the source of the dust extinction in type Ia supernovae and the discovery of anomalously strong Na I absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, E. Y.; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Simon, Joshua D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, Sven E.; Thompson, I. B.; Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cox, Nick L. J. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D bus 2401, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Karakas, Amanda I. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Patat, F. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl Schwarschild Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Sternberg, A. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Williams, R. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gal-Yam, A. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Leonard, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: mmp@lco.cl [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-10

    High-dispersion observations of the Na I D ??5890, 5896 and K I ??7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to 'Blueshifted' profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.

  11. Effects of NaCl, sucrose, and storage on rheological parameters of heat induced gels of liquid egg products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brough, Joan

    1988-01-01

    EFFECTS OF NaCl, SUCROSE, AND STORAGE ON RHEOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF HEAT INDUCED GELS OF LIQUID EGG PRODUCTS A Thesis by Joan Brough Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... and content by: C. W. Dill (Chair of Committee) F. A. Gardner (Member) R. L. Edwards (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT Effects of NaC1, Sucrose, and Storage on Rheological Parameters of Heat Induced Gels of Liquid Egg...

  12. Thermochemical generation of hydrogen and oxygen from water. [NaMnO/sub 2/ and TiO/sub 2/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, P.R.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1980-02-08

    A thermochemical cyclic process for the production of hydrogen exploits the reaction between sodium manganate (NaMnO/sub 2/) and titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) to form sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/), manganese (II) titanate (MnTiO/sub 3/) and oxygen. The titanate mixture is treated with sodium hydroxide, in the presence of steam, to form sodium titanate, sodium manganate (III), water and hydrogen. The sodium titanate-manganate (III) mixture is treated with water to form sodium manganate (III), titanium dioxide and sodium hydroxide. Sodium manganate (III) and titanium dioxide are recycled following dissolution of sodium hydroxide in water.

  13. Genetic Evidence for the Phylogenetic Relationship between Na-Dene and Yeniseian Speakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubicz, Rohina; Melvin, Kristin L.; Crawford, Michael H.

    2002-12-01

    *O, MN*M, RH*R1, RH*R2, GM*AG, GM*AXG, KM*]) from three blood group systems and immunoglobulins. The first principal component accounts for 55.8% of the total variation and separates the Na-Dene (AP, DG, HA, and NV) from the Siberian populations (AE, CC..., EK, FN, KT, and 748 / RUBICZ ET AL. 0.3 NG FN '-. 0.2 - C..' 0 0.1 DG a) c HA *L) 0.0 -. ,---- ,---,,,,,---- ,,,,---- ,-- ,,,-,,,,,---,,,,,,,----............ AE NV CC -0.1 -EK * AP A~KT -0.2 -0.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 Eigenvector 1 - 55.8% Figure 2...

  14. Nanocheckerboard modulations in (NaNd)(MgW)O[subscript 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Licurse, Mark W.; Davies, Peter K.

    2010-10-22

    Data is presented for a complex structural and compositional modulation in the perovskite (NaNd)(MgW)O{sub 6}. This modulation creates a large 14a{sub p} x 14a{sub p} x 2a{sub p} supercell (a{sub p} {approx} 3.9 {angstrom} is the lattice parameter of the cubic perovskite aristotype) containing ordered regions with doubled (110) d-spacings in the a-b plane separated by two-dimensional periodic antiphase boundaries and accompanied by a nanocheckerboard pattern. Faint periodic modulations in Z-contrast images suggest an associated periodic variation in composition. The presence of a sodium rich impurity implies the composition of the stable perovskite is nonstoichiometric.

  15. Direct exoplanet detection and characterization using the ANDROMEDA method: Performance on VLT/NaCo data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantalloube, F; Mugnier, L M; Milli, J; Absil, O; Gonzalez, C A Gomez; Chauvin, G; Beuzit, J -L; Cornia, A

    2015-01-01

    Context. The direct detection of exoplanets with high-contrast imaging requires advanced data processing methods to disentangle potential planetary signals from bright quasi-static speckles. Among them, angular differential imaging (ADI) permits potential planetary signals with a known rotation rate to be separated from instrumental speckles that are either statics or slowly variable. The method presented in this paper, called ANDROMEDA for ANgular Differential OptiMal Exoplanet Detection Algorithm is based on a maximum likelihood approach to ADI and is used to estimate the position and the flux of any point source present in the field of view. Aims. In order to optimize and experimentally validate this previously proposed method, we applied ANDROMEDA to real VLT/NaCo data. In addition to its pure detection capability, we investigated the possibility of defining simple and efficient criteria for automatic point source extraction able to support the processing of large surveys. Methods. To assess the performan...

  16. GPUs for the realtime low-level trigger of the NA62 experiment at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammendola, R; Biagioni, A; Chiozzi, S; Cotta Ramusino, A; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, M; Gianoli, A; Graverini, E; Lamanna, G; Lonardo, A; Messina, A; Neri, I; Pantaleo, F; Paolucci, P S; Piandani, R; Pontisso, L; Simula, F; Sozzi, M; Vicini, P

    2015-01-01

    A pilot project for the use of GPUs (Graphics processing units) in online triggering ap- plications for high energy physics experiments (HEP) is presented. GPUs offer a highly parallel architecture and the fact that most of the chip resources are devoted to computa- tion. Moreover, they allow to achieve a large computing power using a limited amount of space and power. The application of online parallel computing on GPUs is shown for the synchronous low level trigger of NA62 experiment at CERN. Direct GPU communication using a FPGA-based board has been exploited to reduce the data transmission latency and results on a first field test at CERN will be highlighted. This work is part of a wider project named GAP (GPU application project), intended to study the use of GPUs in real-time applications in both HEP and medical imagin

  17. Magnetically Driven Metal-Insulator Transition in NaOsO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calder, Stuart A [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL; Lumsden, Mark D [ORNL; Lang, Jonathan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; McMorrow, D. F. [University College, London; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Kim, Jong-Woo [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Schlueter, J. A. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Shi, Y. G. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yamaura, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan; Sun, Y. S. [MANA; Tsujimoto, Y. [Kyoto University, Japan

    2012-01-01

    The metal-insulator transition (MIT) is one of the most dramatic manifestations of electron correlations in materials. Various mechanisms producing MITs have been extensively considered, including the Mott (electron localization via Coulomb repulsion), Anderson (localization via disorder), and Peierls (local- ization via distortion of a periodic one-dimensional lattice) mechanisms. One additional route to a MIT proposed by Slater, in which long-range magnetic order in a three dimensional system drives the MIT, has received relatively little attention. Using neutron and x-ray scattering we show that the MIT in NaOsO3 is coincident with the onset of long-range commensurate three dimensional magnetic order. While candidate materials have been suggested, our experimental methodology allows the first definitive demonstration of the long predicted Slater MIT.

  18. Total reflection infrared spectroscopy of water-ice and frozen aqueous NaCl solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Rachel L.; Searles, Keith; Willard, Jesse A.; Michelsen, Rebecca R. H., E-mail: RMichelsen@rmc.edu [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Liquid-like and liquid water at and near the surface of water-ice and frozen aqueous sodium chloride films were observed using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The concentration of NaCl ranged from 0.0001 to 0.01 M and the temperature varied from the melting point of water down to 256 K. The amount of liquid brine at the interface of the frozen films with the germanium ATR crystal increased with salt concentration and temperature. Experimental spectra are compared to reflection spectra calculated for a simplified morphology of a uniform liquid layer between the germanium crystal and the frozen film. This morphology allows for the amount of liquid observed in an experimental spectrum to be converted to the thickness of a homogenous layer with an equivalent amount of liquid. These equivalent thickness ranges from a nanometer for water-ice at 260 K to 170 nm for 0.01 M NaCl close to the melting point. The amounts of brine observed are over an order of magnitude less than the total liquid predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic models, implying that the vast majority of the liquid fraction of frozen solutions may be found in internal inclusions, grain boundaries, and the like. Thus, the amount of liquid and the solutes dissolved in them that are available to react with atmospheric gases on the surfaces of snow and ice are not well described by thermodynamic equilibrium models which assume the liquid phase is located entirely at the surface.

  19. Microstructural and compositional change of NaOH-activated high calcium fly ash by incorporating Na-aluminate and co-existence of geopolymeric gel and C-S-H(I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Jae Eun; Moon, Juhyuk; Oh, Sang-Gyun; Clark, Simon M.; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2012-05-15

    This study explores the reaction products of alkali-activated Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate samples by means of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (HSXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and compressive strength tests to investigate how the readily available aluminum affects the reaction. Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate raw materials were prepared by incorporating Na-aluminate into the original fly ashes, then alkali-activated by 10 M NaOH solution. Incorporating Na-aluminate reduced the compressive strength of samples, with the reduction magnitude relatively constant regardless of length of curing period. The HSXRD provides evidence of the co-existence of C-S-H with geopolymeric gels and strongly suggests that the C-S-H formed in the current system is C-S-H(I). The back-scattered electron images suggest that the C-S-H(I) phase exists as small grains in a finely intermixed form with geopolymeric gels. Despite providing extra source of aluminum, adding Na-aluminate to the mixes did not decrease the Si/Al ratio of the geopolymeric gel.

  20. Na, Mg, Ni and Cs distribution and speciation after long-term alteration of a simulated nuclear waste glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farges b,c , Marika Vespa a,1 a Laboratory for Waste Management, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen distribution and speciation of Na, Mg, Ni and Cs in a simulated (inactive) nuclear waste glass were studied and Cs represent dose determining long-lived radionuclides (59 Ni, 135 Cs) in vitrified nuclear waste

  1. Relao da Produo Cientfica e de Divulgao da Equipe do Projeto "Meteorologia na EACF" PROANTAR/CNPq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relação da Produção Científica e de Divulgação da Equipe do Projeto "Meteorologia na EACF" PROANTAR. Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia, 24 (3) 254-261, 2009. http Meteorologia, 23(4) 49-500, 2008. http://antartica.cptec.inpe.br/~rantar/publicacoes/2008_Justino

  2. Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2004-04-02

    The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

  3. Evidence for a Role of Salicylic Acid in the Oxidative Damage Generated by NaCl and Osmotic Stress in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Málaga, Universidad de

    Evidence for a Role of Salicylic Acid in the Oxidative Damage Generated by NaCl and Osmotic Stress plays a role in the plant response to adverse environmental conditions, such as salt and osmotic during salt and osmotic stresses. This hypothesis is supported by the following observations. First

  4. UC DAVIS CUPA SELF AUDIT CHECKLIST 1. Are chemical hazardous waste containers disposed of through Yes No NA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    UC DAVIS CUPA SELF AUDIT CHECKLIST 1. Are chemical hazardous waste containers disposed of through days if 1 pound or 1 quart of acutely hazardous waste is accumulated? (Prudent practice is to dispose of within 90 days). 2. Does each chemical hazardous waste container have a UC Davis Yes Ë No Ë NA Ë

  5. Journal of Power Sources 165 (2007) 509516 Direct NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Power Sources 165 (2007) 509­516 Direct NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells George H. Mileya,e,, Nie online 5 December 2006 Abstract A fuel cell (FC) using liquid fuel and oxidizer is under investigation. H Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Fuel cell; Hydrogen peroxide; Regenerative fuel cell; Sodium

  6. Role of Protein Kinase C in the Signal Pathways That Link Na /K -ATPase to ERK1/2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Askari, Amir

    Role of Protein Kinase C in the Signal Pathways That Link Na /K -ATPase to ERK1/2* Received, transactivation of EGFR, and activation of the Ras/ ERK1/2 cascade. To determine the role of protein kinase C (PKC, but not toxic, effects of ouabain in rat cardiac ventricles. Ouabain-induced activation of ERK1/2 was blocked

  7. Neutron Reflection Study of the Adsorption of the Phosphate Surfactant NaDEHP onto Alumina from Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welbourn, Rebecca J. L.; Lee, Seung Yeon; Gutfreund, Philipp; Hughes, Arwel; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Clarke, Stuart M.

    2015-03-11

    The adsorption of a phosphorus analogue of the surfactant AOT, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (NaDEHP), at the water/alumina interface is described. The material is found to adsorb as an essentially water-free bilayer from neutron reflection...

  8. Inteligncia Artificial Gigantes tecnolgicos como a Google e o Facebook apostam tudo na criao de programas que consigam aprender, conversar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Inteligência Artificial Gigantes tecnológicos como a Google e o Facebook apostam tudo na criação de tecnológica. Mas está longe de ser a única em marcha. Grandes potên- cias como a Google e o Facebook estão utilizado- res um ano após o lançamento." O gigante Facebook também tem me- tas ambiciosas nesta área

  9. Quadruple-layered perovskite (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitada, A.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Yamamoto, T. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Narumi, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kindo, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Aczel, A.A.; Luke, G.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Uemura, Y.J. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kiuchi, Y.; Ueda, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Yoshimura, K. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ajiro, Y. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kageyama, H., E-mail: kage@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    We will present the synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of a new quadruple-layered perovskite (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13}. Through a topotactic ion-exchange reaction with CuCl{sub 2}, the precursor RbCa{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} presumably having an incoherent octahederal tliting changes into (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} with a 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2c{sub p} superstructure (tetragonal; a=7.73232(5) A, c=39.2156(4) A). The well-defined superstructure for the ion-exchanged product should be stabilized by the inserted CuCl{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedral layers that firmly connect with neighboring perovskite layers. Magnetic studies show the absence of long-range magnetic ordering down to 2 K despite strong in-plane interactions. Aleksandrov Prime s group theory and Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray diffraction data suggest the structure to be of I4/mmm space group with in-phase tilting along the a and b axes, a two-tilt system (++0). - Graphical Abstract: We present a quadruple-layered copper oxyhalide (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} synthesized through a topotactic ion-exchange reaction of RbCa{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} with CuCl{sub 2}. The compound has a well-defined superstructure. Magnetic studies suggest the absence of magnetic order even at 2 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} was prepared by ion-exchange reaction of RbCa{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} with CuCl{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound has a 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2c{sub p} superstructure (tetragonal; a=7.73 A, c=39.21 A). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such a well-defined superstructure was not observed in the precursor compound. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aleksandrov Prime s theory and Rietveld study suggest a (++0) octahedral tilting (I4/mmm). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic studies revealed the absence of magnetic order down to 2 K.

  10. Measurement of the Low Energy Nuclear Response in NaI(Tl) Crystals for Use in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiegler, Tyana Michele

    2013-07-30

    The response of low energy nuclear recoil in NaI(Tl) is investigated in the following experiment. Such detectors have been used recently to search for evidence of dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Na...

  11. N/Z and N/A dependence of balance energy as a probe of symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aman D. Sood

    2011-07-21

    We study the N/Z and N/A dependence of balance energy (E$_{bal}$) for isotopic series of Ca having N/Z (N/A) varying from 1.0 to 2.0 (0.5 to 0.67). We show that the N/Z (N/A) dependence of E$_{bal}$ is sensitive to symmetry energy and its density dependence at densities higher than saturation density and is insensitive towards the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross section and Coulomb repulsion. We also study the effect of momentum dependent interactions (MDI) on the N/Z (N/A) dependence of E$_{bal}$. We find that although MDI influences the E$_{bal}$ drastically, the N/Z (N/A) dependence of E$_{bal}$ remains unchanged on inclusion of MDI.

  12. Na9K16TI~25: A New Phase Containing Naked Icosahedral Cluster Fragments Ti99-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Bin; Corbett, John D.

    2007-12-05

    The phase Na{sub 9}K{sub 16}Tl{sub 25.25(2)} was synthesized by fusion of the elements in sealed Ta containers followed by quenching and annealing at 250 C. The structure established by single crystal X-ray diffraction means (P6{sub 3}/m, Z = 2, a = 19.376(3) {angstrom}, c = 11.480(2) {angstrom}) features Tl{sub 9}{sup 9-} clusters. These are well separated by cations that bridge between, faces, edges, and vertices of the clusters; sodium appears to be essential in this role. This is the third compound known to contain Tl{sub 9} clusters, but here two of nine sites are partially occupied, which can be interpreted as a 70:30 mixture of Tl{sub 9} and Tl{sub 7} units in the same cavity. This Tl{sub 9} example also displays lower symmetry (C{sub s}) but requires the same 2n skeletal electrons. EHTB electronic structure calculations indicate that the Fermi level intersects a finite densities-of-states (DOS), and only some bonds are optimized at E{sub F}, giving some insight regarding the site of Tl deficiency. Direct geometric relationships are found among Tl{sub 13}, Tl{sub 9}, Tl{sub 7} and Tl{sub 5} clusters through systematic removal of vertices.

  13. Spin-lozenge thermodynamics and magnetic excitations in Na3RuO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haraldsen, Jason T; Stone, Matthew B; Lumsden, Mark D; Barnes, Ted {F E }; Jin, Rongying; Taylor, J. W.; Fernandez-Alonso, F

    2009-01-01

    We report inelastic and elastic neutron scattering, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements of polycrystalline sodium ruthenate (Na3RuO4). Previous work suggests this material consists of isolated tetramers of S = 3/2 Ru5+ ions in a so-called lozenge configuration. Using a Heisenberg antiferromagnet Hamiltonian, we analytically determine the energy eigenstates for general spin S. From this model, the neutron scattering cross-sections for excitations associated with spin-3/2 tetramer configurations is determined. Comparison of magnetic susceptibility and inelastic neutron scattering results shows that the proposed lozenge model is not distinctly supported, but provides evidence that the system may be better described as a pair of non-interacting inequivalent dimers, i.e double dimers. However, the existence of long-range magnetic order below Tc ? 28 K immediately questions such a description. Although no evidence of the lozenge model is observed, future studies on single crystals may further clarify the appropriate magnetic Hamiltonian.

  14. Collective Acceleration in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.

    2008-01-01

    Collective Acceleration in Solar Flares w. Barletta, S.S.COLLECTIVE ACCELERATION IN SOLAR FLARES* W. Barletta (1), S.Park, MD 20742 Abstract Solar flare data are examined with

  15. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-02-03

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides.

  16. Flare System Optimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aegerter, R.

    2003-01-01

    , steam, nitrogen, and natural gas. By properly operating and maintaining the flare system and with minor improvements, significant savings can be achieved....

  17. The influence of field-free orientation on the predissociation dynamics of the NaI molecule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Ze-Yu; Han, Yong-Chang, E-mail: ychan@dlut.edu.cn; Yu, Jie; Cong, Shu-Lin [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-01-28

    The orientation and predissociation dynamics of the NaI molecule are studied by using a time-dependent wavepacket method. The NaI molecule is first pre-oriented by a single-cycle pulse (SCP) in terahertz (THz) region and then predissociated by a femtosecond pump pulse. The influence of the molecular field-free orientation on the predissociation dynamics is studied in detail. We calculate the radial and angular distributions, the molecular orientation degrees, and the time-dependent populations for both the ground and excited electronic states. It is found that the pre-orientation affects the angular distributions significantly, and that it has weak influence on the radial distributions. By varying the delay time between the THz SCP and the pump pulse, the angular distribution of the fragments from the predissociation can be manipulated.

  18. Single crystal growth of Yb doped NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} and structural and spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. G.; Singh, A. K.; Desai, D. G.; Tiwari, B.; Tyagi, M. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    High quality single crystals of NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} doped with 5 mol % Yb and oriented along <001> have been grown by the Czochralski technique in Ar atmosphere. The tetragonal space group I41/a accounts for all the reflections observed in the powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Polarized optical spectroscopy at room temperature revealed a direction dependence of absorption at different wavelength. As a novel uniaxial laser host for Yb{sup 3+}, NaGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} is characterized with respect to its transparency and band-edge. The emission spectrum of Yb{sup 3+} (excitation: 980-990 nm diode laser) was also recorded.

  19. 46 NA iEEE SpEctrum AuguSt 2010 spectrum.ieee.org On 1 June 2009,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavi, Krishna

    to the ground by krishna m. kavi viktorkoen #12;AuguSt 2010 · iEEE SpEctrum · iNt 47spectrum.ieee.org #12;48 NA and flight- control surfaces. Such information has enabled analysts to infer the causes of most crashes and no steps to prevent similar failures in the future. The black box may be the greatest single invention

  20. Development of Na/sup +/-dependent hexose transport in cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK/sub 1/)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.R.; Amsler, K.; Dawson, W.D.; Cook, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A number of factors were explored to analyze how they interact to yield the increasing transport capacity in differentiating cell populations. These factors include the number of functional transporters in the population, the distribution of these transporters among the individual cells, the Na/sup +/ chemical gradient, the transmembrane potential, the pathways and activities of these pathways for efflux of glucoside, and cell-cell coupling between accumulating and non-accumulating cells. 35 references, 9 figures, 2 tables. (ACR)

  1. Low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis of the three-layered sodium cobaltite P3-Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} (x ? 0.60)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miclau, M.; Bokinala, K.; Miclau, N.

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • We report direct synthesis of the high temperature stable phase, P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2}. • The hydrothermal synthesis of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} involves one step and low temperature. • The yield diagram for Na–Co–H{sub 2}O system has been builded up to 250 °C. • We propose a formation mechanism of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} phase using the unit cell theory. • The thermal stability of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been investigated by means of HT-XRD. - Abstract: In order to obtain the layered sodium cobalt oxide materials by hydrothermal synthesis, the yield diagram for Na–Co–H{sub 2}O system has been built and studied. In the same time, the well-known data of Co–H{sub 2}O system have been extended at 250 °C in basic solution. We had first synthesized directly the high temperature stable phase, P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} by a one-step low-temperature hydrothermal method. The rhombohedral structure of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the purity of phases has been confirmed by XPS. The thermal stability of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been investigated by means of high temperature X-ray diffraction in 298–873 K range and when the temperature has reached 723 K, the completely transformation of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} in the rhombohedral stable phase ?-NaCoO{sub 2} (space group R-3m) was observed. Also, a formation mechanism of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} phase using the unit cell theory in the hydrothermal process was proposed.

  2. NaREC Offshore and Drivetrain Test Facility Collaboration: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.

    2014-08-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the National Renewable Energy Centre (NaREC) in the United Kingdom (UK) have a mutual interest in collaborating in the development of full-scale offshore wind energy and drivetrain testing facilities. NREL and NaREC will work together to share resources and experiences in the development of future wind energy test facilities. This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) includes sharing of test protocols, infrastructure cost data, test plans, pro forma contracting instruments, and safe operating strategies. Furthermore, NREL and NaREC will exchange staff for training and development purposes.

  3. Materials corrosion in molten LiF-NaF-KF eutectic salt under different reduction-oxidation conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellers, R. S. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison (United States); 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison WI 53711 (United States); Cheng, W. J. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison (United States); National Taiwan Univ. of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Anderson, M. H.; Sridharan, K.; Wang, C. J.; Allen, T. R. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Molten fluoride salts such as FLiNaK (LiF-NaF-KF: 46.5-11.5-42 mol %) have been proposed for use as secondary reactor coolants, media for transfer of high temperature process heat from nuclear reactors to chemical plants, and for concentrated solar power thermal energy storage. In molten fluoride salts, passive oxide films are chemically unstable, and corrosion is driven largely by the thermodynamically driven dissolution of alloying elements into the molten salt environment. Two alloys, Hastelloy{sup R} N and 316L stainless steel were exposed to molten FLiNaK salt in a 316L stainless steel crucible under argon cover gas for 1000 hours at 850 deg. C. Graphite was present in some of the crucibles with the goal of studying corrosion behavior of relevant reactor material combinations. In addition, a technique to reduce alloy corrosion through modification of the reduction-oxidation state was tested by the inclusion of zirconium to the system. Corrosion of 316L stainless steel was noted to occur primarily through surface depletion of chromium, an effect that was enhanced by the presence of graphite. Hastelloy{sup R} N experienced weight gain through electrochemical plating of corrosion products derived from the 316L stainless steel crucible. In the presence of zirconium, both alloys gained weight through plating of zirconium and as a result formed intermetallic layers. (authors)

  4. Modeling the Interaction between Integrin-Binding Peptide (RGD) and Rutile Surface: The Effect of Na+ on Peptide Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chunya; Skelton, Adam; Chen, Mingjun; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of a single tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) adsorbing onto negatively charged hydroxylated rutile (110) surface in aqueous solution was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results indicate that the adsorbed Na{sup +} ions play an important role in determining the binding geometry of RGD. With an initial 'horseshoe' configuration, the charged side groups (COO{sup -} and NH{sub 2}) of the peptide are able to interact with the surface through direct hydrogen bonds (H bonds) in the very early stage of adsorption. The Na{sup +} ions approach the positively charged Arg side chain, competing with the Arg side chain for adsorption to the negatively charged hydroxyl oxygen. In coordination with the structural adjustment of the peptide, the Arg residue is driven to detach from the rutile surface. In contrast, the Na+ ions in close proximity to the negatively charged Asp side chain contribute to the binding of the COO{sup -} group on the surface, helping the carboxyl oxygen not involved in COO{sup -}-surface H bonds to orientate toward the hydroxyl hydrogens. Once both carboxyl oxygens form enough H bonds with the hydroxyl hydrogens, the redundant ions move toward a more favorable adsorption site.

  5. Large ferroelectric polarization in the new double perovskite NaLaMnWO$_{6}$ induced by non-polar instabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, T; Picozzi, S; Perez-Mato, J M

    2011-01-01

    Based on density functional theory calculations and group theoretical analysis, we have studied NaLaMnWO$_{6}$ compound which has been recently synthesized [Phys. Rev. B 79, 224428 (2009)] and belongs to the $AA'BB'{\\rm O}_{6}$ family of double perovskites. At low temperature, the structure has monoclinic $P2_{1}$ symmetry, with layered ordering of the Na and La ions and rocksalt ordering of Mn and W ions. The Mn atoms show an antiferromagnetic (AFM) collinear spin ordering, and the compound has been reported as a potential multiferroic. By comparing the low symmetry structure with a parent phase of $P4/nmm$ symmetry, two distortion modes are found dominant. They correspond to MnO$_{6}$ and WO$_{6}$ octahedron \\textit{tilt} modes, often found in many simple perovskites. While in the latter these common tilting instabilities yield non-polar phases, in NaLaMnWO$_{6}$ the additional presence of the $A$-$A^{'}$ cation ordering is sufficient to make these rigid unit modes as a source of the ferroelectricity. Throu...

  6. Protective coatings for alloys in contact with molten drawsalt (NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carling, R.W.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Mar, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    Molten drawsalt (NaNO/sub 3/-KNO/sub 3/) is being considered as the energy transfer and storage medium for many solar central receiver applications. In an effort to reduce the cost of the containment material while maintaining corrosion resistance, alloys with aluminide coatings have been examined while in contact with molten drawsalt for more than 6000 hours at 600/sup 0/C. The alloys examined were 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo, 5 Cr-1/2 Mo, and 9 Cr-1 Mo low-alloy steels, and 316 stainless steel. The results show a steady, albeit slow, net weight loss over the course of the experiment. The weight loss has been attributed to spalling of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from the surface (the occurrence of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is a result of the aluminizing process) and dissolution of corrosion products NaAlO/sub 2/ and/or NaFeO/sub 2/ during post-immersion handling. Scanning electron micrographs of exposed surfaces revealed little or no corrosion of the base metal. It has been concluded that aluminide coated alloys could provide significant cost savings (approx. 50%) relative to Incoloy 800, and provide at least equivalent corrosion resistance.

  7. The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Méheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

    2010-02-01

    Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

  8. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces at 10-50 degrees C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH2 group is more acidic than the bridging Sn2OH group, with protonation constants (log KH) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 degrees C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural alpha-TiO2 (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na+ and Rb+, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na+ between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb+ is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na+/Rb+ was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH(-0.40)) and the protonated bridging group (Sn2OH+0.36) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The complexation of medium cations increases significantly with increasing negative surface charge, and at pH 10, roughly 40% of the terminal sites are predicted to form cation complexes, whereas anion complexation is minor throughout the studied pH range.

  9. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) Surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite ({alpha}-SnO{sub 2}) surfaces at 10-50 C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH{sub 2} group is more acidic than the bridging Sn{sub 2}OH group, with protonation constants (log K{sub H}) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural {alpha}-TiO{sub 2} (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na{sup +} and Rb{sup +}, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na{sup +} between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb{sup +} is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na{sup +}/Rb{sup +} was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH{sup -0.40}) and the protonated bridging group (Sn{sub 2}OH{sup +0.36}) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The complexation of medium cations increases significantly with increasing negative surface charge, and at pH 10, roughly 40% of the terminal sites are predicted to form cation complexes, whereas anion complexation is minor throughout the studied pH range.

  10. A new mechanism for ozonolysis of unsaturated organics on solids: phosphocholines on NaCl as a model for sea salt particles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagulian, Federico; Scott Lea, A; Dilbeck, Christopher W; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2008-01-01

    and S. E. Schwartz, Sea Salt Aerosol Production: Mechanisms,the Na + and Cl ions in the salt, respectively. As discussedshown in Fig. 2. Coating of the salt by the organic would be

  11. Na~~StnrcturcdMatuials. Vol. 5. No. 3. pp. 257268.1995 Copyright Q 1995 Elsevia Science Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Pergamon Na~~StnrcturcdMatuials. Vol. 5. No. 3. pp. 257268.1995 Copyright Q 1995 Elsevia Science, University Park, PA 16802 (Accepted February 1995) Abstract- The thermodynamic stabilityof periodic layer

  12. High temperature oxidation and NaCl-induced accelerated corrosion of hot-dip aluminized 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsaur, Charng-Cheng

    2005-02-17

    The behaviors of high temperature corrosion on hot-dip aluminized on 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steels when catalyzed by NaCl and cyclic heating environment were studied experimentally. The corrosion behavior and morphological development were...

  13. Nanoparticle/Graphene Capsules by Capillary Molding K. Sohn1, Y. J. Na1, H. Chang2, K. Roh2, H. D. Jang2 and J. Huang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    MRSEC Nanoparticle/Graphene Capsules by Capillary Molding K. Sohn1, Y. J. Na1, H. Chang2, K. Roh2 by capillary molding of graphene oxide (GO) sheets against polystyrene bead template in evaporating aerosol

  14. Threshold Reaction Rates and Energy Spectra of Neutrons in the 0.8-1.6 GeV Proton-Irradiated W, Na Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yury E. Titarenko; Vyacheslav F. Batyaev; Evgeny I. Karpikhin; Valery M. Zhivun; Svetlana V. Kvasova; Ruslan D. Mulambetov; Dmitry V. Fischenko; Aleksander B. Koldobsky; Yury V. Trebukhovsky; Vladimir A. Korolev; Gennady N. Smirnov; Andrey M. Voloshenko; Vladimir Yu. Belov; Nikolay I. Kachalin Stepan G. Mashnik; Richard E. Prael; Arnold J. Sierk; Hideshi Yasuda

    2002-08-30

    Considering the prospects of using the W-Na target assemblies in ADS facilities, the experiments were made to study the nuclear-physics characteristics of W and Na, and the composite structures thereof in their interactions with 0.8-GeV and 1.6-GeV protons. The neutron and proton-induced reaction rates were measured inside, and on the surface of, a cylinder-shaped heterogeneous W-Na assembly together with the double-differential spectra of secondary neutrons emitted from different-depth W and Na discs. The measurement results were simulated by the LAHET, CEM2k, and KASKAD-S codes in terms of the latest versions of nuclear databases.

  15. High-pressure stability relations, crystal structures, and physical properties of perovskite and post-perovskite of NaNiF{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirako, Y.; Shi, Y.G.; Aimi, A.; Mori, D.; Kojitani, H.; Yamaura, K.; Inaguma, Y.; Akaogi, M.

    2012-07-15

    NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite was found to transform to post-perovskite at 16-18 GPa and 1273-1473 K. The equilibrium transition boundary is expressed as P (GPa)=-2.0+0.014 Multiplication-Sign T (K). Structure refinements indicated that NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite and post-perovskite have almost regular NiF{sub 6} octahedra consistent with absence of the first-order Jahn-Teller active ions. Both NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite and post-perovskite are insulators. The perovskite underwent a canted antiferromagnetic transition at 156 K, and the post-perovskite antiferromagnetic transition at 22 K. Magnetic exchange interaction of NaNiF{sub 3} post-perovskite is smaller than that of perovskite, reflecting larger distortion of Ni-F-Ni network and lower dimension of octahedral arrangement in post-perovskite than those in perovskite. - Graphical abstract: Perovskite-post-perovskite transition in NaNiF{sub 3} at high pressure Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite (Pv) transforms to post-perovskite (pPv) at 16 GPa and 1300 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The equilibrium transition boundary is expressed as P (GPa)=-2.0+0.014 T (K). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antiferromagnetic transition occurs at 156 K in Pv and 22 K in pPv.

  16. Nucleosynthesis in stellar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Tatischeff; J. -P. Thibaud; I. Ribas

    2008-01-11

    Nuclear interactions of ions accelerated at the surface of flaring stars can produce fresh isotopes in stellar atmospheres. Although this nucleosynthesis is not significant for the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, it can be important for a number of measurements of "anomalously" high 6-Li and 7-Li abundances. We discuss the possible role of stellar flares to explain the recent report of high 6-Li abundances in metal-poor halo stars and the well-established correlation between Li abundance and stellar activity in young open clusters. We then study the possibility of observing directly Li production during flares of nearby and active dwarfs of spectral type M.

  17. Energy dependence of fluctuations in central Pb+Pb collisions from NA49 at the CERN SPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The NA49 Collaboration

    2008-06-16

    The latest NA49 results on fluctuations of multiplicity and average transverse-momentum analyzed on an event-by-event basis are presented for central Pb+Pb interactions over the whole SPS energy range (20A - 158A GeV). The scaled variance of the multiplicity distribution decreases with collision energy whereas the $\\Phi_{p_{T}}$ measure of $$ fluctuations is small and independent of collision energy. Thus in central Pb+Pb collisions these fluctuations do not show an indication of the critical point of strongly interacting matter.

  18. SJT O)p Document: NA Actionee: Dorothy Riehle * Document Date: 03/29/2011 Due Date: NO ACTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800 ModificationSJT O)p Document: NA

  19. Structure of 2 molar NaOH in aqueous solution from neutron diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLain, Sylvia E.; Imberti, Silvia; Soper, Alan K.; Botti, Alberto; Bruni, Fabio; Ricci, Maria Antonietta

    2006-09-01

    Neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution has been used to investigate aqueous solutions of 2M NaOH in the liquid state. The data were modeled using empirical potential structure refinement which allows for the extraction of the ion-water and water-water correlations. The data show that the ion-water radial distribution functions are in accordance with those found by previous studies on NaOH solutions and follow a trend which is dependent on the concentration of the solute. In particular, the shape of the hydroxide hydration shell is found to be concentration independent, but the number of water molecules occupying this shell increases with dilution. Additionally, the water-water correlations show that there is still a measurable effect on water structure with the addition of ions at this concentration, as the second shell in the water oxygen radial distribution function is compressed relative to the first shell. The data are also used to discuss the recent claims that the published radial distribution functions of water are unreliable, showing that data taken at different neutron sources, with different diffraction geometry and systematic errors lead to the same structural information when analyzed via a realistic modeling regime.

  20. Cell kinetics of differentiation of Na/sup +/-dependent hexose transport in a cultured renal epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.S.; Weiss, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Fully differentiated cells of the renal proximal tubule have the capability of taking up hexoses across their apical borders by transport coupled to the Na/sup +/-electrochemical gradient. This property is also found in postconfluent cultures of the cloned cell line LLC-PK/sub 1/, a morphologically polarized line of renal cells. Postconfluent cells develop the Na/sup +/-dependent capacity to transport hexoses at their apical surface. This function is not observable during the growth phase of the cultures. To analyze the developmental process at the cellular level a method has been derived to separate transporting cells, expressing the differentiated function, from nontransporting cells. The method is based on the swelling of the cells accompanying the uptake of the nonmetabolizable glucose analog alpha methylglucoside. The swollen cells have a lower buoyant density than the undifferentiated cells and may be separated from them on density gradients. Analysis of the distribution of cells on such gradients shows that after the cells reach confluence the undifferentiated subpopulation is recruited onto the differentiation pathway with a rate constant of 0.2 per day, that 5 to 7 days are required for a cell to traverse this pathway to the fully differentiated state, and that once the maximum uptake capacity is achieved the cells do not develop further.

  1. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphor for white LED application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Jingshan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China) [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yin, Xin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China) [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Huang, Fuqiang, E-mail: huangfq@mail.sic.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China) [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, Weizhong, E-mail: jwzh@dhu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Dong Hua University, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ? NaLa{sub 1?x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} phosphors were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. ? Compared with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+} performed better luminescence properties. ? The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6} as a suitable host for RE{sup 3+}-doping. -- Abstract: Single phase of NaLa{sub 1?x}MgWO{sub 6}:xRE{sup 3+} (0 < x ?1) (RE = Eu, Sm, Tb) phosphors were prepared by solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, the morphology energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra and photoluminescence were used to characterize the samples. Under the light excitation, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Eu{sup 3+}, NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Sm{sup 3+} and NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:Tb{sup 3+}, phosphors showed the characteristic emissions of Eu{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 0} ? {sup 7}F{sub 4,3,2,1}), Sm{sup 3+} ({sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 5/2,7/2,9/2}), and Tb{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 4} ? {sup 7}F{sub 6,5,4,3}), respectively. The intensity of the red emission for Na(La{sub 0.6}Eu{sub 0.4})MgWO{sub 6} is 2.5 times higher than that of (Y{sub 0.95}Eu{sub 0.05}){sub 2}O{sub 3} under blue light irradiation. The quantum efficiencies of the entitled phosphors excited under 394 nm and 464 nm are also investigated and compared with commercial phosphors Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} and Y{sub 3}A{sub 5}G{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}. The results demonstrated NaLaMgWO{sub 6}:RE{sup 3+} phosphors as potential candidates for white light emitting diode pumped by UV or blue chip.

  2. Thermal stability, acidity, catalytic properties, and deactivation behaviour of SAPO-5 catalysts: Effect of silicon content, acid treatment, and Na exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akolekar, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Crystalline microporous SAPO-5 molecular sieves with different silicon content, acid-treated SAPO-5 and Na-exchanged SAPO-5 were investigated for their thermal stability, and acidic and catalytic properties. SAPO-5 materials with increasing SI framework content exhibited lower thermal stability. The effects of the thermal treatment and Na exchange on the N{sub 2}-sorption capacity (at 78 K) of these materials were studied. In situ IR spectroscopic investigations of pyridine chemisorbed on the aluminophosphate catalysts revealed that the concentration of Broensted and Lewis acid sites are strongly affected by the Si content in the AlPO{sub 4} framework, acid treatment, and Na exchange. The results of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and stepwise thermal desorption of pyridine suggest that there exists a broad site energy distribution over the aluminophosphate catalysts increases with the increasing Si content in the AlPO{sub 4} framework. The acid treatment and Na exchange showed a decrease in the number of strong acid sites on SAPO-5. The TPD of pyridine over SAPO-5, acid-treated SAPO-5, and Na-exchanged SAPO-5 indicated the presence of two types of acid sites. Correlation between the number of strong acid sites (measured in terms of the chemisorption of pyridine at 673 K) and framework charge on the aluminophosphate catalysts has also been obtained. The catalytic activities of SAPO-5 catalysts in the ethanol, n-hexane, isooctane, toluene, and o-xylene conversion reactions were studied. 22 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Liu, Jue; Lee, Byungju; Qiao, Ruimin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Shuyin; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Wanli; et al

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accuratelymore »identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.« less

  4. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Liu, Jue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lee, Byungju [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Qiao, Ruimin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Yang, Zhenzhong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Xu, Shuyin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)] (ORCID:000000018513518X); Gu, Lin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Hu, Yong-Sheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)] (ORCID:0000000284306474); Yang, Wanli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source] (ORCID:0000000306668063); Kang, Kisuk [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Li, Hong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)] (ORCID:000000028659086X); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Liquan [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Huang, Xuejie [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accurately identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.

  5. Parameterization of solar flare dose 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamarche, Anne Helene

    1995-01-01

    A critical aspect of missions to the Moon or Mars is the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare ...

  6. Exotic magnetism on the quasi-FCC lattices of the d3 double perovskites La2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, Adam A; Baker, Peter J.; Bugaris, Dan; Yeon, Jeongho; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad; Guidi, T.; Adroja, D. T.

    2014-01-01

    We find evidence for long-range and short-range ($\\zeta$~$=$~70~\\AA~at 4~K) incommensurate magnetic order on the quasi-face-centered-cubic (FCC) lattices of the monoclinic double perovskites La$_2$NaRuO$_6$ and La$_2$NaOsO$_6$ respectively. Incommensurate magnetic order on the FCC lattice has not been predicted by mean field theory, but may arise via a delicate balance of inequivalent nearest neighbour and next nearest neighbour exchange interactions. In the Ru system with long-range order, inelastic neutron scattering also reveals a spin gap $\\Delta$~$\\sim$~2.75~meV. Magnetic anisotropy is generally minimized in the more familiar octahedrally-coordinated $3d^3$ systems, so the large gap observed for La$_2$NaRuO$_6$ may result from the significantly enhanced value of spin-orbit coupling in this $4d^3$ material.

  7. Frustration by competing interactions in the highly-distorted double perovskites La2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, Adam A [ORNL; Bugaris, Dan [University of South Carolina; Li, Ling [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Yan, Jiaqiang [ORNL; Dela Cruz, Clarina R [ORNL; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad [University of South Carolina; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The usual classical behaviour of S = 3/2, B-site ordered double perovskites generally results in simple, commensurate magnetic ground states. In contrast, heat capacity and neutron powder diffraction measurements for the S = 3/2 systems La2NaB'O6 (B = Ru, Os) reveal an incommensurate magnetic ground state for La2NaRuO6 and a drastically suppressed ordered moment for La2NaOsO6. This behaviour is attributed to the large monoclinic structural distortions of these double perovskites. The distortions have the effect of weakening the nearest neighbour superexchange interactions, presumably to an energy scale that is comparable to the next nearest neighbour superexchange. The exotic ground states in these materials can then arise from a competition between these two types of antiferromagnetic interactions, providing a novel mechanism for achieving frustration in the double perovskite family.

  8. Structure and ferroelectricity of nonstoichiometric (Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jared; Aksel, Elena; Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L.; Chen, Jun

    2014-03-17

    Stoichiometric (Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3} (NBT) adopts the ABO{sub 3} perovskite structure with the A-site equally occupied by Na{sup +} and Bi{sup 3+} ions. However, non-stoichiometric compositions can be synthesized intentionally or unintentionally. To determine the effect of A-site nonstoichiometry on the crystal structure and ferroelectricity of NBT, the composition of (Na{sub 0.5?x}Bi{sub 0.5+x})TiO{sub 3+x} was varied using x?=??0.01, ?0.005, 0, 0.005, and 0.01. High resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement revealed that a shift in either direction from x = 0 results in a decrease in the spontaneous ferroelastic strain. Ferroelectric hysteresis and piezoelectric coefficients were found to be optimum in the stoichiometric composition.

  9. Room temperature magnetocaloric effect, critical behavior, and magnetoresistance in Na-deficient manganite La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khlifi, M., E-mail: khlifimouadh3000@yahoo.fr; Dhahri, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, B.P. 802, Université de Sfax, Sfax 3018 (Tunisia); Hlil, E. K. [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2014-05-21

    The La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} oxide was prepared by the solid-state reaction and annealed in air. The X-ray diffraction data reveal that the sample is crystallized in a rhombohedral structure with R3{sup ¯}c space group. Magnetic study shows a second-order magnetic phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic state at the Curie temperature T{sub C}?=?295?K. In addition, the magnetizations as a function of temperature and the magnetic field is used to evaluate the magnetic entropy change ?S{sub M}. Then, we have deduced that the La{sub 0.8}Na{sub 0.1}MnO{sub 3} oxide has a large magnetocaloric effect at room temperature. Such effect is given by the maximum of the magnetic entropy change ?S{sub Mmax}?=?5.56, and by the Relative cooling power (RCP) factor which is equal to 235 under a magnetic field of 5?T. Moreover, the magnetic field dependence of the magnetic entropy change is used to determine the critical exponents ?, ?, and ? which are found to be ??=?0.495, ??=?1.083, and ??=?3.18. These values are consistent with the prediction of the mean field theory (??=?0.5, ??=?1, and ??=?3). Above all, the temperature dependence of electrical resistivity shows a metal–insulator transition at T{sub ?}. The electrical resistivity decrease when we apply a magnetic field giving a magnetoresistance effect in the order of 60% at room temperature.

  10. Density functional theory studies on theelectronic, structural, phonon dynamicaland thermo-stability properties of bicarbonates MHCO3, M D Li, Na, K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Yuhua; Zhang, Bo; Sorescu, Dan C.; Johnson, Karl; Majzoub, Eric H; Luebke, David R.

    2012-07-01

    The structural, electronic, phonon dispersion and thermodynamic properties of MHCO3 (M D Li, Na, K) solids were investigated using density functional theory. The calculated bulk properties for both their ambient and the high-pressure phases are in good agreement with available experimental measurements. Solid phase LiHCO3 has not yet been observed experimentally. We have predicted several possible crystal structures for LiHCO3 using crystallographic database searching and prototype electrostatic ground state modeling. Our total energy and phonon free energy .FPH/ calculations predict that LiHCO3 will be stable under suitable conditions of temperature and partial pressures of CO2 and H2O. Our calculations indicate that the HCO􀀀 3 groups in LiHCO3 and NaHCO3 form an infinite chain structure through O#1; #1; #1;H#1; #1; #1;O hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the HCO􀀀 3 anions form dimers, .HCO􀀀 3 /2, connected through double hydrogen bonds in all phases of KHCO3. Based on density functional perturbation theory, the Born effective charge tensor of each atom type was obtained for all phases of the bicarbonates. Their phonon dispersions with the longitudinal optical–transverse optical splitting were also investigated. Based on lattice phonon dynamics study, the infrared spectra and the thermodynamic properties of these bicarbonates were obtained. Over the temperature range 0–900 K, the FPH and the entropies (S) of MHCO3 (M D Li, Na, K) systems vary as FPH.LiHCO3/ > FPH.NaHCO3/ > FPH.KHCO3/ and S.KHCO3/ > S.NaHCO3/ > S.LiHCO3/, respectively, in agreement with the available experimental data. Analysis of the predicted thermodynamics of the CO2 capture reactions indicates that the carbonate/bicarbonate transition reactions for Na and K could be used for CO2 capture technology, in agreement with experiments.

  11. Hot-stage transmission electron microscopy study of (Na, K)NbO{sub 3} based lead-free piezoceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shengbo; Xu, Zhengkui; Kwok, K. W.; Chan, Helen L. W.

    2014-07-28

    Hierarchical nanodomains assembled into micron-sized stripe domains, which is believed to be associated with outstanding piezoelectric properties, were observed at room temperature in a typical lead free piezoceramics, (Na{sub 0.52}K{sub 0.48?x})(Nb{sub 0.95?x}Ta{sub 0.05})-xLiSbO{sub 3}, with finely tuned polymorphic phase boundaries (x?=?0.0465) by transmission electron microscopy. The evolution of domain morphology and crystal structure under heating and cooling cycles in the ceramic was investigated by in-situ hot stage study. It is found that the nanodomains are irreversibly transformed into micron-sized rectangular domains during heating and cooling cycles, which lead to the thermal instability of piezoelectric properties of the materials.

  12. Low-surface-area hard carbon anode for Na-ion batteries via graphene oxide as a dehydration agent

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Wei; Bommier, Clement; Jian, Zelang; Li, Xin; Carter, Rich; Vail, Sean; Lu, Yuhao; Lee, Jong -Jan; Ji, Xiulei

    2015-02-04

    Na-ion batteries are emerging as one of the most promising energy storage technologies, particularly for grid-level applications. Among anode candidate materials, hard carbon is very attractive due to its high capacity and low cost. However, hard carbon anodes often suffer a low first-cycle Coulombic efficiency and fast capacity fading. In this study, we discover that doping graphene oxide into sucrose, the precursor for hard carbon, can effectively reduce the specific surface area of hard carbon to as low as 5.4 m²/g. We further reveal that such doping can effectively prevent foaming during caramelization of sucrose and extend the pyrolysis burn-offmore »of sucrose caramel over a wider temperature range. Thus, the obtained low-surface-area hard carbon greatly improves the first-cycle Coulombic efficiency from 74% to 83% and delivers a very stable cyclic life with 95% of capacity retention after 200 cycles.« less

  13. Viscosity of NaCl and other solutions up to 350{sup 0}C and 50 MPa pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.L.; Ozbek, H.; Igbene, A.; Litton, G.

    1980-11-01

    Experimental values for the viscosity of sodium chloride solutions are critically reviewed for application to geothermal energy. Data published recently by Kestin, Los, Pepinov, and Semenyuk as well as earlier data are included. A theoretically based equation for calculating relative viscosity was developed, and used to generate tables of smoothed values over the ranges 20{sup 0}C to 350{sup 0}C, 0 to 5 m and pressures up to 50 MPa. The equation reproduces selected data to an average of better than 2 percent over the entire range of temperatures and pressures. Selected tables of data are included for KCl up to 150{sup 0}C, CaCl{sub 2} solutions up to 100{sup 0}C, and for mixtures of NaCl with KCl and CaCl{sub 2}. Recommendations are given for additional data needs.

  14. Enhancement of second harmonic generation in NaNO{sub 2}-infiltrated opal photonic crystal using structural light focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaytsev, Kirill I. Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2014-08-04

    Experimental and numerical results for second harmonic generation (SHG) in photonic crystal (PC) based on NaNO{sub 2}-infiltrated opal matrix are presented. SHG is performed in reflection mode; thus, the direction of the SHG maximum is equal to the angle of mirror reflection. The PC was pumped with femtosecond optical pulses at different angles of incidence, allowing the dependence of the SHG efficiency on the location of the fundamental wavelength toward the PC band gap (BG) to be examined. The most efficient SHG was observed when pumping the BG of the PC. To interpret the experimental results, finite-difference time-domain numerical simulations of the light interaction with the PC were conducted. The observed effect of highly efficient SHG is associated with structural light focusing, and, as a consequence, with strong optical field localization within certain near-surface PC regions. Thus, SHG enhancement based on structural light focusing in PC was demonstrated.

  15. Evidence for the onset of deconfinement and quest for the critical point by NA49 at the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melkumov, G. L.; Anticic, T.; Baatar, B.; Barna, D.; Bartke, J.; Beck, H.; Betev, L.; Bialkowska, H.; Blume, C.; Bogusz, M.; Boimska, B.; Book, J.; Botje, M.; Buncic, P.; Cetner, T.; Christakoglou, P.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cramer, J. G.; Eckardt, V.; and others

    2012-05-15

    The NA49 results on hadron production obtained in PbPb collisions at SPS energies from 20 to 158 A GeV are shown and discussed as evidence for the onset of deconfinement. The primary measures are the pion yield, the kaon-to-pion ratio and the slope parameter of transverse mass distributions. The possible indication of the QCD critical point signatures was investigated in the event-by-event fluctuations of various observables such as the mean transverse momentum, particle multiplicity and azimuthal angle distributions as well as in the particle ratio fluctuations. The energy dependence of these observables was measured in central PbPb collisions in the full SPS energy range while for analysis of the system size dependence data from pp, CC, SiSi, and PbPb collisions at the top SPS energy were used.

  16. The Role of FeS in Initial Activation and Performance Degradation of Na-NiCl2 Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guosheng; Lu, Xiaochuan; Kim, Jin Yong; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-12-25

    The role of iron sulfide (FeS) in initial cell activation and degradation in the Na-NiCl2 battery was investigated in this work. The research focused on identifying the effects of the FeS level on the electrochemical performance and morphological changes in the cathode. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study along with battery tests revealed that FeS plays a critical role in initial battery activation by removing passivation layers on Ni particles. It was also found that the optimum level of FeS in the cathode resulted in minimum Ni particle growth and improved battery cycling performance. The results of electrochemical characterization indicated that sulfur species generated in situ during initial charging, such as polysulfide and sulfur, are responsible for removing the passivation layer. Consequently, the cells containing elemental sulfur in the cathode exhibited similar electrochemical behavior during initial charging compared to that of the cells containing FeS.

  17. Luminescent properties of Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} and its potential application in white light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhijun; Li, Panlai; Li, Ting; Zhang, Xing; Li, Qingxuan; Yang, Zhiping; Guo, Qinglin

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor can be effectively excited by an ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet light, and produce a bright blue emission centered at 436 nm. The CIE chromaticity coordinations (x, y) of Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}(NSCE)/Li{sub 2}SrSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}(LSSE) vary with the molar ratio of the two constituents. When NSCE/LSSE is 1:3, the CIE chromaticity coordination is (0.332, 0.346), which is close to that of the natural sunlight (0.33, 0.33). The results indicate that Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} may be a promising blue phosphor for UV chip-based multi-phosphor converted white light emitting diodes. Highlights: ? Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} shows the blue emission with a peak at 436 nm and broad excitation band in the UV/n-UV range. ? White light with CIE coordinates (0.332, 0.346) is generated by mixing the blue phosphor with the Li{sub 2}SrSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} yellow phosphor. ? Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} would be a promising blue phosphor candidate for UV chip-based multi-phosphor converted white LEDs. - Abstract: A novel blue phosphor Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} is synthesized by a high temperature solid-state reaction, and its luminescent properties are systematically studied. Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} can be effectively excited by the 354 nm radiation, and create blue emission (436 nm). The emission intensity of Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} is influenced by the Eu{sup 2+} doping content, and the optimal doping content is 1.5%, and the concentration quenching mechanism of Eu{sup 2+} in Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4} can be attributed to the multipolar interaction. The white light with CIE coordinates (0.332, 0.346) is generated by mixing the blue phosphor Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} with the yellow phosphor Li{sub 2}SrSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+}. The results indicate that Na{sub 2}CaSiO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+} may be a potential blue emitting phosphor for UV chip-based multi-phosphor converted white light emitting diodes.

  18. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A., E-mail: cswenson@astro.psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ?1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ?50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of ?t/t ? 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  19. Comparison of molecular dynamics simulations with Triple Layer and modified Gouy-Chapman models in a 0.1 M NaCl -montmorillonite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    at the pore scale were carried out at 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl concentration in order to constrain cation, anion, high structural charge and surface area associated with the clay minerals. A comprehensive study of their surface properties and particularly of the ionic composition and mobility is necessary to assess

  20. Synthesis of Na1.25V3O8 Nanobelts with Excellent Long-Term Stability for Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    by the calcination temperatures. As cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, the Na1.25V3O8 nanobelts synthesized vanadium oxide, nanobelts, sol-gel, lithium-ion batteries, long-term stability 1. INTRODUCTION Because of their high energy density, long life cycle, environmentally benign, lithium ion batteries (LIBs) have been

  1. A UNIFYING VIEW OF ERROR NONLINEARITIES IN LMS Ta.req Y. Al-Na.ffouri Azzedine Zerguine Ma.a.mar Bettayeb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    A UNIFYING VIEW OF ERROR NONLINEARITIES IN LMS ADAPTATION Ta.req Y. Al-Na.ffouri Azzedine Zerguine of various error nonlinearities that are used in least mean square (LMS) adaptation such as the least mean that the LMS algorithm and its error- modified variants are approximations of two re- cently developed optimum

  2. The determination of phase relations in the CH?-H?O-NaCl system at 2 and 5 kbars, 300 to 600° C using synthetic fluid inclusions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McShane, Christopher Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Fluid inclusions were synthesized, using quartz and fluorite as host minerals, to determine the phase relations of the CH?-H?O-NaCl system at pressures of 2 and 5 kbars and temperatures of 300, 400, 500, and 600°C . Known quantities of CH?, H?O...

  3. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2000-06-07

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  4. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

    2000-04-01

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  5. LeuT Na+-dependent pump KcsA K+ channel Ca2+ ATPase pump ClC Cl/H+ exchanger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    LeuT Na+-dependent pump KcsA K+ channel Ca2+ ATPase pump ClC Cl­/H+ exchanger The number of binding in a K+ channel and a Ca2+ pump. Sunday, January 26, 14 #12;The Structure of the Calcium Channel: Basis

  6. The Cleveland MuseuM of naTural hisTorY nuMber 56 GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF LEMUDONG'O, KENYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hlusko, Leslea J.

    The Cleveland MuseuM of naTural hisTorY nuMber 56 GEOLOGY AND PALEONTOLOGY OF LEMUDONG'O, KENYA J. Hlusko GEOLOGY, GEOCHEMISTRY, AND STRATIGRAPHY OF THE LEMUDONG'O FORMATION, KENYA RIFT VALLEY 53: Cultural and Physical Anthropology; Archaeology; Botany; Geology; Paleobotany; Invertebrate and Vertebrate

  7. Study of a layered iron(III) phosphate phase Na3Fe3(PO4)4 used as positive electrode in lithium batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    prepared by solid-state reaction was studied as positive electrode in lithium batteries. Up to 1.9 Li and lithium batteries. 1. Introduction : Recently, a new class of cathodic material based on iron phosphatesStudy of a layered iron(III) phosphate phase Na3Fe3(PO4)4 used as positive electrode in lithium

  8. Synthesis of Na-Stabilized Nonporous tZrO2 Supports and Pt/t-ZrO2 Catalysts and Application to Water-Gas-Shift Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    steam reforming,10 and epoxidation of olefins.11 ZrO2 exists primarily in three different polymorphs significantly affect the catalytic performance for chemical reactions. Ma et al. prepared t-ZrO2 using Na2CO3 catalytic performance for methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation compared to amorphous and m-ZrO2

  9. Processo Simplificado de Seleo para Bolsistas para a Alemanha Chamada de candidatos a bolsistas para perodo de estudos na cidade de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

    pontos na seguinte forma: o IAA representará 75% do valor da nota, a nota de proficiência 20% e a carta motivacional 5%. Os documentos Espelho de Matrícula e Passaporte são excludentes. 6. Dos Valores Auferidos: Os alunos selecionados receberão uma bolsa no total de 1225,00 para custeio da passagem Florianópolis

  10. A prismatic-core design for a milling machine component A. Srikantha Phani, S.P. Mai, N.A. Fleck, J. Woodhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    A prismatic-core design for a milling machine component A. Srikantha Phani, S.P. Mai, N.A. Fleck, J-functional structure for potential application in future generation high speed, ultra precise milling machines dynamic stiffness for milling machine application. The sandwich core gives multi-functional capabilities

  11. The Minnesota Wri.ng Project's Collabora.on with Teacher Educators in Norway Na.onal Center for Wri.ng Educa.on and Research (Skrivesenteret)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    The Minnesota Wri.ng Project's Collabora.on with Teacher Educators in Norway Na.onal Center for Wri.ng Educa.on and Research (Skrivesenteret) · Established 21 with MWP, which is part of the Center for Wri.ng, in order to acquire more

  12. arXiv:1312.1524v1[math.NA]5Dec2013 THE BUBBLE TRANSFORM: A NEW TOOL FOR ANALYSIS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winther, Ragnar

    arXiv:1312.1524v1[math.NA]5Dec2013 THE BUBBLE TRANSFORM: A NEW TOOL FOR ANALYSIS OF FINITE ELEMENT estimates for various finite element methods. In particular, for the analysis of mixed finite element be very useful, but hard to construct, is the analysis of the so-called p-version of the finite element

  13. Discrete Li-occupation versus pseudo-continuous Na-occupation and their relationship with structural change behaviors in Fe?(MoO?)?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ji-Li; Zhou, Yong-Ning; Shi, Si-Qi; Shadike, Zulipiya; Huang, Xuan-Qi; Luo, Jun; Yang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Hong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao-Qing; et al

    2015-03-06

    The key factors governing the single-phase or multi-phase structural change behaviors during the intercalation/deintercalation of guest ions have not been well studied and understood yet. Through systematic studies of orthorhombic Fe?(MoO?)? electrode, two distinct guest ion occupation paths, namely discrete one for Li and pseudo-continuous one for Na, as well as their relationship with single-phase and two-phase modes for Na? and Li?, respectively during the intercalation/deintercalation process have been demonstrated. For the first time, the direct atomic-scale observation of biphasic domains (discrete occupation) in partially lithiated Fe?(MoO?)? and the one by one Na occupation (pseudo-continuous occupation) at 8d sites inmore »partially sodiated Fe?(MoO?)? are obtained during the discharge processes of Li/Fe?(MoO?)? and Na/Fe?(MoO?)? cells respectively. Our combined experimental and theoretical studies bring the new insights for the research and development of intercalation compounds as electrode materials for secondary batteries.« less

  14. Rapid gasification of nascent char in steam atmosphere during the pyrolysis of Na- and Ca-ion-exchanged brown coals in a drop-tube reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ondej Maek; Sou Hosokai; Koyo Norinaga; Chun-Zhu Li; Jun-ichiro Hayashi [Hokkaido University, Kita-ku (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Conversion Materials

    2009-09-15

    Several recent studies on in situ steam gasification of coal suggest a possibility of extremely fast steam gasification of char from rapid pyrolysis of pulverized brown coal. The unprecedented rate of char steam gasification can be achieved by exposing nascent char, that is, after tar evolution (temperature range >600{sup o}C), but before devolatilization (<900{sup o}C), to steam in the presence of Na and/or Ca dispersed in/on the char. In this study, we conducted rapid pyrolysis experiments using ion-exchanged Loy Yang brown coal samples, that is, H-form coal with Na/Ca contents <0.001 wt %, Na-form coal with Na content = 2.8 wt % and Ca-form coal with Ca content = 3.2 wt %. These samples were pyrolyzed in an atmospheric drop-tube reactor at a temperature of 900{sup o}C, inlet steam concentration of 50 vol. %, and a particle residence times of 2.8 s. The char yields from the pyrolysis of Na-form and Ca-form coals were as low as 12 and 33% on the respective coal carbon bases, and accounted for only 18 and 53% of the char yields from the full devolatilization of the respective coals at 900{sup o}C. In addition, the pyrolysis also consumed as much as 0.7-1.1 mol of H{sub 2}O per mol of coal C. On the other hand, the nascent char from the H-form coal allowed carbon deposition from the nascent tar, resulting in a char yield as high as 115% of that from the full devolatilization. The chars from the Na-form and Ca-form coals also acted as catalysts for steam reforming of tar, which was evidenced by significant negative synergistic effects of blending of H-form coal with Na-form coal or Ca-form coal on the tar and soot yields. 57 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Syntheses and properties of a series of chromium vanadates ACrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=Na, K, Rb, Cs) with layered structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Yonggang; Liang Jie [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wen Ting [Institute of Nanostructured Functional Materials, Huanghe Science and Technology College, Zhengzhou, Henan 450006 (China); Li Kuo [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Yingxia, E-mail: wangyx@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li Guobao; Liao Fuhui [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Lin Jianhua, E-mail: jhlin@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory for Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A series of layered compounds ACrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=Na, K, Rb, Cs) were investigated by means of powder X-ray diffraction technique, thermal analysis and IR spectroscopy. As a new member in this family, the structure of CsCrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} is confirmed by Rietveld refinement applying powder X-ray diffraction data. Isostructural NaCrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} was obtained by ion-exchange reaction of KCrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} in NaNO{sub 3} melt under 350 Degree-Sign C and was testified to be a metastable phase. These compounds crystallize in a monoclinic structure in the space group P2/c, and consist of planar CrV{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup -} slabs interleaved by alkali-metal cations. ACrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=K, Rb, Cs) present decreasing melting points and characteristic vibration of V=O bond in IR spectra. Magnetic measurements reveal weak antiferromagnetic interactions between Cr{sup 3+} cations in the isolated chains. - Graphical Abstract: A series of layered chromium vanadates ACrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=Na, K, Rb, Cs) have been synthesized by direct solid state reactions and ion-exchange routes. The interlayer alkali-metal cations were testified ion-exchangeable by some smaller monovalent cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The entire family of ACrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A=Na, K, Rb, Cs) have been prepared via solid-state reactions and ion-exchange routes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CsCrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} and a metastable phase of NaCrV{sub 2}O{sub 7} (ie-NaCrV{sub 2}O{sub 7}) were synthesized for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural characterization, spectra features and physical property measurements were carried out contrastively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkali-metal cations in the layered structure were testified to be ion-exchangeable with smaller monovalent ions.

  16. GE Healthcare -formerly Amersham Biosciences -Products -DyNA... http://www.mdyn.com/aptrix/upp01077.nsf/Content/Products?Open... 1 of 3 3/19/06 1:53 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    GE Healthcare - formerly Amersham Biosciences - Products - DyNA... http://www.mdyn.com/aptrix/upp01077.nsf/Content/Products?Open... 1 of 3 3/19/06 1:53 PM SEARCH LOGIN MY CART PRODUCTS LITERATURE SUPPORT Location: Home > Products > Spectrophotometry & Fluorometry > Fluorometry > DyNA QuantTM 200

  17. Solar Flares and particle acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy ~2 1032 ergs #12;"Standard" model of a solar flare/CME Solar corona T ~ 106 K => 0.1 keV per MeV Proton energies >100 MeV Large solar flare releases about 1032 ergs (about half energy-free emission) #12;X-ray spectrum of solar flares Thermal X-rays Non-thermal X-rays Gamma-ray lines Ramaty High

  18. Preparation, catalysis, and characterization of highly dispersed molybdenum sulfide catalysts supported on a NaY zeolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Yasuaki; Katsuyama, Hiromoto [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)] [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    The structure and dispersion of the molybdenum sulfides supported on a NaY zeolite were studied using XAFS techniques. It was found that molybdenum sulfide species prepared by sulfiding vapor deposited Mo(CO){sub 6} or by sulfiding molybdenum oxide dimer species encaged in the zeolite are highly dispersed and thermally stabilized against sintering or restructuring. These molybdenum species are formed via molybdenum sulfide dimer species as an intermediate. On the other hand, with the molybdenum sulfide catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the sulfidation of molybdenum oxides was incomplete. The molybdenum oxide species are suggested to be mainly located in the zeolite cavities after calcination, forming isolated molybdenum oxides in tetrahedral configurations. The molybdenum sulfide species prepared from Mo(CO){sub 6} showed much higher catalytic activities for thiophene hydrodesulfurization and butadiene hydrogenation than the molybdenum sulfides prepared by the impregnation, in conformity with a higher dispersion and higher fraction of the molybdenum sulfide species. It is demonstrated that in combination with metal carbonyl techniques, zeolite supports are very suitable for the preparation of highly dispersed molybdenum sulfides at a high Mo loading.

  19. Radiative transfer modeling of the enigmatic scattering polarization in the solar NaI D1 line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belluzzi, Luca; Degl'Innocenti, Egidio Landi

    2015-01-01

    The modeling of the peculiar scattering polarization signals observed in some diagnostically important solar resonance lines requires the consideration of the detailed spectral structure of the incident radiation field as well as the possibility of ground level polarization, along with the atom's hyperfine structure and quantum interference between hyperfine F-levels pertaining either to the same fine structure J-level, or to different J-levels of the same term. Here we present a theoretical and numerical approach suitable for solving this complex non-LTE radiative transfer problem. This approach is based on the density-matrix metalevel theory (where each level is viewed as a continuous distribution of sublevels) and on accurate formal solvers of the transfer equations and efficient iterative methods. We show an application to the D-lines of NaI, with emphasis on the enigmatic D1 line, pointing out the observable signatures of the various physical mechanisms considered. We demonstrate that the linear polariza...

  20. Laboratory Test Report for Fujitsu 12RLS and Mitsubishi FE12NA Mini-Split Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.

    2011-09-01

    Mini-split heat pumps are being proposed as a new retrofit option to replace resistance heating in the Pacific Northwest. NREL has previously developed a field test protocol for mini-split systems to ensure consistent results from field tests. This report focuses on the development of detailed system performance maps for mini-split heat pumps so that the potential benefits of mini-split systems can be accurately analyzed for different climate regions and housing types. This report presents laboratory test results for two mini-split heat pumps. Steady-state heating and cooling performance for the Fujitsu 12RLS and Mitsubishi FE12NA was tested under a wide range of outdoor and indoor temperatures at various compressor and fan speeds. Cycling performance for each unit was also tested under both modes of operation. Both systems performed quite well under low loads and the experimental test data aligned with manufacturer reported values. Adequate datasets were attained to promote performance modeling of these two systems in the future.

  1. Using GC-FID to Quantify the Removal of 4-sec-Butylphenol from NGS Solvent by NaOH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloop, Jr., Frederick V.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2014-12-01

    A caustic wash of the solvent used in the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process was found to remove the modifier breakdown product 4-sec-butylphenol (SBP) with varying efficiency depending on the aqueous NaOH concentration. Recent efforts at ORNL have aimed at characterizing the flowsheet chemistry and reducing the technical uncertainties of the NG-CSSX process. One technical uncertainty has been the efficacy of caustic washing of the solvent for the removal of lipophilic anions, in particular, the efficient removal of SBP, an important degradation product of the solvent modifier, Cs-7SB. In order to make this determination, it was necessary to develop a sensitive and reliable analytical technique for the detection and quantitation of SBP. This report recounts the development of a GC-FID-based (Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detection) technique for analyzing SBP and the utilization of the technique to subsequently confirm the ability of the caustic wash to efficiently remove SBP from the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) used in NG-CSSX. In particular, the developed technique was used to monitor the amount of SBP removed from a simple solvent and the full NGS by contact with sodium hydroxide wash solutions over a range of concentrations. The results show that caustic washing removes SBP with effectively the same efficiency as it did in the original Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process.

  2. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Na-birnessites and phase transformation by arsenic(III) oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br; Sa, Rodrigo G.; Spitale, Matheus C.; Athayde, Maycon; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T. [DEMET, UFMG, Rua Espirito Santo 35, Sala 206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-06-03

    Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis was employed to produce Na-birnessites. Crystalline, single-phase materials were obtained at temperatures as low as 120 deg. C and times as short as 1 min. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural features of the nanostructured powders. Birnessites possessed a monoclinic structure in space group C2/m with nine Raman-active bands, all of which were observed for the first time due to optimized acquisition of the spectroscopic data. The highly reactive materials produced were submitted to sorption experiments with As(III). An oxidative precipitation occurred with the production of Mn(II) arsenate at higher arsenic concentrations. In addition, the formation of hausmannite (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman analyses of the reacted solid phase. The observed 14 Raman-active modes were adjusted according to the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd space group for hausmannite. An additional band related to the breathing mode of the arsenate was observed, leading to the conclusion that adsorption onto hausmannite takes place in addition to the oxidative precipitation of manganese arsenate.

  3. Preparation of NaGdS{sub 2} via thermolysis of Gd[S{sub 2}CN(C{sub 4}H{sub 8})]{sub 3}-phen complexes and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Xixian, E-mail: Luoxixiandl@126.com [Physics Department, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Ma, Lubin; Xing, Mingming; Fu, Yao; Zhou, Xiaolin; Sun, Min [Physics Department, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? We adopt a new and simple thermolysis method to synthesise NaGdS{sub 2} compounds. ? The obtained NaGdS{sub 2} presents a microrod morphology with a length diameter ratio of 2.1. ? NaGdS{sub 2} has excellent transmission over a very wide range of wavelengths (>430 nm). ? The route may be used for the synthesis of other AREX{sub 2}-based materials or nanocrystals. - Abstract: A novel, simple thermolysis method is adopted to prepare alkali metal rare earth ternary sulphide NaGdS{sub 2} using Gd(S{sub 2}CNEt{sub 2}){sub 3-}phen complexes and NaS{sub 2}CNEt{sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O mixtures as precursors in a nitrogen atmosphere at 600–1000 °C. The obtained NaGdS{sub 2} presents a microrod morphology with an average diameter of 112 nm, average length of 236 nm, and length diameter ratio of 2.1. Furthermore, the as-prepared NaGdS{sub 2} has excellent transmission over a very wide range of wavelengths (>430 nm) and may be an ideal IR window material.

  4. (Ca,Na)(Zn,Mn){sub 2}As{sub 2}: A new spin and charge doping decoupled diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, K.; Chen, B. J.; Deng, Z.; Zhao, G. Q.; Zhu, J. L.; Liu, Q. Q.; Wang, X. C.; Han, W.; Frandsen, B.; Liu, L.; Cheung, S.; Uemura, Y. J.; Ning, F. L.; Munsie, T. J. S.; Medina, T.; Luke, G. M.; Carlo, J. P.; Munevar, J.; Zhang, G. M.; Jin, C. Q.

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report the successful synthesis of a spin- and charge-decoupled diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) (Ca,Na)(Zn,Mn){sub 2}As{sub 2}, crystallizing into the hexagonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2} structure. The compound shows a ferromagnetic transition with a Curie temperature up to 33?K with 10% Na doping, which gives rise to carrier density of n{sub p}???10{sup 20?}cm{sup ?3}. The new DMS is a soft magnetic material with H{sub C}?

  5. Enhancing upconversion emissions of NaTm0.02YbxY0.98xF4 nanocrystals through increasing Yb3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Enhancing upconversion emissions of NaTm0.02YbxY0.98ÀxF4 nanocrystals through increasing Yb3 þ the enhancement of the 470 nm emissions, which is in good agreement with the experimental data. & 2011 Elsevier B are vital to realize multicolor fluorescence bio-labels [3,4]. Blue UC emissions can also excite several FDA

  6. Pt/[Fe]ZSM-5 modified by Na and Cs cations: an active and selective catalyst for dehydrogenation of n-alkanes to n-alkenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    catalytic dehydrogenation of n-alkanes to n-alkenes. Cs and Na cations titrate acid sites and inhibit with [(NH3)4Pt](NO3)2 solutions (6.25 6 1025 M; Aldrich, 99.995%) for 12 h at 353 K, filtered, washed with deionized water, and treated in flowing dry air (1.67 cm3 s21 ) for 12 h at 723 K (0.017 K s21

  7. Electronic, structural, phonon dynamical, and CO{sub 2} capture properties of LiMZrO{sub 3} (M=Na, K) by ab initio thermodynamic investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    The electronic, structural and phonon properties of LiMZrO{sub 3} (M=Na, K) were investigated by the density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics. Their thermodynamic properties for CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption were analyzed in comparison with the corresponding M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Two substituted configurations of LiMZrO{sub 3} were created from Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Both types of LiNaZrO3 have direct band gaps with values of 3.84 eV and 3.49 eV respectively. While in the case of LiKZrO{sub 3}, one type has an indirect band gap of 3.79 eV between ? and M high symmetric points while another has a direct band gap of 3.12 eV. The phonon dispersions and phonon density of states of LiMZrO{sub 3} were calculated with the direct method. From the calculated thermodynamic properties of LiMZrO{sub 3} reacting with CO{sub 2}, our results showed that by doping Na into Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, the obtained new solid LiNaZrO{sub 3} has better performance as a CO{sub 2} sorbent applying to post-combustion capture technology. For K doping into Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, our calculated thermodynamic results showed that the new solid LiKZrO{sub 3} does not gain improvement on its CO{sub 2} capture performance because its regeneration temperature is much higher than Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}.

  8. Ion exchange-induced dissolution of calcite in Na-montmorillonite/CaCO?b3?s systems: its effect on hydraulic conductivity, CaCO?b3?s dissolution kinetics, and CaCO?b3?s equilibrium relations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Del Rio Durand, Jose Bruno

    1990-01-01

    Minerals Repository, Clay Minerals Society, University of Missouri, Columbia, MQ) was treated with pH 5. 5 Na-acetate in order to remove traces of CaCO3; complete Na-saturation of the sample was achieved by successive washings with 1 M NaC1... was present. The DD reaction resulted in pH values of approximately 10, a decrease of the exchangeable sodium percemage (ESP), and in a substantial enhancement of calcite dissolution. The rate of calcite dissolution in these systems, as well as in batch...

  9. Effects of Mg doping on the remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Xiqian; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Liu, Liang-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites with different Mg2+ doping contents (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The doping effects on the crystal structure were investigated by XRD, XPS and EXAFS. The results show that low dose doping Mg2+ does not alter the structure of the material, and magnesium is successfully substituted for vanadium site. The Mg doped Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites exhibit significant improvements on the electrochemistry performances in terms of the rate capability and cycle performance, especially for the Na3V1.95Mg0.05(PO4)3/C. For example, when the current density increased from 1 C to 30 C, the specific capacitymore »only decreased from 112.5 mAh g-1 to 94.2 mAh g-1 showing very good rate capability. Moreover, even cycling at a high rate of 20 C, an excellent capacity retention of 81% is maintained from the initial value of 106.4 mAh g-1 to 86.2 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle. Enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the optimized particle size, structural stability and enhanced ionic and electronic conductivity induced by Mg doping.« less

  10. Synthesis and characterization of ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thao Tran, T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Shiv Halasyamani, P., E-mail: psh@uh.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Kemistintie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-02-15

    A family of alkali metal tin(II) fluorides, ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, or Cs{sup +}), has been synthesized through a low temperature solvothermal technique. A fluorine free solvent, methanol, was used in the synthesis. NaSnF{sub 3}, KSnF{sub 3}, and RbSnF{sub 3} have been reported previously; however for RbSnF{sub 3} the reported space group is incorrect. CsSnF{sub 3} is a new alkali tin(II) fluoride, and exhibits a ‘zero-dimensional’ crystal structure with isolated SnF{sub 3}{sup ?} anions separated by Cs{sup +} cations. In addition to the synthesis, infrared, UV–vis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis measurements were performed. - Graphical abstract: Ball-and-stick diagrams of CsSnF{sub 3}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A family of ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +} or Cs{sup +}) has been synthesized solvothermally at low temperatures. • Fluorine-free solvent, methanol, was used instead of conventional fluorinating agents. • RbSnF{sub 3} described in the correct space group exhibits infinite chains of corner-sharing SnF{sub 4} polyhedra. • New CsSnF{sub 3} exhibits a ‘zero-dimensional’ crystal structure consisting of isolated SnF{sub 3}{sup ?} anionic polyhedra.

  11. Structural stability and depolarization of manganese-doped (Bi?.?Na?.?){sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}TiO? relaxor ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Sheng-Fen [Department of Physics, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chi-Shun, E-mail: 039611@mail.fju.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Engineering, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Lun; Chen, Pin-Yi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ming-Chi University of Technology, New Taipei City 24301, Taiwan (China); Chen, Cheng-Sao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hwa-Hsia University of Technology, New Taipei City 23567, Taiwan (China); Hugo Schmidt, V. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717 (United States); Anthoniappen, J. [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Engineering, Fu Jen Catholic University, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-21

    This work reveals that 0.5?mol. % manganese (Mn) doping in (Bi?.?Na?.?){sub 1?x}Ba{sub x}TiO? (x?=?0 and 0.075) solid solutions can increase structural thermal stability, depolarization temperature (T{sub d}), piezoelectric coefficient (d??), and electromechanical coupling factor (k?). High-resolution X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal coexistence of rhombohedral (R) R3c and tetragonal (T) P4bm phases in (Bi?.?Na?.?)?.???Ba?.???TiO? (BN7.5BT) and 0.5?mol. % Mn-doped BN7.5BT (BN7.5BT-0.5Mn). (Bi?.?Na?.?)TiO? (BNT) and BN7.5BT show an R???R?+?T phase transition, which does not occur in 0.5?mol. % Mn-doped BNT (BNT-0.5Mn) and BN7.5BT-0.5Mn. Dielectric permittivity (??) follows the Curie-Weiss equation, ???=?C/(T???T{sub o}), above the Burns temperature (TB), below which polar nanoregions begin to develop. The direct piezoelectric coefficient (d??) and electromechanical coupling factor (k?) of BN7.5BT-0.5Mn reach 190 pC/N and 47%.

  12. Effects of Mg doping on the remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Hui [Beijing Inst. of Technology, Beijing (China). Key Lab. of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Bai, Ying [Beijing Inst. of Technology, Beijing (China). Key Lab. of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Wu, Feng [Beijing Inst. of Technology, Beijing (China). Key Lab. of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Wu, Chuan [Beijing Inst. of Technology, Beijing (China). Key Lab. of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Liu, Liang-Yu [Beijing Inst. of Technology, Beijing (China). Key Lab. of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites with different Mg2+ doping contents (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The doping effects on the crystal structure were investigated by XRD, XPS and EXAFS. The results show that low dose doping Mg2+ does not alter the structure of the material, and magnesium is successfully substituted for vanadium site. The Mg doped Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites exhibit significant improvements on the electrochemistry performances in terms of the rate capability and cycle performance, especially for the Na3V1.95Mg0.05(PO4)3/C. For example, when the current density increased from 1 C to 30 C, the specific capacity only decreased from 112.5 mAh g-1 to 94.2 mAh g-1 showing very good rate capability. Moreover, even cycling at a high rate of 20 C, an excellent capacity retention of 81% is maintained from the initial value of 106.4 mAh g-1 to 86.2 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle. Enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the optimized particle size, structural stability and enhanced ionic and electronic conductivity induced by Mg doping.

  13. Reduction of Hydrocarbon Losses to Flare Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, J.

    1979-01-01

    action to minimize hydrocarbon releases, 2) install flare gas recovery systems, and 3) recover or reduce process streams which have to be continuous1y vented to the flare system. This report discusses alternate designs for flare gas monitoring and flare...

  14. NA Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncrief Ames019 For moreMyx

  15. DOE/NA-0027

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia National 1 PAGE 1 OF2Guidance to [SubmitO3 FISCAL

  16. A Bayesian Approach to Solar Flare Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Wheatland

    2004-03-26

    A number of methods of flare prediction rely on classification of physical characteristics of an active region, in particular optical classification of sunspots, and historical rates of flaring for a given classification. However these methods largely ignore the number of flares the active region has already produced, in particular the number of small events. The past history of occurrence of flares (of all sizes) is an important indicator to future flare production. We present a Bayesian approach to flare prediction, which uses the flaring record of an active region together with phenomenological rules of flare statistics to refine an initial prediction for the occurrence of a big flare during a subsequent period of time. The initial prediction is assumed to come from one of the extant methods of flare prediction. The theory of the method is outlined, and simulations are presented to show how the refinement step of the method works in practice.

  17. STELLAR CORONAE, SOLAR FLARES: A DETAILED COMPARISON OF {sigma} GEM, HR 1099, AND THE SUN IN HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara E-mail: kennethjhphillips@yahoo.com E-mail: bs@cbk.pan.wroc.pl

    2013-05-10

    The Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETG) spectra of the coronally active binary stars {sigma} Gem and HR 1099 are among the highest fluence observations for such systems taken at high spectral resolution in X-rays with this instrument. This allows us to compare their properties in detail to solar flare spectra obtained with the Russian CORONAS-F spacecraft's RESIK instrument at similar resolution in an overlapping bandpass. Here we emphasize the detailed comparisons of the 3.3-6.1 A region (including emission from highly ionized S, Si, Ar, and K) from solar flare spectra to the corresponding {sigma} Gem and HR 1099 spectra. We also model the larger wavelength range of the HETG, from 1.7 to 25 A - having emission lines from Fe, Ca, Ar, Si, Al, Mg, Ne, O, and N-to determine coronal temperatures and abundances. {sigma} Gem is a single-lined coronally active long-period binary which has a very hot corona. HR 1099 is a similar, but shorter period, double-lined system. With very deep HETG exposures we can even study emission from some of the weaker species, such as K, Na, and Al, which are important since they have the lowest first ionization potentials, a parameter well known to be correlated with elemental fractionation in the solar corona. The solar flare temperatures reach Almost-Equal-To 20 MK, comparable to the {sigma} Gem and HR 1099 coronae. During the Chandra exposures, {sigma} Gem was slowly decaying from a flare and its spectrum is well characterized by a collisional ionization equilibrium plasma with a broad temperature distribution ranging from 2 to 60 MK, peaking near 25 MK, but with substantial emission from 50 MK plasma. We have detected K XVIII and Na XI emission which allow us to set limits on their abundances. HR 1099 was also quite variable in X-rays, also in a flare state, but had no detectable K XVIII. These measurements provide new comparisons of solar and stellar coronal abundances, especially at the lowest first ionization potential (FIP) values. The low FIP elements do not show enhancement in the stellar coronae as they do in the Sun, except perhaps for K in {sigma} Gem. While {sigma} Gem and HR 1099 differ in their emission measure distributions, they have very similar elemental abundances.

  18. NREL is a na*onal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. A Survey of State-Level Cost and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equivalent to 0.9% of retail electricity rates when calculated as a weighted-funded by EERE's Solar Energy Technologies Office, and the Na*onal Electricity Delivery Division of the DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

  19. NREL is a na*onal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 2030 CA Low Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    NREL is a na*onal laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office Study o Introduc*on o Results o Conclusions · General insights from NREL modeling

  20. NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite: A highly efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst utilizing upconversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzwang@mail.sic.ac.cn; Sun, Songmei; Zhang, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Design and synthesis of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} based on upconversion. • NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite was prepared for the first time. • Core–shell structure benefits the properties. • Upconversion contributed to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. • Helps to understand the functionality of new type photocatalysts. - Abstract: NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite was designed and prepared for the first time based on upconversion. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The results revealed that the as-synthesized NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} consisted of spheres with a core diameter of about 26 nm and a shell diameter of around 6 nm. The core was upconversion illuminant NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb and the shell was Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} around the core, which was confirmed by EDS. The NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the photodecomposition of Rhodamine B (RhB) under the irradiation of Xe lamp and green light emitting diode (g-LED). The mechanism of the high photocatalytic activity was discussed by photoluminescence spectra (PL), which is mainly attributed to upconversion of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb in the NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite and the core–shell structure.

  1. RNA Extraction and Labeling 1. To IP pellet (~ 25 l vol), add 175 l of: 10 mM HEPES-NaOH, pH 7.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    85 RNA Extraction and Labeling 1. To IP pellet (~ 25 µl vol), add 175 µl of: 10 mM HEPES-NaOH, pH 7 Speed-Vac. 7. Labeling 3' ends. To each pellet, add 10 µl containing: 1 X NEB RNA Ligase buffer 10% DMSO precipitate. Use DEPC-treated 3M NaOAc, pH 5. Wash with 75% EtOH and dry. 12. Resuspend pellet completely in 5

  2. Colloyuc C6, supplinzcrlt uu rzo 7, Tornc 41, Juillet 1980,lI(i@' C6-88 Energy levels of F,(Na)-centre in KC1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Colloyuc C6, supplinzcrlt uu rzo 7, Tornc 41, Juillet 1980,lI(i@' C6-88 Energy levels of F,(Na)-centre in KC1 C. K. Ong PhysicsDepartment,Ahmadu Bello University,Zaria, Nigeria RCsumC. - Nous avons calcult les energies des bandes d'absorption du centre F,(Na) dans KC1 par la methode du reseau statique

  3. RHESSI observation of flare elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2006-02-14

    RHESSI observations of elementary flare bursts are presented. These solar flare elements are distinct emission peaks of a duration of some tens of seconds present in the hard X-ray light curves. They are characterized by consistent soft-hard-soft spectral behavior, which can be described in a quantitative way and compared which predictions from acceleration models. A detailed analysis of hard X-ray images for an M5 class flare shows that elementary flare bursts do not occur at distinct locations, but as twin X-ray sources move smoothly along an arcade of magnetic loops. This observation apparently contradicts the predictions of standard translation invariant 2.5-dimensional reconnection models.

  4. Surface Complexation of Neodymium at the Rutile-Water Interface: A Potentiometric and Modeling Study in NaCl Media to 250°C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, Mora K.; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J; Palmer, Donald

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption of Nd{sup 3+} onto rutile surfaces was examined by potentiometric titration from 25 to 250 C, in 0.03 and 0.30m NaCl background electrolyte. Experimental results show that Nd{sup 3+} sorbs strongly, even at low temperature, with adsorption commencing below the pHznpc of rutile. In addition, there is a systematic increase in Nd{sup 3+} adsorption with increasing temperature. The experimental results were rationalized and described using surface oxygen proton affinities computed from the MUlti SIte Complexation or MUSIC model, coupled with a Stern-based three-layer description of the oxide/water interface. Moreover, molecular-scale information was incorporated successfully into the surface complexation model, providing a unique geometry for the adsorption of Nd{sup 3+} on rutile. The primary mode of Nd{sup 3+} adsorption was assumed to be the tetradentate configuration found for Y{sup 3+} adsorption on the rutile (110) surface from previously described in situ X-ray standing wave experiments, wherein the sorbing cations bond directly with two adjacent ''terminal'' and two adjacent ''bridging'' surface oxygen atoms. Similarly, the adsorption of Na{sup +} counterions was also assumed to be tetradentate, as supported by MD simulations of Na{sup +} interactions with the rutile (110) surface, and by analogous X-ray standing wave results for Rb{sup +} adsorption on rutile. Fitting parameters for Nd{sup 3+} adsorption included binding constants for the tetradentate adsorption complex and capacitance values for the inner-sphere binding plane. In addition, hydrolysis of the tetradentate adsorption complex was permitted and resulted in significantly improved model fits at higher temperature and pH values. The modeling results indicate that the Stern-based MUSIC surface-complexation model adequately accommodates molecular-scale information to uniquely rationalize and describe multivalent ion adsorption systematically into the hydrothermal regime.

  5. Calculo I Exercicios Folha 6. Derivadas 1. Uma massa na extremidade de uma mola e esticada 4 cm alem da sua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amorim, Paulo

    C´alculo I ­ Exerc´icios ­ Folha 6. Derivadas 1. Uma massa na extremidade de uma mola ´e esticada 4 a regra d dx 1 g(x) = g (x) g2(x) e verifique que d dx (x-n ) = -nx-n-1 . 3. Calcule as derivadas de a) 1. Calcule as derivadas de a) n x (usando a derivada da fun¸c~ao inversa) b) sin2 x2 (usando a derivada da

  6. In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of electrochemical corrosion of copper in aqueous NaHCO3 solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Peng; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Borondics, Ferenc; Glans, Per-Anders; West, Mark W.; Chang, Ching-Lin; Salmeron, Miquel; Guo, Jinghua

    2010-03-31

    A novel electrochemical setup has been developed for soft x-ray absorption studies of the electronic structure of electrode materials during electrochemical cycling. In this communication we illustrate the operation of the cell with a study of the corrosion behavior of copper in aqueous NaHCO3 solution via the electrochemically induced changes of its electronic structure. This development opens the way for in situ investigations of electrochemical processes, photovoltaics, batteries, fuel cells, water splitting, corrosion, electrodeposition, and a variety of important biological processes.

  7. NaLaF{sub 4}:Pr{sup 3+},Yb{sup 3+}, an efficient blue to near infra-red quantum cutter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guille, A.; Pereira, A.; Moine, B.

    2013-12-01

    In order to reduce the thermalization losses in solar cells, down-conversion of blue photons into near infra-red photons is a promising solution. In the present paper, we analyse the energy transfer processes between Pr{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} in NaLaF{sub 4} and we show that an efficient quantum-cutting process occurs. Nevertheless, we also show that a back transfer from Yb{sup 3+} toward the {sup 1}G{sub 4} level of Pr{sup 3+} ion leading to emission beyond 1??m reduces the potentiality of this material as a quantum cutter for Si solar cells.

  8. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$?$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosanna Depalo; Francesca Cavanna; Federico Ferraro; Alessandra Slemer; Tariq Al-Abdullah; Shavkat Akhmadaliev; Michael Anders; Daniel Bemmerer; Zoltán Elekes; Giovanni Mattei; Stefan Reinicke; Konrad Schmidt; Carlo Scian; Louis Wagner

    2015-07-14

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which is found to be less intense by one order of magnitude. In addition, improved branching ratios have been determined for the gamma decay of the resonances at 436, 479, and 639 keV.

  9. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$?$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosanna Depalo; Francesca Cavanna; Federico Ferraro; Alessandra Slemer; Tariq Al-Abdullah; Shavkat Akhmadaliev; Michael Anders; Daniel Bemmerer; Zoltán Elekes; Giovanni Mattei; Stefan Reinicke; Konrad Schmidt; Carlo Scian; Louis Wagner

    2015-09-18

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which is found to be less intense by one order of magnitude. In addition, improved branching ratios have been determined for the gamma decay of the resonances at 436, 479, and 639 keV.

  10. Report on the GC-MBS method for correcting NaI spectra for transmission loss in hand-held instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawool-Sullivan, M.

    1997-10-08

    The goals of this project were (1) to develop a capability to study the scattered components in the NaI spectra of attenuated sources and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of the gross count material basis set (GC-MBS) method in quantifying transmission losses from the shapes of measured NaI spectra. These goals are related, as the GC-MBS method involves a linear log-spectrum decomposition into MBS component spectra, and scattered gamma rays represent a significant nonlinear interference. Eventually, the authors hope to understand the effect of the scattered components on the MBS decomposition and to develop ways to correct for inaccuracies. As of this writing the authors have not reached that long-term objective, so the two halves of this project are treated here as separate topics, with a separate section for each. They have substantially achieved both of the project goals and are collecting additional data for two publications at the upcoming IEEE conference in Albuquerque, NM--one paper about their work on scattering and another on the GC-MBS method. This project report will contain preliminary portions of those two papers.

  11. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$?$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosanna Depalo; Francesca Cavanna; Federico Ferraro; Alessandra Slemer; Tariq Al-Abdullah; Shavkat Akhmadaliev; Michael Anders; Daniel Bemmerer; Zoltán Elekes; Giovanni Mattei; Stefan Reinicke; Konrad Schmidt; Carlo Scian; Louis Wagner

    2015-10-21

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which is found to be less intense by one order of magnitude. In addition, improved branching ratios have been determined for the gamma decay of the resonances at 436, 479, and 639 keV.

  12. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Depalo, Rosanna; Ferraro, Federico; Slemer, Alessandra; Al-Abdullah, Tariq; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Anders, Michael; Bemmerer, Daniel; Elekes, Zoltán; Mattei, Giovanni; Reinicke, Stefan; Schmidt, Konrad; Scian, Carlo; Wagner, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which i...

  13. Earth Planets Space, , , Flares and the Chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    produces in the photospheric magnetic field. Key words: Solar flares, Solar chromosphere, Solar corona understand about solar flares. The reason for this was the recognition, in the 19th and early 20th cen The radiative energy of a solar flare appears mainly in the optical and UV continuum, which form in the lower

  14. OVERVIEW OF SOLAR FLARES The Yohkoh Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Chapter 8 OVERVIEW OF SOLAR FLARES The Yohkoh Perspective Hugh Hudson Space Sciences Laboratory, UC This chapter reviews the physics of solar flares, with special emphasis on the past decade. During this decade, corona 1 #12;2 1. Introduction The physics of solar flares seems too broad a subject to review adequately

  15. Solar Flares STFC Advanced Summer School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Solar Flares STFC Advanced Summer School in Solar Physics H. S. Hudson Space Sciences Laboratory · A solar flare is, strictly speaking, the electromagnetic radiation from a coronal magnetic energy release and CME require a magnetic storage to supply the energy: #12;Glasgow Summerschool 2011 Why is flare

  16. Lithium-6 from Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ramaty; V. Tatischeff; J. P. Thibaud; B. Kozlovsky; N. Mandzhavidze

    2000-03-23

    By introducing a hitherto ignored Li-6 producing process, due to accelerated He-3 reactions with He-4, we show that accelerated particle interactions in solar flares produce much more Li-6 than Li-7. By normalizing our calculations to gamma-ray data we demonstrate that the Li-6 produced in solar flares, combined with photospheric Li-7, can account for the recently determined solar wind lithium isotopic ratio, obtained from measurements in lunar soil, provided that the bulk of the flare produced lithium is evacuated by the solar wind. Further research in this area could provide unique information on a variety of problems, including solar atmospheric transport and mixing, solar convection and the lithium depletion issue, and solar wind and solar particle acceleration.

  17. A first-principles density functional theory study of the electronic structural and thermodynamic properties of M2ZrO3 and M2CO3 (M=Na, K) and their capabilities for CO2 capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhua Duan

    2012-01-01

    Alkali metal zirconates could be used as solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture. The structural, electronic, and phonon properties of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are investigated by combining the density functional theory with lattice phonon dynamics. The thermodynamics of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption reactions of these two zirconates are analyzed. The calculated results show that their optimized structures are in a good agreement with experimental measurements. The calculated band gaps are 4.339 eV (indirect), 3.641 eV (direct), 3.935 eV (indirect), and 3.697 eV (direct) for Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, respectively.The calculated phonon dispersions and phonon density of states for M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) revealed that from K to Na to Li, their frequency peaks are shifted to high frequencies due to the molecular weight decreased from K to Li. From the calculated reaction heats and relationships of free energy change versus temperatures and CO{sub 2} pressures of the M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) reacting with CO{sub 2}, we found that the performance of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} capturing CO{sub 2} is similar to that of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and is better than that of K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Therefore, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} are good candidates of high temperature CO{sub 2} sorbents and could be used for post combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies.

  18. Mechanism of Na2SO4-induced corrosion of molybdenum containing nickel-base superalloys at high temperatures. I. Corrosion in atmospheres containing O2 only. II. Corrosion in O2 + SO2 atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, A.K.

    1986-05-01

    Kinetics of the Na2SO4-induced corrosion of the molybdenum-containing nickel-base superalloys, B-1900 and Udimet 700, coated with Na2MoO4, has been studied in oxygen atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 750 to 950 C. Because the gas turbine atmosphere always contains some SO2 and SO3, the effect of atmospheric SO2 content on corrosion of Udimet-700 has also been studied. It was found that in the O2 atmosphere the melt in the catastrophic corrosion phase consists of Na2MoO4 plus MoO3, with the onset of the catastrophic corrosion coinciding with the appearance of MoO3. In the presence of low levels of atmospheric SO2 (below 0.24 percent), the melt during catastrophic corrosion contains, in addition to Na2MoO4 and MoO3, some quantities of Na2SO4. At the levels of SO2 above 1 percent, no catastrophic corrosion was observed. At these SO2 levels, internal sulfidation appears to be the primary mode of degradation. 40 references.

  19. Scaling laws of solar and stellar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus J. Aschwanden; Robert A. Stern; Manuel Güdel

    2007-10-12

    In this study we compile for the first time comprehensive data sets of solar and stellar flare parameters, including flare peak temperatures T_p, flare peak volume emission measures EM_p, and flare durations t_f from both solar and stellar data, as well as flare length scales L from solar data. Key results are that both the solar and stellar data are consistent with a common scaling law of EM_p ~ T_p^4.7, but the stellar flares exhibit ~250 times higher emission measures (at the same flare peak temperature). For solar flares we observe also systematic trends for the flare length scale L(T_p) ~ T_p^0.9 and the flare duration t_F(T_p) ~ T_p^0.9 as a function of the flare peak temperature. Using the theoretical RTV scaling law and the fractal volume scaling observed for solar flares, i.e., V(L) ~ L^2.4, we predict a scaling law of EM_p ~ T_p^4.3, which is consistent with observations, and a scaling law for electron densities in flare loops, n_p ~ T_p^2/L ~ T_p^1.1. The RTV-predicted electron densities were also found to be consistent with densities inferred from total emission measures, n_p=(EM_p/q_V*V)^1/2, using volume filling factors of q_V=0.03-0.08 constrained by fractal dimensions measured in solar flares. Our results affect also the determination of radiative and conductive cooling times, thermal energies, and frequency distributions of solar and stellar flare energies.

  20. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flares and Flavors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion

    2004-04-16

    Intense solar flares originated in sun spots produce high energy particles (protons, $\\alpha$) well observable by satellites and ground-based detectors. The flare onset produces signals in different energy bands (radio, X, gamma and neutrons). The most powerful solar flares as the ones occurred on 23 February 1956, 29 September 1989 and the more recent on October 28th, and the 2nd, 4th, 13th of November 2003 released in sharp times the largest flare energies (${E}_{FL} \\simeq {10}^{31}\\div {10}^{32} erg). The high energy solar flare protons scatter within the solar corona and they must be source of a prompt neutrino burst through the production of charged pions. Later on, solar flare particles hitting the atmosphere may marginally increase the atmospheric neutrino flux. The prompt solar neutrino flare may be detected in the largest underground $\

  1. SUPPORTING INFORMATION METHODS Buffers. Buffer U is 20 mM TrisHCl, 6 mM NaCl, 1.7 mM MgCl2, 5 mM 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    SUPPORTING INFORMATION METHODS Buffers. Buffer U is 20 mM Tris·HCl, 6 mM NaCl, 1.7 mM MgCl2, 5 mM 2H 7.5 at 25°C. SM buffer is 50 mM Tris·HCl, 0.1 M NaCl, 8 mM MgSO4, 0.01% gelatin, pH 7.5 at 25°C. Lysis buffer is 50 mM Tris·HCl, 0.2 M NaCl, 20% (w/v) sucrose, 15% (v/v) glycerol, 1 mM EDTA, 2 mM 2-ME

  2. Solubility and near-equilibrium dissolution rates of quartz in dilute NaCl solutions at 398-473 K under alkaline conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Rosenqvist, Jorgen K [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The dissolution-precipitation of quartz controls porosity and permeability in many lithologies and may be the best studied mineral-water reaction. However, the rate of quartz-water reaction is relatively well characterized far from equilibrium but relatively unexplored near equilibrium. We present kinetic data for quartz as equilibrium is approached from undersaturation and more limited data on the approach from supersaturated conditions in 0.1 molal NaCl + NaOH + NaSiO(OH){sub 3} solutions with pH 8.2-9.7 at 398, 423, 448, and 473 K. We employed a potentiometric technique that allows precise determination of solution speciation within 2 kJ mol{sup -1} of equilibrium without the need for to perturb the system through physical sampling and chemical analysis. Slightly higher equilibrium solubilities between 423 and 473 K were found than reported in recent compilations. Apparent activation energies of 29 and 37 kJ mol{sup -1} are inferred for rates of dissolution at two surface sites with different values of connectedness: dissolution at Q{sup 1} or Q{sup 2} silicon sites, respectively. The dissolution mechanism varies with DG such that reactions at both sites control dissolution up until a critical free energy value above which only reactions at Q{sup 1} sites are important. When our near-equilibrium dissolution rates are extrapolated far from equilibrium, they agree within propagated uncertainty at 398 K with a recently published model by Bickmore et al. (2008). However, our extrapolated rates become progressively slower than model predictions with increasing temperature. Furthermore, we see no dependence of the postulated Q{sup 1} reaction rate on pH, and a poorly-constrained pH dependence of the postulated Q{sup 2} rate. Our slow extrapolated rates are presumably related to the increasing contribution of dissolution at Q{sup 3} sites far from equilibrium. The use of the potentiometric technique for rate measurement will yield both rate data and insights into the mechanisms of dissolution over a range of chemical affinity. Such measurements are needed to model the evolution of many natural systems quantitatively.

  3. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin Tengteng; Liu Wei; Chen Shuang; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter; Zhao Jingtai; Kniep, Ruediger; Hoffmann, Stefan

    2012-08-15

    A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that the title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters a=8.392(2) A, b=6.3960(10) A, c=16.670(2) A, {beta}=109.470(10) Degree-Sign , V=843.6(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The crystal structure is characterized by a complex chain of copper-centered polyhedra running along [0 1 0] which are connected by phosphate tetrahedra. The resulting three-dimensional polyhedra framework exhibits channels filled by additional copper and sodium atoms. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the specific heat and the magnetic susceptibility reveal low-dimensional magnetic behavior. The compound starts to decompose at 700 K under release of oxygen and evaporation of Cu{sup I}Cl as shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new copper(II) phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], exhibits linear chains of copper tetrahedra which show low-dimensional magnetic behavior proven by specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure comprises chains of Cu{sub 4}O tetrahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dimensional behavior has been proven by magnetic and specific heat measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating, Cu{sup I}Cl and oxygen are released shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

  4. Fundamental limitation to the magnitude of piezoelectric response of (001)pc textured K0.5Na0.5NbO3 ceramic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Shashaank; Belianinov, Alex; Okatan, Mahmut B; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Priya, Shashaank

    2014-01-01

    (001)pc textured K0.5Na0.5NbO3 (KNN) ceramic was found to exhibit a 65% improvement in the longitudinal piezoelectric response as compared to its random counterpart. Piezoresponse force microscopy study revealed the existence of larger 180 and non-180 domains for textured ceramic as compared to that of the random ceramic. Improvement in piezoresponse by the development of (001)pc texture is discussed in terms of the crystallographic nature of KNN and domain morphology. A comparative analysis performed with a rhombohedral composition suggested that the improvement in longitudinal piezoresponse of polycrystalline ceramics by the development of (001)pc texture is limited by the crystal structure.

  5. {sup 25}Na and {sup 25}Mg fragmentation on {sup 12}C at 9.23 MeV per nucleon at TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St-Onge, Patrick; Boisjoli, Mark; Fregeau, Marc-Olivier; Gauthier, Jerome; Wallace, Barton; Roy, Rene

    2012-10-20

    HERACLES is a multidetector that is used to study heavy-ion collisions, with ion beams with an energy range between 8 to 15 MeV per nucleon. It has 78 detectors axially distributed around the beam axis in 6 rings allowing detection of multiple charged fragments from nuclear reactions. HERACLES has 4 different types of detectors, BC408/BaF{sub 2} phoswich, Si/CsI(Tl) telescope, BC408/BC444 phoswich and CsI(Tl) detectors. The multidetector has been run with a radioactive {sup 25}Na beam and a stable {sup 25}Mg beam at 9.23 MeV per nucleon on a carbon target.

  6. Magnetic reconnection configurations and particle acceleration in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, P. F.

    types of solar flares. Upper panel: two-ribbon flares; Lower panel: compact flares. The color showsMagnetic reconnection configurations and particle acceleration in solar flares P. F. Chen, W. J space under different magnetic configurations. Key words: solar flares, magnetic reconnection, particle

  7. Recent Flare Studies at NJIT Outline of Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    continuum brightening (white-light flares) Black-light solar flares (BLFs; Henoux et al. 1990): electron flares. - Solar limb in D3, showing a narrow, bright band above the photosphere between 1000 and 2500 km3/28/2014 1 Recent Flare Studies at NJIT Lecture 10 Outline of Studies Black Light Flares Moreton

  8. The Ulysses Catalog of Solar Hard X-Ray Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tranquille, C.; Hurley, K.; Hudson, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    Sturrock, P.A. (ed. ) Solar Flares: A Monograph from SkylabSmith E.V.P. : 1963, Solar Flares, Macmillan, New York.Catalog of Solar Hard X-Ray Flares Table 1 (Continued. )

  9. Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

    1983-01-01

    six years total operating experience with modern flare gas recovery units. The compression facilities in each utilize a two-stage reciprocating machine, one liquid seal drum per flare stack, and an automated load control strategy. The purpose... these issues. SYSTEM CONFIGURATION A schematic of a typical refinery flare gas recovery facility is shown in Figure I. The facilities include the following pieces of equipment: - compressor suction drum - compressor set - inter-stage knock-out drum...

  10. Solar flares: Preflare Phase SOLAR FLARES are believed to be the result of a sud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martens, Petrus C.

    build­up and the trigger mechanism is at the heart of understanding the physics of solar flaresSolar flares: Preflare Phase SOLAR FLARES are believed to be the result of a sud­ den conversion of a large amount of FREE MAGNETIC ENERGY, previously stored in the solar CORONA. The release takes place

  11. Fuks, H., Gerosa, M.A., Raposo, A.B. & Lucena, C.J.P. (2004), "O Modelo de Colaborao 3C no Ambiente AulaNet", Informtica na Educao: Teoria e Prtica,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    a trabalhar em grupo. Tendo em vista estas necessidades, o ambiente de aprendizagem AulaNet valoriza uma conectada, a organização baseada no comando e controle perde força e é substituída por uma mais colaborativa #12;buscar idéias, informações e recursos para auxiliar na resolução dos problemas [Turoff & Hiltz

  12. Differential effects of five 'classical' scorpion {beta}-toxins on rNa{sub v}1.2a and DmNav1 provide clues on species-selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosmans, Frank; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Tytgat, Jan . E-mail: Jan.Tytgat@pharm.kuleuven.be

    2007-01-01

    In general, scorpion {beta}-toxins have been well examined. However, few in-depth studies have been devoted to species selectivity and affinity comparisons on the different voltage-activated Na{sup +} channels since they have become available as cloned channels that can be studied in heterologous expression systems. As a result, their classification is largely historical and dates from early in vivo experiments on mice and cockroach and fly larvae. In this study, we aimed to provide an updated overview of selectivity and affinity of scorpion {beta}-toxins towards voltage-activated Na{sup +} channels of vertebrates or invertebrates. As pharmacological tools, we used the classic {beta}-toxins AaHIT, Css II, Css IV, Css VI and Ts VII and tested them on the neuronal vertebrate voltage-activated Na{sup +} channel, rNa{sub v}1.2a. For comparison, its invertebrate counterpart, DmNav1, was also tested. Both these channels were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and the currents measured with the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. We supplemented this data with several binding displacement studies on rat brain synaptosomes. The results lead us to propose a general classification and a novel nomenclature of scorpion {beta}-toxins based on pharmacological activity.

  13. A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis Alexander H. Ip, Li Na Quan, Michael M. Adachi, Jeffrey J. McDowell, Jixian Xu, Dong Ha Kim, and Edward H.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Edward H. "Ted"

    A two-step route to planar perovskite cells exhibiting reduced hysteresis Alexander H. Ip, Li Na-efficiency planar perovskite solar cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 253508 (2014); 10.1063/1.4885367 Dominating to IP: 142.150.235.171 On: Mon, 08 Jun 2015 18:21:31 #12;A two-step route to planar perovskite cells

  14. Rapid precipitation of magnesite micro-crystals from Mg(OH)2-H2O-CO2 slurry enhanced by NaOH and a heat-ageing step (from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    sequential reactions: (1) aqueous carbonation of synthetic brucite (Mg(OH)2) by injection of CO2 in a highly system at ambient temperatures and at atmospheric CO2 partial pressure is of both geological interest1 Rapid precipitation of magnesite micro-crystals from Mg(OH)2- H2O-CO2 slurry enhanced by Na

  15. Prediction of Solar Flare Size and Time-to-Flare Using Support Vector Machine Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucheron, Laura E; McAteer, R T James

    2015-01-01

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a \\emph{geostationary operational environmental satellite} (\\emph{GOES}) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately 3/4 a \\emph{GOES} class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity fe...

  16. The local Poisson hypothesis for solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Wheatland

    2001-07-09

    The question of whether flares occur as a Poisson process has important consequences for flare physics. Recently Lepreti et al. presented evidence for local departure from Poisson statistics in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray flare catalog. Here it is argued that this effect arises from a selection effect inherent in the soft X-ray observations; namely that the slow decay of enhanced flux following a large flare makes detection of subsequent flares less likely. It is also shown that the power-law tail of the GOES waiting-time distribution varies with the solar cycle. This counts against any intrinsic significance to the appearance of a power law, or to the value of its index.

  17. Multiwavelength Observations of NaSt1 (WR 122): Equatorial Mass Loss and X-rays from an Interacting Wolf-Rayet Binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauerhan, Jon C; Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Morzinski, Katie M; Close, Laird M; Hinz, Philip M; Males, Jared R; Rodigas, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    NaSt1 (aka Wolf-Rayet 122) is a peculiar emission-line star embedded in an extended nebula of [N II] emission with a compact dusty core. This object was characterized by Crowther & Smith (1999) as a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star cloaked in an opaque nebula of CNO-processed material, perhaps analogous to Eta Car and its Homunculus nebula, albeit with a hotter central source. To discern the morphology of the [N II] nebula we performed narrowband imaging using the Hubble Space Telescope and Wide-field Camera 3. The images reveal that the nebula has a disk-like geometry tilted 12 degrees from edge-on, composed of a bright central ellipsoid surrounded by a larger clumpy ring. Ground-based spectroscopy reveals radial velocity structure (~10 km/s) near the outer portions of the nebula's major axis, which is likely to be the imprint of outflowing gas. Near-infrared adaptive-optics imaging with Magellan AO has resolved a compact ellipsoid of Ks-band emission aligned with the larger [N II] nebula, which we suspect is the re...

  18. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Micca, P.L.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1986-03-11

    A stable boronated (/sup 10/B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/, at a dose of about 200 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight. The infusion is preformed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of /sup 10/B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of /sup 10/B in the tumor. 1 tab.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl?) solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison

    2011-01-01

    We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl–CaCl2 electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO2 or high-level radioactive waste (0.34–1.83 molc dm-3). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, ?-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the ?- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) “indifferent electrolyte” ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl+ ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations {>=0.34 molc dm-3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid “ice-like” structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

  20. Testing Buda-Lund hydro model on particle correlations and spectra in NA44, WA93 and WA98 heavy ion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ster; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad

    1998-09-28

    Analytic and numerical approximations to a hydrodynamical model describing longitudinally expanding, cylindrically symmetric, finite systems are fitted to preliminary NA44 data measured in 200 AGeV central $S + Pb$ reactions. The model describes the measured spectra and HBT radii of pions, kaons and protons, simultaneously. The source is characterized by a central freeze-out temperature of T_0 = 154 +/- 8 +/- 11 MeV, a "surface" temperature of T_r = 107 +/- 28 +/- 18 MeV and by a well-developed transverse flow, = 0.53 +/- 0.17 +/- 0.11. The transverse geometrical radius and the mean freeze-out time are found to be R_G = 5.4 +/- 0.9 +/- 0.7 fm and tau_0 = 5.1 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.3 fm/c, respectively. Fits to preliminary WA93 200 AGeV S + Au and WA98 158 AGeV Pb + Pb data dominated by pions indicate similar model parameters. The absolute normalization of the measured particle spectra together with the experimental determination of both the statistical and the systematic errors were needed to obtain successful fits.

  1. High Schottky barrier at grain boundaries observed in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somphan, Weeraya; Thongbai, Prasit; Yamwong, Teerapon; Maensiri, Santi

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • NSCTO exhibits a high ?? of 7.0–8.4 × 10{sup 3} and low tan ? of 0.030–0.041. • NSCTO exhibits a high E{sub b} of ?2208 V cm{sup ?1} and large ? of 15.6. • Giant ?? response is attributed to the electrically heterogeneous microstructure. • High ?{sub b} values at grain boundaries are found to be 0.925–0.964 eV. • Formation of a potential barrier at grain boundaries is caused by Schottky effect. - Abstract: The dielectric properties and nonlinear current–voltage characteristics of Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics prepared by a conventional solid state reaction method were investigated. Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics exhibited a high dielectric permittivity of 7.0–8.4 × 10{sup 3} and low loss tangent (tan ??0.030–0.041). Non-Ohmic properties with a high breakdown voltage of ?2208 V cm{sup ?1} and large nonlinear coefficient of 15.6 were observed in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics. Using complex impedance analysis, Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics were shown to be electrically heterogeneous consisting of semiconducting grains and insulating grain boundaries. Giant dielectric properties were described based on the electrically heterogeneous microstructure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis suggested that the semiconductive nature of grains may be related to the presence of Cu{sup +} and Ti{sup 3+}. The formation of an electrostatic potential barrier at the grain boundaries of Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics was suggested to be caused by the Schottky effect. Interestingly, high electrostatic potential barriers at grain boundaries in Na{sub 1/2}Sm{sub 1/2}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics were calculated and found to be 0.925–0.964 eV.

  2. SOLAR FLARE CYCLES , M. D. POPESCU1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR FLARE CYCLES G. MARI1 , M. D. POPESCU1, 2 1 Astronomical Institute of the Romanian Academy solar flare periodicity intervals. Our analysis includes a statistical investigation of flare occurrence and the strength of solar cycles. For that purpose, we studied not only the number of flares occurring monthly

  3. Location of Narrowband Spikes in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold O. Benz; Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Nicole Vilmer

    2001-12-19

    Narrowband spikes of the decimeter type have been identified in dynamic spectrograms of Phoenix-2 of ETH Zurich and located in position with the Nancay Radioheliograph at the same frequency. The spike positions have been compared with the location of hard X-ray emission and the thermal flare plasma in soft X-rays and EUV lines. The decimetric spikes are found to be single sources located some 20" to 400" away from the flare site in hard or soft X-rays. In most cases there is no bright footpoint nearby. In at least two cases the spikes are near loop tops. These observations do not confirm the widely held view that the spike emission is produced by some loss-cone instability masering near the footpoints of flare loops. On the other hand, the large distance to the flare sites and the fact that these spikes are all observed in the flare decay phase make the analyzed spike sources questionable sites for the main flare electron acceleration. They possibly indicate coronal post-flare acceleration sites.

  4. An examination of the role of plasma treatment for lean NOx reduction over sodium zeolite Y and gamma alumina: Part 1. Plasma assisted NOx reduction over NaY and Al2O3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Ilsop S.; Panov, Alexander G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Ebeling, Ana C.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Balmer, Mari Lou

    2002-03-15

    The role of plasma processing on NOx reduction over gammma-alumina and a basic zeolite, NaY was examined. During the plasma treatment NO is oxidized to NO2 and propylene is partially oxidized to CO, CO2, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde. With plasma treatment, NO as the NOx gas, and a NaY catalyst, the maximum NOx conversion was 70% between 180 and 230?C. The activity decreased at higher and lower temperatures. As high as 80% NOx removal over gamma alumina was measured by a chemiluminescent NOx meter with plasma treatment and NO as the NOx gas. For both catalysts a simultaneous decrease in NOx and aldehydes concentrations was observed, which suggests that aldehyde may be important components for NOx reduction in plasma-treated exhaust.

  5. Giant AGN Flares and Cosmic Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; Andrei Gruzinov

    2008-09-15

    We predict a new class of very intense, short-duration AGN flares capable of accelerating the highest energy cosmic rays, resulting from the tidal disruption of a star or from a disk instability. The rate and power of these flares readily explains the observed flux and density statistics of UHECRs. The photon bursts produced by the predicted AGN flares are discussed; they may soon be detectable. Observations are shown to exclude that continuous jets of powerful Active Galactic Nuclei are the sole source of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays; the stringent requirements for Gamma Ray Bursts to be the source are delineated.

  6. Isothermal evaporation process simulation using the Pitzer model for the Quinary system LiCl–NaCl–KCl–SrCl2–H2O at 298.15 K

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Lingzong; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw S.; Deng, Tianlong; Guo, Yafei; Li, Dan

    2015-08-05

    In this study, the Pitzer thermodynamic model for solid-liquid equilibria in the quinary system LiCl–NaCl–KCl–SrCl2–H2O at 298.15 K was constructed by selecting the proper parameters for the subsystems in the literature. The solubility data of the systems NaCl–SrCl2–H2O, KCl–SrCl2–H2O, LiCl–SrCl2–H2O, and NaCl–KCl–SrCl2–H2O were used to evaluate the model. Good agreement between the experimental and calculated solubilities shows that the model is reliable. The Pitzer model for the quinary system at 298.15 K was then used to calculate the component solubilities and conduct computer simulation of isothermal evaporation of the mother liquor for the oilfield brine from Nanyishan district in themore »Qaidam Basin. The evaporation-crystallization path and sequence of salt precipitation, change in concentration and precipitation of lithium, sodium, potassium, and strontium, and water activities during the evaporation process were demonstrated. The salts precipitated from the brine in the order : KCl, NaCl, SrCl2?6H2O, SrCl2?2H2O, and LiCl?H2O. The entire evaporation process may be divided into six stages. In each stage the variation trends for the relationships between ion concentrations or water activities and the evaporation ratio are different. This result of the simulation of brines can be used as a theoretical reference for comprehensive exploitation and utilization of this type of brine resources.« less

  7. Charge Compensation in RE3+ (RE = Eu, Gd) and M+ (M = Li, Na, K) Co-Doped Alkaline Earth Nanofluorides Obtained by Microwave Reaction with Reactive Ionic Liquids Leading to Improved Optical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorbeer, C [Ruhr-Universitat Bochum; Behrends, F [Westfalische Wilhelsm-Universitat Munster; Cybinska, J [Ruhr Universitat Bochum; Eckert, H [Westfalische Wilhelsm-Universitat Munster; Mudring, Anja -V [Ames Laboratory

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline earth fluorides are extraordinarily promising host matrices for phosphor materials with regard to rare earth doping. In particular, quantum cutting materials, which might considerably enhance the efficiency of mercury-free fluorescent lamps or SC solar cells, are often based on rare earth containing crystalline fluorides such as NaGdF4, GdF3 or LaF3. Substituting most of the precious rare earth ions and simultaneously retaining the efficiency of the phosphor is a major goal. Alkaline earth fluoride nanoparticles doped with trivalent lanthanide ions (which are required for the quantum cutting phenomenon) were prepared via a microwave assisted method in ionic liquids. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect was thoroughly studied by powder X-ray and electron diffraction, luminescence spectroscopy and 23Na, 139La and 19F solid state NMR spectroscopy. Monovalent alkali ions were codoped with the trivalent lanthanide ions to relieve stress and achieve a better crystallinity and higher quantum cutting abilities of the prepared material. 19F-magic angle spinning (MAS)-NMR-spectra, assisted by 19F{23Na} rotational echo double resonance (REDOR) studies, reveal distinct local fluoride environments, the populations of which are discussed in relation to spatial distribution and clustering models. In the co-doped samples, fluoride species having both Na+ and La3+ ions within their coordination sphere can be identified and quantified. This interplay of mono- and trivalent ions in the CaF2 lattice appears to be an efficient charge compensation mechanism that allows for improved performance characteristics of such co-doped phosphor materials.

  8. Investigation of the hydrothermal crystallisation of the perovskite solid solution NaCe{sub 1?x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} and its defect chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harunsani, Mohammad H.; Woodward, David I.; Peel, Martin D.; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-11-15

    Perovskites of nominal composition NaCe{sub 1?x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} (0?x?1) crystallise directly under hydrothermal conditions at 240 °C. Raman spectroscopy shows distortion from the ideal cubic structure and Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray and neutron diffraction reveals that the materials represent a continuous series in rhombohedral space group R3-bar c. Ce L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy shows that while the majority of cerium is present as Ce{sup 3+} there is evidence for Ce{sup 4+}. The paramagnetic Ce{sup 3+} affects the chemical shift and line width of {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectra, which also show with no evidence for A-site ordering. {sup 2}H MAS NMR of samples prepared in D{sub 2}O shows the inclusion of deuterium, which IR spectroscopy shows is most likely to be as D{sub 2}O. The deuterium content is highest for the cerium-rich materials, consistent with oxidation of some cerium to Ce{sup 4+} to provide charge balance of A-site water. - Graphical abstract: A multi-element A-site perovskite crystallises directly from aqueous, basic solutions at 240 °C; while the paramagnetic effect of Ce{sup 3+} on the {sup 23}Na NMR shows a homogeneous solid-solution, the incorporation of A-site water is also found from {sup 2}H NMR and IR, with oxidation of some cerium to charge balance proved by XANES spectroscopy. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Direct hydrothermal synthesis allows crystallisation of a perovskite solid-solution. • XANES spectroscopy shows some oxidation of Ce{sup 3+} to Ce{sup 4+}. • The paramagnetism of Ce{sup 3+} shifts and broadens the {sup 23}Na solid-state NMR. • The perovskite materials incorporate water as an A-site defect.

  9. Selected Publications, Norman E. Phillips 221. Specific heat of Na0.3CoO21.3H2O: Two energy gaps, non-magnetic pair breaking,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    1 Selected Publications, Norman E. Phillips 221. Specific heat of Na0.3CoO2·1.3H2O: Two energy gaps, in Handbook of High-Temperature Superconductivity, edited by J. R. Schrieffer and J. S. Brooks (Springer and magnetism in a new class of heavy-fermion materials, J.D. Thompson, R. Movshovich, Z. Fisk, F. Bouquet, N

  10. Morphotropic phase boundary and electric properties in (1-x)Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-xBiCoO3 lead-free piezoelectric ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    -free piezoelectric ceramics Fei-Fei Guo, Bin Yang, Shan-Tao Zhang, Xiao Liu, Li-Mei Zheng et al. Citation: J. Appl ceramics Appl. Phys. Lett. 101, 252905 (2012) Enhanced piezoelectric performance from carbon fluoropolymer phase boundary and electric properties in (12x)Bi0.5Na0.5TiO3-xBiCoO3 lead-free piezoelectric ceramics

  11. Effect of tungsten doping in bismuth-layered Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 2.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} high temperature piezoceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Zhiyong Li, Yuchen; Hui, Shipeng; Dong, Xianlin

    2014-01-06

    The effects of W{sup 6+} doping for B site on the structural and electrical properties of Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 2.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}-based ceramics were studied. It shows a trend of preferable orientation growth along c-axis and the Curie point (T{sub c}) decreases slightly from 792 to 761?°C with the increasing W{sup 6+} amount. The electrical resistivity of Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 2.5}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}-based ceramics increases as much as about two orders of magnitude and the piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} is significantly improved from 10.5 to 21.8 pC/N by W{sup 6+} modification. The composition of Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 2.5}Nb{sub 1.99}W{sub 0.01}O{sub 9} with a high T{sub c} (792?°C), very good temperature stability up to ?0.96T{sub c}, a large d{sub 33} of 17.9 pC/N and sufficient high resistivity, is an excellent candidate for high temperature piezoelectric applications.

  12. Characterisation of Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag cement-like composites for the immobilisation of sulfate bearing nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobasher, Neda; Bernal, Susan A.; Hussain, Oday H.; Apperley, David C.; Kinoshita, Hajime; Provis, John L.

    2014-12-15

    Soluble sulfate ions in nuclear waste can have detrimental effects on cementitious wasteforms and disposal facilities based on Portland cement. As an alternative, Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composites are studied for immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes. Calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C–A–S–H) with some barium substitution is the main binder phase, with barium also present in the low solubility salts BaSO{sub 4} and BaCO{sub 3}, along with Ba-substituted calcium sulfoaluminate hydrates, and a hydrotalcite-type layered double hydroxide. This reaction product assemblage indicates that Ba(OH){sub 2} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} act as alkaline activators and control the reaction of the slag in addition to forming insoluble BaSO{sub 4}, and this restricts sulfate availability for further reaction as long as sufficient Ba(OH){sub 2} is added. An increased content of Ba(OH){sub 2} promotes a higher degree of reaction, and the formation of a highly cross-linked C–A–S–H gel. These Ba(OH){sub 2}–Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–blast furnace slag composite binders could be effective in the immobilisation of sulfate-bearing nuclear wastes.

  13. The Energetics of a Flaring Solar Active Region, and Observed Flare Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Wheatland

    2008-02-26

    A stochastic model for the energy of a flaring solar active region is presented, generalising and extending the approach of Wheatland & Glukhov (1998). The probability distribution for the free energy of an active region is described by the solution to a master equation involving deterministic energy input and random jump transitions downwards in energy (solar flares). It is shown how two observable distributions, the flare frequency-energy distribution and the flare waiting-time distribution, may be derived from the steady-state solution to the master equation, for given choices for the energy input and for the rates of flare transitions. An efficient method of numerical solution of the steady-state master equation is presented. Solutions appropriate for flaring, involving a constant rate of energy input and power-law distributed jump transition rates, are numerically investigated. The flare-like solutions exhibit power-law flare frequency-energy distributions below a high energy rollover, set by the largest energy the active region is likely to have. The solutions also exhibit approximately exponential (i.e. Poisson) waiting-time distributions, despite the rate of flaring depending on the free energy of the system.

  14. A proposal for positive cooperativity in anion-cation binding in yttrium and lutetium complexes based on o-amino-substituted phenolate ligands. On the way to coordination polymers by self-assembly. Molecular structures of [ClLu(OAr){sub 3}Na] (X-ray) and [ClY(OAr{prime}){sub 3}Y(OAr{prime}){sub 3}Na] (X-ray and {sup 89}Y-NMR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogerheide, M.P.; Ringelberg, S.N.; Grove, D.M.

    1996-02-28

    The authors prepared the hetero(poly)metallic complexes [ClM(OAr){sub 3}Na] (M = Lu (3a), Y (3b)) and [ClY(OAr`){sub 3}Y(OAR`){sub 3}Na] (4) (OAr = OC{sub 6}H{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-2,6,Me-4; OAr` = OC{sub 6}H{sub 4}(CH{sub 2}NMe{sub 2})-2). Structural analysis was afforded by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The structures show evidence for anion-cation cooperativity in bonding and are discussed in detail for the compounds in both the solid state and in solution.

  15. Universitrios apostam na eficincia energtica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    de energia das empresas onde estagiaram. O desafio não é sim- ples: se encontras- se o CEO da Galp Energia no eleva- dor, conseguia vender-lhe o seu projecto de eficiência energética em dois minutos-20-20, em parceria com empresas e as suas universidades. Este ano foram 21 projectos, apre- sentados quinta

  16. Crato quer menos 'eduques' na

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    ensinar Matemá- tica a alunos do básico tendo chumbado à disciplina no 9S ano e no secundário. Os responsá Português e Matemá- tica) não é uma necessidade científica e pedagógica. É uma opção política que prejudica

  17. NA SD 452.2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal of Honor recipients honored at Y-12CONTROLLEDStatements |Mo-99N

  18. Document: NA Actionee: Dorothy Riehie

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown August 9,5The2ndNEWSSI T op

  19. Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

    2010-01-01

    An advanced process control application, using DMCplus® (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system...

  20. Sauget Plant Flare Gas Reduction Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratkowski, D. P.

    2007-01-01

    Empirical analysis of stack gas heating value allowed the Afton Chemical Corporation Sauget Plant to reduce natural gas flow to its process flares by about 50% while maintaining the EPA-required minimum heating value of the gas streams....

  1. The Shape of M Dwarf Flares in Kepler Light Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davenport, James R A

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-precise light curves from Kepler provide the best opportunity to determine rates and statistical properties of stellar flares. From 11 months of data on the active M4 dwarf, GJ 1243, we have built the largest catalog of flares for a single star: over 6100 events. Combining 885 of our most pristine flares, we generated an empirical white-light flare template. This high-fidelity template shows a rapid initial rise, and two distinct exponential cooling phases. This template is useful in constraining flare energies and for improved flare detection in many surveys. Complex, multi-peaked events are more common for higher energy flares in this sample. Using our flare template we characterize the structure of complex events. In this contributed talk, I presented results from our boutique study of GJ 1243, and described an expanded investigation of the structure of complex flares and their connection to solar events.

  2. ON THE DURATION OF BLAZAR SYNCHROTRON FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichmann, B.; Schlickeiser, R.; Rhode, W.

    2012-01-10

    A semi-analytical model is presented that describes the temporal development of a blazar synchrotron flare for the case of a broadband synchrotron power spectrum. We examine three different injection scenarios and present its influence on the synchrotron flare. An accurate approximation of the half-life of a synchrotron flare is analytically computed and we give some illustrative examples of the time evolution of the emergent synchrotron intensity by using a numerical integration method. The synchrotron flare starts at all photon energies right after the injection of ultrarelativistic electrons into the spherical emission volume of radius R and its duration exceeds the light travel time 2R/c in the low energy regime. Furthermore, the flare duration extends by the period of injection of relativistic electrons into the emission knot. However, the energetic and spatial distribution of these injected electrons has no significant influence on the flare duration. We obtain a temporal behavior that agrees most favorably with the observations of PKS 2155-304 on 2006 July 29-30 and it differs considerably from the results that were recently achieved by using a monochromatic approximation of the synchrotron power.

  3. EIT and TRACE responses to flare plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Tripathi; G. Del Zanna; H. E. Mason; C. Chifor

    2008-02-26

    Aims: To understand the contribution of active region and flare plasmas to the $\\lambda$195 channels of SOHO/EIT (Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope) and TRACE (Transition Region and Coronal Explorer). Methods: We have analysed an M8 flare simultaneously observed by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS), EIT, TRACE and RHESSI. We obtained synthetic spectra for the flaring region and an outer region using the differential emission measures (DEM) of emitting plasma based on CDS and RHESSI observations and the CHIANTI atomic database. We then predicted the EIT and TRACE count rates. Results: For the flaring region, both EIT and TRACE images taken through the $\\lambda$195 filter are dominated by Fe ${\\rm XXIV}$ (formed at about 20 MK). However, in the outer region, the emission was primarily due to the Fe${\\rm XII}$, with substantial contributions from other lines. The average count rate for the outer region was within 25% the observed value for EIT, while for TRACE it was a factor of two higher. For the flare region, the predicted count rate was a factor of two (in case of EIT) and a factor of three (in case of TRACE) higher than the actual count rate. Conclusions: During a solar flare, both TRACE and EIT $\\lambda$195 channels are found to be dominated by Fe ${\\rm XXIV}$ emission. Reasonable agreement between predictions and observations is found, however some discrepancies need to be further investigated.

  4. Are there Radio-quiet Solar Flares?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold O. Benz; Roman Brajsa; Jasmina Magdalenic

    2007-01-19

    Some 15% of solar flares having a soft X-ray flux above GOES class C5 are reported to lack coherent radio emission in the 100 - 4000 MHz range (type I - V and decimetric emissions). A detailed study of 29 such events reveals that 22 (76%) of them occurred at a radial distance of more than 800'' from the disk center, indicating that radio waves from the limb may be completely absorbed in some flares. The remaining seven events have statistically significant trends to be weak in GOES class and to have a softer non-thermal X-ray spectrum. All of the non-limb flares that were radio-quiet > 100 MHz were accompanied by metric type III emission below 100 MHz. Out of 201 hard X-ray flares, there was no flare except near the limb (R>800'') without coherent radio emission in the entire meter and decimeter range. We suggest that flares above GOES class C5 generally emit coherent radio waves when observed radially above the source.

  5. The Origin of the Solar Flare Waiting-Time Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Wheatland

    2000-05-08

    It was recently pointed out that the distribution of times between solar flares (the flare waiting-time distribution) follows a power law, for long waiting times. Based on 25 years of soft X-ray flares observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) instruments it is shown that 1. the waiting-time distribution of flares is consistent with a time-dependent Poisson process, and 2. the fraction of time the Sun spends with different flaring rates approximately follows an exponential distribution. The second result is a new phenomenological law for flares. It is shown analytically how the observed power-law behavior of the waiting times originates in the exponential distribution of flaring rates. These results are argued to be consistent with a non-stationary avalanche model for flares.

  6. Enhanced tolerance to NaCl and LiCl stresses by over-expressing Caragana korshinskii sodium/proton exchanger 1 (CkNHX1) and the hydrophilic C terminus is required for the activity of CkNHX1 in Atsos3-1 mutant and yeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Da-Hai; Department of Plant Physiology, Institute of General Botany and Plant Physiology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Dornburger Strasse 159, 07743 Jena ; Song, Li-Ying; Hu, Jun; Yin, Wei-Bo; Li, Zhi-Guo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Su, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Hu, Zan-Min

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CkNHX1 was isolated from Caragana korshinskii. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CkNHX1 was expressed mainly in roots, and significantly induced by NaCl in stems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of CkNHX1 enhanced the resistance to NaCl and LiCl in yeast and Atsos3-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of CkNHX1-{Delta}C had little effect on NaCl/LiCl tolerance in Atsos3-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-terminal region of CkNHX1 is required for its Na{sup +} and Li{sup +} transporting activity. -- Abstract: Sodium/proton exchangers (NHX antiporters) play important roles in plant responses to salt stress. Previous research showed that hydrophilic C-terminal region of Arabidopsis AtNHX1 negatively regulates the Na{sup +}/H{sup +} transporting activity. In this study, CkNHX1 were isolated from Caragana korshinskii, a pea shrub with high tolerance to salt, drought, and cold stresses. Transcripts of CkNHX1 were detected predominantly in roots, and were significantly induced by NaCl stress in stems. Transgenic yeast and Arabidopsisthalianasos3-1 (Atsos3-1) mutant over-expressing CkNHX1 and its hydrophilic C terminus-truncated derivative, CkNHX1-{Delta}C, were generated and subjected to NaCl and LiCl stresses. Expression of CkNHX1 significantly enhanced the resistance to NaCl and LiCl stresses in yeast and Atsos3-1 mutant. Whereas, compared with expression of CkNHX1, the expression of CkNHX1-{Delta}C had much less effect on NaCl tolerance in Atsos3-1 and LiCl tolerance in yeast and Atsos3-1. All together, these results suggest that the predominant expression of CkNHX1 in roots might contribute to keep C. korshinskii adapting to the high salt condition in this plant's living environment; CkNHX1 could recover the phenotype of Atsos3-1 mutant; and the hydrophilic C-terminal region of CkNHX1 should be required for Na{sup +}/H{sup +} and Li{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanging activity of CkNHX1.

  7. Effects of Mg doping on the remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Xiqian; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Liu, Liang-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites with different Mg2+ doping contents (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The doping effects on the crystal structure were investigated by XRD, XPS and EXAFS. The results show that low dose doping Mg2+ does not alter the structure of the material, and magnesium is successfully substituted for vanadium site. The Mg doped Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites exhibit significant improvements on the electrochemistry performances in terms of the rate capability and cycle performance, especially for the Na3V1.95Mg0.05(PO4)3/C. For example, when the current density increased from 1 C to 30 C, the specific capacity only decreased from 112.5 mAh g-1 to 94.2 mAh g-1 showing very good rate capability. Moreover, even cycling at a high rate of 20 C, an excellent capacity retention of 81% is maintained from the initial value of 106.4 mAh g-1 to 86.2 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle. Enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the optimized particle size, structural stability and enhanced ionic and electronic conductivity induced by Mg doping.

  8. Photoluminescence properties of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) activated NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite host lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asiri Naidu, S.; Boudin, S. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France); Varadaraju, U.V. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Raveau, B., E-mail: bernard.raveau@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France)

    2012-01-15

    The photoluminescence (PL) studies on NaIn{sub 1-x}RE{sub x}W{sub 2}O{sub 8}, with RE=Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} phases have shown that the relative contribution of the host lattice and of the intra-f-f emission of the activators to the PL varies with the nature of the rare earth cation. In the case of Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} activators, with yellow and blue emission, respectively, the energy transfer from host to the activator plays a major role. In contrast for Eu{sup 3+}, with intense red emission, the host absorption is less pronounced and the intra-f-f transitions of the Eu{sup 3+} ions play a major role, whereas for Tb{sup 3+} intra-f-f transitions are only observed, giving rise to green emission. - Graphical abstract: NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} double tungstate doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}and Tm{sup 3+} shows characteristic emission of intense red for Eu{sup 3+}, yellow for Dy{sup 3+}, green for Tb{sup 3+} and blue for Tm{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic emissions of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) are observed NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer from host to the activators (Eu{sup 3+} Dy{sup 3+} Tm{sup 3+} is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL properties of rare earth ions depend on minor structural variations in the host lattice.

  9. Spatial Relationship between Solar Flares and Coronal Mass Ejections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Yashiro; G. Michalek; S. Akiyama; N. Gopalswamy; R. A. Howard

    2007-10-16

    We report on the spatial relationship between solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed during 1996-2005 inclusive. We identified 496 flare-CME pairs considering limb flares (distance from central meridian > 45 deg) with soft X-ray flare size > C3 level. The CMEs were detected by the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We investigated the flare positions with respect to the CME span for the events with X-class, M-class, and C-class flares separately. It is found that the most frequent flare site is at the center of the CME span for all the three classes, but that frequency is different for the different classes. Many X-class flares often lie at the center of the associated CME, while C-class flares widely spread to the outside of the CME span. The former is different from previous studies, which concluded that no preferred flare site exists. We compared our result with the previous studies and conclude that the long-term LASCO observation enabled us to obtain the detailed spatial relation between flares and CMEs. Our finding calls for a closer flare-CME relationship and supports eruption models typified by the CSHKP magnetic reconnection model.

  10. Rapid Transition of Uncombed Penumbrae to Faculae during Large Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    field evolution in solar photosphere plays important roles in building energy and triggering eruption structure associated with major flares. Taking advantage of two near-limb events, we found that in sections: flares -- Sun: magnetic topology -- sunspots #12;­ 2 ­ 1. INTRODUCTION Solar flares have been understood

  11. Version on March 21, 2002 STATISTICAL EVIDENCE FOR SYMPATHETIC FLARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Subject headings: Sun: flare - Sun: X-ray - Sun: corona 1 Big Bear Solar Observatory, NJIT, 40386 North as solar flares in different active regions that apparently occur as the common result of activation, which are defined as unrelated solar flares that occur at nearly the same time. However

  12. Probabilistic forecasting of solar flares from vector magnetogram data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Graham

    Probabilistic forecasting of solar flares from vector magnetogram data G. Barnes,1 K. D. Leka,1 E to solar flare forecasting, adapted to provide the probability that a measurement belongs to either group, the groups in this case being solar active regions which produced a flare within 24 hours and those

  13. Driving Major Solar Flares and Eruptions: Carolus J. Schrijver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Driving Major Solar Flares and Eruptions: A Review Carolus J. Schrijver Lockheed Martin Adv. Techn: emerging flux 1 Introduction We have known of the phenomenon called 'solar flare' ever since the first,000 refereed publications with the words 'flare' and 'Sun' or 'solar' in the abstract. Even the limited focus

  14. THE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE. II. FLARE ACTIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE 22-YEAR SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE. II. FLARE ACTIVITY G. MARI, M. D. POPESCU, A. C. DONEA, M. MIERLA cycle, a cycle that had an unexpected behaviour. Here we analyze the occurrence of the solar flares predicted of the current 11-year solar cycle. We conclude that it could be determined by a pulse of flare

  15. Blazar Flaring Rates Measured with GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer; B. L. Dingus

    2003-12-22

    We derive the minimum observing time scales to detect a blazar at a given flux level with the LAT on GLAST in the scanning and pointing modes. Based upon Phase 1 observations with EGRET, we predict the GLAST detection rate of blazar flares at different flux levels. With some uncertainty given the poor statistics of bright blazars, we predict that a blazar flare with integral flux >~ 200e-8 ph(> 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which are the best candidates for Target of Opportunity pointings and extensive temporal and spectral studies, should occur every few days.

  16. Blazar Flaring Rates Measured with GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermer, C D

    2004-01-01

    We derive the minimum observing time scales to detect a blazar at a given flux level with the LAT on GLAST in the scanning and pointing modes. Based upon Phase 1 observations with EGRET, we predict the GLAST detection rate of blazar flares at different flux levels. With some uncertainty given the poor statistics of bright blazars, we predict that a blazar flare with integral flux >~ 200e-8 ph(> 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which are the best candidates for Target of Opportunity pointings and extensive temporal and spectral studies, should occur every few days.

  17. O3-type layered transition metal oxide Na(NiCoFeTi)1/4O2 as a high rate and long cycle life cathode material for sodium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yue, Ji -Li; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zhou, Yong -Ning; Yu, Xiqian; Bak, Seong -Min; Fu, Zheng -Wen

    2015-10-09

    High rate capability and long cycle life are challenging goals for the development of room temperature sodium-ion batteries. Here we report a new single phase quaternary O3-type layer-structured transition metal oxide Na(NiCoFeTi)1/4O2 synthesized by a simple solid-state reaction as a new cathode material for sodium-ion batteries. It can deliver a reversible capacity of 90.6 mA h g–1 at a rate as high as 20C. At 5C, 75.0% of the initial specific capacity can be retained after 400 cycles with a capacity-decay rate of 0.07% per cycle, demonstrating a superior long-term cyclability at high current density. X-ray diffraction and absorption characterizationmore »revealed reversible phase transformations and electronic structural changes during the Na+ deintercalation/intercalation process. Ni, Co and Fe ions contribute to charge compensation during charge and discharge. Although Ti ions do not contribute to the charge transfer, they play a very important role in stabilizing the structure during charge and discharge by suppressing the Fe migration. Additionally, Ti substitution can also smooth the charge–discharge plateaus effectively, which provides a potential advantage for the commercialization of this material for room temperature sodium-ion batteries.« less

  18. Dual-enhancement of ferro-/piezoelectric and photoluminescent performance in Pr{sup 3+} doped (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} lead-free ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yongbin; Jia, Yanmin E-mail: ymjia@zjnu.edu.cn; Wu, Jiang; Shen, Yichao; Wu, Zheng E-mail: ymjia@zjnu.edu.cn; Luo, Haosu

    2014-07-28

    A mutual enhancement action between the ferro-/piezoelectric polarization and the photoluminescent performance of rare earth Pr{sup 3+} doped (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} (KNN) lead-free ceramics is reported. After Pr{sup 3+} doping, the KNN ceramics exhibit the maximum enhancement of ?1.2 times in the ferroelectric remanent polarization strength and ?1.25 times in the piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33}, respectively. Furthermore, after undergoing a ferro-/piezoelectric polarization treatment, the maximum enhancement of ?1.3 times in photoluminescence (PL) was observed in the poled 0.3% Pr{sup 3+} doped sample. After the trivalent Pr{sup 3+} unequivalently substituting the univalent (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sup +}, A-sites ionic vacancies will occur to maintain charge neutrality, which may reduce the inner stress and ease the domain wall motions, yielding to the enhancement in ferro-/piezoelectric performance. The polarization-induced enhancement in PL is attributed to the decrease of crystal symmetry abound the Pr{sup 3+} ions after polarization. The dual-enhancement of the ferro-/piezoelectric and photoluminescent performance makes the Pr{sup 3+} doped KNN ceramic hopeful for piezoelectric/luminescent multifunctional devices.

  19. Solid-state reaction preparation and photoluminescence properties of Na{sub 2}Ba{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Pinglu; Xia, Zhiguo, E-mail: xiazg@cugb.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Green-emitting phosphor powder Na{sub 2}Ba{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} was synthesized. • Two different emission centers occupied by Eu{sup 2+} were investigated. • The concentration quenching mechanism was studied. - Abstract: A kind of novel green-emitting phosphor Na{sub 2}Ba{sub 6}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Eu{sup 2+} was synthesized by a solid-state reaction. The phase formation of as-prepared sample was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction. The photoluminescence emission (PL) and excitation (PLE) spectra results indicated that the phosphor could be efficiently excited by ultraviolet (UV) light from 240 to 400 nm, and presented a broad green emission band with two-band profile suggesting two different emission centers occupied by Eu{sup 2+}. The critical quenching concentration of Eu{sup 2+} was determined to be 0.01 mol and the concentration quenching mechanism was also investigated.

  20. The Relation between Solar Eruption Topologies and Observed Flare Features I: Flare Ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savcheva, A; McKillop, S; McCauley, P; Hanson, E; Su, Y; Werner, E; DeLuca, E E

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a topological magnetic field investigation of seven two-ribbon flares in sigmoidal active regions observed with Hinode, STEREO, and SDO. We first derive the 3D coronal magnetic field structure of all regions using marginally unstable 3D coronal magnetic field models created with the flux rope insertion method. The unstable models have been shown to be a good model of the flaring magnetic field configurations. Regions are selected based on their pre-flare configurations along with the appearance and observational coverage of flare ribbons, and the model is constrained using pre-flare features observed in extreme ultraviolet and X-ray passbands. We perform a topology analysis of the models by computing the squashing factor, Q, in order to determine the locations of prominent quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). QSLs from these maps are compared to flare ribbons at their full extents. We show that in all cases the straight segments of the two J-shaped ribbons are matched very well by the flux...

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF ABSOLUTE ABUNDANCES IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of elemental abundances in solar flares with the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. EVE observes both high temperature Fe emission lines (Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and continuum emission from thermal bremsstrahlung that is proportional to the abundance of H. By comparing the relative intensities of line and continuum emission it is possible to determine the enrichment of the flare plasma relative to the composition of the photosphere. This is the first ionization potential or FIP bias (f). Since thermal bremsstrahlung at EUV wavelengths is relatively insensitive to the electron temperature, it is important to account for the distribution of electron temperatures in the emitting plasma. We accomplish this by using the observed spectra to infer the differential emission measure distribution and FIP bias simultaneously. In each of the 21 flares that we analyze we find that the observed composition is close to photospheric. The mean FIP bias in our sample is f = 1.17 ± 0.22. This analysis suggests that the bulk of the plasma evaporated during a flare comes from deep in the chromosphere, below the region where elemental fractionation occurs.

  2. Properties of Flares-Generated Seismic Waves on the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Kosovichev

    2005-12-31

    The solar seismic waves excited by solar flares (``sunquakes'') are observed as circular expanding waves on the Sun's surface. The first sunquake was observed for a flare of July 9, 1996, from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) space mission. However, when the new solar cycle started in 1997, the observations of solar flares from SOHO did not show the seismic waves, similar to the 1996 event, even for large X-class flares during the solar maximum in 2000-2002. The first evidence of the seismic flare signal in this solar cycle was obtained for the 2003 ``Halloween'' events, through acoustic ``egression power'' by Donea and Lindsey. After these several other strong sunquakes have been observed. Here, I present a detailed analysis of the basic properties of the helioseismic waves generated by three solar flares in 2003-2005. For two of these flares, X17 flare of October 28, 2003, and X1.2 flare of January 15, 2005, the helioseismology observations are compared with simultaneous observations of flare X-ray fluxes measured from the RHESSI satellite. These observations show a close association between the flare seismic waves and the hard X-ray source, indicating that high-energy electrons accelerated during the flare impulsive phase produced strong compression waves in the photosphere, causing the sunquake. The results also reveal new physical properties such as strong anisotropy of the seismic waves, the amplitude of which varies significantly with the direction of propagation. The waves travel through surrounding sunspot regions to large distances, up to 120 Mm, without significant decay. These observations open new perspectives for helioseismic diagnostics of flaring active regions on the Sun and for understanding the mechanisms of the energy release and transport in solar flares.

  3. On the crystal energy and structure of A{sub 2}Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n+1} (A=Li, Na, K) titanates by DFT calculations and neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catti, Michele; Pinus, Ilya; Scherillo, Antonella

    2013-09-15

    First-principles quantum-mechanical calculations (CRYSTAL09 code, B3LYP functional) were performed on alkali titanates A{sub 2}Ti{sub n}O{sub 2n+1} with layered structure (n=3,4,6). Monoclinic structural types with unshifted (P2{sub 1}/m) and with shifted (C2/m) layers were considered. Crystal energies and full structural details were obtained for all Li, Na, and K phases. Neutron diffraction data were collected on powder samples of P2{sub 1}/m-Li{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} (a=9.3146(3), b=3.7522(1), c=7.5447(3) Å, ?=97.611(4)°) and C2/m-K{sub 2}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 9} (a=18.2578(8), b=3.79160(9), c=12.0242(4) Å, ?=106.459(4)°) and their structures were Rietveld-refined. Computed energies show the P2{sub 1}/m arrangement as favoured over the C2/m one for n=3, and the opposite holds for n=6. In the n=4 case the P2{sub 1}/m configuration is predicted to be more stable for Li and Na, and the C2/m one for K titanates. Analysis of Li–O and K–O crystal-chemical environments from experiment and theory shows that the alkali atom bonding is stabilized/destabilized in the different phases consistently with the energy trend. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The P2{sub 1}/m structure-type is found to be more stable for A{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 7} layer titanates. • The C2/m structure-type is found to be more stable for A{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 13} layer titanates. • Tetratitanates are predicted to prefer the P2{sub 1}/m (Li and Na) or C2/m (K) structure. • Li–O and K–O bond distances follow a trend consistent with computed phase energies.

  4. Smokeless Control of Flare Steam Flow Rate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agar, J.; Balls, B. W.

    1979-01-01

    inside the glass. The instrument has a vibrating spool accu rately machined from a material resistant to wet H2S, The patented flow path through the transducer (Figure 8) inhibits moisture and dirt from contaminating the spool and enables installation..., also the inclusion of average values for ZG and ZA' REFERENCES 1. API Publication 931, Chapter 15, "Flares", Manual on Disposal of Refinery Wastes, Volume on Atmospheric Emissions, 1977 American Petroleum Institute, Refinery Department, 2120 L...

  5. Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    R. , et al. 1980, in Solar Flares: A Monograph from SKYLABR. , et al. 1980, in Solar Flares: A Monograph from SKYLAB1988, The Physics of Solar Flares (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge

  6. Faint Coronal Hard X-rays From Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glesener, Lindsay Erin

    2012-01-01

    also be applicable to solar flares. Figure is from Lin (High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares, (Space Science Reviews2002 July 23 class X4.8 solar flare, showing thermal (red)

  7. Initial Observations of Sunspot Oscillations Excited by Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Kosovichev; T. Sekii

    2007-10-09

    Observations of a large solar flare of December 13, 2006, using Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode spacecraft revealed high-frequency oscillations excited by the flare in the sunspot chromosphere. These oscillations are observed in the region of strong magnetic field of the sunspot umbra, and may provide a new diagnostic tool for probing the structure of sunspots and understanding physical processes in solar flares.

  8. Modelling repeatedly flaring delta-sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Active regions (AR) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into $\\alpha$, $\\beta$, $\\gamma$, and $\\delta$ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the $\\delta$-sunspots are known to be super-active and produce the most X-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin sub-photospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux-tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic $\\delta$-sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  9. Giant strain with ultra-low hysteresis and high temperature stability in grain oriented lead-free K???Bi???TiO?-BaTiO?-Na???Bi???TiO? piezoelectric materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maurya, Deepam; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Yaojin; Yan, Yongke; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight; Priya, Shashank

    2015-02-26

    We synthesized grain-oriented lead-free piezoelectric materials in (K???Bi???TiO?-BaTiO?-xNa???Bi???TiO? (KBT-BT-NBT) system with high degree of texturing along the [001]c (c-cubic) crystallographic orientation. We demonstrate giant field induced strain (~0.48%) with an ultra-low hysteresis along with enhanced piezoelectric response (d?? ~ 190pC/N) and high temperature stability (~160°C). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) results demonstrate smaller size highly ordered domain structure in grain-oriented specimen relative to the conventional polycrystalline ceramics. The grain oriented specimens exhibited a high degree of non-180° domain switching, in comparison to the randomly axed ones. These results indicate the effective solution to the lead-free piezoelectricmore »materials.« less

  10. First principles DFT study of ferromagnetism in SnO{sub 2} induced by doped group 1A and 2A non-magnetic elements X (X=Li, Na, K, Be, Mg, Ca)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Brahmananda Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    Transition metal - free - ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) is of much current interest in the search for more efficient DMS materials for spintronic applications. Here, we report the results of our first principles density functional theory (DFT) study on impurity - induced ferromagnetism in non-magnetic SnO{sub 2} by a non-magnetic impurity. The impurities considered are sp-type of group 1A and 2A elements X (X = Li, Na, K, Be, Mg, Ca). Even a single atom of the group 1A elements makes the system magnetic, whereas for the group 2A elements Ca and Mg, a higher doping is required to induce ferromagnetism. For all the elements studied, the magnetic moment appears to increase with the doping concentration, at least at certain impurity separations, which is a positive indicator for practical applications.

  11. Alternating and direct current field effects on the structure-property relationships in Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}-x%BaTiO{sub 3} textured ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ge, Wenwei; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, D.; Maurya, Deepam; Priya, Shashank

    2013-06-03

    The influence of alternating (ac) and direct current (dc) fields on the structural and dielectric properties of [001]{sub PC} textured Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}-7%BaTiO{sub 3} (NBT-7%BT) ceramics has been investigated. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the depolarization at temperature T{sub d} in poled samples resulted from a tetragonal {yields} pseudo-cubic transition on heating. Moderate ac drive and dc bias had opposite influences on T{sub d}: ac drive decreased the T{sub d}, whereas dc bias increased it. These investigations suggested an effective method to expand the working temperature range of NBT-x%BT textured ceramics to a high temperature.

  12. Fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence from glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}:NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals under excitation of two near infrared femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Xiaoying; Cheng, Wenjing; Zhou, Kan; Ma, Jing; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Jia, Tianqing; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-08-14

    In this paper, we report fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence of glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}: NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals excited simultaneously by two near infrared femtosecond lasers. When the glass ceramic was irradiated by 800?nm femtosecond laser, weak red emission centered at 670?nm was detected. Bright red light was observed when the fs laser wavelength was tuned to 1490?nm. However, when excited by the two fs lasers simultaneously, the sample emitted bright green light centered at 550?nm, while the red light kept the same intensity. The dependences of the red and the green light intensities on the two pump lasers are much different, which enables us to manipulate the color emission by adjusting the two pump laser intensities, respectively. We present a theoretical model of Er{sup 3+} ions interacting with two fs laser fields, and explain well the experimental results.

  13. Aging in the relaxor and ferroelectric state of Fe-doped (1-x)(Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2})TiO?-xBaTiO? piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sapper, Eva; Dittmer, Robert; Rödel, Jürgen; Damjanovic, Dragan; Erdem, Emre; Keeble, David J.; Jo, Wook; Granzow, Torsten

    2014-09-14

    Aging of piezoelectric properties was investigated in lead-free (1–x)(Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2})TiO?-xBaTiO? doped with 1at.% Fe. The relaxor character of the un-poled material prevents macroscopic aging effects, while in the field-induced ferroelectric phase aging phenomena are similar to those found in lead zirconate titanate or barium titanate. Most prominent aging effects are the development of an internal bias field and the decrease of switchable polarization. These effects are temperature activated, and can be explained in the framework of defect complex reorientation. This picture is further supported by electron paramagnetic resonance spectra indicating the existence of (Fe{sub Ti}´-V{sub O}{sup ••}){sup •} defect complexes in the Fe-doped material.

  14. Study of electrical conduction behavior of the system La[sub 1[minus]x]Na[sub x]Co[sub 1[minus]x]Nb[sub x]O[sub 3] (x [gt] 0. 05)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkash, O. . School of Materials Science and Technology); Tewari, H.S.; Tare, V.B. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering); Kumar, D. ); Pandey, L. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports on electrical behavior of a few compositions with x [ge] 0.50 in the system La[sub 1 [minus] x]Na[sub x]Co[sub 1 [minus] x]Nb[sub x]O[sub 3] that has been studied by complex-plane-impedance analysis in the temperature range 300-525 K. Three depressed semicircular arcs have been observed in the complex impedance plot of the composition with x = 0.50. These arcs represent the contributions of bulk, grain boundaries, and electrode polarization to the total observed resistance. Two semicircular arcs have been observed in the complex-impedance plot of the compositions with x = 0.70 and 0.80. They represent the bulk and the grain boundaries contribution to the total observed resistance. The values of the resistance for the bulk and grain boundaries in each sample indicate the formation of barrier layers in these mathese materials.

  15. Massively Parallel Simulations of Solar Flares and Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grauer, Rainer

    in space- and astrophysical plasmasystems include solar flares and hydro- or magnetohydrodynamic turbulence a pure MPI parallelization, which, however requires a careful optimization of the multi

  16. Electrical properties of (1?x)(Bi{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3}–xKNbO{sub 3} lead-free ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Xijie; Wang, Baoyin; Luo, Laihui; Li, Weiping; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Hongbing

    2014-05-01

    In this investigation, a simple compound (1?x)(Bi{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3}–xKNbO{sub 3} (BNT–xKN, x=0–0.08) lead-free ceramics were synthesized successfully by conventional solid state reaction method. The piezoelectric, dielectric and ferroelectric characteristics of the ceramics were investigated and discussed. The results shows that moderate KN addition can enhance the piezoelectric response without an obvious decline of ferroelectric properties. The largest piezoelectric response is obtained in BNT–0.05KN, whereas largest electric-field-induced strain is obtained in BNT–0.06KN. An effective d{sub 33}{sup eff} of ?400 pC/N calculated from electric-field-induced strain is obtained in BNT–0.06KN. The present investigation demonstrates that addition KN effectively reduces the depolarization temperature of the BNT–xKN ceramics. The electrical properties of the ceramics are tightly related to their depolarization temperature. - Graphical abstract: Unipolar electric-field-induced strain for the BNT–xKN ceramics. A maximum strain of 0.28% is achieved with a low field in BNT–0.06KN. - Highlights: • Moderate KNbO{sub 3} addition enhances the piezoelectric properties of the ceramics. • A maximum strain of 0.28% is achieved with a low field. • A large piezoelectric response is achieved in 0.95(Bi{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})TiO{sub 3}–0.05KNbO{sub 3}. • The electrical properties are tightly related to the depolarization temperature T{sub d}.

  17. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6-2015 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA...

  18. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1-2015 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA...

  19. ISSN 1063-7729, Astronomy Reports, 2012, Vol. 56, No. 4, pp. 315327. c Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2012. Original Russian Text c N.A. Gun'ko, A.S. Kozyrev, I.G. Mitrofanov, A.I. Tsygan, 2012, published in Astronomicheskii Zhurnal, 2012, Vol. 89, No. 4, pp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., 2012. Original Russian Text c N.A. Gun'ko, A.S. Kozyrev, I.G. Mitrofanov, A.I. Tsygan, 2012, published of Mercury on Its Surface Composition and Temperature N. A. Gun'ko1 , A. S. Kozyrev2* , I. G. Mitrofanov2

  20. Manifestations of energetic electrons with anisotropic distributions in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    observations of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emissions in foot- points of solar flares are often closelyManifestations of energetic electrons with anisotropic distributions in solar flares II. Gyrosynchrotron microwave emission Alexey A. Kuznetsov1,2 & Valentina V. Zharkova3 ABSTRACT We investigate

  1. Blazar Alerts with the HAWC Online Flare Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisgarber, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory monitors the gamma-ray sky in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range with > 95% uptime and unprecedented sensitivity for a survey instrument. The HAWC Collaboration has implemented an online flare monitor that detects episodes of rapid flaring activity from extragalactic very high energy (VHE) sources in the declination band from -26 to 64 degrees. This allows timely alerts to be sent to multiwavelength instruments without human intervention. The preliminary configuration of the online flare monitor achieves sensitivity to flares of at least 1 hour duration that attain an average flux of 10 times that of the Crab Nebula. While flares of this magnitude are not common, several flares reaching the level of 10 Crab have been observed in the VHE band within the past decade. With its survey capabilities and high duty cycle, HAWC will expand the observational data set on these particularly extreme flares. We characterize the sensitivity of the online flare monitor an...

  2. Size dependence of solar X-ray flare properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Battaglia; Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2005-05-09

    Non-thermal and thermal parameters of 85 solar flares of GOES class B1 to M6 (background subtracted classes A1 to M6) have been compared to each other. The hard X-ray flux has been measured by RHESSI and a spectral fitting provided flux and spectral index of the non-thermal emission, as well as temperature and emission measure of the thermal emission. The soft X-ray flux was taken from GOES measurements. We find a linear correlation in a double logarithmic plot between the non-thermal flux and the spectral index. The higher the acceleration rate of a flare, the harder the non-thermal electron distribution. The relation is similar to the one found by a comparison of the same parameters from several sub-peaks of a single flare. Thus small flares behave like small subpeaks of large flares. Thermal flare properties such as temperature, emission measure and the soft X-ray flux also correlate with peak non-thermal flux. A large non-thermal peak flux entails an enhancement in both thermal parameters. The relation between spectral index and the non-thermal flux is an intrinsic feature of the particle acceleration process, depending on flare size. This property affects the reported frequency distribution of flare energies.

  3. Initial test of a Bayesian approach to solar flare prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Wheatland

    2004-11-14

    A test of a new Bayesian approach to solar flare prediction (Wheatland 2004a) is presented. The approach uses the past history of flaring together with phenomenological rules of flare statistics to make a prediction for the probability of occurrence of a large flare within an interval of time, or to refine an initial prediction (which may incorporate other information). The test of the method is based on data from the Geostationary Observational Environmental Satellites (GOES), and involves whole-Sun prediction of soft X-ray flares for 1976-2003. The results show that the method somewhat over-predicts the probability of all events above a moderate size, but performs well in predicting large events.

  4. Design Enhancements To Improve Flare Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, K. A.; McLeod, G. M.; Lorenz, M. D.

    1997-01-01

    and purge gases. It was configured as a two-stage system with each stage consisting of multiple burners. The original burners were of a fin plate design. The flare system was designed to operate at low pressure due to venting constraints imposed... was reconfigured to accommodate the lower heat content via the addition of an alternate first stage. The new stage was comprised of three new burners designed for lower flowrates and for gases with lower heating values than the original fin-plate burners...

  5. Summarizing FLARE assay images in colon carcinogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leyk Williams, Malgorzata

    2006-04-12

    times the distance between the moments of the head and tail DNA distributions. Symmetry of the head was assumed, and hence the tail area could be identi ed. Another measure used in comet analysis is the relative tail moment (RTM) (Riso et al. 1999... of damage was then computed by the program for each comet. The standard output from FLARE analysis is the relative tail moment (RTM) (Hellman et al. 1995, Morris et al. 1999, Riso et al. 1999), de ned as RTM = 100*(tail moment)/(tail moment + head moment...

  6. The Flare-ona of EK Draconis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayres, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    EK Draconis (HD 129333: G1.5 V) is a well-known young (50 Myr) solar analog. In 2012, Hubble Space Telescope returned to EK Dra to follow up a far-ultraviolet (FUV) SNAPshot visit by Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) two years earlier. The brief SNAP pointing had found surprisingly redshifted, impulsively variable subcoronal "hot-line" emission of Si IV 140 nm (T~ 80,000 K). Serendipitously, the 2012 follow-on program witnessed one of the largest FUV flares ever recorded on a sunlike star, which again displayed strong redshifts (downflows) of 30-40 km/s, even after compensating for small systematics in the COS velocity scales, uncovered through a cross-calibration by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The (now reduced, but still substantial) ~10 km/s hot-line redshifts outside the flaring interval did not vary with rotational phase, so cannot be caused by "Doppler Imaging" (bright surface patches near a receding limb). Density diagnostic O IV] 140 nm multiplet line ratios of EK Dra suggest log(Ne)~ ...

  7. The study of solar flares with the extended cellular automaton (XCA) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    ) at a temporal snap­shot during a flare. explain the power­law frequency distributions of the solar flareThe study of solar flares with the extended cellular automaton (X­CA) model H. Isliker 1 , A of cellular automaton (CA) model, the extended CA (X­CA), for the study of solar flares. The X­CA model

  8. SMALL AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS INVOLVED WITH SOLAR FLARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT SMALL AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS INVOLVED WITH SOLAR FLARES by Chang Liu Solar flares of an EUV sigmoid. #12;SMALL AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS INVOLVED WITH SOLAR FLARES by Chang Liu RESERVED #12;APPROVAL PAGE SMALL AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS INVOLVED WITH SOLAR FLARES Chang Liu Dr

  9. Solar Flares and the Chromosphere A white paper for the Decadal Survey*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Solar Flares and the Chromosphere A white paper for the Decadal Survey* L. Fletcher, R. Turkmani, H acceleration (De Pontieu et al. 2007). The need for chromospheric observations of flares: The solar flare of radiation in a solar flare (Canfield et al 1986, Neidig 1989, Woods et al. 2004). In other words, solar

  10. Earth Planets Space, 00, 000--000, 2000 Solar Flare Mechanism Based on Magnetic Arcade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Planets Space, 00, 000--000, 2000 Solar Flare Mechanism Based on Magnetic Arcade Reconnection of solar flares based on re­ sistive reconnection of magnetic field subject to continuous increase flares. 1. INTRODUCTION Solar flares are intense, abrupt release of energy occurring usually

  11. Submitted to Ap.J. A Model of Solar Flares and Their Homologous Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Submitted to Ap.J. A Model of Solar Flares and Their Homologous Behavior G. S. Choe and C. Z. Cheng@pppl.gov ABSTRACT A model describing physical processes of solar flares and their homologous behavior is presented. #12; -- 2 -- Subject headings: Sun: flares, MHD, methods: numerical 1. INTRODUCTION Solar flares

  12. X-ray and EUV Observations of GOES C8 Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    X-ray and EUV Observations of GOES C8 Solar Flare Events Kathy Reeves1, Trevor Bowen1,2, Paola;Solar Flares Tuesday, February 19, 2013 #12;Solar Flares Tuesday, February 19, 2013 #12;Solar Dynamics Veronig et al, A&A, 2002 Tuesday, February 19, 2013 #12;Flare Timing GOESflux(Wm-2) Rise Decay Tuesday

  13. GAMMA-RAY POLARIMETRY OF TWO X-CLASS SOLAR FLARES Steven E. Boggs,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    GAMMA-RAY POLARIMETRY OF TWO X-CLASS SOLAR FLARES Steven E. Boggs,1 W. Coburn, and E. Kalemci Space 2005 May 29; accepted 2005 October 18 ABSTRACT We have performed the first polarimetry of solar flare Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) for two large flares: the GOES X4.8-class solar flare of 2002

  14. The Effects of Solar Flares on Planetary Ionospheres PAUL WITHERS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    The Effects of Solar Flares on Planetary Ionospheres PAUL WITHERS1 and MICHAEL MENDILLO1 1 Center 353 1531) During solar flares, the Sun's X-ray irradiance increases dramatically, often within a few during solar flares. Similar increases in plasma densities during solar flares have been observed

  15. Submitted to Ap.J. A Model of Solar Flares and Their Homologous Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Submitted to Ap.J. A Model of Solar Flares and Their Homologous Behavior G. S. Choe and C. Z. Cheng@pppl.gov ABSTRACT A model describing physical processes of solar flares and their homologous behavior is presented. #12;­ 2 ­ Subject headings: Sun: flares, MHD, methods: numerical 1. INTRODUCTION Solar flares

  16. Solar-type Magnetic Reconnection Model for Magnetar Giant Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youhei Masada; Shigehiro Nagataki; Kazunari Shibata; Toshio Terasawa

    2010-05-24

    We present a theoretical model describing magnetar giant flares on the basis of solar flare/coronal mass ejection theory. In our model, a preflare activity plays a crucial role in driving evaporating flows and supplying baryonic matters into the magnetosphere. The loaded baryonic matter, that is called "prominence", is then gradually uplifted via crustal cracking with maintaining a quasi-force-free equilibrium of the magnetosphere. Finally the prominence is erupted by the magnetic pressure force due to the loss of equilibrium triggered by the explosive magnetic reconnection. The giant flare should be induced as a final outcome of the prominence eruption accompanied by large-scale field reconfigurations. An essential difference between solar and magnetar flares is the control process of their evolutionary dynamics. The flaring activity on magnetars is mainly controlled by the radiative process unlike the solar flare governed by the electron conduction. It is highly suggestive that our model is accountable for the physical properties of the extraordinary giant flare observed on 2004 December 27 from SGR1806-20, including the source of baryonic matters loaded in the expanding ejecta observed after the giant burst.

  17. Distinguishing Solar Flare Types by Differences in Reconnection Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Blackman

    1997-04-24

    Observations show that magnetic reconnection and its slow shocks occur in solar flares. The basic magnetic structures are similar for long duration event (LDE) flares and faster compact impulsive (CI) flares, but the former require less non-thermal electrons than the latter. Slow shocks can produce the required non-thermal electron spectrum for CI flares by Fermi acceleration if electrons are injected with large enough energies to resonate with scattering waves. The dissipation region may provide the injection electrons, so the overall number of non-thermal electrons reaching the footpoints would depend on the size of the dissipation region and its distance from the chromosphere. In this picture, the LDE flares have converging inflows toward a dissipation region that spans a smaller overall length fraction than for CI flares. Bright loop-top X-ray spots in some CI flares can be attributed to particle trapping at fast shocks in the downstream flow, the presence of which is determined by the angle of the inflow field and velocity to the slow shocks.

  18. OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL FLARE PLASMA WITH THE EUV VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Doschek, George A. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mariska, John T. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    One of the defining characteristics of a solar flare is the impulsive formation of very high temperature plasma. The properties of the thermal emission are not well understood, however, and the analysis of solar flare observations is often predicated on the assumption that the flare plasma is isothermal. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides spectrally resolved observations of emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures (e.g., Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and allow for thermal flare plasma to be studied in detail. In this paper we describe a method for computing the differential emission measure distribution in a flare using EVE observations and apply it to several representative events. We find that in all phases of the flare the differential emission measure distribution is broad. Comparisons of EVE spectra with calculations based on parameters derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites soft X-ray fluxes indicate that the isothermal approximation is generally a poor representation of the thermal structure of a flare.

  19. CONSTRAINING SOLAR FLARE DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURES WITH EVE AND RHESSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caspi, Amir [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); McTiernan, James M. [Space Sciences Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from ?2 to ?50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ?2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to ?10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from the EVE data also constrain the low energy cutoff of the non-thermal electrons, a crucial parameter for flare energetics. The DEM analysis can also be used to predict the soft X-ray flux in the poorly observed ?0.4-5 nm range, with important applications for geospace science.

  20. Distinguishing Solar Flare Types by Differences in Reconnection Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackman, E G

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that magnetic reconnection and its slow shocks occur in solar flares. The basic magnetic structures are similar for long duration event (LDE) flares and faster compact impulsive (CI) flares, but the former require less non-thermal electrons than the latter. Slow shocks can produce the required non-thermal electron spectrum for CI flares by Fermi acceleration if electrons are injected with large enough energies to resonate with scattering waves. The dissipation region may provide the injection electrons, so the overall number of non-thermal electrons reaching the footpoints would depend on the size of the dissipation region and its distance from the chromosphere. In this picture, the LDE flares have converging inflows toward a dissipation region that spans a smaller overall length fraction than for CI flares. Bright loop-top X-ray spots in some CI flares can be attributed to particle trapping at fast shocks in the downstream flow, the presence of which is determined by the angle of the inflow...

  1. Discovering Tau and Muon Solar Neutrino Flares above backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; F. Moscato

    2004-07-11

    Solar neutrino flares astronomy is at the edge of its discover. High energy flare particles (protons, alpha) whose self scattering within the solar corona is source of a rich prompt charged pions are also source of sharp solar neutrino "burst" (at tens-hundred MeV) produced by their pion-muon primary decay in flight. This brief (minute) solar neutrino "burst" at largest peak overcome by four-five order of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise at the Earth. Later on, solar flare particles hitting the terrestrial atmosphere may marginally increase the atmospheric neutrino flux without relevant consequences. Largest prompt "burst" solar neutrino flare may be detected in present or better in future largest neutrino underground neutrino detectors. Our estimate for the recent and exceptional October - November 2003 solar flares gives a number of events above or just near unity for Super-Kamiokande. The neutrino spectra may reflect in a subtle way the neutrino flavour mixing in flight. A surprising tau appearance may even occur for a hard ({E}_{nu}_{mu}--> {E}_{nu}_{tau} > 4 GeV) flare spectra. A comparison of the solar neutrino flare (at their birth place on Sun and after oscillation on the arrival on the Earth) with other neutrino foreground is here described and it offer an independent road map to disentangle the neutrino flavour puzzles and its secret flavour mixing angles .

  2. Solar Flare Measurements with STIX and MiSolFA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casadei, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Solar flares are the most powerful events in the solar system and the brightest sources of X-rays, often associated with emission of particles reaching the Earth and causing geomagnetic storms, giving problems to communication, airplanes and even black-outs. X-rays emitted by accelerated electrons are the most direct probe of solar flare phenomena. The Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus (MiSolFA) is a proposed compact X-ray detector which will address the two biggest issues in solar flare modeling. Dynamic range limitations prevent simultaneous spectroscopy with a single instrument of all X-ray emitting regions of a flare. In addition, most X-ray observations so far are inconsistent with the high anisotropy predicted by the models usually adopted for solar flares. Operated at the same time as the STIX instrument of the ESA Solar Orbiter mission, at the next solar maximum (2020), they will have the unique opportunity to look at the same flare from two different directions: Solar Orbiter gets very close to the Sun wit...

  3. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2015 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2015 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Arizona NA NA NA NA...

  4. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2015 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2015 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2015 Arizona NA NA NA NA...

  5. The VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. III. The frequency of brown dwarfs and giant planets as companions to solar-type stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reggiani, M; Chauvin, G; Vigan, A; Quanz, S P; Biller, B; Bonavita, M; Desidera, S; Delorme, P; Hagelberg, J; Maire, A -L; Boccaletti, A; Beuzit, J -L; Buenzli, E; Carson, J; Covino, E; Feldt, M; Girard, J; Gratton, R; Henning, T; Kasper, M; Lagrange, A -M; Mesa, D; Messina, S; Montagnier, G; Mordasini, C; Mouillet, D; Schlieder, J E; Segransan, D; Thalmann, C; Zurlo, A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there have been many attempts to characterize the occurrence of stellar, BD and planetary-mass companions to solar-type stars, with the aim of constraining formation mechanisms. From RV observations a dearth of companions with masses between 10-40 MJup has been noticed at close separations, suggesting the possibility of a distinct formation mechanism for objects above and below this range. We present a model for the substellar companion mass function (CMF). It consists of the superposition of the planet and BD companion mass distributions, assuming that we can extrapolate the RV measured companion mass function for planets to larger separations and the stellar companion mass-ratio distribution over all separations into the BD mass regime. By using both the results of the VLT/NaCo large program and the complementary archive datasets that probe the occurrence of planets and BDs on wide orbits around solar-type stars, we place some constraints on the planet and BD distributions. We developed a MC...

  6. Low-frequency inelastic light scattering in a ZBLAN (ZrF{sub 4}-BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF) glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adichtchev, S. V.; Malinovsky, V. K.; Surovtsev, N. V., E-mail: lab21@iae.nsk.su [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ignatieva, L. N.; Merkulov, E. B. [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation)] [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-14

    Low-frequency (down to 30 GHz) inelastic light scattering is studied in a multicomponent glass ZBLAN (ZrF{sub 4}-BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF) in a wide temperature range. The contributions of the THz vibrational spectrum (boson peak) and of the fast relaxation are extracted and analyzed. It is shown that the fast relaxation spectrum is described by a distribution of relaxation times leading to a power-law ?{sup ?} dependence in the frequency range 30–300 GHz. Temperature dependence of ?(T) is well described by the Gilroy-Phillips model, while the integrated intensity of the fast relaxation increases significantly with the temperature. This feature distinguishes the fast relaxation in ZBLAN from the case of most single-component glasses. Thermodynamic and kinetic fragility indexes are significantly different for the ZBLAN glass. The correlations between the boson peak intensity, elastic moduli, and fragility index, found earlier for single-component glasses, are fulfilled for the thermodynamic fragility index of ZBLAN. In contrast, the correlation between the fast relaxation intensity at T{sub g} and the fragility holds better for the kinetic fragility index of ZBLAN. We propose that thermodynamic and kinetic fragilities reflect different aspects of glassy dynamics in the case of glass formers with the complex chemical composition and structure topology: the former correlates with the elastic properties and the boson peak, the latter with the relaxation.

  7. Dielectric spectroscopy of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahesh, P. Subhash, T. Pamu, D.

    2014-04-24

    We report the dielectric properties of (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} ceramics doped with x wt% of Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x= 0.0-1.5 wt%) using the broadband dielectric spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction studies showed the formation of perovskite structure signifying that Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} diffuse into the KNN lattice. Samples doped with x > 0.5 wt% exhibit smaller grain size and lower relative densities. The dielectric properties of KNN ceramics doped with Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} are enhanced by increasing the Dy{sup 3+} content; among the compositions studied, x = 0.5 wt% exhibited the highest dielectric constant and lowest loss at 1MHz over the temperature range of 30°C to 400°C. All the samples exhibit maximum dielectric constant at the Curie temperature (? 326°C) and a small peak in the dielectric constant at around 165°C is due to a structural phase transition.

  8. The first observed stellar X-ray flare oscillation: Constraints on the flare loop length and the magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Mitra-Kraev; L. K. Harra; D. R. Williams; E. Kraev

    2005-03-17

    We present the first X-ray observation of an oscillation during a stellar flare. The flare occurred on the active M-type dwarf AT Mic and was observed with XMM-Newton. The soft X-ray light curve (0.2-12 keV) is investigated with wavelet analysis. The flare's extended, flat peak shows clear evidence for a damped oscillation with a period of around 750 s, an exponential damping time of around 2000 s, and an initial, relative peak-to-peak amplitude of around 15%. We suggest that the oscillation is a standing magneto-acoustic wave tied to the flare loop, and find that the most likely interpretation is a longitudinal, slow-mode wave, with a resulting loop length of (2.5 +- 0.2) e10 cm. The local magnetic field strength is found to be (105 +- 50) G. These values are consistent with (oscillation-independent) flare cooling time models and pressure balance scaling laws. Such a flare oscillation provides an excellent opportunity to obtain coronal properties like the size of a flare loop or the local magnetic field strength for the otherwise spatially-unresolved star.

  9. Evidence that solar flares drive global oscillations in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Karoff; H. Kjeldsen

    2008-03-21

    Solar flares are large explosions on the Sun's surface caused by a sudden release of magnetic energy. They are known to cause local short-lived oscillations travelling away from the explosion like water rings. Here we show that the energy in the solar acoustic spectrum is correlated with flares. This means that the flares drive global oscillations in the Sun in the same way that the entire Earth is set ringing for several weeks after a major earthquake like the December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake. The correlation between flares and energy in the acoustic spectrum of disk-integrated sunlight is stronger for high-frequency waves than for ordinary p-modes which are excited by the turbulence in the near surface convection zone immediately beneath the photosphere.

  10. Detecting Solar Neutrino Flare in Megaton and km^3 detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion; Paola Di Giacomo

    2009-01-21

    To foresee a solar flare neutrino signal we infer its upper and lower bound. The upper bound was derived since a few years by general energy equipartition arguments on observed solar particle flare. The lower bound, the most compelling one for any guarantee neutrino signal, is derived by most recent records of hard Gamma bump due to solar flare on January 2005 (by neutral pion decay).The observed gamma flux reflects into a corresponding one for the neutrinos, almost one to one. Therefore we obtain minimal bounds already at the edge of present but quite within near future Megaton neutrino detectors. Such detectors are considered mostly to reveal cosmic supernova background or rare Local Group (few Mpc) Supernovas events. However Megaton or even inner ten Megaton Ice Cube detector at ten GeV threshold may also reveal traces of solar neutrino in hardest energy of solar flares. Icecube, marginally, too. Solar neutrino flavors may shine light on neutrino mixing angles.

  11. Interferometric at-wavelength flare characterization of EUV optical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Naulleau, Patrick P. (Oakland, CA); Goldberg, Kenneth Alan (Berkeley, CA)

    2001-01-01

    The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) provides the high-accuracy wavefront characterization critical to the development of EUV lithography systems. Enhancing the implementation of the PS/PDI can significantly extend its spatial-frequency measurement bandwidth. The enhanced PS/PDI is capable of simultaneously characterizing both wavefront and flare. The enhanced technique employs a hybrid spatial/temporal-domain point diffraction interferometer (referred to as the dual-domain PS/PDI) that is capable of suppressing the scattered-reference-light noise that hinders the conventional PS/PDI. Using the dual-domain technique in combination with a flare-measurement-optimized mask and an iterative calculation process for removing flare contribution caused by higher order grating diffraction terms, the enhanced PS/PDI can be used to simultaneously measure both figure and flare in optical systems.

  12. Obscuration of Flare Emission by an Eruptive Prominence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-01-01

    We report on the eclipsing of microwave flare emission by an eruptive prominence from a neighboring region as observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. The obscuration of the flare emission appears as a dimming feature in the microwave flare light curve. We use the dimming feature to derive the temperature of the prominence and the distribution of heating along the length of the filament. We find that the prominence is heated to a temperature above the quiet Sun temperature at 17 GHz. The duration of the dimming is the time taken by the eruptive prominence in passing over the flaring region. We also find evidence for the obscuration in EUV images obtained by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission.

  13. Leukemia cutis resembling a flare-up of psoriasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia; Caetano, Mónica; Amorim, Isabel; Selores, Manuela

    2006-01-01

    resembling a flare-up of psoriasis Márcia Ferreira, Mónicaof a 64-year-old man with psoriasis who presented with a 4-colored to erythematous, psoriasis-like papules and plaques

  14. Associated Shale Gas- From Flares to Rig Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Elizabeth Michelle

    2014-10-16

    From September 2011 to July 2013 the percentage of flared associated gas produced in the Bakken shale formation decreased from 36% to 29%. Although the percentage decreased, the volume of associated gas produced has almost tripled to 900 MMcf...

  15. Electron Firehose instability and acceleration of electrons in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnar Paesold; Arnold O. Benz

    2000-01-14

    An electron distribution with a temperature anisotropy T_par/T_perp > 1 can lead to the Electron Firehose instability (Here par and perp denote directions relative to the background magnetic field B_0). Since possible particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares exhibit a preference of energizing particles in parallel direction, such an anisotropy is expected during the impulsive phase of a flare. The properties of the excited waves and the thresholds for instability are investigated by using linearized kinetic theory. These thresholds were connected to the pre-flare plasma parameters by assuming an acceleration model acting exclusively in parallel direction. For usually assumed pre-flare plasma conditions the electrons become unstable during the acceleration process and lefthand circularly polarized waves with frequencies of about the proton gyrofrequency are excited at parallel propagation. Indications have been found, that the largest growth rates occur at oblique propagation and the according frequencies lie well above the proton gyrofrequency.

  16. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Kubo

    2008-02-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  17. Multi-Thread Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry P. Warren

    2005-07-13

    Past hydrodynamic simulations have been able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities characteristic of solar flares. These simulations, however, have not been able to account for the slow decay of the observed flare emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles. Recent work has suggested that modeling a flare as an sequence of independently heated threads instead of as a single loop may resolve the discrepancies between the simulations and observations. In this paper we present a method for computing multi-thread, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of solar flares and apply it to observations of the Masuda flare of 1992 January 13. We show that it is possible to reproduce the temporal evolution of high temperature thermal flare plasma observed with the instruments on the \\textit{GOES} and \\textit{Yohkoh} satellites. The results from these simulations suggest that the heating time-scale for a individual thread is on the order of 200 s. Significantly shorter heating time scales (20 s) lead to very high temperatures and are inconsistent with the emission observed by \\textit{Yohkoh}.

  18. Observational evidence for return currents in solar flare loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Battaglia; Arnold O. Benz

    2008-06-11

    Context: The common flare scenario comprises an acceleration site in the corona and particle transport to the chromosphere. Using satellites available to date it has become possible to distinguish between the two processes of acceleration and transport, and study the particle propagation in flare loops in detail, as well as complete comparisons with theoretical predictions. Aims: We complete a quantitative comparison between flare hard X-ray spectra observed by RHESSI and theoretical predictions. This enables acceleration to be distinguished from transport and the nature of transport effects to be explored. Methods: Data acquired by the RHESSI satellite were analyzed using full sun spectroscopy as well as imaging spectroscopy methods. Coronal source and footpoint spectra of well observed limb events were analyzed and quantitatively compared to theoretical predictions. New concepts are introduced to existing models to resolve discrepancies between observations and predictions. Results: The standard thin-thick target solar flare model cannot explain the observations of all events. In the events presented here, propagation effects in the form of non-collisional energy loss are of importance to explain the observations. We demonstrate that those energy losses can be interpreted in terms of an electric field in the flare loop. One event seems consistent with particle propagation or acceleration in lower than average density in the coronal source. Conclusions: We find observational evidence for an electric field in flare loops caused by return currents.

  19. Gamma-Ray Polarimetry of Two X-Class Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven E. Boggs; W. Coburn; E. Kalemci

    2005-10-19

    We have performed the first polarimetry of solar flare emission at gamma-ray energies (0.2-1 MeV). These observations were performed with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) for two large flares: the GOES X4.8-class solar flare of 2002 July 23, and the X17-class flare of 2003 October 28. We have marginal polarization detections in both flares, at levels of 21% +/- 9% and -11% +/- 5% respectively. These measurements significantly constrain the levels and directions of solar flare gamma-ray polarization, and begin to probe the underlying electron distributions.

  20. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31

    The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

  1. Trends in Electrical Transport of p-type Skutterudites RFe4Sb12 (R-Na,K,Ca,Sr,Ba,La,Ce,Pr,Yb) from First Principles Calculations and Boltzmann Transport Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Qiu, P [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Liu, R [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Xi, L [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Zheng, S [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Zhang, W [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS); Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Singh, David J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    We report a consistent set of ab initio calculations of the electronic structures and electrical transport properties of p-type thermoelectric compounds RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, where R is a rattling filler selected from alkali metals (Na, K), alkaline earths (Ca, Sr, Ba), and rare earth metals (La, Ce, Pr, Yb). Different from the single Sb-dominated light band in the valence band edge of CoSb{sub 3}, the heavy bands from Fe d electronic states also fall in the energy range close to the valence band edges in the RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}. These heavy bands dominate the band-edge density of states, pin the Fermi levels, and mostly determine the electrical transport properties of those p-type RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}. The Seebeck coefficients can be roughly categorized into three groups based on the charge states of fillers, and the maxima are lower than those of n-type CoSb{sub 3} skutterudites. Effective carrier relaxation time in p-type RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, obtained from the combinations of calculations and experiments, is remarkably similar among different compounds with values around 7.5 x 10{sup -15} s and weak temperature dependence. The optimal doping levels of those RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} are estimated to be around 0.6-0.8 holes per unit cell at 850 K, which is difficult to achieve in RFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} compounds. Prospects for further improving the performance of p-type skutterudites are also discussed.

  2. ECO2M: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2, Including Super- and Sub-Critical Conditions, and Phase Change Between Liquid and Gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-04-01

    ECO2M is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O - NaCl - CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for temperature, pressure and salinity conditions in the range of 10 C {le} T {le} 110 C, P {le} 600 bar, and salinity from zero up to full halite saturation. The fluid property correlations used in ECO2M are identical to the earlier ECO2N fluid property package, but whereas ECO2N could represent only a single CO{sub 2}-rich phase, ECO2M can describe all possible phase conditions for brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This allows for seamless modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-and three-phase mixtures of aqueous, liquid CO{sub 2} and gaseous CO{sub 2} phases. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. TOUGH2/ECO2M is upwardly compatible with ECO2N and accepts ECO2N-style inputs. This report gives technical specifications of ECO2M and includes instructions for preparing input data. Code applications are illustrated by means of several sample problems, including problems that had been previously solved with TOUGH2/ECO2N.

  3. U Gorskome kotaru kao na Strawberry Hillu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boley, Colleen; Stakun, Rebecca; Novak, Charles; Pirnat-Greenberg, Marta

    2012-07-01

    Students of Croatian working under the supervision of their instructor, Marta Pirnat-Greenberg, interviewed and wrote an article on the Croatian-American photographer Don Wolf, a native of Strawberry Hill, Kansas City, Kansas. This is the second...

  4. master's degree NaNotechNology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    , or more closely related to applications in domains such as sustainable energy or health technology. Most around us: from new solar cells and energy innovations to breakthroughs in medical diagnosis

  5. ARTIGO INTERNET Portugal na `noite do Yuri'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    a fantástica aventura da Humanidade no Espaço. file:///Users/salvina/Desktop/Clipping/Abril%202010/CienciaHoje

  6. Kako natan?na je lahko transkripcija

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivi?, Mira Krajnc

    2010-02-01

    gibanjem idej v stanje aktivne, deloma aktivne in neaktivne zavesti in iz teh stanj zavesti (Couper-Kuhler 2001: 15). Intonacija naj bi nudila okno v zavest z osnovanjem dveh razli?nih tipov enot: intonacijske in poudarjene enote. Intonacijska enota... izpostavljene. 2.1.1.1.3 Pojmovanje intonacije kot kontekstualizacijskega namiga za prikli- cevanje dolo?enega interpretativnega okvira izre?enega dopolnjuje spoznanja o intonaciji kot delu informacijskega poteka (Couper-Kuhler 2001: 16–17). Intonacijo je kot...

  7. A=13Na (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries80AJ01)86AJ01) (Not

  8. A=13Na (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries80AJ01)86AJ01) (Not91AJ01) (Not illustrated)

  9. A=14Na (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries80AJ01)86AJ01)76AJ04)76AJ04)81AJ01)70AJ04)

  10. A=14Na (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion

  11. A=16Na (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01) (Not93TI07) (Not illustrated)71AJ02) (See

  12. A=16Na (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01) (Not93TI07) (Not illustrated)71AJ02) (See93TI07)

  13. A=17Na (1977AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01) (Not93TI07)93TI07) (See93TI07) (See Energy77AJ02)

  14. A=17Na (1982AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01) (Not93TI07)93TI07) (See93TI07) (See

  15. A=17Na (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01) (Not93TI07)93TI07) (See93TI07) (See6AJ04) (Not

  16. A=17Na (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01) (Not93TI07)93TI07) (See93TI07) (See6AJ04)

  17. A=17Na (71AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01) (Not93TI07)93TI07) (See93TI07) (See6AJ04)71AJ02)

  18. A=18Na (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See Energy Level

  19. A=18Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See Energy Level3AJ01) (Not illustrated)

  20. A=18Na (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See Energy Level3AJ01) (Not

  1. A=18Na (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See Energy Level3AJ01) (Not95TI07) (Not

  2. A=18Na (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See Energy Level3AJ01) (Not95TI07)

  3. A=19Na (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See72AJ02) (Not87AJ02)7AJ02)

  4. A=19Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See72AJ02) (Not87AJ02)7AJ02)3AJ01) (See

  5. A=19Na (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See72AJ02) (Not87AJ02)7AJ02)3AJ01)

  6. A=19Na (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See72AJ02) (Not87AJ02)7AJ02)3AJ01)95TI07)

  7. A=19Na (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02) (See72AJ02)

  8. A=20Na (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02)78AJ03) (Not98TI06)

  9. A=20Na (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02)78AJ03) (Not98TI06)3AJ01) (See Energy Level

  10. A=20Na (1987AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02)78AJ03) (Not98TI06)3AJ01) (See Energy

  11. A=20Na (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02)78AJ03) (Not98TI06)3AJ01) (See Energy98TI06)

  12. A=20Na (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion1AJ01)72AJ02)78AJ03) (Not98TI06)3AJ01) (See

  13. SOFE Romanelli_na1.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small AngleSNL&BAMn n u aRoadmap to

  14. Contract No. DE-NA0001942

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia National 1 PAGE 1 OF2Guidance to the1N I T E1942 Section

  15. Contract No. DE-NA0002839

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia National 1 PAGE 1 OF2Guidance to the1N I T E1942

  16. NA 80 - Associate Administrator for Counterterrorism and

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 2012 Guidance for

  17. na-00 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII: TheJointCoupling, , Laser

  18. Document: NA (FOIA) Actionee: Dorothy Riehie

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown August 9,5The2ndNEWS

  19. Anti-Neutrino Imprint in Solar Neutrino Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion

    2006-06-09

    Future neutrino detector at Megaton mass might enlarge the neutrino telescope thresholds revealing cosmic supernova background and largest solar flares neutrino. Indeed the solar energetic flare particles while scattering among themselves on Solar corona atmosphere must produce prompt charged pions, whose chain decays are source of solar (electron-muon) neutrino "flare" (at tens or hundreds MeV energy). These brief (minutes) neutrino "burst" at largest flare peak may overcome by three to five order of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise on the Earth, possibly leading to their detection above detection. Moreover the birth of anti-neutrinos at a few tens MeVs is well loudly flaring above a null thermal "hep" anti-neutrino solar background and also above a tiny supernova relic and atmospheric noise. The largest prompt solar anti-neutrino "burst" may be well detected in future SuperKamikande (Gadolinium implemented) by anti-neutrino signatures mostly in inverse Beta decay. Our estimate for the recent and exceptional October - November 2003 solar flares and January 20th 2005 exceptional eruption might lead to a few events above or near unity for existing Super-Kamiokande and above unity for Megaton detectors. The neutrino spectra may reflect in a subtle way the neutrino flavor oscillations and mixing in flight. A comparison of the solar neutrino flare (at their birth place on Sun and after oscillation on the arrival on the Earth) with other neutrino foreground is estimated: it offers an independent track to disentangle the neutrino flavor puzzles and its most secret mixing angles. The sharpest noise-free anti-neutrino imprint maybe its first clean voice.

  20. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 2 JULY 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS2670 Self-organized criticality in X-ray flares of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    statistical results of X-ray flares of GRBs with known redshifts, and show that X-ray flares and solar flares-organized criticality (SOC) system. The statistical properties of X-ray flares of GRBs are similar to solar flares for the first time. On the other hand, it is well known that solar flares with a timescale of hours

  1. Product transfer service chosen over LPG flaring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, J.; Powers, M.

    1994-07-01

    Seadrift Pipeline Corp. recently decommissioned its Ella Pipeline, an 108-mile, 8-in. line between the King Ranch and a Union Carbide plant at Seadrift, Texas. The pipeline company opted for the product transfer services of pipeline Dehydrators Inc. to evacuate the ethane-rich LPG mixture from the pipeline instead of flaring the LPG or displacing it with nitrogen at operating pressures into another pipeline. The product transfer system of Pipeline Dehydrators incorporates the use of highly specialized portable compressors, heat exchangers and interconnected piping. The product transfer process of evacuating a pipeline is an economically viable method that safely recovers a very high percentage of the product while maintaining product purity. Using positive-displacement compressors, PLD transferred the LPG from the idled 8-in. Ella line into an adjacent 12-in. ethane pipeline that remained in service at approximately 800 psig. Approximately 4.3 million lb of LPG (97% ethane, 2.7% methane and 0.3% propane) were transferred into the ethane pipeline, lowering the pressure on the Ella Pipeline from 800 psig to 65 psig.

  2. Spectral Hardening of Large Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2008-05-01

    RHESSI observations are used to quantitatively study the hard X-ray evolution in 5 large solar flares selected for spectral hardening in the course of the event. The X-ray bremsstrahlung emission from non-thermal electrons is characterized by two spectroscopically distinct phases: impulsive and gradual. The impulsive phase usually consists of several emission spikes following a soft-hard-soft spectral pattern, whereas the gradual stage manifests itself as spectral hardening while the flux slowly decreases. Both the soft-hard-soft (impulsive) phase and the hardening (gradual) phase are well described by piecewise linear dependence of the photon spectral index on the logarithm of the hard X-ray flux. The different linear parts of this relation correspond to different rise and decay phases of emission spikes. The temporal evolution of the spectra is compared with the configuration and motion of the hard X-ray sources in RHESSI images. These observations reveal that the two stages of electron acceleration causing these two different behaviors are closely related in space and time. The transition between the impulsive and gradual phase is found to be smooth and progressive rather than abrupt. This suggests that they arise because of a slow change in a common accelerator rather than being caused by two independent and distinct acceleration processes. We propose that the hardening during the decay phase is caused by continuing particle acceleration with longer trapping in the accelerator before escape.

  3. OPTICAL DISCOVERY OF PROBABLE STELLAR TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Velzen, Sjoert; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, NY 10003 (United States); Gezari, Suvi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morrell, Nidia [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casillas 601, La Serena (Chile); Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Oestman, Linda [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Smith, Mathew [Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7701 (South Africa); Gelfand, Joseph [New York University-Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Drake, Andrew J., E-mail: s.vanvelzen@astro.ru.nl [Center for Advance Computing Research, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K and observed peak luminosities of M{sub g} = -18.3 and -20.4 ({nu}L{sub {nu}} = 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42}, 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}, in the rest frame); their cooling rates are very low, qualitatively consistent with expectations for tidal disruption flares. The properties of the TDE candidates are examined using (1) SDSS imaging to compare them to other flares observed in the search, (2) UV emission measured by GALEX, and (3) spectra of the hosts and of one of the flares. Our pipeline excludes optically identifiable AGN hosts, and our variability monitoring over nine years provides strong evidence that these are not flares in hidden AGNs. The spectra and color evolution of the flares are unlike any SN observed to date, their strong late-time UV emission is particularly distinctive, and they are nuclear at high resolution arguing against these being first cases of a previously unobserved class of SNe or more extreme examples of known SN types. Taken together, the observed properties are difficult to reconcile with an SN or an AGN-flare explanation, although an entirely new process specific to the inner few hundred parsecs of non-active galaxies cannot be excluded. Based on our observed rate, we infer that hundreds or thousands of TDEs will be present in current and next-generation optical synoptic surveys. Using the approach outlined here, a TDE candidate sample with O(1) purity can be selected using geometric resolution and host and flare color alone, demonstrating that a campaign to create a large sample of TDEs, with immediate and detailed multi-wavelength follow-up, is feasible. A by-product of this work is quantification of the power spectrum of extreme flares in AGNs.

  4. Super-hot (T > 30 MK) Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, Amir

    2010-01-01

    MNRAS, 148, 17 Kane, S. R. , et al. 1980, in Solar Flares: AMonograph from SKYLAB Solar Workshop II, ed. P. A.Moore, R. , et al. 1980, in Solar Flares: A Monograph from

  5. ELECTROMAGNETIC AND CORPUSCULAR EMISSION FROM THE SOLAR FLARE OF 1991 JUNE 15: CONTINUOUS ACCELERATON OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    detected previously in only a few ground level events (GLE) detected by the neutron monitor network (e-flare loop system were also recorded. In Figure 1 we show the post-flare loops observed at Big Bear

  6. Connecting Flares and Transient Mass Loss Events in Magnetically Active Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osten, Rachel A

    2015-01-01

    We explore the ramification of associating the energetics of extreme mag- netic reconnection events with transient mass loss in a stellar analogy with solar eruptive events. We establish energy partitions relative to the total bolometric radiated flare energy for different observed components of stellar flares, and show that there is rough agreement for these values with solar flares. We apply an equipartition between the bolometric radiated flare energy and kinetic energy in an accompanying mass ejection, seen in solar eruptive events and expected from reconnection. This allows an integrated flare rate in a particular waveband to be used to estimate the amount of associated transient mass loss. This approach is supported by a good correspondence between observational flare signatures on high flaring rate stars and the Sun, which suggests a common physical origin. If the frequent and extreme flares that young solar-like stars and low-mass stars experience are accompanied by transient mass loss in the form of ...

  7. Space weather effects on the Mars ionosphere due to solar flares and meteors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Space weather effects on the Mars ionosphere due to solar flares and meteors P. Withers (1), M observed two aspects of space weather at Mars. Following solar flares of both moderate to strong magnitude

  8. Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

    2005-03-03

    The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

  9. Impulsive Heating of Solar Flare Ribbons Above 10 MK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-01-01

    The chromospheric response to the input of flare energy is marked by extended extreme ultraviolet (EUV) ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. These are usually explained as the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from accelerated electrons colliding in the dense chromospheric plasma. We present evidence of impulsive heating of flare ribbons above 10 MK in a two-ribbon flare. We analyse the impulsive phase of SOL2013-11-09T06:38, a C2.6 class event using data from Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to derive the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flaring regions and investigate the evolution of the plasma in the flaring ribbons. The ribbons were visible at all SDO/AIA EUV/UV wavelengths, in particular, at 94 and 131 \\AA\\ filters, sensitive to temperatures of 8 MK and 12 MK. Time evolution of the emission measure of the plasma above 10 MK at the ribb...

  10. Repeated X-ray Flaring Activity in Sagittarius A*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Belanger; Andrea Goldwurm; Fulvio Melia; Farah Yusef-Zadeh; Philippe Ferrando; Delphine Porquet; Nicolas Grosso; Robert Warwick

    2005-08-19

    Investigating the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-rays coming from Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is essential to our development of a more complete understanding of the emission mechanisms in this supermassive black hole located at the center of our Galaxy. Several X-ray flares with varying durations and spectral features have already been observed from this object. Here we present the results of two long XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic nucleus carried out in 2004, for a total exposure time of nearly 500 ks. During these observations we detected two flares from Sgr A* with peak 2-10 keV luminosities about 40 times (L ~ 9x10^34 erg s?1) above the quiescent luminosity: one on 2004 March 31 and another on 2004 August 31. The first flare lasted about 2.5 ks and the second about 5 ks. The combined fit on the Epic spectra yield photon indeces of about 1.5 and 1.9 for the first and second flare respectively. This hard photon index strongly suggests the presence of an important population of non-thermal electrons during the event and supports the view that the majority of flaring events tend to be hard and not very luminous.

  11. Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; F. Moscato

    2004-05-03

    Solar neutrino flares and mixing are considered. Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The observed and estimated total flare energy should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with, gamma,radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold of 113 MeV. The rarest tau appearence will be possible only for hardest solar neutrino energies above 3.471 GeV

  12. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allred, Joel C; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework which can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and...

  13. On flare predictability based on sunspot group evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korsos, Marianna; Erdelyi, Robert; Baranyi, Tunde

    2015-01-01

    The forecast method introduced by Kors\\'os et al.(2014) is generalised from the horizontal magnetic gradient (GM), defined between two opposite polarity spots, to all spots within an appropriately defined region close to the magnetic neutral line of an active region. This novel approach is not limited to searching for the largest GM of two single spots as in previous methods. Instead, the pre-flare conditions of the evolution of spot groups is captured by the introduction of the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient, or W_GM. This new proxy enables the potential of forecasting flares stronger than M5. The improved capability includes (i) the prediction of flare onset time and (ii) an assessment whether a flare is followed by another event within about 18 hours. The prediction of onset time is found to be more accurate here. A linear relationship is established between the duration of converging motion and the time elapsed from the moment of closest position to that of the flare onset of opposite polarity spot...

  14. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  15. Early Abnormal Temperature Structure of X-ray Looptop Source of Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinhua Shen; Tuanhui Zhou; Haisheng Ji; Na Wang; Wenda Cao; Haimin Wang

    2008-08-29

    This Letter is to investigate the physics of a newly discovered phenomenon -- contracting flare loops in the early phase of solar flares. In classical flare models, which were constructed based on the phenomenon of expansion of flare loops, an energy releasing site is put above flare loops. These models can predict that there is a vertical temperature gradient in the top of flare loops due to heat conduction and cooling effects. Therefore, the centroid of an X-ray looptop source at higher energy bands will be higher in altitude, for which we can define as normal temperature distribution. With observations made by {\\it RHESSI}, we analyzed 10 M- or X-class flares (9 limb flares). For all these flares, the movement of looptop sources shows an obvious U-shaped trajectory, which we take as the signature of contraction-to-expansion of flare loops. We find that, for all these flares, normal temperature distribution does exist, but only along the path of expansion. The temperature distribution along the path of contraction is abnormal, showing no spatial order at all. The result suggests that magnetic reconnection processes in the contraction and expansion phases of these solar flares are different.

  16. Automatic Solar Flare Detection Using MLP, RBF and SVM , Frank Y. Shih1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in light curves. In the mean time, solar flares also emit high velocity charged particles that take one1 Automatic Solar Flare Detection Using MLP, RBF and SVM Ming Qu1 , Frank Y. Shih1 , Ju Jing2. The focus of the automatic solar flare detection is on the development of efficient feature

  17. Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2 and Bruce J; published 17 June 2003) We argue that Earth's short-term temperature anomalies and the solar flare data sets that corresponds to the one that would be induced by the solar flare intermittency. The mean

  18. LETTER Earth Planets Space, 61, 577580, 2009 Flares and the chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    magnetic field. Key words: Solar flares, solar chromosphere, solar corona, Alfv´en waves. 1. Introduction The chromosphere historically has been the origin of much of what we understand about solar flares. The rea- son of a solar flare appears mainly in the optical and UV continuum, which form in the lower solar atmosphere

  19. Statistical Assessment of Photospheric Magnetic Features in Imminent Solar Flares Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical Assessment of Photospheric Magnetic Features in Imminent Solar Flares Predictions Hui in solar physics to predict solar flares. 1. Introduction Over the past decades, mankind has become more of the primary objectives in space weather research is to predict the occurrence of solar flares and Coronal Mass

  20. Relationship between magnetic power spectrum and flare productivity in solar active regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relationship between magnetic power spectrum and flare productivity in solar active regions V day, being equal to 1 when the specific flare productivity is one C1.0 flare per day. The power index.I. Abramenko Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314, USA ABSTRACT Power