Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

VALUING FLARED NATURAL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LAST YEAR , enough natural gas to supply 27% of U.S. needs was burned off as waste around the world, according to a new report by the World Bank. Flared natural gas is a by-product of petroleum production and is not generally considered worth capture and ...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Recovering Flare Gas Energy - A Different Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, September 16-18, 1987 SLIDLIN CH81ICAL CX1'1PANY RARE GAS RECXNERY SYSID1 K.O, ~LM 19) PSIG STEAM F,D, FAN0'1 '" N Z N NAT~L GAS SEAL SEAL FU\\RE OIL PoT STACK TANK FLARE GAS I?T ~y ~LM ~LM ESL...RECOVERING FLARE GAS ENERGY - A DIFFERENT APPROACH \\ WALTER BRENNER Process Engineer SunOlin Chemical Co. Claymont, Delaware AUSTRACT Most petrochemical complexes and oil re fineries have systems to collect and dispose of waste gases...

Brenner, W.

3

Sauget Plant Flare Gas Reduction Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Empirical analysis of stack gas heating value allowed the Afton Chemical Corporation Sauget Plant to reduce natural gas flow to its process flares by about 50% while maintaining the EPA-required minimum heating value of the gas streams....

Ratkowski, D. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Detecting gas flares and estimating flaring volumes at individual flow stations using MODIS data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas flaring has gained global recognition as a prominent agent of pollution, leading to the establishment of the Global Gas Flaring Reduction (GGFR) initiative, which requires an objective means of monitoring flaring activity. Because auditable information on flaring activity is difficult to obtain there have recently been attempts to detect flares using satellite imagery, typically at global scales. However, to adequately assess the environmental and health impacts of flaring from local to regional scales, it is important that we have a means of acquiring information on the location of individual active flaring sites and the volume of gas combusted at these sites. In this study we developed an approach to the retrieval of such information using nighttime MODIS thermal imagery. The MODIS flare detection technique (MODET) and the MODIS flare volume estimation technique (MOVET) both exploit the absolute and contextual radiometric response of flare sites. The levels of detection accuracy and estimation error were quantified using independent observations of flare location and volume. The MODET and MOVET were applied to an archive of MODIS data spanning 2000–2014 covering the Niger Delta, Nigeria, a significant global hotspot of flaring activity. The results demonstrate the substantial spatial and temporal variability in gas flaring across the region, between states and between onshore and offshore sites. Thus, whilst the estimated total volume of gas flared in the region over the study period is large (350 Billion Cubic Metres), the heterogeneity in the flaring indicates that the impacts of such flares will be highly variable in space and time. In this context, the MODET and MOVET offer a consistent and objective means of monitoring flaring activity over an appropriate range of scales and it is now important that their robustness and transferability is tested in other oil-producing regions of the world.

Obinna C.D. Anejionu; G. Alan Blackburn; J. Duncan Whyatt

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Other States Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 408 1992 501 530 501 1993 501 522 515 533 536 531 583 546 1994 533 616 623 620 629 654 1995 667 594 663 634 643 626 643 663 603 553 567 578 1996 549 538 625 620 693 703 709 715 676 708 682 690 1997 133 124 135 142 147 142 149 177 160 150 159 161 1998 147 134 150 148 132 117 126 132 124 121 121 123 1999 754 406 686 588 693 611 708 340 590 811 785 592 2000 147 135 152 163 175 159 187 180 175 179 176 183 2001 166 149 171 206 224 208 221 218 229 222 222 238 2002 172 163 176 196 185 177 191 184 188 180 157 165

7

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

8

DOE/EA-1745 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BLAST FURNACE GAS FLARE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BLAST FURNACE GAS FLARE CAPTURE PROJECT AT THE ARCELORMITTAL USA, INC. INDIANA HARBOR STEEL MILL, EAST CHICAGO, INDIANA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1745 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE BLAST FURNACE GAS FLARE CAPTURE PROJECT AT THE ARCELORMITTAL USA, INC. INDIANA HARBOR STEEL MILL, EAST CHICAGO, INDIANA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August 2010 DOE/EA-1745 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Final Environmental Assessment for the Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture Project at the ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. Indiana Harbor Steel Mill, East Chicago, Indiana

9

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

10

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

11

Kentucky Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

12

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

13

Ohio Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

14

Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

15

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

16

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

17

Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

18

Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

19

Illinois Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

20

Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reduced Nitrogen and Natural Gas Consumption at Deepwell Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facing both an economic downturn and the liklihood of steep natural gas price increases, company plants were challenged to identify and quickly implement energy saving projects that would reduce natural gas usage. Unit operating personnel...

Williams, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States, oil and gas wastewater is managed through recycling of the wastewater for shale gas operations of the wastewater.7 However, options for the proper disposal and management of the wastewater that is not recycledImpacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R

Jackson, Robert B.

23

Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Drilling Operators' Choice of Wastewater Disposal Method.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As natural gas drilling in the Marcellus Shale region moves forward, the issue of wastewater disposal has risen to the forefront. In 2010, the Pennsylvania… (more)

Edmundson, Caitlyn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Recovery Act: ArcelorMittal USA Blast Furnace Gas Flare Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to ArcelorMittal USA, Inc. (ArcelorMittal) for a project to construct and operate a blast furnace gas recovery boiler and supporting infrastructure at ArcelorMittal’s Indiana Harbor Steel Mill in East Chicago, Indiana. Blast furnace gas (BFG) is a by-product of blast furnaces that is generated when iron ore is reduced with coke to create metallic iron. BFG has a very low heating value, about 1/10th the heating value of natural gas. BFG is commonly used as a boiler fuel; however, before installation of the gas recovery boiler, ArcelorMittal flared 22 percent of the blast furnace gas produced at the No. 7 Blast Furnace at Indiana Harbor. The project uses the previously flared BFG to power a new high efficiency boiler which produces 350,000 pounds of steam per hour. The steam produced is used to drive existing turbines to generate electricity and for other requirements at the facility. The goals of the project included job creation and preservation, reduced energy consumption, reduced energy costs, environmental improvement, and sustainability.

Seaman, John

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

25

On the usage of Flaring Gas Layers to determine the Shape of Dark Matter Halos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I present a new method of deriving the shape of the dark matter (DM) halos of spiral galaxies. The method relies on the comparison of model predictions with high spectral and spatial resolution HI observations of the gas layer. The potential arising from the {\\em total} mass distribution of the galaxy is used in the calculation of the vertical distribution of the gas. I developed a new algorithm to calculate the force field of an arbitrary, azimuthally symmetric, density distribution. This algorithm is used to calculate the forces due to the radially truncated stellar disk as well as of the flaring gas layer. I use a simple two-parameter family of disk-halo models which have essentially the same observed equatorial rotation curve but different vertical forces. This mass model is composed of a stellar disk with constant M/L, and a DM-halo with a given axial ratio. I approximate the radial force due to the gaseous disk, and iteratively determine the vertical force due to the global distribution of the gas. The thickness of the gaseous disk is sensitive to both the flattening of the DM-halo and the self-gravity of the gas, but not to the particular choice of disk-halo decomposition. I show that the determination of the thickness of the gas layer is not restricted to edge-on galaxies, but can be measured for moderately inclined systems as well.

Rob P. Olling

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

26

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 1,994 1,804 1,837 1,504 1,798 1,541 1,890 1,954 1,742 2,018 1,823 1,711 2002 1,661 1,512 1,693 1,728 1,794 1,738 1,809 1,820 1,523 1,433 1,667 1,714 2003 1,728 1,590 1,801 1,753 1,774 1,675 1,639 1,702 1,612 1,661 1,555 1,617 2004 1,554 1,465 1,600 1,544 1,566 1,463 1,536 1,508 1,194 1,301 1,336 1,339 2005 1,368 1,266 1,430 1,362 1,429 1,351 1,291 1,204 609 607 862 1,021

27

Options and costs for offsite disposal of oil and gas exploration and production wastes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, most of the exploration and production (E&P) wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. Certain types of wastes are not suitable for onsite management, and some well locations in sensitive environments cannot be used for onsite management. In these situations, operators must transport the wastes offsite for disposal. In 1997, Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) prepared a report that identified offsite commercial disposal facilities in the United States. This information has since become outdated. Over the past year, Argonne has updated the study through contacts with state oil and gas agencies and commercial disposal companies. The new report, including an extensive database for more than 200 disposal facilities, provides an excellent reference for information about commercial disposal operations. This paper describes Argonne's report. The national study provides summaries of the types of offsite commercial disposal facilities found in each state. Data are presented by waste type and by disposal method. The categories of E&P wastes in the database include: contaminated soils, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), oil-based muds and cuttings, produced water, tank bottoms, and water-based muds and cuttings. The different waste management or disposal methods in the database involve: bioremediation, burial, salt cavern, discharge, evaporation, injection, land application, recycling, thermal treatment, and treatment. The database includes disposal costs for each facility. In the United States, most of the 18 billion barrels (bbl) of produced water, 149 million bbl of drilling wastes, and 21 million bbl of associated wastes generated at onshore oil and gas wells are disposed of or otherwise managed at the well site. However, under certain conditions, operators will seek offsite management options for these E&P wastes. Commercial disposal facilities are offsite businesses that accept and manage E&P wastes for a fee. Their services include waste management and disposal, transportation, cleaning of vehicles and tanks, disposal of wash water, and, in some cases, laboratory analysis. Commercial disposal facilities offer a suite of waste management methods and technologies.

Puder, M. G.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Near-infrared flares from accreting gas around the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Centre  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... . The infrared flares all originated from within a few milliarcseconds, or a few hundred Schwarzschild radii, of the black-hole position (Table 1). That position was determined from ... the infrared flares originate in the innermost accretion zone, on a scale less than ten Schwarzschild radii (the light travel time across the ...

R. Genzel; R. Schödel; T. Ott; A. Eckart; T. Alexander; F. Lacombe; D. Rouan; B. Aschenbach

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Micro-miniature gas chromatograph column disposed in silicon wafers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A micro-miniature gas chromatograph column is fabricated by forming matching halves of a circular cross-section spiral microcapillary in two silicon wafers and then bonding the two wafers together using visual or physical alignment methods. Heating wires are deposited on the outside surfaces of each wafer in a spiral or serpentine pattern large enough in area to cover the whole microcapillary area inside the joined wafers. The visual alignment method includes etching through an alignment window in one wafer and a precision-matching alignment target in the other wafer. The two wafers are then bonded together using the window and target. The physical alignment methods include etching through vertical alignment holes in both wafers and then using pins or posts through corresponding vertical alignment holes to force precision alignment during bonding. The pins or posts may be withdrawn after curing of the bond. Once the wafers are bonded together, a solid phase of very pure silicone is injected in a solution of very pure chloroform into one end of the microcapillary. The chloroform lowers the viscosity of the silicone enough that a high pressure hypodermic needle with a thumbscrew plunger can force the solution into the whole length of the spiral microcapillary. The chloroform is then evaporated out slowly to leave the silicone behind in a deposit.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Combination gas-producing and waste-water disposal well. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, R.M.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

31

Assessment of microbial processes on gas production at radioactive low-level waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Factors controlling gaseous emanations from low level radioactive waste disposal sites are assessed. Importance of gaseous fluxes of methane, carbon dioxide, and possible hydrogen from the site, stems from the inclusion of tritium and/or carbon-14 into the elemental composition of these compounds. In that the primary source of these gases is the biodegradation of organic components of the waste material, primary emphasis of the study involved an examination of the biochemical pathways producing methane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen, and the environmental parameters controlling the activity of the microbial community involved. Initial examination of the data indicates that the ecosystem is anaerobic. As the result of the complexity of the pathway leading to methane production, factors such as substrate availability, which limit the initial reaction in the sequence, greatly affect the overall rate of methane evolution. Biochemical transformations of methane, hydrogen and carbon dioxide as they pass through the soil profile above the trench are discussed. Results of gas studies performed at three commercial low level radioactive waste disposal sites are reviewed. Methods used to obtain trench and soil gas samples are discussed. Estimates of rates of gas production and amounts released into the atmosphere (by the GASFLOW model) are evaluated. Tritium and carbon-14 gaseous compounds have been measured in these studies; tritiated methane is the major radionuclide species in all disposal trenches studied. The concentration of methane in a typical trench increases with the age of the trench, whereas the concentration of carbon dioxide is similar in all trenches.

Weiss, A.J.; Tate, R.L. III; Colombo, P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Flare System Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be minimally the flare manufacturer's total recommended flow. For systems with a liquid seal, the purge gas should be added downstream of the seal or designed to continuously flow through the seal at a low pressure. Excessive purge gas should not be added... problems with incorrect purge gas rates include: o Not knowing the correct purge rate o Missing restriction orifices o Improperly sized restriction orifices o Improper flow meter settings o Improperly set pressure regulators o Improper valve...

Aegerter, R.

33

FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F., E-mail: paggi@roma2.infn.it [INAF/IASF-Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 1, I-00100 Roma (Italy)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Underground Injection Wells as an Option for Disposal of Shale Gas Wastewaters: Policies & Practicality.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are received for injection. We recently received a new permit in VA, but it is for disposal of coalbed methane

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

35

Reducing Safety Flaring through Advanced Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An advanced process control application, using DMCplus® (Aspen Technology, Inc.), was developed to substantially reduce fuel gas losses to the flare at a large integrated refining / petrochemical complex. Fluctuations in internal fuel gas system...

Hokanson, D.; Lehman, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takai, N.; Takase, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of eastern Devonian gas shale: Society of PetroleumShale Disposal Reference Case August 2014 Borehole activity: Oil and gas

Zheng, Liange

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Reduction of Hydrocarbon Losses to Flare Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

merit consideration because the losses and associated economic penalties are assumed to be small. Flare gas flow is not easily measured and as a result, most plants are unaware of how much product they are actually losing during normal operation...

Page, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Recent ORNL experience in site performance prediction: the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability of the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant Landfill and the Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Central Waste Disposal Facility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste was evaluated using pathways analyses. For these evaluations, a conservative approach was selected; that is, conservatism was built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events had to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics existed. Data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations were used in developing the conceptual and numerical models that served as the basis for the numerical simulations of the long-term transport of contamination to man. However, the analyses relied on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Maximum potential doses to man were calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. Even under this conservative framework, the sites were found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations and conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability were drawn. Our experience through these studies has shown that in reaching conclusions in such studies, some consideration must be given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and to quantitatively determine the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed.

Pin, F.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Thermodynamic-Analysis-Based Design and Operation for Boil-Off Gas Flare Minimization at LNG Receiving Terminals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The LNG (liquefied natural gas) receiving terminal is an important component of the entire LNG value chain. ... Corpus Christi, TX, U.S. ...

Chaowei Liu; Jian Zhang; Qiang Xu; John L. Gossage

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar and stellar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lynden-Bell, E. R. Priest and N. O. Weiss Solar and stellar flares T. G. Forbes EOS Institute...advances in understanding the nature of solar flares. X-ray and UV imaging of flare...associated with currents flowing in the solar atmosphere. Although many different processes...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Natural Gas Vented and Flared  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 Alaska 6,458 10,023 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 1967-2012 Alaska Onshore 5,125 7,812 5,271 8,034 9,276 9,244 1992-2012 Alaska State Offshore 1,334 2,212 1,210 2,139 1,690 2,525 1992-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 12,509 14,507 14,754 13,971 15,502 16,296 1997-2012 Louisiana 6,496 4,021 4,336 4,578 6,302 NA 1967-2012 Louisiana Onshore 6,078 3,777 4,121 4,432 6,153 NA 1992-2012 Louisiana State Offshore 418 243 215 146 149 NA 1999-2012 New Mexico 929 803 481 1,586 4,360 12,259 1967-2012 Oklahoma 0 0 0 0 1967-2010 Texas 36,682 42,541 41,234 39,569 35,248 47,530 1967-2012 Texas Onshore 36,682 42,541 41,234 39,569 35,248 47,530 1992-2012

43

Natural Gas Vented and Flared  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-2013 6-2013 Oklahoma NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Texas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Wyoming NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Other States Other States Total NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Mississippi NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Missouri NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013

44

Solar Flare Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...April 1981 research-article Solar Flare Plasmas A. H. Gabriel The solar flare is discussed in terms of its three phases: energy storage, energy release, and dissipation...made by the N.A.S.A. Solar Maximum Mission satellite...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Solar and stellar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...R. Priest and N. O. Weiss Solar and stellar flares T. G. Forbes...understanding the nature of solar flares. X-ray and UV imaging...Pudritz (McCaster University, Canada). T-Tauri stars are known...thoughts on the applicability of solar are models to T-Tauri stars...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Soot and SO[subscript 2] contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order ...

Molina, Luisa Tan

47

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

48

Solar Flares and particle acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-free emission) #12;X-ray spectrum of solar flares Thermal X-rays Non-thermal X-rays Gamma-ray lines Ramaty High from Krucker et al, 2007 Solar flares are rapid localised brightening in the lower atmosphere. More particle Flaring region T ~ 4x107 K => 3 keV per particle Flare volume 1027 cm3 => (104 km)3 Plasma density

49

Septage Disposal, Licensure (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute describes licensing requirements for septage disposal, and addresses land disposal and processing facilities.

50

Astronomy: Revealing flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... far-off bursts of light, they must first take a foreground 'fog' of flaring stars in our own Galaxy into account. Despite these successes, our monitoring and knowledge of ... transient emission is important because it provides a window on diverse astrophysical objects, from variable stars and stellar explosions to the mergers of compact stellar remnants. Even more exciting is ...

J. Anthony Tyson

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

Application of pathways analyses for site performance prediction for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability of the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant and the Oak Ridge Central Waste Disposal Facility for shallow-land burial of low-level radioactive waste is evaluated using pathways analyses. The analyses rely on conservative scenarios to describe the generation and migration of contamination and the potential human exposure to the waste. Conceptual and numerical models are developed using data from comprehensive laboratory and field investigations and are used to simulate the long-term transport of contamination to man. Conservatism is built into the analyses when assumptions concerning future events have to be made or when uncertainties concerning site or waste characteristics exist. Maximum potential doses to man are calculated and compared to the appropriate standards. The sites are found to provide adequate buffer to persons outside the DOE reservations. Conclusions concerning site capacity and site acceptability are drawn. In reaching these conclusions, some consideration is given to the uncertainties and conservatisms involved in the analyses. Analytical methods to quantitatively assess the probability of future events to occur and the sensitivity of the results to data uncertainty may prove useful in relaxing some of the conservatism built into the analyses. The applicability of such methods to pathways analyses is briefly discussed. 18 refs., 9 figs.

Pin, F.G.; Oblow, E.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland)] [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland)] [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, University of Turku, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland)] [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, PL-30-244 Krakow (Poland); Liakos, A. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR 157 84 Zografos, Athens, Hellas (Greece)] [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, University of Athens, GR 157 84 Zografos, Athens, Hellas (Greece); Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W. [Mount Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland)] [Mount Suhora Observatory, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorazych 2, PL-30-084 Krakow (Poland); Provencal, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Santangelo, M. M. M. [O.A.C. Osservatorio Astronomico di Capannori, Via di Valle, I-55060 Vorno, Capannori (Italy)] [O.A.C. Osservatorio Astronomico di Capannori, Via di Valle, I-55060 Vorno, Capannori (Italy); Salo, H. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland)] [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FI-90014 University of Oulu (Finland); Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S., E-mail: popiha@utu.fi [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380009 (India); and others

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

53

Design Enhancements To Improve Flare Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two flare systems used at separate units within a larger chemical complex were modified to improve overall performance and efficiency. One system was a standard enclosed ground flare; the other was a less-conventional horizontal ground flare system...

Dooley, K. A.; McLeod, G. M.; Lorenz, M. D.

54

Solar flares and energetic particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...compiled and edited by Clare E. Parnell Solar flares and energetic particles Nicole Vilmer...Issue Astrophysical processes on the Sun . Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths...Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Parameterization of solar flare dose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A critical aspect of missions to the Moon or Mars is the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very...

Lamarche, Anne Helene

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

20 - Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disposal options are outlined, including geological and near-surface disposal. Alternative disposal options are briefly considered. The multi-barrier system is described, including the natural geological barrier and the engineered barrier system. The roles of both EBS and NGB are discussed. Worldwide disposal experience is reviewed and acceptance criteria for disposal are analysed.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gas visualization of industrial hydrocarbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gases leaking from a polyethene plant and a cracker plant were visualized with the gas-correlation imaging technique. Ethene escaping from flares due to incomplete or erratic...

Sandsten, Jonas; Edner, Hans; Svanberg, Sune

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Flares in Gamma Ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flare activity that is observed in GRBs soon after the prompt emission with the XRT (0.3–10 KeV) instrument on Board of the Swift satellite is leading to important clues in relation to the physical characteristics of the mechanism generating the emission of energy in Gamma Ray Bursts. We will briefly refer to the results obtained with the recent analysis [1] and [2] and discuss the preliminary results we obtained with a new larger sample of GRBs [limited to early flares] based on fitting of the flares using the Norris 2005 profile. We find in agreement with previous results that XRT flares follow the main characteristics observed in [3] for the prompt emission spikes. The estimate of the flare energy for the subsample with redshift is rather robust and an attempt is made using the redshisft sample to estimate how the energy emitted in flares depends on time. We used a H 0 ?=?70?km/s/Mpc ? ? ?=?0.7 ? m ?=?0.3 cosmology.

G. Chincarini; J. Mao; F. Pasotti; R. Margutti; C. Guidorzi; M. G. Bernardini; Swfit Italian team

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 143,457 166,909 165,360 165,928 209,439 212,848 1936-2012 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 12,509 14,507 14,754 13,971 15,502 16,296 1997-2012 Alabama 2,372 1,801 2,495 2,617 3,491 NA 1967-2012 Alaska 6,458 10,023 6,481 10,173 10,966 11,769 1967-2012 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 0 1971-2012 Arkansas 11 114 141 425 494 NA 1967-2012 California 1,879 2,127 2,501 2,790 2,424 NA 1967-2012 Colorado 1,333 1,501 1,411 1,242 1,291 NA 1967-2012 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1971-2012 Illinois 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2012 Indiana 0 0 0 0 2003-2010 Kansas 363 373 353 323 307 NA 1967-2012 Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0 0 1967-2012 Louisiana 6,496 4,021 4,336 4,578 6,302 NA 1967-2012 Maryland 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2012 Michigan 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 NA 1967-2012

60

Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6-2013 6-2013 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Illinois NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Indiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Kansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Kentucky NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Louisiana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Maryland NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Michigan NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Mississippi NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Missouri NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Montana NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013 Nebraska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Nevada NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 New Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1996-2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

62

slc_disposal.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposal Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Disposal Site ENERGY Office of Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Site Description and History Regulatory Setting The Salt Lake Disposal Site is located approximately 81 miles west of Salt Lake City and 2.5 miles south of Interstate 80 on the eastern edge of the Great Salt Lake Desert. The disposal cell is adjacent to Energy Solutions, Inc., a commercial low-level radioactive materials disposal site. The surrounding area is sparsely populated, and the nearest residences are at least 15 miles from the site. Vegetation in the area is sparse and typical of semiarid low shrubland. The disposal cell encapsulates about

63

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

64

Transition Region Emission and Energy Input to Thermal Plasma During the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy released in a solar flare is partitioned between thermal and non-thermal particle energy and lost to thermal conduction and radiation over a broad range of wavelengths. It is difficult to determine the conductive losses and the energy radiated at transition region temperatures during the impulsive phases of flares. We use UVCS measurements of O VI photons produced by 5 flares and subsequently scattered by O VI ions in the corona to determine the 5.0 thermal energy and the conductive losses deduced from RHESSI and GOES X-ray data using areas from RHESSI images to estimate the loop volumes, cross-sectional areas and scale lengths. The transition region luminosities during the impulsive phase exceed the X-ray luminosities for the first few minutes, but they are smaller than the rates of increase of thermal energy unless the filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas is ~ 0.01. The estimated conductive losses from the hot gas are too large to be balanced by radiative losses or heating of evaporated plasma, and we conclude that the area of the flare magnetic flux tubes is much smaller than the effective area measured by RHESSI during this phase of the flares. For the 2002 July 23 flare, the energy deposited by non-thermal particles exceeds the X-ray and UV energy losses and the rate of increase of the thermal energy.

J. C. Raymond; G. Holman; A. Ciaravella; A. Panasyuk; Y. -K. Ko; J. Kohl

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

65

Magnetic reconnection configurations and particle acceleration in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of solar flares. Upper panel: two-ribbon flares; Lower panel: compact flares. The color showsMagnetic reconnection configurations and particle acceleration in solar flares P. F. Chen, W. J space under different magnetic configurations. Key words: solar flares, magnetic reconnection, particle

Chen, P. F.

66

Material Disposal Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

67

Monitoring of FR Cnc Flaring Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Being excited by the detection of the first ever-observed optical flare in FR Cnc, we decided to continue photometrical monitoring of this object. The observations were carried out at Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (Crimea, Ukraine; CrAO - hereafter) and at the Terskol Observatory (Russia, Northern Caucasus). The obtained lightcurves are presented and discussed. No distinguishable flares were detected that could imply that flares on FR Cnc are very rare event.

A. Golovin; M. Andreev; E. Pavlenko; Yu. Kuznyetsova; V. Krushevska; A. Sergeev

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Disposal Information - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Disposal of Radioactive Waste at Hanford The Hanford Site operates lined, RCRA Subtitle C land...

69

System design for disposal of tritium at TFTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has cleanup systems which convert tritium gas to the oxide form and absorb it on molecular sieve beds. These beds are regenerated by transferring their moisture content to disposable sieve beds. Preparing this sieve for disposal can be awkward and hazardous. Monitoring the tritium and moisture content of the disposable sieve is not straightforward. Modifications to the regeneration system at the TFTR are being made to address these concerns and others relating to maintainability.

Tuohy, J.M.; Cherdack, R.; Lacy, N.H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Disposal of boiler ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As more boilers are converted from oil to solid fuels such as coal, the quantity of ash requiring disposal will increase dramatically. The factors associated with the development of land disposal systems for ash landfills are presented, including ash characterization, site selection procedures, design parameters, and costs.

Atwell, J.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

University of Delaware Laboratory Chemical Waste Disposal Guide ALL CHEMICAL WASTE MUST BE DISPOSED OF THROUGH THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments and procedures Non-Returnable gas cylinders Batteries Spent solvents, Stains, Strippers, Thinners, Fertilizers Formaldehyde and Formalin Solutions Mercury containing items (other heavy metals) Liquid OR SMALL CONTAINERS IMPORTANT: DO NOT DISPOSE OF REACTIVE, AIR SENSITIVE, OR OXIDIZER SAMPLES

Firestone, Jeremy

73

Municipal Sludge disposal economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal Sludge disposal economics ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ...

Jerry Jones; David Bomberger, Jr.; F Lewis; Joel Jacknow

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Prediction of noise emissions from industrial flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In many industries where combustible waste gases are obtained flares are used to burn these gases in a controlled manner. Among other environmental aspects the noise emissions associated with flaring are becoming increasingly important in many countries as population density goes up and residential and industrial areas move closer together. Installing noise control equipment on flares is almost impossible while they are in service since flares are typically a safety related plant component that can only be turned off after the connected plant has been shut down. Accordingly in order to plan appropriate noise controlmeasures in time and to avoid unnecessary costs predicting the noise emissions of flares as early in the design process as possible is crucial. This requires knowledge of the relevant individual noise sources associated to the flare system and the ability to calculate their respective contribution ? in the operating condition in question ? to the overall noise emission based on the data available in the planning stage. The present paper summarizes these sources and outlines some of the individual effects and parameters having an influence on the acoustical characteristics of flares.

Carl?Christian Hantschk; Edwin Schorer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Gas atomized magnesium powders are critical for the production of a wide variety of flares, tracer projectiles, and other munitions for the United States military,… (more)

Steinmetz, Andrew Douglas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

77

Transition Region Emission and Energy Input to Thermal Plasma during the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The energy released in a solar flare is partitioned between thermal and nonthermal particle energy and lost to thermal conduction and radiation over a broad range of wavelengths. It is difficult to determine the conductive losses and the energy radiated at transition region temperatures during the impulsive phases of flares. We use UVCS measurements of O VI photons produced by five flares and subsequently scattered by O VI ions in the corona to determine the 5.0 ? log T ? 6.0 transition region luminosities. We compare them with the rates of increase of thermal energy and the conductive losses deduced from RHESSI and GOES X-ray data using areas from RHESSI images to estimate the loop volumes, cross-sectional areas, and scale lengths. The transition region luminosities during the impulsive phase exceed the X-ray luminosities for the first few minutes, but they are smaller than the rates of increase of thermal energy unless the filling factor of the X-ray-emitting gas is ~0.01. The estimated conductive losses from the hot gas are too large to be balanced by radiative losses or heating of evaporated plasma, and we conclude that the area of the flare magnetic flux tubes is much smaller than the effective area measured by RHESSI during this phase of the flares. For the 2002 July 23 flare, the energy deposited by nonthermal particles exceeds the energy radiated in X-rays, the energy radiated at transition region temperatures, and the rate of increase of the thermal energy.

John C. Raymond; Gordon Holman; A. Ciaravella; A. Panasyuk; Y.-K. Ko; J. Kohl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Summarizing FLARE assay images in colon carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

usually develops slowly, the amount of oxidative damage to DNA can be used as a cancer biomarker. This dissertation examines effective ways of analyzing FLARE assay data, which quanti?es oxidative damage. The statistical methods will be implemented...

Leyk Williams, Malgorzata

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

80

disposal_cell.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

With the With the April 24, 1997, ceremonial ground-breaking for disposal facility construction, the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) moved into the final stage of cleanup, treatment, and disposal of uranium- processing wastes. The cleanup of the former uranium- refining plant consisted of three primary operations: Demolition and removal of remaining concrete pads and foundations that supported the 44 structures and buildings on site Treatment of selected wastes Permanent encapsulation of treated and untreated waste in an onsite engineered disposal facility In September l993, a Record of Decision (ROD) was signed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with concurrence by the Missouri Department of Natural

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

82

SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF C-CLASS FLARE FOOTPOINTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the decay phase of a C-class flare in full-Stokes imaging spectropolarimetry with quasi-simultaneous measurements in the photosphere (6302.5 A line) and in the chromosphere (8542 A line) with the IBIS instrument. We analyze data from two fields of view, each spanning about 40'' Multiplication-Sign 80'' and targeting the two footpoints of the flare. A region of interest is identified from V/I images: a patch of opposite polarity in the smaller sunspot's penumbra. We find unusual flows in this patch at photospheric levels: a Doppler shift of -4 km s{sup -1}, but also a possible radial inflow into the sunspot of 4 km s{sup -1}. Such patches seem to be common during flares, but only high-resolution observations allowed us to see the inflow, which may be related to future flares observed in this region. Chromospheric images show variable overlying emission and flows and unusual Stokes profiles. We also investigate the irregular penumbra, whose formation may be blocked by the opposite polarity patch and flux emergence. The 40 minute temporal evolution depicts the larger of the flare ribbons becoming fainter and changing its shape. Measurable photospheric magnetic fields remain constant and we do not detect flare energy transport down from the chromosphere. We find no clear indications of impact polarization in the 8542 A line. We cannot exclude the possibility of impact polarization, because weaker signals may be buried in the prominent Zeeman signatures or it may have been present earlier during the flare.

Kleint, L., E-mail: kleintl@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Offsite Disposal at Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Disposal Facilities Commercial Disposal Facilities Fact Sheet - Commercial Disposal Facilities Although drilling wastes from many onshore wells are managed at the well site, some wastes cannot be managed onsite. Likewise, some types of offshore drilling wastes cannot be discharged, so they are either injected underground at the platform (not yet common in the United States) or are hauled back to shore for disposal. According to an American Petroleum Institute waste survey, the exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes in 1985. The report estimates that 28% of drilling wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal (Wakim 1987). A similar American Petroleum Institute study conducted ten years later found that the volume of drilling waste had declined substantially to about 150 million bbl.

87

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

88

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted ... Of all the issues haunting nuclear power plants, that of disposing of the radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel they generate has been the most vexing. ...

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

89

The production of high energy particles in solar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A neutral point theory of solar flares might be tenable if sunspots were formed from flux tubes protruding through the photosphere. Such a mechanism is consistent with the point-like nature of a flare at its o...

P. A. Sweet

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Measurements on a shock wave generated by a solar flare  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The solar flare that occurred on 18 August 1979 at 1400 UT was one of the more ... August 1979 at 1400 UT was one of the more energetic flares of the current solar ...

Alan Maxwell; Murray Dryer

1982-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

REMOTE OSCILLATORY RESPONSES TO A SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The processes governing energy storage and release in the Sun are both related to the solar magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of a magnetic connection between the energy released by a flare and increased oscillatory power in the lower solar atmosphere. The oscillatory power in active regions tends to increase in response to explosive events at other locations, but not in the active region itself. We carry out timing studies and show that this effect is probably caused by a large-scale magnetic connection between the regions, instead of a globally-propagating wave. We show that oscillations tend to exist in longer-lived wave trains with short periods (P < 200 s) at the time of a flare. These wave trains may be mechanisms by which flare energy can be redistributed throughout the solar atmosphere.

Andic, A.; McAteer, R. T. J. [Astronomy Department, NMSU, MSC 4500, P.O. Box 30001, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission W...Vestrand We review high-energy observations of solar flares with emphasis...expectation, high-energy emission is a common property of solar flares. Direct interpretation...

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Solar-Type Magnetic Reconnection Model for Magnetar Giant Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Papers 8320 8390 8420 Solar-Type Magnetic...Terasawa Hinode Science Project, National Astronomical...on the basis of solar flare/coronal...flare with enormous energy and long bursting...crucial mechanism of energy release in a solar flare (Parker 1963......

Youhei Masada; Shigehiro Nagataki; Kazunari Shibata; Toshio Terasawa

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

94

A close-up of the Sun (shown in ultraviolet light) reveals a mottled surface, bright flares,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;A close-up of the Sun (shown in ultraviolet light) reveals a mottled surface, bright flares, and tongues of hot gas leaping into space. Though they look like burns in the face of the Sun, sunspots circle in the center of the photo--allows scientists to see the solar wind streaming away from the Sun

Christian, Eric

95

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based on Nanoparticle Probe and Immunochromatographic Strip. Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...

96

Chapter 8 - Coal Combustion Residue Disposal Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are presently regulated as solid waste (Subtitle D) under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Such classification promotes beneficial use by end-users i.e. mitigating excessive liability. According to the US Environmental Protection agency (USEPA), about 131 million tons of coal combustion residuals—including 71 million tons of fly ash, 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag, and 40 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material—were generated in the US in 2007. Of this, approximately 36% was disposed of in landfills, 21% was disposed of in surface impoundments, 38% was beneficially reused, and 5% was used as minefill. Stringent regulation, as Subtitle C (hazardous waste), would impose a perceived liability upon end-users; greatly reducing beneficial use opportunities. Mandatory use of synthetic liners—would not have prevented dike wall failure and fails to consider inherent engineering characteristics of CCRs.

Richard W. Goodwin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

98

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

99

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

100

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

102

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

103

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

104

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

105

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

106

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

107

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

108

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

109

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

110

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

111

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

112

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

113

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

114

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

115

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

116

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

117

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

118

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

119

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

120

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

122

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

123

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

124

Optical flares and flaring oscillations on the M-type eclipsing binary CU Cnc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report here the discovery of an optical flare observed in R band from the red-dwarf eclipsing binary CU Cnc whose component stars are at the upper boundary of full convection (M1=0.43 and M2=0.4M0, M0 is the solar mass). The amplitude of the flare is the largest among those detected in R band (~0.52mag) and the duration time is about 73 minutes. As those observed on the Sun, quasi-periodic oscillations were seen during and after the flare. Three more R-band flares were found by follow up monitoring. In total, this binary was monitored photometrically by using R filter for 79.9 hours, which reveals a R-band flare rate about 0.05 flares per hour. These detections together with other strong chromospheric and coronal activities, i.e., very strong H_alpha and H_beta emission features and an EUV and X-ray source, indicate that it has very strong magnetic activity. Therefore, the apparent faintness (~1.4 magnitude in V) of CU Cnc compared with other single red dwarfs of the same mass can be plausibly explained by...

-B., Qian S; Zhu, L -Y; Liu, L; Liao, W -P; Zhao, E -G; He, J -J; Li, L -J; Li, K; Dai, Z -B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Compensation of flare-induced CD changes EUVL  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for compensating for flare-induced critical dimensions (CD) changes in photolithography. Changes in the flare level results in undesirable CD changes. The method when used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography essentially eliminates the unwanted CD changes. The method is based on the recognition that the intrinsic level of flare for an EUV camera (the flare level for an isolated sub-resolution opaque dot in a bright field mask) is essentially constant over the image field. The method involves calculating the flare and its variation over the area of a patterned mask that will be imaged and then using mask biasing to largely eliminate the CD variations that the flare and its variations would otherwise cause. This method would be difficult to apply to optical or DUV lithography since the intrinsic flare for those lithographies is not constant over the image field.

Bjorkholm, John E. (Pleasanton, CA); Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Gullikson, Eric M. (Oakland, CA); Tichenor, Daniel A. (Castro Valley, CA); Hector, Scott D. (Oakland, CA)

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The incandescent disposal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrotechnology device being introduced to the low-level waste market is an Incandescent Disposal System (IDS) for volume reduction and vitrification. The process changes the composition of the waste material, usually long molecular chains, into simple molecules and elements. It renders the volume of low-level wastes to a manageable solid vitrified residue, carbon black, and a water discharge. The solid material, which has been vitrified if silica is introduced into the waste stream, is an ideal inert filler. The carbon black is non-leaching and is readily available for vitrification as it comes out of the IDS.

Smith, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Converter waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of waste management and disposal issues to the converting and print industries is demonstrated by the high response rate to a survey of US and Canadian converters and printers. The 30-item questionnaire measured the impact of reuse, recycling, source reduction, incineration, and landfilling on incoming raw-material packaging, process scrap, and waste inks, coatings, and adhesives. The results indicate that significant amounts of incoming packaging materials are reused in-house or through supplier take-back programs. However, there is very little reuse of excess raw materials and process scrap, suggesting the need for greater source reduction within these facilities as the regulatory climate becomes increasingly restrictive.

Schultz, R.B. (RBS Technologies, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Synergic and conflicting issues in planning underground use to produce energy in densely populated countries, as Italy: Geological storage of CO2, natural gas, geothermics and nuclear waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In densely populated countries there is a growing and compelling need to use underground for different and possibly coexisting technologies to produce “low carbon” energy. These technologies include (i) clean coal combustion merged with CO2 Capture and Storage (CCS); (ii) last-generation nuclear power or, in any case, safe nuclear wastes disposal, both “temporary” and “geological” somewhere in Europe (at least in one site): Nuclear wastes are not necessarily associated to nuclear power plants; (iii) safe natural gas (CH4) reserves to allow consumption also when the foreign pipelines are less available or not available for geopolitical reasons and (iv) “low-space-consuming” renewables in terms of Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL measured in [GW h/ha/year]) as geothermics. When geothermics is exploited as low enthalpy technology, the heat/cool production could be associated, where possible, to increased measures of “building efficiency”, low seismic risks building reworking and low-enthalpy heat managing. This is undispensable to build up “smart cities”. In any case the underground geological knowledge is prerequisite. All these technologies have been already proposed and defined by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Road Map 2009 as priorities for worldwide security: all need to use underground in a rational and safe manner. The underground is not renewable in most of case histories [10,11]. IEA recently matched and compared different technologies in a unique “Clean Energy Economy” improved document (Paris, November 16–17, 2011), by the contribution of this vision too (see reference). In concert with “energy efficiency” improvement both for plants and buildings, in the frame of the “smart cities” scenarios, and the upstanding use of “energy savings”, the energetic planning on regional scale where these cities are located, are strategic for the year 2050: this planning is strongly depending by the underground availability and typology. Therefore, if both literature and European Policy are going fast to improve the concept of “smart cities” this paper stresses the concept of “smart regions”, more strategic than “smart cities”, passing throughout a discussion on the synergic and conflicting use of underground to produce energy for the “smart regions” as a whole. The paper highlights the research lines which are urgent to plan the soundest energy mix for each region by considering the underground performances case by case: a worldwide mapping, by GIS tools of this kind of information could be strategic for all the “world energy management” authorities, up to ONU, with its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the G20, the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) and the European Platforms such as the “Zero Emissions Fossil Fuel Power Plants” (EU-ZEP Platform), the Steel Platform, the Biomass Platform too. All of these organizations agree on the need for synergistic and coexistent uses of underground for geological storage of CO2, CH4, nuclear waste and geothermic exploitation. The paper is therefore a discussion of the tools, methods and approaches to these underground affecting technologies, after a gross view of the different uses of underground to produce energy for each use, with their main critical issues (i.e. public acceptance in different cases). The paper gives some gross evaluation for the Lazio Region and some hints from the Campania Region, located in Central Italy. Energy Density Potential in Land (EDPL), is calculated for each renewable energy technology (solar, wind, geothermal) highlighting the potentiality of the last. Why the Italian case history among the densely populated countries? on the Italian territory is hard to find suitable areas (mostly if greenfields) to use the own underground, with respect to other European countries, due to the presence of seismotectonic activity and many faulted areas characterized by Diffuse Degassing Structures (DDSs, which are rich in CO2 and CH4). In this cases, public acceptan

Fedora Quattrocchi; Enzo Boschi; Angelo Spena; Mauro Buttinelli; Barbara Cantucci; Monia Procesi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Magnetic Flares and State Transitions in Galactic Black Hole and Neutron Star Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We here examine the conditions of the two-phase disk model under which magnetic flares arise above the cold accretion disk due to magnetic buoyancy and produce X-rays via Comptonization of the disk's soft radiation. We find that the disk's ability to produce strong magnetic flares is substantially diminished in its radiation dominated regions due to the diffusion of radiation into the magnetic flux tubes. Using a simplified, yet physically self-consistent, model that takes this effect into account, we show that the hard X-ray spectrum of some GBHCs can be explained as the X-ray emission by magnetic flares only when the disk's bolometric luminosity is a relatively small fraction ($\\sim$ 5%) of the Eddington value, $L_{Edd}$. Further, we compute the hard ($20-200$ keV) and soft ($1-20$ keV) X-ray power as a function of the disk's luminosity, and find an excellent agreement with the available data for GBHC transient and persistent sources. We conclude that the observed high-energy spectrum of stellar-sized accretion disk systems can be explained by Comptonization of the disk's soft radiation by the hot gas trapped inside the magnetic flares when the luminosity falls in the range $\\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-1}\\times L_{Edd}$. For higher luminosities, another emission mechanism must be at work. For lower luminosities, the X-ray emissivity may still be dominated by magnetic flares, but this process is more likely to be thermal or non-thermal bremstrahlung, so that the X-ray spectrum below $\\sim 10^{-3}L_{Edd}$ may be quite distinct from the typical hard spectrum for higher luminosities.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

133

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 3 T he journey to the WIPP began nearly 60 years before the first barrels of transuranic waste arrived at the repository. The United States produced the world's first sig- nificant quantities of transuranic material during the Manhattan Project of World War II in the early 1940s. The government idled its plutonium- producing reactors and warhead manu- facturing plants at the end of the Cold War and scheduled most of them for dismantlement. However, the DOE will generate more transuranic waste as it cleans up these former nuclear weapons facilities. The WIPP is a cor- nerstone of the effort to clean up these facilities by providing a safe repository to isolate transuranic waste in disposal rooms mined out of ancient salt beds, located 2,150 feet below ground. The need for the WIPP

134

Flare Ribbon Energetics in the Early Phase of an SDO Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sites of chromospheric excitation during solar flares are marked by extended extreme ultraviolet ribbons and hard X-ray footpoints. The standard interpretation is that these are the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from non-thermal electrons precipitating from the corona. We examine this picture using multi-wavelength observations of the early phase of an M-class flare SOL2010-08-07T18:24. We aim to determine the properties of the heated plasma in the flare ribbons, and to understand the partition of the power input into radiative and conductive losses. Using GOES, SDO/EVE, SDO/AIA and RHESSI we measure the temperature, emission measure and differential emission measure of the flare ribbons, and deduce approximate density values. The non-thermal emission measure, and the collisional thick target energy input to the ribbons are obtained from RHESSI using standard methods. We deduce the existence of a substantial amount of plasma at 10 MK in the flare ribbons, during the pre-impulsive and early...

Fletcher, L; Hudson, H S; Innes, D E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

136

Ministers block disposal of oil rigs at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ministers last week ended three years of public controversy about the fate of disused oil rigs in the northeast Atlantic ocean. They decided that most will have to be dismantled ... all environmentalist groups. Oil companies, on the other hand, were disappointed. The UK Offshore Operators Association said the decision to outlaw deep-sea disposal of oil and gas ...

Ehsan Masood

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

138

Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 32 38 34 40 43 27 63 59 60 71 67 62 1997 67 60 71 62 66 83 72 92 47 118 186 195 1998 189 147 159 177 107 76 155 129 136 0 0 0 1999 47 54 50 52 56 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 43 39 41 44 49 44 44 36 36 39 43 28 2001 36 32 40 35 36 36 35 33 34 32 28 27 2002 30 25 27 31 31 30 28 32 30 29 28 27 2003 34 28 30 33 34 36 32 32 29 30 43 43 2004 49 41 37 81 85 91 97 125 135 150 125 55 2005 42 36 52 46 57 57 60 55 52 56 51 66 2006 74 75 73 86 111 99 94 87 117 119 110 127 2007 154 105 167 146 404 370 357 396 406 350 423 442 2008 441 459 496 511 599 506 583 685 659 668 615 642

139

Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 63 63 63 61 62 57 57 55 56 58 59 61 1997 60 55 60 59 62 60 58 54 50 54 54 54 1998 55 50 54 52 52 52 45 48 48 51 49 50 1999 52 44 47 46 46 47 46 46 44 45 44 46 2000 47 43 45 50 45 44 45 45 42 42 41 41 2001 42 37 41 40 41 39 41 41 39 40 39 40 2002 40 36 40 38 40 39 39 39 36 37 36 37 2003 36 32 36 35 36 34 36 36 35 35 34 34 2004 34 32 34 33 34 33 35 34 33 33 32 32 2005 32 30 32 32 32 30 32 33 31 32 31 31 2006 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 31 30 31 32 2007 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 30 30 31 32 2008 31 28 31 31 31 31 32 33 31 30 32 32 2009 29 26 29 29 29 29 30 31 30 29 30 31

140

South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 384 350 382 380 382 376 405 418 397 439 445 486 1992 455 445 448 468 497 447 465 459 438 450 440 465 1993 463 417 484 453 478 459 497 500 495 545 507 435 1994 385 324 383 373 409 424 506 590 595 591 601 625 1995 640 570 637 609 617 602 617 637 578 526 540 549 1996 533 516 618 620 662 658 680 685 650 689 657 669 1997 128 123 129 135 139 134 135 145 143 146 140 143 1998 145 134 148 145 129 114 122 121 118 119 114 117 1999 147 136 151 148 132 116 124 124 120 122 116 119 2000 147 135 151 147 154 142 163 157 148 157 152 153 2001 165 148 169 172 179 173 173 170 172 174 172 175

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1997 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1998 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1999 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2000 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2001 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2002 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2003 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2004 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2005 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2006 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277

142

New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1993 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1994 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

143

Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

144

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,478 2,147 2,113 2,353 3,203 2,833 3,175 2,684 2,296 2,457 2,750 2,150 1992 1,337 1,107 1,379 1,254 1,439 1,833 2,083 1,970 2,009 1,630 1,835 1,812 1993 3,276 3,172 2,618 2,863 2,492 2,286 2,563 2,471 2,865 3,708 2,934 3,238 1994 3,225 3,330 3,515 3,403 3,959 4,686 3,429 2,766 3,188 3,543 3,122 3,871 1995 3,543 3,658 3,862 3,738 4,350 5,148 3,768 3,039 3,503 3,893 3,430 4,252 1996 3,461 3,537 3,340 3,922 3,459 4,520 4,339 3,794 3,556 3,781 3,809 3,865 1997 4,840 4,113 3,927 4,679 5,610 3,723 4,139 3,845 4,287 3,430 2,237 3,092 1998 2,621 2,227 2,126 2,533 3,038 2,016 2,241 2,082 2,321 1,857 1,211 1,674

145

New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 236 220 240 230 241 229 217 221 212 215 216 223 1997 241 220 245 236 243 225 235 239 231 240 217 213 1998 231 211 235 227 233 215 226 229 221 230 209 205 1999 232 210 231 226 225 229 230 235 224 235 229 212 2000 289 245 293 242 287 251 285 246 240 278 233 242 2001 249 226 245 237 213 175 179 384 317 237 505 288 2002 304 207 214 254 269 249 266 263 247 216 202 159 2003 179 154 198 210 234 226 221 285 199 193 127 121 2004 124 128 292 275 327 338 333 302 296 454 334 322 2005 286 279 290 253 291 295 299 311 310 310 303 306 2006 270 296 252 247 242 249 251 246 234 241 236 105

146

Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2003 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2004 2 1 1 2 2 1 3 2 2 2 2 2 2005 4 3 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 3 3 3 2006 5 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2007 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

147

Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 217 199 223 219 237 234 239 235 213 224 218 220 1997 214 202 214 209 221 223 218 242 235 258 250 256 1998 250 222 245 225 233 220 238 232 235 234 227 236 1999 230 217 247 232 239 233 234 231 226 223 214 219 2000 205 161 204 193 213 198 210 214 205 223 216 235 2001 236 216 234 241 248 236 265 266 242 260 251 267 2002 259 299 266 255 266 262 267 274 276 280 267 298 2003 293 261 282 277 284 285 244 304 306 323 305 337 2004 319 321 331 325 340 324 322 323 287 306 289 326 2005 411 296 348 330 342 320 347 322 319 360 339 210 2006 349 331 328 359 370 362 399 398 394 423 425 439

148

Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 63 63 63 61 62 57 57 55 56 58 59 61 1997 60 55 60 59 62 60 58 54 50 54 54 54 1998 55 50 54 52 52 52 45 48 48 51 49 50 1999 52 44 47 46 46 47 46 46 44 45 44 46 2000 47 43 45 50 45 44 45 45 42 42 41 41 2001 42 37 41 40 41 39 41 41 39 40 39 40 2002 40 36 40 38 40 39 39 39 36 37 36 37 2003 36 32 36 35 36 34 36 36 35 35 34 34 2004 34 32 34 33 34 33 35 34 33 33 32 32 2005 32 30 32 32 32 30 32 33 31 32 31 31 2006 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 31 30 31 32 2007 30 27 30 30 30 30 31 32 30 30 31 32 2008 31 28 31 31 31 31 32 33 31 30 32 32 2009 29 26 29 29 29 29 30 31 30 29 30 31

149

Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

150

Maryland Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

151

West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

152

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 646 1995 696 4,590 4,767 4,382 4,389 4,603 4,932 5,137 1996 5,088 4,788 2,269 2,009 2,564 1,687 1,695 1,724 1,229 1,255 1,547 1,422 1997 2,411 2,381 1,594 942 490 1,391 1,344 1,185 1,114 1,130 1,058 1,750 1998 909 697 700 689 1,194 1,161 2,299 2,625 2,235 2,226 2,258 2,373 1999 1,462 1,480 993 1,254 1,131 1,316 904 776 1,291 1,249 894 1,084 2000 158 65 69 100 91 626 87 119 185 220 123 99 2001 129 98 83 55 49 47 79 274 242 254 469 68 2002 167 68 110 123 71 55 54 89 37 40 38 102 2003 39 47 66 69 67 52 66 80 67 56 48 50 2004 48 56 57 45 39 43 81 73 59 89 51 46

153

Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 2,478 2,147 2,113 2,353 3,203 2,833 3,175 2,684 2,296 2,457 2,750 2,150 1992 1,337 1,107 1,379 1,254 1,439 1,833 2,083 1,970 2,009 1,630 1,835 1,812 1993 3,276 3,172 2,618 2,863 2,492 2,286 2,563 2,471 2,865 3,708 2,934 3,238 1994 3,225 3,330 3,515 3,403 3,959 4,686 3,429 2,766 3,188 3,543 3,122 3,871 1995 3,543 3,658 3,862 3,738 4,350 5,148 3,768 3,039 3,503 3,893 3,430 4,252 1996 3,461 3,537 3,340 3,922 3,459 4,520 4,339 3,794 3,556 3,781 3,809 3,865 1997 4,840 4,113 3,927 4,679 5,610 3,723 4,139 3,845 4,287 3,430 2,237 3,092 1998 2,621 2,227 2,126 2,533 3,038 2,016 2,241 2,082 2,321 1,857 1,211 1,674

154

Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 23 13 12 7 13 28 28 30 36 9 5 5 1992 33 29 32 31 30 29 30 30 30 32 32 33 1993 36 32 35 33 34 32 33 33 33 35 35 37 1994 27 25 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1995 27 24 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1996 17 23 8 0 31 45 28 29 25 19 25 21 1997 5 0 6 7 7 8 13 32 16 4 19 17 1998 2 0 2 2 2 3 4 11 5 1 6 6 1999 607 269 535 439 561 494 583 216 469 689 668 472 2000 1 0 1 16 21 17 23 23 27 23 24 30 2001 2 1 2 33 45 35 48 48 57 47 50 63 2002 12 15 29 41 29 25 27 24 25 17 1 5 2003 31 37 34 36 35 29 23 33 28 33 24 11 2004 28 26 24 23 21 16 18 17 17 17 17 16

155

Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1997 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1998 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 1999 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2000 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2001 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2002 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2003 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2004 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2005 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 2006 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277 277

156

Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 194 200 140 132 106 82 205 152 157 192 159 134 1997 134 110 90 112 98 125 119 114 118 91 227 224 1998 125 101 87 104 91 117 114 112 112 86 206 206 1999 92 73 67 77 67 87 87 90 85 64 145 150 2000 130 149 130 112 75 80 120 97 78 98 88 105 2001 91 72 78 76 87 81 73 94 108 86 93 101 2002 122 135 99 106 129 94 107 98 103 100 103 134 2003 116 143 147 108 141 141 145 126 127 139 138 140 2004 171 119 130 154 201 208 395 182 179 207 188 181 2005 213 183 202 264 256 191 168 151 174 167 249 267 2006 271 273 301 303 289 302 383 356 262 305 242 238 2007 227 238 283 234 243 187 185 174 155 134 160 152

157

Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,788 1,684 1,571 1,593 1,807 1,690 2,042 1,781 1,437 1,867 1,649 1,505 1992 1,707 1,639 1,564 1,775 1,752 2,153 1,623 1,737 1,907 1,568 1,595 1,518 1993 1,588 1,460 1,500 1,708 1,614 1,590 1,778 1,711 2,014 1,500 1,482 1,636 1994 1,597 1,468 1,509 1,717 1,623 1,599 1,788 1,720 2,025 1,509 1,490 1,645 1995 1,519 1,396 1,435 1,633 1,544 1,521 1,701 1,636 1,926 1,435 1,418 1,565 1996 1,545 1,443 1,514 1,471 1,528 1,939 2,042 2,033 1,985 1,930 2,083 2,192 1997 1,991 1,798 1,991 1,874 1,913 1,751 1,813 1,841 1,785 1,777 1,674 1,720 1998 1,775 1,602 1,775 1,670 1,705 1,561 1,616 1,641 1,590 1,583 1,492 1,533

158

Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 23 13 12 7 13 28 28 30 36 9 5 5 1992 33 29 32 31 30 29 30 30 30 32 32 33 1993 36 32 35 33 34 32 33 33 33 35 35 37 1994 27 25 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1995 27 24 27 25 26 25 25 26 25 27 27 28 1996 17 23 8 0 31 45 28 29 25 19 25 21 1997 5 0 6 7 7 8 13 32 16 4 19 17 1998 2 0 2 2 2 3 4 11 5 1 6 6 1999 607 269 535 439 561 494 583 216 469 689 668 472 2000 1 0 1 16 21 17 23 23 27 23 24 30 2001 2 1 2 33 45 35 48 48 57 47 50 63 2002 12 15 29 41 29 25 27 24 25 17 1 5 2003 31 37 34 36 35 29 23 33 28 33 24 11 2004 28 26 24 23 21 16 18 17 17 17 17 16

159

Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 217 199 223 219 237 234 239 235 213 224 218 220 1997 214 202 214 209 221 223 218 242 235 258 250 256 1998 250 222 245 225 233 220 238 232 235 234 227 236 1999 230 217 247 232 239 233 234 231 226 223 214 219 2000 205 161 204 193 213 198 210 214 205 223 216 235 2001 236 216 234 241 248 236 265 266 242 260 251 267 2002 259 299 266 255 266 262 267 274 276 280 267 298 2003 293 261 282 277 284 285 244 304 306 323 305 337 2004 319 321 331 325 340 324 322 323 287 306 289 326 2005 411 296 348 330 342 320 347 322 319 360 339 210 2006 349 331 328 359 370 362 399 398 394 423 425 439

160

Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 5,712 5,109 6,529 6,408 6,948 6,430 7,035 7,792 7,475 7,837 7,649 7,930 1992 7,430 7,009 7,475 7,039 5,797 7,809 8,770 8,218 7,442 7,505 7,662 7,580 1993 10,674 10,789 10,568 10,480 11,572 12,350 10,996 8,163 9,912 10,526 9,870 10,463 1994 11,590 11,569 11,181 10,129 9,324 10,365 10,174 10,394 10,578 10,635 10,629 10,155 1995 13,046 11,867 11,628 12,102 14,419 12,911 12,917 10,472 12,302 12,592 11,896 12,569 1996 13,000 12,042 12,951 12,509 12,793 4,939 12,847 13,190 12,355 13,227 12,716 12,883 1997 12,874 11,288 12,834 11,829 11,169 9,136 13,161 11,362 11,217 11,213 11,457 12,607 1998 753 689 750 718 689 701 717 729 724 764 745 732

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 384 350 382 380 382 376 405 418 397 439 445 486 1992 455 445 448 468 497 447 465 459 438 450 440 465 1993 463 417 484 453 478 459 497 500 495 545 507 435 1994 385 324 383 373 409 424 506 590 595 591 601 625 1995 640 570 637 609 617 602 617 637 578 526 540 549 1996 533 516 618 620 662 658 680 685 650 689 657 669 1997 128 123 129 135 139 134 135 145 143 146 140 143 1998 145 134 148 145 129 114 122 121 118 119 114 117 1999 147 136 151 148 132 116 124 124 120 122 116 119 2000 147 135 151 147 154 142 163 157 148 157 152 153 2001 165 148 169 172 179 173 173 170 172 174 172 175

162

Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 32 38 34 40 43 27 63 59 60 71 67 62 1997 67 60 71 62 66 83 72 92 47 118 186 195 1998 189 147 159 177 107 76 155 129 136 0 0 0 1999 47 54 50 52 56 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 43 39 41 44 49 44 44 36 36 39 43 28 2001 36 32 40 35 36 36 35 33 34 32 28 27 2002 30 25 27 31 31 30 28 32 30 29 28 27 2003 34 28 30 33 34 36 32 32 29 30 43 43 2004 49 41 37 81 85 91 97 125 135 150 125 55 2005 42 36 52 46 57 57 60 55 52 56 51 66 2006 74 75 73 86 111 99 94 87 117 119 110 127 2007 154 105 167 146 404 370 357 396 406 350 423 442 2008 441 459 496 511 599 506 583 685 659 668 615 642

163

Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 194 200 140 132 106 82 205 152 157 192 159 134 1997 134 110 90 112 98 125 119 114 118 91 227 224 1998 125 101 87 104 91 117 114 112 112 86 206 206 1999 92 73 67 77 67 87 87 90 85 64 145 150 2000 130 149 130 112 75 80 120 97 78 98 88 105 2001 91 72 78 76 87 81 73 94 108 86 93 101 2002 122 135 99 106 129 94 107 98 103 100 103 134 2003 116 143 147 108 141 141 145 126 127 139 138 140 2004 171 119 130 154 201 208 395 182 179 207 188 181 2005 213 183 202 264 256 191 168 151 174 167 249 267 2006 271 273 301 303 289 302 383 356 262 305 242 238 2007 227 238 283 234 243 187 185 174 155 134 160 152

164

New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 236 220 240 230 241 229 217 221 212 215 216 223 1997 241 220 245 236 243 225 235 239 231 240 217 213 1998 231 211 235 227 233 215 226 229 221 230 209 205 1999 232 210 231 226 225 229 230 235 224 235 229 212 2000 289 245 293 242 287 251 285 246 240 278 233 242 2001 249 226 245 237 213 175 179 384 317 237 505 288 2002 304 207 214 254 269 249 266 263 247 216 202 159 2003 179 154 198 210 234 226 221 285 199 193 127 121 2004 124 128 292 275 327 338 333 302 296 454 334 322 2005 286 279 290 253 291 295 299 311 310 310 303 306 2006 270 296 252 247 242 249 251 246 234 241 236 105

165

California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 97 103 109 107 107 104 108 107 104 108 106 108 1997 111 113 85 88 213 140 121 108 122 171 175 144 1998 235 192 246 157 166 129 173 167 152 132 127 76 1999 165 135 173 110 116 91 121 117 106 92 89 53 2000 266 218 279 178 188 146 196 189 172 149 144 86 2001 207 169 217 138 146 114 152 146 134 116 111 67 2002 324 265 340 216 228 178 238 230 209 181 175 105 2003 266 228 237 343 405 431 342 333 276 316 593 170 2004 217 186 193 280 331 352 279 272 225 258 484 138 2005 143 123 127 184 218 232 184 179 148 170 319 91 2006 105 90 94 136 161 171 136 132 109 125 235 67

166

North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 232 193 232 176 230 258 269 324 298 334 213 199 1997 229 264 293 280 303 313 258 301 327 330 321 315 1998 308 301 334 380 418 459 435 425 310 328 345 330 1999 231 194 245 204 202 206 231 307 232 227 202 212 2000 225 218 226 237 257 271 292 327 293 333 311 300 2001 269 246 276 255 245 263 289 283 250 260 281 249 2002 231 221 210 235 250 238 258 245 257 222 210 214 2003 196 167 193 174 167 161 158 171 164 181 168 170 2004 197 157 166 150 211 140 183 209 187 247 208 143 2005 175 200 247 273 271 299 324 339 300 274 283 275 2006 528 485 550 541 582 540 566 599 615 735 724 995

167

Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 1,788 1,684 1,571 1,593 1,807 1,690 2,042 1,781 1,437 1,867 1,649 1,505 1992 1,707 1,639 1,564 1,775 1,752 2,153 1,623 1,737 1,907 1,568 1,595 1,518 1993 1,588 1,460 1,500 1,708 1,614 1,590 1,778 1,711 2,014 1,500 1,482 1,636 1994 1,597 1,468 1,509 1,717 1,623 1,599 1,788 1,720 2,025 1,509 1,490 1,645 1995 1,519 1,396 1,435 1,633 1,544 1,521 1,701 1,636 1,926 1,435 1,418 1,565 1996 1,545 1,443 1,514 1,471 1,528 1,939 2,042 2,033 1,985 1,930 2,083 2,192 1997 1,991 1,798 1,991 1,874 1,913 1,751 1,813 1,841 1,785 1,777 1,674 1,720 1998 1,775 1,602 1,775 1,670 1,705 1,561 1,616 1,641 1,590 1,583 1,492 1,533

168

Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

169

Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

170

California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 97 103 109 107 107 104 108 107 104 108 106 108 1997 111 113 85 88 213 140 121 108 122 171 175 144 1998 235 192 246 157 166 129 173 167 152 132 127 76 1999 165 135 173 110 116 91 121 117 106 92 89 53 2000 266 218 279 178 188 146 196 189 172 149 144 86 2001 207 169 217 138 146 114 152 146 134 116 111 67 2002 324 265 340 216 228 178 238 230 209 181 175 105 2003 266 228 237 343 405 431 342 333 276 316 593 170 2004 217 186 193 280 331 352 279 272 225 258 484 138 2005 143 123 127 184 218 232 184 179 148 170 319 91 2006 105 90 94 136 161 171 136 132 109 125 235 67

171

Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 1,514 1,326 1970's 7,126 2,843 4,758 3,008 2,957 2,516 1,836 1,528 1,108 1,199 1980's 796...

172

Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 112 77 78 91 100 89 100 106 97 121 155 102 1997 173 188 180 168 228 187 188 102 189 192 185 199 1998 92 166 98 92 98 115 222 83 82 92 95 10 1999 70 71 70 65 68 66 66 66 63 67 65 64 2000 67 64 68 65 68 66 67 68 65 69 69 70 2001 77 69 75 71 73 74 73 78 76 79 78 83 2002 83 75 84 79 79 77 79 80 72 80 72 75 2003 96 86 95 92 95 92 94 96 94 98 95 90 2004 99 89 98 94 98 95 97 99 97 101 98 93 2005 103 94 103 99 103 99 102 104 102 106 102 98 2006 110 99 109 105 109 105 108 111 109 113 109 104 2007 113 103 113 109 113 109 112 114 112 116 112 107 2008 128 116 127 122 127 123 126 129 126 131 127 121

173

West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

174

Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2012 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

175

North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 232 193 232 176 230 258 269 324 298 334 213 199 1997 229 264 293 280 303 313 258 301 327 330 321 315 1998 308 301 334 380 418 459 435 425 310 328 345 330 1999 231 194 245 204 202 206 231 307 232 227 202 212 2000 225 218 226 237 257 271 292 327 293 333 311 300 2001 269 246 276 255 245 263 289 283 250 260 281 249 2002 231 221 210 235 250 238 258 245 257 222 210 214 2003 196 167 193 174 167 161 158 171 164 181 168 170 2004 197 157 166 150 211 140 183 209 187 247 208 143 2005 175 200 247 273 271 299 324 339 300 274 283 275 2006 528 485 550 541 582 540 566 599 615 735 724 995

176

Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 646 1995 696 4,590 4,767 4,382 4,389 4,603 4,932 5,137 1996 5,088 4,788 2,269 2,009 2,564 1,687 1,695 1,724 1,229 1,255 1,547 1,422 1997 2,411 2,381 1,594 942 490 1,391 1,344 1,185 1,114 1,130 1,058 1,750 1998 909 697 700 689 1,194 1,161 2,299 2,625 2,235 2,226 2,258 2,373 1999 1,462 1,480 993 1,254 1,131 1,316 904 776 1,291 1,249 894 1,084 2000 158 65 69 100 91 626 87 119 185 220 123 99 2001 129 98 83 55 49 47 79 274 242 254 469 68 2002 167 68 110 123 71 55 54 89 37 40 38 102 2003 39 47 66 69 67 52 66 80 67 56 48 50 2004 48 56 57 45 39 43 81 73 59 89 51 46

177

New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1993 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1994 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

178

Alaska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 815 672 921 1,101 820 914 1,257 828 750 843 991 873 1992 1,627 880 1,087 827 1,093 902 1,323 1,401 1,859 1,015 1,082 1,001 1993 1,044 2,207 1,408 2,149 2,273 4,052 2,251 1,323 1,734 1,557 906 1,581 1994 615 1,300 829 1,266 1,338 2,386 1,325 779 1,021 917 534 931 1995 858 547 835 883 1,574 874 514 674 605 615 1996 682 532 552 569 588 618 691 545 634 560 528 570 1997 798 623 646 666 687 723 808 637 741 654 618 666 1998 788 615 639 658 679 715 799 630 733 647 610 658 1999 685 535 555 572 590 621 694 547 636 562 530 572 2000 728 568 590 608 627 660 738 582 677 597 564 608

179

Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1991 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1992 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

180

Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options The ORSSAB encourages DOE to evaluate additional storage...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transmittal Memo for Disposal Authorization Statement | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) has conducted a review of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) 2009 performance assessment (PA) in...

182

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and...

183

PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and personal property surplus to the needs of the Government PROPERTY...

184

Optimization of Waste Disposal - 13338  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 2009 through 2011, remediation of areas of a former fuel cycle facility used for government contract work was conducted. Remediation efforts were focused on building demolition, underground pipeline removal, contaminated soil removal and removal of contaminated sediments from portions of an on-site stream. Prior to conducting the remediation field effort, planning and preparation for remediation (including strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal) was conducted during the design phase. During the remediation field effort, waste characterization and disposal practices were continuously reviewed and refined to optimize waste disposal practices. This paper discusses strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal that was employed in the design phase, and continuously reviewed and refined to optimize efficiency. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Magnetar giant flares and afterglows as relativistic magnetized explosions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......case of crustal storage of magnetic field energy before the flare...see a medium-energy flare with a very...example, the crust response may depend on...with the typical frequency nu 1 GHz), and...Because the energy release during......

Maxim Lyutikov

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

Size dependence of solar X-ray flare properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-thermal and thermal parameters of 85 solar flares of GOES class B1 to M6 (background subtracted classes A1 to M6) have been compared to each other. The hard X-ray flux has been measured by RHESSI and a spectral fitting provided flux and spectral index of the non-thermal emission, as well as temperature and emission measure of the thermal emission. The soft X-ray flux was taken from GOES measurements. We find a linear correlation in a double logarithmic plot between the non-thermal flux and the spectral index. The higher the acceleration rate of a flare, the harder the non-thermal electron distribution. The relation is similar to the one found by a comparison of the same parameters from several sub-peaks of a single flare. Thus small flares behave like small subpeaks of large flares. Thermal flare properties such as temperature, emission measure and the soft X-ray flux also correlate with peak non-thermal flux. A large non-thermal peak flux entails an enhancement in both thermal parameters. The relation between spectral index and the non-thermal flux is an intrinsic feature of the particle acceleration process, depending on flare size. This property affects the reported frequency distribution of flare energies.

Marina Battaglia; Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

Energy-Dependent Timing of Thermal Emission in Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report solar flare plasma to be multi-thermal in nature based on the theoretical model and study of the energy-dependent timing of thermal emission in ten M-class flares. We ... observed by the Si detector of ...

Rajmal Jain; Arun Kumar Awasthi; Arvind Singh Rajpurohit…

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

An Accretion-Induced X-ray Flare in Sgr A*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent detection of a three-hour X-ray flare from Sgr A* by Chandra provides very strong evidence for a compact emitting region near this supermassive black hole at the Galactic center. Sgr A*'s mm/sub-mm spectrum and polarimetric properties, and its quiescent-state X-ray flux density, are consistent with a model in which low angular momentum gas captured at large radii circularizes to form a hot, magnetized Keplerian flow within tens of Schwarzschild radii of the black hole's event horizon. In Sgr A*'s quiescent state, the X-ray emission appears to be produced by self-Comptonization (SSC) of the mm/sub-mm synchrotron photons emitted in this region. In this paper, we show that the prominent X-ray flare seen in Sgr A* may be due to a sudden enhancement of accretion through the circularized flow. Depending on whether the associated response of the anomalous viscosity is to increase or decrease in tandem with this additional injection of mass, the X-ray photons during the outburst may be produced either via thermal bremsstrahlung (if the viscosity decreases), or via SSC (if the viscosity increases). However, the latter predicts a softer X-ray spectrum than was seen by Chandra, so it appears that a bremsstrahlung origin for the X-ray outburst is favored. A strong correlation is expected between the mm/sub-mm and X-ray fluxes when the flare X-rays are produced by SSC, while the correlated variability is strongest between the sub-mm/far-IR and X-rays when bremsstrahlung emission is dominant during the flare. In addition, we shows that future coordinated multi-wavelength observations planned for the 2002 and 2003 cycles may be able to distinguish between the accretion and jet scenarios.

Siming Liu; Fulvio Melia

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

A BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO FLARE IN MRK 231  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radio monitoring of the broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) Mrk 231 from 13.9 GHz to 17.6 GHz detected a strong flat spectrum flare. Even though BALQSOs are typically weak radio sources, the 17.6 GHz flux density doubled in ?150 days, from ?135 mJy to ?270 mJy. It is demonstrated that the elapsed rise time in the quasar rest frame and the relative magnitude of the flare is typical of some of the stronger flares in blazars that are usually associated with the ejection of discrete components on parsec scales. The decay of a similar flare was found in a previous monitoring campaign at 22 GHz. We conclude that these flares are not rare. The implication is that Mrk 231 seems to be a quasar in which the physical mechanism that produces the broad absorption line wind is in tension with the emergence of a fledgling blazar.

Reynolds, Cormac; Hurley-Walker, Natasha [ICRAR-Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia, 6102 (Australia)] [ICRAR-Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia, 6102 (Australia); Punsly, Brian [1415 Granvia Altamira, Palos Verdes Estates, CA 90274 (United States)] [1415 Granvia Altamira, Palos Verdes Estates, CA 90274 (United States); O'Dea, Christopher P., E-mail: brian.punsly1@verizon.net, E-mail: brian.punsly@comdev-usa.com [Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

EVIDENCE FOR HOT FAST FLOW ABOVE A SOLAR FLARE ARCADE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar flares are one of the main forces behind space weather events. However, the mechanism that drives such energetic phenomena is not fully understood. The standard eruptive flare model predicts that magnetic reconnection occurs high in the corona where hot fast flows are created. Some imaging or spectroscopic observations have indicated the presence of these hot fast flows, but there have been no spectroscopic scanning observations to date to measure the two-dimensional structure quantitatively. We analyzed a flare that occurred on the west solar limb on 2012 January 27 observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and found that the hot (?30MK) fast (>500 km s{sup –1}) component was located above the flare loop. This is consistent with magnetic reconnection taking place above the flare loop.

Imada, S. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Aoki, K.; Hara, H.; Watanabe, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)] [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Shimizu, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)] [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

Abrupt Longitudinal Magnetic Field Changes in Flaring Active Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65° of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of ~10 G to as high as ~450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65° of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

G. J. D. Petrie; J. J. Sudol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES IN FLARING ACTIVE REGIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We characterize the changes in the longitudinal photospheric magnetic field during 38 X-class and 39 M-class flares within 65{sup 0} of disk center using 1 minute GONG magnetograms. In all 77 cases, we identify at least one site in the flaring active region where clear, permanent, stepwise field changes occurred. The median duration of the field changes was about 15 minutes and was approximately equal for X-class and for M-class flares. The absolute values of the field changes ranged from the detection limit of {approx}10 G to as high as {approx}450 G in two exceptional cases. The median value was 69 G. Field changes were significantly stronger for X-class than for M-class flares and for limb flares than for disk-center flares. Longitudinal field changes less than 100 G tended to decrease longitudinal field strengths, both close to disk center and close to the limb, while field changes greater than 100 G showed no such pattern. Likewise, longitudinal flux strengths tended to decrease during flares. Flux changes, particularly net flux changes near disk center, correlated better than local field changes with GOES peak X-ray flux. The strongest longitudinal field and flux changes occurred in flares observed close to the limb. We estimate the change of Lorentz force associated with each flare and find that this is large enough in some cases to power seismic waves. We find that longitudinal field decreases would likely outnumber increases at all parts of the solar disk within 65{sup 0} of disk center, as in our observations, if photospheric field tilts increase during flares as predicted by Hudson et al.

Petrie, G. J. D. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Sudol, J. J. [West Chester University, West Chester, PA 19383 (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Sun as an X-Ray Star. III. Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In previous works we have developed a method to convert solar X-ray data, collected with the Yohkoh/SXT, into templates of stellar coronal observations. Here we apply the method to several solar flares, for comparison with stellar X-ray flares. Eight flares, from weak (GOES class C5.8) to very intense ones (X9) are selected as representative of the flaring Sun. The emission measure distribution versus temperature, EM(T), of the flaring regions is derived from Yohkoh/SXT observations in the rise, peak, and decay of the flares. The EM(T) is rather peaked and centered around T ? 107 K for most of the time. Typically, it grows during the rise phase of the flare, and then it decreases and shifts toward lower temperatures during the decay, more slowly if there is sustained heating. The most intense flare we studied shows emission measure even at very high temperatures (T ? 108 K). Time-resolved X-ray spectra both unfiltered and filtered through the instrumental responses of the nonsolar instruments ASCA/SIS and ROSAT/PSPC are then derived. Synthesized ASCA/SIS and ROSAT/PSPC spectra are generally well fitted with single thermal components at temperatures close to that of the EM(T) maximum, albeit two thermal components are needed to fit some flare decays. ROSAT/PSPC spectra show that solar flares are in a 2 orders of magnitude flux range (106-108 ergs cm-2 s-1) and a narrow PSPC hardness ratio range, however, higher than that of typical nonflaring solar-like stars.

F. Reale; G. Peres; S. Orlando

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Xray Flare Light Curves and Dimensions of the Flaring S. Serio, F. Reale, R. Betta, G. Peres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the temperature evolution as tracer of the presence of heating during the decay. Many solar flares appear). We outline here the method and some testing on spatially­resolved solar flares observed with Yohkoh (slope in a Log/Log plot) depends on the decay time of the heating re­ leased in the loop during

195

Deterministically Driven Avalanche Models of Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop and discuss the properties of a new class of lattice-based avalanche models of solar flares. These models are readily amenable to a relatively unambiguous physical interpretation in terms of slow twisting of a coronal loop. They share similarities with other avalanche models, such as the classical stick--slip self-organized critical model of earthquakes, in that they are driven globally by a fully deterministic energy loading process. The model design leads to a systematic deficit of small scale avalanches. In some portions of model space, mid-size and large avalanching behavior is scale-free, being characterized by event size distributions that have the form of power-laws with index values, which, in some parameter regimes, compare favorably to those inferred from solar EUV and X-ray flare data. For models using conservative or near-conservative redistribution rules, a population of large, quasiperiodic avalanches can also appear. Although without direct counterparts in the observational global st...

Strugarek, Antoine; Joseph, Richard; Pirot, Dorian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Noise Control of a Flare Stack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of its noise abatement program the Standard Oil Company of California has undertaken to reduce the noise radiated from the flare stacks serving the new process plants at the El Segundo Refinery. These flares used to burn excess refinery hydrocarbon gases have to operate smokelessly. To accomplish this high?pressure steam jets are used to discharge a turbulent steam?air mixture into the combustion zone. This system although muffled proved to be an intolerable source of noise in the adjacent community. An examination of the noise spectrum indicated that the mixing between the steam ejected from the 3 4 ? in. ? diam primary nozzle and the ambient air was a major source of noise. A series of exploratory model scale tests were conducted in an effort to reduce the noise. By replacing a single 3 4 ? in. ?diam nozzle with a multiple nozzle the radiated noise was reduced by 16 dB. The multiple nozzle configuration and the experimental program leading to its design are described.

A. S. Hersh; J. G. Seebold

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

LPG recovery from refinery flare by waste heat powered absorption refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A waste heat powered ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit (ARU) has commenced operation at the Colorado Refining Company in Commerce City, Colorado. The ARU provides 85 tons of refrigeration at 30 F to refrigerate the net gas/treat gas stream, thereby recovering 65,000 barrels per year of LPG which formerly was flared or burned as fuel. The ARU is powered by the 290 F waste heat content of the reform reactor effluent. An additional 180 tons of refrigeration is available at the ARU to debottleneck the FCC plant wet gas compressors by cooling their inlet vapor. The ARU is directly integrated into the refinery processes, and uses enhanced, highly compact heat and mass exchange components. The refinery's investment will pay back in less than two years from increased recovery of salable product, and CO{sub 2} emissions are decreased by 10,000 tons per year in the Denver area.

Erickson, D.C.; Kelly, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

36Super-fast solar flares ! NASA's Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) satellite has been studying solar flares since 2002. The sequence of figures to the left shows a flaring region hr/3600 sec = 0.98 kilometers/sec. The solar flare blob was traveling at 207 kilometers per second

199

Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Chapter 22 - Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses safe disposal of radioactive waste in order to provide safety to workers and the public. Radioactive wastes arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, and from beneficial uses of isotopes and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. In the United States spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. A multi-barrier system involving packaging and geological media will provide protection of the public over the centuries the waste must be isolated. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In other countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes (LLWs) come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Establishment of regional disposal sites by interstate compacts has generally been unsuccessful in the United States. Decontamination of defense sites will be long and costly. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Soft X-ray Pulsations in Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The soft X-ray emissions of solar flares come mainly from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. We analyze the suitability of the GOES data for this kind of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after Sept. 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend Dolla et al. results to a list of X-class flares from Cycle 24, and show that most of them display QPP in the impulsive phase. During the impulsive phase the footpoints of the newly-forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations. The QPP show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES dat...

Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL FLARE PLASMA WITH THE EUV VARIABILITY EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the defining characteristics of a solar flare is the impulsive formation of very high temperature plasma. The properties of the thermal emission are not well understood, however, and the analysis of solar flare observations is often predicated on the assumption that the flare plasma is isothermal. The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides spectrally resolved observations of emission lines that span a wide range of temperatures (e.g., Fe XV-Fe XXIV) and allow for thermal flare plasma to be studied in detail. In this paper we describe a method for computing the differential emission measure distribution in a flare using EVE observations and apply it to several representative events. We find that in all phases of the flare the differential emission measure distribution is broad. Comparisons of EVE spectra with calculations based on parameters derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites soft X-ray fluxes indicate that the isothermal approximation is generally a poor representation of the thermal structure of a flare.

Warren, Harry P.; Doschek, George A. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mariska, John T. [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Solar Flare Measurements with STIX and MiSolFA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar flares are the most powerful events in the solar system and the brightest sources of X-rays, often associated with emission of particles reaching the Earth and causing geomagnetic storms, giving problems to communication, airplanes and even black-outs. X-rays emitted by accelerated electrons are the most direct probe of solar flare phenomena. The Micro Solar-Flare Apparatus (MiSolFA) is a proposed compact X-ray detector which will address the two biggest issues in solar flare modeling. Dynamic range limitations prevent simultaneous spectroscopy with a single instrument of all X-ray emitting regions of a flare. In addition, most X-ray observations so far are inconsistent with the high anisotropy predicted by the models usually adopted for solar flares. Operated at the same time as the STIX instrument of the ESA Solar Orbiter mission, at the next solar maximum (2020), they will have the unique opportunity to look at the same flare from two different directions: Solar Orbiter gets very close to the Sun wit...

Casadei, Diego

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

PROPERTIES OF SEQUENTIAL CHROMOSPHERIC BRIGHTENINGS AND ASSOCIATED FLARE RIBBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the physical properties of solar sequential chromospheric brightenings (SCBs) observed in conjunction with moderate-sized chromospheric flares with associated Coronal mass ejections. To characterize these ephemeral events, we developed automated procedures to identify and track subsections (kernels) of solar flares and associated SCBs using high-resolution H{alpha} images. Following the algorithmic identification and a statistical analysis, we compare and find the following: SCBs are distinctly different from flare kernels in their temporal characteristics of intensity, Doppler structure, duration, and location properties. We demonstrate that flare ribbons are themselves made up of subsections exhibiting differing characteristics. Flare kernels are measured to have a mean propagation speed of 0.2 km s{sup -1} and a maximum speed of 2.3 km s{sup -1} over a mean distance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km. Within the studied population of SCBs, different classes of characteristics are observed with coincident negative, positive, or both negative and positive Doppler shifts of a few km s{sup -1}. The appearance of SCBs precedes peak flare intensity by Almost-Equal-To 12 minutes and decay Almost-Equal-To 1 hr later. They are also found to propagate laterally away from flare center in clusters at 45 km s{sup -1} or 117 km s{sup -1}. Given SCBs' distinctive nature compared to flares, we suggest a different physical mechanism relating to their origin than the associated flare. We present a heuristic model of the origin of SCBs.

Kirk, Michael S.; Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Jackiewicz, Jason; McAteer, R. T. James [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Milligan, Ryan O., E-mail: mskirk@nmsu.edu [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, University Road Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 CHAPTER 7 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PAGE I. Radioactive Waste Disposal ............................................................................................ 7-2 II. Radiation Control Technique #2 Instructions for Preparation of Radioactive Waste

Slatton, Clint

206

Disposable telemetry cable deployment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

Holcomb, David Joseph (Sandia Park, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Sign singularity and flares in solar active region NOAA 11158  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Active Region NOAA 11158 has hosted a number of strong flares, including one X2.2 event. The complexity of current density and current helicity are studied through cancellation analysis of their sign-singular measure, which features power-law scaling. Spectral analysis is also performed, revealing the presence of two separate scaling ranges with different spectral index. The time evolution of parameters is discussed. Sudden changes of the cancellation exponents at the time of large flares, and the presence of correlation with EUV and X-ray flux, suggest that eruption of large flares can be linked to the small scale properties of the current structures.

Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Kazachenko, Maria D; Krucker, Sam; Primavera, Leonardo; Servidio, Sergio; Vecchio, Antonio; Welsch, Brian T; Fisher, George H; Lepreti, Fabio; Carbone, Vincenzo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts The invention also includes electrochemical apparatus that can interface with optical instrumentation. If the working electrode is transparent, light from an optical fiber may be directed through the working electrode and into a cuvette. July 3, 2013 Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Applications: Electrochemical experiments in solution Electrochemical experiments on surfaces Bulk electrolysis experiments Fuel cells Corrosion studies Academic Labs Teaching and research Benefits: Incorporates disposable, commercially available cuvettes

209

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

210

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

211

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

212

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

213

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

214

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

215

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

216

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

217

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

218

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

219

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

220

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

222

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

223

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

224

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

225

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

226

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

227

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

228

XMM-Newton observes flaring in the polar UZ For during a low state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During an XMM-Newton observation, the eclipsing polar UZ For was found in a peculiar state with an extremely low X-ray luminosity and occasional X-ray and UV flaring. For most of the observation, UZ For was only barely detected in X-rays and about 800 times fainter than during a high state previously observed with ROSAT. A transient event, which lasted about 900 s, was detected simultaneously by the X-ray instruments and, in the UV, by the Optical Monitor. The transient was likely caused by the impact of 10^17-10^18 g of gas on the main accretion region of the white dwarf. The X-ray spectrum of the transient is consistent with 7 keV thermal bremsstrahlung from the shock-heated gas in the accretion column. A soft blackbody component due to reprocessing of X-rays in the white dwarf atmosphere is not seen. The likely origin of the UV emission during the transient is cyclotron radiation from the accretion column. We conclude from our analysis that the unusual flaring during the low state of UZ For was caused by intermittent increases of the mass transfer rate due to stellar activity on the secondary.

Dirk Pandel; France A. Cordova

2002-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

Obscuration of Flare Emission by an Eruptive Prominence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the eclipsing of microwave flare emission by an eruptive prominence from a neighboring region as observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 GHz. The obscuration of the flare emission appears as a dimming feature in the microwave flare light curve. We use the dimming feature to derive the temperature of the prominence and the distribution of heating along the length of the filament. We find that the prominence is heated to a temperature above the quiet Sun temperature at 17 GHz. The duration of the dimming is the time taken by the eruptive prominence in passing over the flaring region. We also find evidence for the obscuration in EUV images obtained by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) mission.

Gopalswamy, Nat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lifetime of solar flare particles in coronal storage regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most discussions of lifetime of flare particles in the solar corona have assumed that collision loss is ... However, it is quite possible that the solar cosmic rays are not imbedded in 106...K coronal material bu...

Kinsey A. Anderson

1972-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Magnetohydrodynamics of Energy Release in Solar Flares [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1991 research-article The Magnetohydrodynamics of Energy Release in Solar Flares [and Discussion] E. R. Priest K. J. H...two key processes of magnetic eruption and magnetic energy conversion by reconnection are reviewed briefly, with...

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Interplanetary hydromagnetic clouds as flare-generated spheromaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar flare-generated interplanetary clouds are proposed to be treated as oblate spheromaks (oblamaks) with predominantly force-free magnetic field. The solution found for a force-free field equation in spheroida...

K. G. Ivanov; A. F. Harshiladze

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Magnetic energy conversion, magnetospheric substorms and solar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The magnetospheric substorm has been thought to be the manifestation of a sudden conversion of the magnetic ... of the magnetic energy stored in the magnetotail before substorm onset. It has been believed that solar flares ...

S.-I. Akasofu

1980-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being evaluated at Idaho National Laboratory and the facilities we’ve designed to evaluate options and support optimization.

Dirk Gombert

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Disposal Practices at...

236

New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services Ecosystem Management Team New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal...

237

SHATTERING FLARES DURING CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF NEUTRON STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate that resonant shattering flares can occur during close passages of neutron stars in eccentric or hyperbolic encounters. We provide updated estimates for the rate of close encounters of compact objects in dense stellar environments, which we find are substantially lower than given in previous works. While such occurrences are rare, we show that shattering flares can provide a strong electromagnetic counterpart to the gravitational wave bursts expected from such encounters, allowing triggered searches for these events to occur.

Tsang, David, E-mail: dtsang@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spent Fuel Disposal Trust Fund (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any licensee operating a nuclear power plant in this State shall establish a segregated Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Trust Fund in accordance with this subchapter for the eventual disposal of spent...

239

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal...

240

Constraining Solar Flare Differential Emission Measures with EVE and RHESSI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deriving a well-constrained differential emission measure (DEM) distribution for solar flares has historically been difficult, primarily because no single instrument is sensitive to the full range of coronal temperatures observed in flares, from $\\lesssim$2 to $\\gtrsim$50 MK. We present a new technique, combining extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory with X-ray spectra from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), to derive, for the first time, a self-consistent, well-constrained DEM for jointly-observed solar flares. EVE is sensitive to ~2-25 MK thermal plasma emission, and RHESSI to $\\gtrsim$10 MK; together, the two instruments cover the full range of flare coronal plasma temperatures. We have validated the new technique on artificial test data, and apply it to two X-class flares from solar cycle 24 to determine the flare DEM and its temporal evolution; the constraints on the thermal emission derived from ...

Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The air pollutants associated with shale gas development include greenhouse gases (primarily methane), ozone precursors (volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides), air toxics, and particulate matter from flaring, compressors, and engines. ... Kiviat, E.Risks to biodiversity from hydraulic fracturing for natural gas in the Marcellus and Utica shales Annu. ...

Mitchell J. Small; Paul C. Stern; Elizabeth Bomberg; Susan M. Christopherson; Bernard D. Goldstein; Andrei L. Israel; Robert B. Jackson; Alan Krupnick; Meagan S. Mauter; Jennifer Nash; D. Warner North; Sheila M. Olmstead; Aseem Prakash; Barry Rabe; Nathan Richardson; Susan Tierney; Thomas Webler; Gabrielle Wong-Parodi; Barbara Zielinska

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microminiature gas chromatograph  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 66  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 28. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 8 7 9 6 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 305 300 443 331 233 From Oil Wells .................................................. 1 * * * * Total................................................................... 307 301 443 331 233 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .............................................. * 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 307 301 443 331 233 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed......................

244

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

245

Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded locally Three small businesses with offices in Northern New Mexico awarded nuclear waste clean-up contracts. April 3, 2012 Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area A worker stages drums of transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 54. the Lap ships such drums to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southern New Mexico. The Lab annually averages about 120 shipments of TRU waste to WIPP. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "They will be valuable partners in the Lab's ability to dispose of the waste safely and efficiently." Small businesses selected for environmental work at LANL

246

Gamma-Ray Polarimetry of Two X-Class Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed the first polarimetry of solar flare emission at gamma-ray energies (0.2-1 MeV). These observations were performed with the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) for two large flares: the GOES X4.8-class solar flare of 2002 July 23, and the X17-class flare of 2003 October 28. We have marginal polarization detections in both flares, at levels of 21% +/- 9% and -11% +/- 5% respectively. These measurements significantly constrain the levels and directions of solar flare gamma-ray polarization, and begin to probe the underlying electron distributions.

Steven E. Boggs; W. Coburn; E. Kalemci

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

Discovery of a Radio Flare from GRB 990123  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of a radio counterpart to GRB 990123. In contrast to previous well-studied radio afterglows which rise to peak flux on a timescale of a week and then decay over several weeks to months, the radio emission from this GRB was clearly detected one day after the burst, after which it rapidly faded away. The simplest interpretation of this ``radio flare'' is that it arises from the reverse shock. In the framework of the afterglow models discussed to date, a forward shock origin for the flare is ruled out by our data. However, at late times, some radio afterglow emission (commensurate with the observed late-time optical emission, the optical afterglow) is expected from the forward shock. The relative faintness of the observed late-time radio emission provides an independent indication for a jet-like geometry in this GRB. We use the same radio observations to constrain two key parameters of the forward shock, peak flux and peak frequency, to within a factor of two. These values are inconsistent with the notion advocated by several authors that the prompt optical emission detected by ROTSE smoothly joins the optical afterglow emission. Finally, with hindsight we now recognize another such radio flare and this suggests that one out of eight GRBs has a detectable radio flare. This abundance coupled with the reverse shock interpretation suggests that the radio flare phenomenon has the potential to shed new light into the physics of reverse shocks in GRBs.

S. R. Kulkarni; D. A. Frail; R. Sari; G. H. Moriarty-Schieven; D. S. Shepherd; P. Udomprasert; A. C. S. Readhead; J. S. Bloom; M. Feroci; E. Costa

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Repeated X-ray Flaring Activity in Sagittarius A*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigating the spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-rays coming from Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is essential to our development of a more complete understanding of the emission mechanisms in this supermassive black hole located at the center of our Galaxy. Several X-ray flares with varying durations and spectral features have already been observed from this object. Here we present the results of two long XMM-Newton observations of the Galactic nucleus carried out in 2004, for a total exposure time of nearly 500 ks. During these observations we detected two flares from Sgr A* with peak 2-10 keV luminosities about 40 times (L ~ 9x10^34 erg s?1) above the quiescent luminosity: one on 2004 March 31 and another on 2004 August 31. The first flare lasted about 2.5 ks and the second about 5 ks. The combined fit on the Epic spectra yield photon indeces of about 1.5 and 1.9 for the first and second flare respectively. This hard photon index strongly suggests the presence of an important population of non-thermal electrons during the event and supports the view that the majority of flaring events tend to be hard and not very luminous.

Guillaume Belanger; Andrea Goldwurm; Fulvio Melia; Farah Yusef-Zadeh; Philippe Ferrando; Delphine Porquet; Nicolas Grosso; Robert Warwick

2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

250

Integrated process for coalbed brine and methane disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a technology and project to demonstrate and commercialize a brine disposal process for converting the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process also utilizes coalbed methane (CBM) released from coal mining for the combustion process thereby substantially reducing the potential for methane emissions to the atmosphere. The technology is ideally suited for the treatment and disposal of produced brines generated from the development of coal mines and coalbed methane resources worldwide. Over the next 10 to 15 years, market potential for brine elimination equipment and services is estimated to be in the range of $1 billion.

Byam, J.W. Jr.; Tait, J.H.; Brandt, H.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute gout flare Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gout flare Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acute gout flare Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Uricase for gout treatment Chapter 5.1...

252

An Invariable Point in the Energy Spectra of Non-Thermal Electrons of Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The power-law energy spectra of non-thermal electrons for each 1.024 second have been drawn together during the flare. For some flares, it is discovered that the energy spectra taken at different times present...

W.Q. Gan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (SNF DC) supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access mains, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container provides long term confinement of DOE SNF waste, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The DOE SNF Disposal Containers provide containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limit radionuclide release thereafter. The disposal containers maintain the waste in a designated configuration, withstand maximum handling and rockfall loads, limit the individual waste canister temperatures after emplacement. The disposal containers also limit the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resist corrosion in the expected repository environment, and provide complete or limited containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple disposal container designs may be needed to accommodate the expected range of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel. The disposal container will include outer and inner barrier walls and outer and inner barrier lids. Exterior labels will identify the disposal container and contents. Differing metal barriers will support the design philosophy of defense in depth. The use of materials with different failure mechanisms prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The corrosion-resistant inner barrier and inner barrier lid will be constructed of a high-nickel alloy and the corrosion-allowance outer barrier and outer barrier lid will be made of carbon steel. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Containers interface with the emplacement drift environment by transferring heat from the waste to the external environment and by protecting the DOE waste canisters and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The disposal containers also interface with the SNF by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents to the waste. The disposal containers interface with the Ex-Container System's emplacement drift disposal container supports. The disposal containers interface with the Canister Transfer System, Waste Emplacement System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement and remediation of the disposal container.

F. Habashi

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

Physical origin of X-ray flares following GRBs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the major achievements of Swift is the discovery of the erratic X-ray flares harboring nearly half of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), both for long-duration and short-duration categories, and both for traditional hard GRBs and soft X-ray flashes (XRFs). Here I review the arguments in support of the suggestion that they are powered by reactivation of the GRB central engine, and that the emission site is typically ``internal'', i.e. at a distance within the forward shock front. The curvature effect that characterizes the decaying lightcurve slope during the fading phase of the flares provides an important clue. I will then discuss several suggestions to re-start the GRB central engine and comment on how future observations may help to unveil the physical origin of X-ray flares.

Bing Zhang

2006-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

256

Terahertz photometer to observe solar flares in continuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar observations at sub-THz frequencies detected a new flare spectral component peaking in the THz range, simultaneously with the well known microwaves component, bringing challenging constraints for interpretation. Higher THz frequencies observations are needed to understand the nature of the mechanisms occurring in flares. A THz photometer system was developed to observe outside the terrestrial atmosphere on stratospheric balloons or satellites, or at exceptionally transparent ground stations. The telescope was designed to observe the whole solar disk detecting small relative changes in input temperature caused by flares at localized positions. A Golay cell detector is preceded by low-pass filters to suppress visible and near IR radiation, a band-pass filter, and a chopper. A prototype was assembled to demonstrate the new concept and the system performance. It can detect temperature variations smaller than 1 K for data sampled at a rate of 10/second, smoothed for intervals larger than 4 seconds. For a 76 ...

Marcon, Rogerio; Fernandes, Luis Olavo T; Godoy, Rodolfo; Marun, Adolfo; Bortolucci, Emilio C; Zakia, Maria Beny; Diniz, José Alexandre; Kudaka, Amauri S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy Partitions and Evolution in a Purely Thermal Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a solely thermal flare, which we detected in the microwave range from the thermal gyro- and free-free emission it produced. An advantage of analyzing thermal gyro emission is its unique ability to precisely yield the magnetic field in the radiating volume. When combined with observationally-deduced plasma density and temperature, these magnetic field measurements offer a straightforward way of tracking evolution of the magnetic and thermal energies in the flare. For the event described here, the magnetic energy density in the radio-emitting volume declines over the flare rise phase, then stays roughly constant during the extended peak phase, but recovers to the original level over the decay phase. At the stage where the magnetic energy density decreases, the thermal energy density increases; however, this increase is insufficient, by roughly an order of magnitude, to compensate for the magnetic energy decrease. When the magnetic energy release is over, the source parameters come back to ne...

Fleishman, Gregory D; Gary, Dale E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Modelling the influence of photospheric turbulence on solar flare statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar flares stem from the reconnection of twisted magnetic field lines in the solar photosphere. The energy and waiting time distributions of these events follow complex patterns that have been carefully considered in the past and that bear some resemblance with earthquakes and stockmarkets. Here we explore in detail the tangling motion of interacting flux tubes anchored in the plasma and the energy ejections resulting when they recombine. The mechanism for energy accumulation and release in the flow is reminiscent of self-organized criticality. From this model we suggest the origin for two important and widely studied properties of solar flare statistics, including the time-energy correlations. We first propose that the scale-free energy distribution of solar flares is largely due to the twist exerted by the vorticity of the turbulent photosphere. Second, the long-range temporal and time-energy correlations appear to arise from the tube-tube interactions. The agreement with satellite measurements is encoura...

Mendoza, M; de Arcangelis, L; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Flare Intermittency and the Earth's Temperature Anomalies Nicola Scafetta1,2 and Bruce J; published 17 June 2003) We argue that Earth's short-term temperature anomalies and the solar flare data sets that corresponds to the one that would be induced by the solar flare intermittency. The mean

Scafetta, Nicola

260

Detection of a Large Flare in FR Cnc (=1RXS J083230.9+154940)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report detection of an optical flare in the BY Draconis type star FR Cnc. The flare duration is 41 min, the amplitude is in the B band 1.02 m. It is the first flare reported for this object.

Alex Golovin; Elena Pavlenko; Yuliana Kuznyetsova; Victoria Krushevska

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermal and Magnetic Parameters in Solar Flares Derived from GOES X-Ray Light Curves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......6110 6190 6220 6310 Thermal and Magnetic Parameters in Solar Flares Derived from...impulsive phase of 20 solar flares and to estimate the thermal and magnetic parameters...parameters and the thermal ones, have been applied not only to solar flares, but also......

Tetsuya T. Yamamoto; Takashi Sakurai

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

Automatic Solar Flare Detection Using MLP, RBF and SVM , Frank Y. Shih1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in light curves. In the mean time, solar flares also emit high velocity charged particles that take one1 Automatic Solar Flare Detection Using MLP, RBF and SVM Ming Qu1 , Frank Y. Shih1 , Ju Jing2. The focus of the automatic solar flare detection is on the development of efficient feature

263

Title: Development of Statistical and Data Drive Models to Predict Flares for Space Weather Predictions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D and civilian assets in both space and ground. The current state of predictability of solar flares is basedTitle: Development of Statistical and Data Drive Models to Predict Solar Flares for Space Weather Collaborator: Dr. K. S. Balasubramaniam, Air Force Research Laboratory Summary: Solar flares impact Do

Johnson, Eric E.

264

Alternatives for the disposal of NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials) wastes in Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some of the Texas wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have been disposed of in a uranium mill tailings impoundment. There is currently no operating disposal facility in Texas to accept these wastes. As a result, some wastes containing extremely small amounts of radioactivity are sent to elaborate disposal sites at extremely high costs. The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has sponsored a study to investigate lower cost, alternative disposal methods for certain wastes containing small quantities of NORM. This paper presents the results of a multipathway safety analysis of various scenarios for disposing of wastes containing limited quantities of NORM in Texas. The wastes include pipe scales and sludges from oil and gas production, residues from rare-earth mineral processing, and water treatment resins, but exclude large-volume, diffuse wastes (coal fly ash, phosphogypsum). The purpose of the safety analysis is to define concentration and quantity limits for the key nuclides of NORM that will avoid dangerous radiation exposures under different waste disposal scenarios.

Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C. (Rogers Associates Engineering Corporation, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Pollard, C.G. (Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, Austin (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Potential for terrestrial disposal of carbon dioxide in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many scientists are concerned about the possibility of global climate change of the continuing buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Capture and permanent disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) would help alleviate this potential problem. Abandoned oil and natural gas reservoirs and deep aquifers were investigated as potential disposal sites for CO{sub 2}. Currently abandoned oil and gas reservoirs could hold approximately 2.9 Gt of CO{sub 2}. Since the annual CO{sub 2} emissions from utility power plants is 2 Gt, these reservoirs would be filled in less than 1.5 years. The volume corresponding to ultimate reserves of oil and gas would hold roughly 100 Gt of CO{sub 2}. Therefore, the ultimate capacity for CO{sub 2} storage is approximately 50 years. Over half of the CO{sub 2} is emitted east of the Mississippi River, and most of the potential disposal sites are west of the Mississippi. Because of the high cost of transporting CO{sub 2} by pipeline over long distances, only a small fraction of the reservoir capacity would be useful. The capacity of deep aquifers for CO{sub 2} disposal is highly uncertain. A rough estimate for the US, derived from global estimates, is 5--500 Gt of CO{sub 2}. Problems associated with each method of disposal are discussed.

Winter, E.M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bergman, P.D. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Enhancements to Generic Disposal System Modeling Capabilities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

disposal system modeling and analysis capability that takes advantage of high-performance computing (HPC) environments to simulate the important multi-physics phenomena and...

267

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste Treatment Plant Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Email Email Page | Print Print...

268

Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Briefing: Summary and Recommendations of EM Landfill Workshop...

269

Multi-wavelength analysis of high energy electrons in solar flares: a case study of August 20, 2002 flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multi-wavelength spatial and temporal analysis of solar high energy electrons is conducted using the August 20, 2002 flare of an unusually flat (gamma=1.8) hard X-ray spectrum. The flare is studied using RHESSI, Halpha, radio, TRACE, and MDI observations with advanced methods and techniques never previously applied in the solar flare context. A new method to account for X-ray Compton backscattering in the photosphere (photospheric albedo) has been used to deduce the primary X-ray flare spectra. The mean electron flux distribution has been analysed using both forward fitting and model independent inversion methods of spectral analysis. We show that the contribution of the photospheric albedo to the photon spectrum modifies the calculated mean electron flux distribution, mainly at energies below 100 keV. The positions of the Halpha emission and hard X-ray sources with respect to the current-free extrapolation of the MDI photospheric magnetic field and the characteristics of the radio emission provide evidence of the closed geometry of the magnetic field structure and the flare process in low altitude magnetic loops. In agreement with the predictions of some solar flare models, the hard X-ray sources are located on the external edges of the Halpha emission and show chromospheric plasma heated by the non-thermal electrons. The fast changes of Halpha intensities are located not only inside the hard X-ray sources, as expected if they are the signatures of the chromospheric response to the electron bombardment, but also away from them.

J. Kasparova; M. Karlicky; E. P. Kontar; R. A. Schwartz; B. R. Dennis

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

Stochastic Electron Acceleration During the NIR and X-ray Flares in Sagittarius A*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent near-IR (NIR) and X-ray observations of Sagittarius A*'s spectrum have yielded several strong constraints on the transient energization mechanism, justifying a re-examination of the stochastic acceleration model proposed previously for these events. We here demonstrate that the new results are fully consistent with the acceleration of electrons via the transit-time damping process. But more importantly, these new NIR and X-ray flares now can constrain the source size, the gas density, the magnetic field, and the wave energy density in the turbulent plasma. Future simultaneous multi-wavelength observations with good spectral information will, in addition, allow us to study their temporal evolution, which will eventually lead to an accurate determination of the behavior of the plasma just minutes prior to its absorption by the black hole.

Siming Liu; Fulvio Melia; Vahe Petrosian

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

TIDAL DISRUPTION FLARES: THE ACCRETION DISK PHASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of the main results derived from our simulations is that blackbody fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. In fact, the temperature derived from blackbody fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous (or accretion) timescale, which also fixes the rising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution of the light curve depends on the evolution of the debris fallback rate. Peak bolometric luminosities are in the range 10{sup 45}-10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}, whereas peak luminosities in soft X-rays (0.2-2.0 keV) are typically one order of magnitude lower. The typical timescale derived from our preferred models for the flare luminosity to decay by two orders of magnitude is about 3-4 yr. Predicted soft X-ray light curves reproduce quite well data on galaxies in which a variable X-ray emission possibly related to a tidal event was detected. In the cases of NGC 3599 and IC 3599, data are reproduced well by models defined by a black hole with mass {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of about 1 solar mass. The X-ray variation observed in XMMSL1 is consistent with a model defined by a black hole with mass {approx}3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of 1 solar mass, while that observed in the galaxy situated in the cluster A1689 is consistent with a model including a black hole of {approx}10{sup 7} M{sub sun} and a disrupted star of {approx}0.5 M{sub sun}.

Montesinos Armijo, Matias; De Freitas Pacheco, Jose A. [Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Laboratoire Cassiopee, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis Bd de l'Observatoire, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign September 2012 FCR&D-USED-2011-000065 REV 1 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark, manufacturer, or

273

14 - Lubricant use and disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Criteria are defined for optimum machine-specific selection of conventional, high-performance and specialty lubricants. Lubrication consolidation is indicated as a means of rationalisation of inventories. Intended use of lubricants may be compromised by oxidation, water and air contamination, additive depletion and accumulation of contaminants, including wear debris, and biological degradation. Strategic oil analysis is described from simple in-shop sensory inspections to primary on-site standard testing and more comprehensive secondary testing methods as an operational maintenance tool for machine and lubricant condition monitoring to estimate remaining lubricant life time and prevent premature machine failure. The disposal of spent lubricants, including waste oil legislation and management, and re-refining technologies, are discussed.

Jan C.J. Bart; Emanuele Gucciardi; Stefano Cavallaro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Magnetic and dynamical photospheric disturbances observed during an M3.2 solar flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This letter reports on a set of full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations in the near infrared He I 10830 A spectral region covering the pre-, flare, and post-flare phases of an M3.2 class solar flare. The flare originated on 2013 May 17 and belonged to active region NOAA 11748. We detected strong He I 10830 A emission in the flare. The red component of the He I triplet peaks at an intensity ratio to the continuum of about 1.86. During the flare, He I Stokes V is substantially larger and appears reversed compared to the usually larger Si I Stokes V profile. The photospheric Si I inversions of the four Stokes profiles reveal the following: (1) the magnetic field strength in the photosphere decreases or is even absent during the flare phase, as compared to the pre-flare phase. However, this decrease is not permanent. After the flare the magnetic field recovers its pre-flare configuration in a short time (i.e., in 30 minutes after the flare). (2) In the photosphere, the line-of-sight velocities show a regular...

Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Large Eddy Simulation of Industrial Flares Philip Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the Institute for Clean and Secure Energy at the University of Utah we are focused on education through and private industry companies to promote rapid deployment of new technologies through the use of high to solve many industrially relevant problems such as industrial flares, oxy-coal combustion processes

Utah, University of

276

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same m...

Saint-Hilaire, P; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Benz, Arnold O.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

OBSERVATIONS OF RECONNECTING FLARE LOOPS WITH THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perhaps the most compelling evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares comes from the supra-arcade downflows that have been observed above many post-flare loop arcades. These downflows are thought to be related to highly non-potential field lines that have reconnected and are propagating away from the current sheet. We present new observations of supra-arcade downflows taken with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The morphology and dynamics of the downflows observed with AIA provide new evidence for the role of magnetic reconnection in solar flares. With these new observations we are able to measure downflows originating at larger heights than in previous studies. We find, however, that the initial velocities measured here ({approx}144 km s{sup -1}) are well below the Alfven speed expected in the lower corona, and consistent with previous results. We also find no evidence that the downflows brighten with time, as would be expected from chromospheric evaporation. These observations suggest that simple two-dimensional models cannot explain the detailed observations of solar flares.

Warren, Harry P.; Sheeley, Neil R. Jr. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); O'Brien, Casey M. [Also at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Simulations of the Mars ionosphere during a solar flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.05.23 08:00-10:00 Spring AGU Meeting 2006, Acapulco, Mexico #12;Increased fluxes of X-rays during solarSimulations of the Mars ionosphere during a solar flare Paul Withers, Joei Wroten, Michael Mendillo simulations of the Mars ionosphere driven by temporally-varying solar fluxes, concentrating on 15 and 26 April

Withers, Paul

279

Magnetic Flares and the Observed Optical Depth in Seyfert Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We here consider the pressure equilibrium during an intense magnetic flare above the surface of a cold accretion disk. Under the assumption that the heating source for the plasma trapped within the flaring region is an influx of energy transported inwards with a group velocity close to $c$, e.g., by magnetohydrodynamic waves, this pressure equilibrium can constrain the Thomson optical depth $\\tau_T$ to be of order unity. We suggest that this may be the reason why $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ in Seyfert Galaxies. We also consider whether current data can distinguish between the spectrum produced by a single X-ray emitting region with $\\tau_T\\sim 1$ and that formed by many different flares spanning a range of $\\tau_T$. We find that the current observations do not yet have the required energy resolution to permit such a differentiation. Thus, it is possible that the entire X-ray/$\\gamma$-ray spectrum of Seyfert Galaxies is produced by many independent magnetic flares with an optical depth $0.5<\\tau_T<2$.

Sergei Nayakshin; Fulvio Melia

1997-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES TRIGGERING SOLAR FLARES AND CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar flares and coronal mass ejections, the most catastrophic eruptions in our solar system, have been known to affect terrestrial environments and infrastructure. However, because their triggering mechanism is still not sufficiently understood, our capacity to predict the occurrence of solar eruptions and to forecast space weather is substantially hindered. Even though various models have been proposed to determine the onset of solar eruptions, the types of magnetic structures capable of triggering these eruptions are still unclear. In this study, we solved this problem by systematically surveying the nonlinear dynamics caused by a wide variety of magnetic structures in terms of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. As a result, we determined that two different types of small magnetic structures favor the onset of solar eruptions. These structures, which should appear near the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), include magnetic fluxes reversed to the potential component or the nonpotential component of major field on the PIL. In addition, we analyzed two large flares, the X-class flare on 2006 December 13 and the M-class flare on 2011 February 13, using imaging data provided by the Hinode satellite, and we demonstrated that they conform to the simulation predictions. These results suggest that forecasting of solar eruptions is possible with sophisticated observation of a solar magnetic field, although the lead time must be limited by the timescale of changes in the small magnetic structures.

Kusano, K.; Bamba, Y.; Yamamoto, T. T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Iida, Y.; Toriumi, S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Asai, A., E-mail: kusano@nagoya-u.jp [Unit of Synergetic Studies for Space, Kyoto University, 17 Kitakazan Ohmine-cho, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

282

Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enters the waste stream with the charge intact (e.g., motor vehicle air conditioners, refrigeratorsAsset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have

Sin, Peter

283

Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the DOE Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

284

Tritium waste disposal technology in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium waste disposal methods in the US range from disposal of low specific activity waste along with other low-level waste in shallow land burial facilities, to disposal of kilocurie amounts in specially designed triple containers in 65' deep augered holes located in an aird region of the US. Total estimated curies disposed of are 500,000 in commercial burial sites and 10 million curies in defense related sites. At three disposal sites in humid areas, tritium has migrated into the ground water, and at one arid site tritium vapor has been detected emerging from the soil above the disposal area. Leaching tests on tritium containing waste show that tritium in the form of HTO leaches readily from most waste forms, but that leaching rates of tritiated water into polymer impregnated concrete are reduced by as much as a factor of ten. Tests on improved tritium containment are ongoing. Disposal costs for tritium waste are 7 to 10 dollars per cubic foot for shallow land burial of low specific activity tritium waste, and 10 to 20 dollars per cubic foot for disposal of high specific activity waste. The cost of packaging the high specific activity waste is 150 to 300 dollars per cubic foot. 18 references.

Albenesius, E.L.; Towler, O.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.

Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Jinming, Cai [Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, 230009 Hefei (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

How carbon-based sorbents will impact fly ash utilization and disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of activated carbon flue gas to control mercury emissions will result in a fly ash and activated carbon mixture. The potential impact of this on coal combustion product disposal and utilization is discussed. The full paper (and references) are available at www.acaa-usa.org. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Hassett, D.J.; Buckley, T.D.; Heebink, L.V.; Pavlish, J.H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Land Management and Disposal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal 42 USC 2201(g), Section 161(g), of the AEA 42 USC Section 2224, Section 174 DOE, July 2004, Real Property Desk Guide Requirements: Document Title P.L. 83-703 (68 Stat. 919), Section 161g Grants Special Authority as Required in the Act to Acquire, Sell, Dispose, etc., of Real Property in Furtherance of the Department's Mission (Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954) P.L. 95-91, 91 Stat. 578 (Sections 302 and 347) Department of Energy Organizational Act of 1977, Delegated Authority for Real Property P.L. 106-580 Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, As Amended P.L. 105-85 Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, As Amended 10 CFR 770 Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development

288

Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Disposal configuration options for future uses of greater confinement disposal at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of a variety of radioactive and mixed wastes, some of which are considered special-case waste because they do not currently have a clear disposal option. The DOE`s Nevada Field Office contracted with Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of disposing of some of this special-case waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). As part of this investigation, a review of a near-surface and subsurface disposal options that was performed to develop alternative disposal configurations for special-case waste disposal at the NTS. The criteria for the review included (1) configurations appropriate for disposal at the NTS; (2) configurations for disposal of waste at least 100 ft below the ground surface; (3) configurations for which equipment and technology currently exist; and (4) configurations that meet the special requirements imposed by the nature of special-case waste. Four options for subsurface disposal of special-case waste are proposed: mined consolidated rock, mined alluvium, deep pits or trenches, and deep boreholes. Six different methods for near-surface disposal are also presented: earth-covered tumuli, above-grade concrete structures, trenches, below-grade concrete structures, shallow boreholes, and hydrofracture. Greater confinement disposal (GCD) in boreholes at least 100 ft deep, similar to that currently practiced at the GCD facility at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the NTS, was retained as the option that met the criteria for the review. Four borehole disposal configurations are proposed with engineered barriers that range from the native alluvium to a combination of gravel and concrete. The configurations identified will be used for system analysis that will be performed to determine the disposal configurations and wastes that may be suitable candidates for disposal of special-case wastes at the NTS.

Price, L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual This Revision 3 of the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...

291

Integrated process for coalbed brine disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brine disposal process is described that converts the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use, combustion products and water vapor that can be released into the atmosphere and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process uses a reverse osmosis unit, a submerged combustion evaporator and a pulse combustion dryer. Pretreatment of the brine feedstream is necessary to prevent fouling of the membranes of the reverse osmosis unit and to separate from the brine stream hazardous metal and other constituents that may make the permeate from the reverse osmosis unit unsuitable for agricultural or other use. A chemical modeling code is used to calculate the saturation states of solids that may precipitate and foul the reverse osmosis membranes. Sodium carbonate is added to the brine to precipitate carbonates of Ba, Ca, Mg and Sr prior to filtration, acidification, and passage into the reverse osmosis unit. Optimization of the process in terms of types and amounts of additives is possible with analysis using the modeling code. The minimum amounts of additives to prevent scaling are calculated. In a typical operation, a brine feedstream of 1,000 m{sup 3}/day (6,290 bpd) that may have a total dissolved salt concentration (TDS) of 7,000 ppm will be separated into a permeate stream of 750 m{sup 3}/day (4,718 bpd) with a TDS of 400 ppm and a concentrated brine stream of 250 m{sup 3}/day (1,573 bpd) with a TDS of 26,800 ppm. The submerged combustion evaporator will concentrate this latter stream to a concentration of 268,000 ppm and reduce the volume to 25 m{sup 3}/day (158 bpd). The pulse combustion dryer can dry the concentrated brine mixture to a low moisture salt. Energy costs to operate the reverse osmosis unit are primarily the pumping costs.

Brandt, H. [AQUATECH Services, Inc., Fair Oaks, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bourcier, W.L.; Jackson, K.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The optical flare and afterglow light curve of GRB 050904 at redshift z=6.29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRB050904 is very interesting since it is by far the most distant GRB event known to date($z=6.29$). It was reported that during the prompt high energy emission phase, a very bright optical flare was detected, and it was temporal coincident with an X-ray flare. Here we use two models to explain the optical flare, One is the "late internal shock model", in which the optical flare is produced by the synchrotron radiation of the electrons accelerated by the late internal shock, and the X-ray flare is produced by the synchrotron-self-Compton mechanism. The other is the external forward-reverse shock model, in which the optical flare is from the reverse shock emission and the X-ray flare is attributed to the central engine activity. We show that with proper parameters, a bright optical flare can appear in both models. We think the "late internal shock model" is more favored since in this model the optical flash and the X-ray flare have the same origin, which provides a natural explanation of the temporal coincidence of them. In the forward-reverse shock scenario, fits to the optical flare and the late afterglow suggests that the physical parameters of the reverse shock are much different from that of forward shock, as found in modeling the optical flash of GRB 990123 previously.

D. M. Wei; T. Yan; Y. Z. Fan

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

High-Energy Gamma-Ray Emission From Solar Flares: Summary of Fermi LAT Detections and Analysis of Two M-Class Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the detections of 19 solar flares detected in high-energy gamma rays (above 100 MeV) with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) during its first four years of operation. Interestingly, all flares are associated with fairly fast Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and are not all powerful X-ray flares. We then describe the detailed temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of the first two long-lasting events: the 2011 March 7 flare, a moderate (M3.7) impulsive flare followed by slowly varying gamma-ray emission over 13 hours, and the 2011 June 7 M2.5 flare, which was followed by gamma-ray emission lasting for 2 hours. We compare the Fermi-LAT data with X-ray and proton data measurements from GOES and RHESSI. We argue that a hadronic origin of the gamma rays is more likely than a leptonic origin and find that the energy spectrum of the proton distribution softens after the 2011 March 7 flare, favoring a scenario with continuous acceleration at the flare site. This work suggests that proton acceleratio...

,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign.  To date, UFD’s International Disposal R...

296

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW) generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of...

297

A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor for diagnosis of exposure to toxic organophosphorus agents. A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical...

298

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the...

299

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This...

300

Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Continuum and Near-Continuum Hypersonic Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas-Kinetic Scheme for Continuum and Near-Continuum Hypersonic Flows Wei Liao and Li-Shi Luo Old. The gas-kinetic schemes are validated with simulations of the hypersonic flow past a hollow flare at Mach and simulation of complex hypersonic flows become very challenging for computa- tional fluid dynamics (CFD) [1

Xu, Kun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas Withdrawals from Underground Storage (Annual Supply &  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

302

Injections of Natural Gas into Storage (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period: Monthly Annual

303

PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE PROTRACTED LOW DOSE PHOTON AND SIMULATED SOLAR FLARE PROTON EFFECTS ON CYTOKINE/CHEMOKINE EXPRESSION AFTER WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION Asma Rizvi 2 , George Coutrakon 1 , James M. Slater 1 , Michael J. Pecaut 1,2 and Daila S. Gridley 1,2 Departments. of 1 Radiation Medicine and 2 Biochemistry & Microbiology Loma Linda University & Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA 92354 Astronauts are exposed to low dose/low dose rate radiation (LDR) and may also be acutely irradiated during a solar particle event (SPE). The biological effects of LDR alone and when combined with a solar particle event, are not yet clearly understood. Previous studies have shown that irradiation can have adverse effects on T cells. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced as a result of radiation can alter or damage the

304

The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) will utilize a newly mined Underground Research Lab (URL) in WIPP to perform a cost effective, proof-of-principle field test of the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste and validate modeling efforts. The goals of the SDDI Thermal Test are to: * Demonstrate a proof-of-principle concept for in-drift disposal in salt. * Investigate, in a specific emplacement concept, the response of the salt to heat. * Develop a full-scale response for run-of- mine (ROM) salt. * Develop a validated coupled process model for disposal of heat-generating wastes in salt. * Evaluate the environmental conditions of the

305

Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 17.3 (March 2011) Chapter 17.3 (March 2011) 1 Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate References DEAR 917.74 - Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate DOE Directives DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, or current version DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, or current version Overview This section provides internal Departmental information and DOE and NNSA points of contact for issues dealing with real estate acquisition, use, and disposal for cost reimbursement and fixed price contracts when in performance of the contract, the contractor will acquire or proposes to acquire use of real property. Background DEAR Subpart 917.74 - Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate provides the policy and

306

Policy Issues in Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Congressional Research Service, in an issue brief on nuclear waste disposal, compactly described a common assessment when it noted that “nuclear waste has sometimes been called the Achilles’ heel of the nu...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

A disposable, self-administered electrolyte test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis demonstrates the novel concept that it is possible to make a disposable, self-administered electrolyte test to be introduced to the general consumer market. Although ion specific electrodes have been used to ...

Prince, Ryan, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Available Options for Waste Disposal [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vitrified high-activity waste in properly selected deep...alternatives to present projects of waste disposal, but rather as...benefits will be different. Long-term storage of either spent fuel or vitrified waste, although not an alternative...

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

US nuclear waste: Widespread problem of disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... individual states in the United States to develop facilities for disposal of low-level radioactive waste produced by ... produced by nuclear reactors, industry and biomdical research and treatment. The federal Low-Level ...

Christopher Earl

1984-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

CSMRI Bagged Soil Disposal Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................................................................... 1 4. Landfill Acceptance and Equipment Appendix G Daily GPS Coordinants of Disposal Location at BFI Foothills Landfill Appendix H Ambient Landfill (Stoller 2005a). After review of the dose assessment report, the CDPHE approved shipment

312

Disposable Bioreactors: Maturation into Pharmaceutical Glycoprotein Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To summarise: the range of disposable bioreactors available on the market offers flexible, cost efficient and time-saving solutions from early process development to large-scale production. Table 1 gives an overv...

René Brecht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Gas turbine combustor transition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

314

Pesticide fate in an aboveground disposal system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PESTICIDE FATE IN AN ABOVEGROUND DISPOSAL SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN RICHARD VANDERGLAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 'l988... Major Subject: Soil Science PESTICIDE FATE IN AN ABOVEGROUND DISPOSAL SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN RICHARD VANDERGLAS Approved as to style and content by: K. W. Brown (Chair of Committee) John M. Sweeten (Member) Jack D. Price (Member) E. C. A...

Vanderglas, Brian Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

316

Global Energetics of Solar Flares: I. Magnetic Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first part of a project on the global energetics of solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that includes about 400 M- and X-class flares observed with AIA and HMI onboard SDO. We calculate the potential energy, free energy, and the flare-dissipated magnetic energy. We calculate these magnetic parameters using two different NLFFF codes: The COR-NLFFF code uses the line-of-sight magnetic field component $B_z$ from HMI to define the potential field, and the 2D coordinates of automatically detected coronal loops in 6 coronal wavelengths from AIA to measure the helical twist of coronal loops caused by vertical currents, while the PHOT-NLFFF code extrapolates the photospheric 3D vector fields. We find agreement between the two codes in the measurement of free energies and dissipated energies within a factor of $ \\approx 3$. The size distributions of magnetic parameters exhibit powerlaw slopes that are approximately consistent with the fractal-diffusive self-organized criticality model. The ma...

Aschwanden, Markus J; Jing, Ju

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Can we explain non-typical solar flares?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We used multi-wavelength high-resolution data from ARIES, THEMIS, and SDO instruments, to analyze a non-standard, C3.3 class flare produced within the active region NOAA 11589 on 2012 October 16. Magnetic flux emergence and cancellation were continuously detected within the active region, the latter leading to the formation of two filaments. Our aim is to identify the origins of the flare taking into account the complex dynamics of its close surroundings. We analyzed the magnetic topology of the active region using a linear force-free field extrapolation to derive its 3D magnetic configuration and the location of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) which are preferential sites for flaring activity. Because the active region's magnetic field was nonlinear force-free, we completed a parametric study using different linear force-free field extrapolations to demonstrate the robustness of the derived QSLs. The topological analysis shows that the active region presented a complex magnetic configuration comprising severa...

Dalmasse, K; Schmieder, B; Aulanier, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Seismic Emissions from a Highly Impulsive M6.7 Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 10 March 2001 the active region NOAA 9368 produced an unusually impulsive solar flare in close proximity to the solar limb. This flare has previously been studied in great detail, with observations classifying it as a type 1 white-light flare with a very hard spectrum in hard X-rays. The flare was also associated with a type II radio burst and coronal mass ejection. The flare emission characteristics appeared to closely correspond with previous instances of seismic emission from acoustically active flares. Using standard local helioseismic methods, we identified the seismic signatures produced by the flare that, to date, is the least energetic (in soft X-rays) of the flares known to have generated a detectable acoustic transient. Holographic analysis of the flare shows a compact acoustic source strongly correlated with the impulsive hard X-ray, visible continuum, and radio emission. Time-distance diagrams of the seismic waves emanating from the flare region also show faint signatures, mainly in the eastern sector of the active region. The strong spatial coincidence between the seismic source and the impulsive visible continuum emission reinforces the theory that a substantial component of the seismic emission seen is a result of sudden heating of the low photosphere associated with the observed visible continuum emission. Furthermore, the low-altitude magnetic loop structure inferred from potential--field extrapolations in the flaring region suggests that there is a significant inverse correlation between the seismicity of a flare and the height of the magnetic loops that conduct the particle beams from the corona.

J. C. Martinez-Oliveros; H. Moradi; A-C. Donea

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

MEASUREMENTS OF THE CORONAL ACCELERATION REGION OF A SOLAR FLARE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH) are used to investigate coronal hard X-ray and microwave emissions in the partially disk-occulted solar flare of 2007 December 31. The STEREO mission provides EUV images of the flare site at different viewing angles, establishing a two-ribbon flare geometry and occultation heights of the RHESSI and NoRH observations of {approx}16 Mm and {approx}25 Mm, respectively. Despite the occultation, intense hard X-ray emission up to {approx}80 keV occurs during the impulsive phase from a coronal source that is also seen in microwaves. The hard X-ray and microwave source during the impulsive phase is located {approx}6 Mm above thermal flare loops seen later at the soft X-ray peak time, similar in location to the above-the-loop-top source in the Masuda flare. A single non-thermal electron population with a power-law distribution (with spectral index of {approx}3.7 from {approx}16 keV up to the MeV range) radiating in both bremsstrahlung and gyrosynchrotron emission can explain the observed hard X-ray and microwave spectrum, respectively. This clearly establishes the non-thermal nature of the above-the-loop-top source. The large hard X-ray intensity requires a very large number (>5 x 10{sup 35} above 16 keV for the derived upper limit of the ambient density of {approx}8 x 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) of suprathermal electrons to be present in this above-the-loop-top source. This is of the same order of magnitude as the number of ambient thermal electrons. We show that collisional losses of these accelerated electrons would heat all ambient electrons to superhot temperatures (tens of keV) within seconds. Hence, the standard scenario, with hard X-rays produced by a beam comprising the tail of a dominant thermal core plasma, does not work. Instead, all electrons in the above-the-loop-top source seem to be accelerated, suggesting that the above-the-loop-top source is itself the electron acceleration region.

Krucker, Saem; Hudson, H. S.; Glesener, L.; Lin, R. P. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); White, S. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Masuda, S. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Wuelser, J.-P., E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed [Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Lockheed Martin ATC, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Advanced Disposal Services to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NATURAL GAS FROM SHALE: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Air Key Points: * Air quality risks from shale oil and gas development are generally the result of: (1) dust and engine exhaust from increased truck traffic; (2) emissions from diesel-powered pumps used to power equipment; (3) intentional flaring or venting of gas for operational reasons; and, (4) unintentional emissions of pollutants from faulty equipment or impoundments. 1 * Natural gas is efficient and clean compared to other fossil fuels, emitting less nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide than coal and oil, no mercury and very few particulates. However, the drilling

322

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

323

X-ray flaring from the young stars in CygnusOB2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We characterize individual and ensemble properties of X-ray flares from stars in the CygOB2 and ONC star-forming regions. Method: We analyzed X-ray lightcurves of 1003 CygOB2 sources observed with Chandra for 100 ksec and of 1616 ONC sources detected in the ``Chandra Orion Ultra-deep Project'' 850 ksec observation. We employed a binning-free maximum likelihood method to segment the light-curves into intervals of constants signal and identified flares on the basis of both the amplitude and the time-derivative of the source luminosity. We then derived and compared the flare frequency and energy distribution of CygOB2 and ONC sources. The effect of the length of the observation on these results was investigated by repeating the statistical analysis on five 100 ksec-long segments extracted from the ONC data. Results: We detected 147 and 954 flares from the CygOB2 and ONC sources, respectively. The flares in CygOB2 have decay times ranging from ~0.5 to about 10 hours. The flare energy distributions of all considered flare samples are described at high energies well by a power law with index alpha=-(2.1+-0.1). At low energies, the distributions flatten, probably because of detection incompleteness. We derived average flare frequencies as a function of flare energy. The flare frequency is seen to depend on the source's intrinsic X-ray luminosity, but its determination is affected by the length of the observation. The slope of the high-energy tail of the energy distribution is, however, affected little. A comparison of CygOB2 and ONC sources, accounting for observational biases, shows that the two populations, known to have similar X-ray emission levels, have very similar flare activity.

J. F. Albacete Colombo; M. Caramazza; E. Flaccomio; G. Micela; S. Sciortino

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

324

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

326

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 48 35 28 43 43 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 48 35 28 43 43 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

327

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 120  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

328

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Kentucky, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 14,175 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 92,795 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 92,795 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,723

329

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Tennessee, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 350 400 430 280 400 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 Total................................................................... 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 2,200

330

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 138  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Pennsylvania, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 46,654 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 168,501 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 168,501 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

331

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Massachusetts, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

332

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Hampshire, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

333

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 134  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

334

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

335

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

336

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 164  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.....................

337

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

338

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 128  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 58. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

339

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Washington, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

340

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 142  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 14 18 21 24 26 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 621 409 778 821 1,407 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 621 409 778 821 1,407 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

342

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

343

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 158  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

344

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 106  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 7 7 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 46 48 35 28 43 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 46 48 35 28 43 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

345

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

346

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nebraska, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 106 109 111 114 114 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 904 1,187 1,229 943 1,033 From Oil Wells.............................................. 288 279 269 258 185 Total............................................................... 1,193 1,466 1,499 1,201 1,217 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 5 12 23 29 17 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 1,188 1,454 1,476 1,172 1,200 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

347

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0

348

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 84  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Florida, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,954 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 2,954 2,845 2,000 2,742 290 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

349

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 6 6 5 5 5 Total............................................................... 6 6 5 5 5 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 6 6 5 5 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

350

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Iowa, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

351

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 130  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 5,449 5,985 6,680 6,675 6,628 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 54,851 55,339 54,232 49,607 44,273 From Oil Wells.............................................. 329 641 710 714 576 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 55,180 55,980 54,942 50,320 44,849 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

352

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 148  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

353

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

354

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 124  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 4 4 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 4 4 4 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 5 5 4 4 4 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

355

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 132  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 5,985 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 55,339 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 From Oil Wells.............................................. 641 710 714 576 650 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 55,980 54,942 50,320 44,849 35,813 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

356

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

357

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 160  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................

358

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

359

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

360

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 76  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nebraska, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 114 186 322 285 276 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 1,033 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 From Oil Wells.............................................. 185 228 221 182 163 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 1,217 1,560 3,083 2,916 2,255 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

362

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

363

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 150  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Dakota, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 69 71 71 89 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 455 422 0 0 1,300 From Oil Wells.............................................. 10,162 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. NA NA 1,098 1,561 NA Total............................................................... 10,616 11,880 12,007 12,927 12,540 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

364

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 114  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

365

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 152  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

366

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

367

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 100  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

368

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 166  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ........................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.....................

369

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Minnesota, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

370

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 94  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 41. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 316 43 45 51 50 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ E 165 E 139 E 119 E 139 E 1,198 From Oil Wells.............................................. E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA E 1,250 E 1,069 E 1,299 NA From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... E 170 E 1,394 1,193 1,443 1,203 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

371

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 118  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nevada, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 6 6 5 5 Total................................................................... 7 6 6 5 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 6 6 5 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

372

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 144  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Dakota, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 68 69 61 61 69 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 563 531 550 531 446 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 10,902 Total................................................................... 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 11,349 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 2,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................

373

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 128  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Carolina, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

374

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 58. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New York, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 5,449 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 54,851 From Oil Wells.................................................. 155 179 194 87 329 Total................................................................... 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 55,180 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 27,787

375

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 72  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 30. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 611 654 523 711 183 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * 0 From Coalbed Wells .................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells ................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 611 655 523 712 183 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.................

376

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 150  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Tennessee, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 400 330 305 285 310 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 NA 4,700 5,478 From Oil Wells.............................................. 2,200 2,663 3,942 R 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 2,200 2,663 3,942 4,700 5,478 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared..........................................

377

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 122  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

378

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

379

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 86  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

380

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

382

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Nebraska, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 96 106 109 111 114 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 886 904 1,187 1,229 943 From Oil Wells.................................................. 322 288 279 269 258 Total................................................................... 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 1,201 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 5 12 23 29 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 1,172

383

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 142  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

384

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Georgia, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

385

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 80  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Delaware, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

386

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 70  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................ 6 7 7 6 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 233 611 654 523 711 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * From Coalbed Wells .................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells ................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 233 611 655 523 712 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed.................

387

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Idaho, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

388

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 108  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Massachusetts, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

389

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 82  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

390

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 74  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 32. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

391

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 156  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Vermont, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

392

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 134  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - North Dakota, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 148 200 200 194 196 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 14,554 16,435 16,416 13,738 11,263 From Oil Wells.............................................. 41,350 46,351 54,381 73,450 81,226 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 55,904 62,786 70,797 87,188 92,489 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

393

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 96  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Indiana, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 2,336 2,350 525 563 620 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 2,921 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 NA From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 NA Total............................................................... 2,921 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 Repressuring .................................................. NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared..........................................

394

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 15 14 18 21 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 454 621 409 778 821 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 454 621 409 778 821 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

395

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - District of Columbia, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

396

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 225 240 251 316 E 316 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 174 169 165 E 161 E 165 From Oil Wells.............................................. 5 5 5 E 5 E 5 Total............................................................... 180 174 170 E 166 E 170 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 180 174 170 166 170 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

397

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 116  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

398

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 146  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 67. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Carolina, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

399

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 126  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - New Jersey, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

400

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 104  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maine, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 78  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Connecticut, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

402

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 148  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - South Dakota, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 69 69 71 71 89 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 446 455 422 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 10,902 10,162 11,458 10,909 11,366 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. NA NA NA 1,098 1,561 Total............................................................... 11,349 10,616 11,880 12,007 12,927 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

403

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 136  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Oregon, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 20 18 15 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,112 837 731 467 454 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,112 837 731 467 454 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,112 837 731 467 454 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

404

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 88  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Table 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

405

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 154  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Table 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Virginia, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 4,132 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,543 76,915 143,644 R 85,508 88,610 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,543 76,915 143,644 R 85,508 88,610 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA NA NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,543

406

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ......................................

407

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 66  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Table 28. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Arizona, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year............................... 7 9 6 6 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ........................................... 300 443 331 233 611 From Oil Wells ............................................. * * * * * Total.............................................................. 301 443 331 233 611 Repressuring ................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation........................... 301 443 331 233 611 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed................. 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production......................................

408

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2009 92  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Illinois, 2005-2009 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 316 316 43 45 51 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ E 161 E 165 E 139 E 119 E 139 From Oil Wells.............................................. E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... NA NA E 1,250 E 1,069 E 1,299 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... E 166 E 170 E 1,394 E 1,193 E 1,443 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared..........................................

409

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 112  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Missouri, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

410

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 160  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Wisconsin, 2002-2006 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year .................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total.................................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared ............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation............................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production .........................................

411

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 140  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Rhode Island, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

412

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2010 90  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Table 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Hawaii, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells ..................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells.................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring .................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .................

413

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 102  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Table 46. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Maryland, 2001-2005 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 5 7 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 32 22 48 34 46 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 32 22 48 34 46 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 32 22 48 34 46 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

414

Microsoft Word - SRSSaltWasteDisposal.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Doc. No. Filename Title Main Document References 1. 2005 RWR DAA §3116 NDAA.pdf "Ronald W. Regan National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2005," Section 3116, 2004. 2. CBU-PIT-2004-00024 CBU-PIT-2004-00024.pdf Ledbetter, L. S., CBU-PIT-2004-00024, 12/01/04 - December Monthly WCS Curie and Volume Inventory Report," Revision 0, December 9, 2004. 3. CBU-PIT-2005-00031 CBU-PIT-2005-00031.pdf Rios-Armstrong, M. A., CBU-PIT-2005-00031, "Decontaminated Salt Solution Volume to be transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility from Salt Treatment and Disposition Activities," Revision 0, February 13, 2005.

415

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

NEUTRON AND ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSIONS DURING THE 1990 MAY 24 SOLAR FLARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEUTRON AND ELECTROMAGNETIC EMISSIONS DURING THE 1990 MAY 24 SOLAR FLARE L. G. KOCHAROV,* JEONGWOO revised form 15 July, 1994) Abstract. In this paper, we are primarilyconcerned with the solar neutron emission during the 1990 May 24 flare, utilizing the counting rate of the Climax neutron monitor

Usoskin, Ilya G.

417

Regularized reconstruction of the differential emission measure from solar flare hard X-ray spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regularized reconstruction of the differential emission measure from solar flare hard X-ray spectra for solar flare hard X-rays, it is currently unclear whether the electron distribution responsible between (T) and J( ). However, in the last years, two issues have made this inversion problem more

Piana, Michele

418

Particle acceleration and radiation by direct electric fields in flaring complex solar active regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to connect the energy re- lease process with the acceleration of electrons in solar flares, using a CA modelParticle acceleration and radiation by direct electric fields in flaring complex solar active-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex, FRANCE Abstract The acceleration and radiation of solar energetic particles

Anastasiadis, Anastasios

419

FLARE HEATING IN STELLAR CORONAE Vinay L. Kashyap and Jeremy J. Drake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138; vkashyap@cfa.harvard.edu, jdrake¨renlingen and Villigen, 5232 Villigen PSI, Switzerland; guedel@astro.phys.ethz.ch, audard@astro.phys.ethz.ch Received to flares that are increasingly less energetic but are more numerous. Previous analyses of flares in light

Audard, Marc

420

A SOLAR FLARE MODEL IN BETWEEN MHD AND CELLULAR AUTOMATON* Heinz Isliker1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and still unresolved problems in solar physics is the nature of energy release in the solar atmosphere) and the reproduction of the observed solar flare statistics. On the other hand the energy release process has been, complementary approaches (CA and MHD) for the solar flare problem. * In The Proceedings of 4th Astronomical

Anastasiadis, Anastasios

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

White-light flares: A TRACE/RHESSI overview H. S. Hudson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White-light flares: A TRACE/RHESSI overview H. S. Hudson Space Sciences Laboratory, University includes a "white light" imaging capability with novel characteristics. Many flares with such white. The spectral response of the TRACE white-light passband extends into the UV, so these data capture

Hudson, Hugh

422

Flare Noise Reduction Exxon Chemical- Baytown Olefins Plant: 1994 CMA Energy Efficiency Award for "Flare Noise Reduction" in the category of "Public Outreach/Plant Site"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frequency noise that resembles the sound of a jet plane passing overhead. To supplement the qualitative data received from the community, quantitative noise data was collected at various flaring conditions, wind conditions, and steam rates. Additional...

Bradham, S.; Stephan, R.

423

Extreme Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy of the Flaring Solar Chromosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extreme ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum contains a wealth of diagnostic tools for probing the lower solar atmosphere in response to an injection of energy, particularly during the impulsive phase of solar flares. These include temperature and density sensitive line ratios, Doppler shifted emission lines and nonthermal broadening, abundance measurements, differential emission measure profiles, and continuum temperatures and energetics, among others. In this paper I shall review some of the advances made in recent years using these techniques, focusing primarily on studies that have utilized data from Hinode/EIS and SDO/EVE, while also providing some historical background and a summary of future spectroscopic instrumentation.

Milligan, Ryan O

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

426

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Kurabashira, Kamitakaracho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Imada, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Konus-Wind and Helicon-Coronas-F Observations of Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of solar flare observations obtained in the Konus-Wind experiment from November, 1994 to December, 2013 and in the Helicon Coronas-F experiment during its operation from 2001 to 2005, are presented. For the periods indicated Konus-Wind detected in the trigger mode 834 solar flares, and Helicon-Coronas-F detected more than 300 solar flares. A description of the instruments and data processing techniques are given. As an example, the analysis of the spectral evolution of the flares SOL2012-11-08T02:19 (M 1.7) and SOL2002-03-10T01:34 (C5.1) is made with the Konus-Wind data and the flare SOL2003-10-26T06:11 (X1.2) is analyzed in the 2.223 MeV deuterium line with the Helicon-Coronas-F data.

Pal'shin, V D; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Kokomov, A A; Svinkin, D S; Sokolova, Z Ya; Ulanov, M V; Frederiks, D D; Tsvetkova, A E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P. [Astronomical Institute, University of Wroclaw, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland); Siarkowski, M., E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: ms@cbk.pan.wroc.pl [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, 51-622 Wroclaw, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

Multi-TeV flaring from blazars: Markarian 421 a case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The TeV blazar Markarian 421 underwent multi-TeV flaring during April 2004 and simultaneously observed in x-ray and TeV energies. It was observed that the TeV outbursts had no counterparts in the lower energies, which implies that this might be an orphan flare. In the context of hadronic model, we have shown that this multi-TeV flaring can be produced due to the interaction of Fermi-accelerated protons of energy $\\lesssim 168$ TeV with the background photons in the low energy tail of the synchrotron self-Compton spectrum of the blazar jet. We fit very well the flaring spectrum with this model. Based on this study, we speculate that Mrk 501 and PG 1553+113 are possible candidates for orphan flaring in the future.

Sahu, Sarira; Rajpoot, Subhash

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The disposal of orphan wastes using the greater confinement disposal concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, radioactive wastes are conventionally classified as high-level wastes, transuranic wastes, or low-level wastes. Each of these types of wastes, by law, has a ``home`` for their final disposal; i.e., high-level wastes are destined for disposal at the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, transuranic waste for the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and low-level waste for shallow-land disposal sites. However, there are some radioactive wastes within the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex that do not meet the criteria established for disposal of either high-level waste, transuranic waste, or low-level waste. The former are called ``special-case`` or ``orphan`` wastes. This paper describes an ongoing project sponsored by the DOE`s Nevada Operations Office for the disposal of orphan wastes at the Radioactive Waste Management Site at Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site using the greater confinement disposal (GCD) concept. The objectives of the GCD project are to evaluate the safety of the site for disposal of orphan wastes by assessing compliance with pertinent regulations through performance assessment, and to examine the feasibility of this disposal concept as a cost-effective, safe alternative for management of orphan wastes within the DOE complex. Decisions on the use of GCD or other alternate disposal concepts for orphan wastes can be expected to be addressed in a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement being prepared by DOE. The ultimate decision to use GCD will require a Record of Decision through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Bonano, E.J.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Price, L.L.; Conrad, S.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Dickman, P.T. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Nevada Operations Office

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares: re-evaluating their nature in the context of power-law flare Fourier spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nature of quasi-periodic pulsations in solar and stellar flares remains debated. Recent work has shown that power-law-like Fourier power spectra, also referred to as 'red' noise processes, are an intrinsic property of solar and stellar flare signals, a property that many previous studies of this phenomenon have not accounted for. Hence a re-evaluation of the existing interpretations and assumptions regarding QPP is needed. Here we adopt a Bayesian method for investigating this phenomenon, fully considering the Fourier power law properties of flare signals. Using data from the PROBA2/LYRA, Fermi/GBM, Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Yohkoh/HXT instruments, we study a selection of flares from the literature identified as QPP events. Additionally we examine optical data from a recent stellar flare that appears to exhibit oscillatory properties. We find that, for all but one event tested, an explicit oscillation is not required in order to explain the observations. Instead, the flare signals are adequately descri...

Inglis, A R; Dominique, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

RAPID TeV GAMMA-RAY FLARING OF BL LACERTAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the detection of a very rapid TeV gamma-ray flare from BL Lacertae on 2011 June 28 with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The flaring activity was observed during a 34.6 minute exposure, when the integral flux above 200 GeV reached (3.4 {+-} 0.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} photons m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, roughly 125% of the Crab Nebula flux measured by VERITAS. The light curve indicates that the observations missed the rising phase of the flare but covered a significant portion of the decaying phase. The exponential decay time was determined to be 13 {+-} 4 minutes, making it one of the most rapid gamma-ray flares seen from a TeV blazar. The gamma-ray spectrum of BL Lacertae during the flare was soft, with a photon index of 3.6 {+-} 0.4, which is in agreement with the measurement made previously by MAGIC in a lower flaring state. Contemporaneous radio observations of the source with the Very Long Baseline Array revealed the emergence of a new, superluminal component from the core around the time of the TeV gamma-ray flare, accompanied by changes in the optical polarization angle. Changes in flux also appear to have occurred at optical, UV, and GeV gamma-ray wavelengths at the time of the flare, although they are difficult to quantify precisely due to sparse coverage. A strong flare was seen at radio wavelengths roughly four months later, which might be related to the gamma-ray flaring activities. We discuss the implications of these multiwavelength results.

Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)] [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States)] [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland)] [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dumm, J.; Fortson, L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Federici, S. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)] [DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Finnegan, G., E-mail: qfeng@purdue.edu, E-mail: cui@purdue.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Several international organizations have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other disposal design options and host rock characteristics (clay/shale, granite), most of which were very different from those studied in the United States. The DOE recognizes that close international collaboration is a beneficial and cost effective strategy for advancing disposal science. This report describes the active collaboration opportunities available to U.S. researchers, and presents specific cooperative research activities that have been recently initiated within DOE's disposal research program.

434

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

72.1 0614 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report June 2014 6319-D6320 8972.2 0614 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6322 6319D-6346 8972.3 0614 North Face Cell 1...

435

Low-level-waste-disposal methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the followng: (1) history of low level waste disposal; (2) current practice at the five major DOE burial sites and six commercial sites with dominant features of these sites and radionuclide content of major waste types summarized in tables; (3) site performance with performance record on burial sites tabulated; and (4) proposed solutions. Shallow burial of low level waste is a continuously evolving practice, and each site has developed its own solutions to the handling and disposal of unusual waste forms. There are no existing national standards for such disposal. However, improvements in the methodology for low level waste disposal are occurring on several fronts. Standardized criteria are being developed by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and by DOE. Improved techniques for shallow burial are evolving at both commercial and DOE facilities, as well as through research sponsored by NRC, DOE, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Alternatives to shallow burial, such as deeper burial or the use of mined cavities is also being investigated by DOE.

Wheeler, M.L.; Dragonette, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

COUEB N T ED Safe Disposal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COUEB N T ED Safe Disposal of Household Chemicals: Protect Yourself and Your Community see inside Minutes The 2010 census asks 10 questions that most households can answer in 10 minutes! You will be asked the name, age, gender, race, ethnic group (if Hispanic), and relationship of all persons living at your

Liskiewicz, Maciej

437

Two solar flares that became X-ray plasma ejections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar flares and X-ray plasma ejections (XPEs) occur simultaneously but usually are separated spatially. We present two exceptional events observed by {\\sl Yohkoh} in 2001 October 2 (event 1) and 2000 October 16 (event 2), in which features of flares and XPEs are mixed. Namely, the soft and hard X-ray images show intense sources of emission that move dynamically. Both events occurred inside broad active regions showing complicated multi-level structure reaching up to 200 Mm high. Both events show also similar four-stages evolution: (1) a fast rise of a system of loops, (2) sudden changes in their emission distribution, (3) a reconfiguration leading to liberation of large amounts of plasma, (4) a small, static loop as the final remnant. Nevertheless, the events are probably caused by different physical processes: emerging magnetic flux plus reconnection (event 1) and reconnection plus ballooning instability (event 2). Different is also the final destination of the ejected plasma: in the event 1 overlying magne...

Tomczak, Michal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

RETURN CURRENTS AND ENERGY TRANSPORT IN THE SOLAR FLARING ATMOSPHERE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the standard Ohmic perspective, the injection of accelerated electrons into the flaring region violates local charge equilibrium and therefore, in response, return currents are driven by an electric field to equilibrate such charge violation. In this framework, the energy loss rate associated with these local currents has an Ohmic nature and significantly shortens the accelerated electron path. In the present paper, we adopt a different viewpoint and, specifically, we study the impact of the background drift velocity on the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons in solar flares. We first utilize the Rutherford cross-section to derive the formula of the energy loss rate when the collisional target has a finite temperature and the background instantaneously and coherently moves up to equilibrate the electron injection. We then use the continuity equation for electrons and imaging spectroscopy data provided by RHESSI to validate this model. We show that this new formula for the energy loss rate provides a better fit of the experimental data with respect to the model based on the effects of standard Ohmic return currents.

Codispoti, Anna; Torre, Gabriele; Piana, Michele; Pinamonti, Nicola [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Genova, via Dodecaneso 35, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE MICROWAVE EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 A channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: sjkim@nro.nao.ac.jp [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE NON-THERMAL FLARE CHARACTERISTICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager non-thermal X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the non-thermal flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the non-thermal flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the non-thermal flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic reconnection sets in. We find that the current sheet length at the onset of magnetic reconnection is 21 {+-} 7 Mm. The flare hard X-ray peaks are well synchronized with the peak of the CME acceleration profile, and in 75% of the cases they occur within {+-}5 minutes. Our findings provide strong evidence for the tight coupling between the CME dynamics and the particle acceleration in the associated flare in impulsive events, with the total energy in accelerated electrons being closely correlated with the peak velocity (and thus the kinetic energy) of the CME, whereas the number of electrons accelerated to high energies is decisively related to the CME peak acceleration and the height of the pre-eruptive structure.

Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M., E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

materials from the Slick RockOld North Continent site and the Slick RockUnion Carbide site were disposed of in this dedicated disposal cell. The Department of Energys...

442

INNOVATIVE DISPOSAL PRACTICES AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE TO MEET...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Innovative Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site to Meet Its Low-Level Waste Generators' Future Disposal Needs E.F. Di Sanza, J.T. Carilli U.S. Department of Energy National...

443

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

444

Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses...

445

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Can the Geologist Guarantee Isolation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to check whether waste disposal really does need an almost...been reported recently at Maxey Flats (Kentucky) (26...radioactive waste burial site, inside a fractured rock...effect of the geological disposal is to con-centrate 3530...

G. de Marsily; E. Ledoux; A. Barbreau; J. Margat

1977-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

446

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

The detection of M-dwarf UV flare events in the GALEX data archives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the preliminary results from implementing a new software tool that enables inspection of time-tagged photon data for the astronomical sources contained within individual GALEX ultraviolet images of the sky. We have inspected the photon data contained within 1802 GALEX images to reveal rapid, short-term (<500 sec) UV source variability in the form of stellar flares. The mean associated change in NUV magnitude due to this flaring activity is 2.7+/-0.3 mag. A list of 49 new UV variable-star candidates is presented, together with their associated Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric magnitudes. From these data we can associate the main source of these UV flare events with magnetic activity on M-dwarf stars. Photometric parallaxes have been determined for 32 of these sources, placing them at distances ranging from approximately 25 to 1000pc. The average UV flare energy for these flare events is 2.5E30 ergs, which is of a similar energy to that of U-band, X-ray and EUV flares observed on many local M-dwarf stars. We have found that stars of classes M0 to M5 flare with energies spanning a far larger range and with an energy approximately 5 times greater than those of later (M6 to M8) spectral type.

Barry Y. Welsh; Jonathan M. Wheatley; Mark Seibert; Stanley E. Browne; Andrew A. West; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Tom A. Barlow; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; D. Christopher Martin; Patrick Morrissey; Todd Small; Ted Wyder; David Schiminovich; Susan Neff; R. Michael Rich

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

HINODE OBSERVATIONS OF COHERENT LATERAL MOTION OF PENUMBRAL FILAMENTS DURING AN X-CLASS FLARE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X-3.4 class flare of 2006 December 13 was observed with a high cadence of 2 minutes at 0.2 arcsec resolution by HINODE/SOT FG instrument. The flare ribbons could be seen in G-band images also. A careful analysis of these observations after proper registration of images shows flare-related changes in penumbral filaments of the associated sunspot for the first time. The observations of sunspot deformation, decay of penumbral area, and changes in magnetic flux during large flares have been reported earlier in the literature. In this Letter, we report lateral motion of the penumbral filaments in a sheared region of the delta-sunspot during the X-class flare. Such shifts have not been seen earlier. The lateral motion occurs in two phases: (1) motion before the flare ribbons move across the penumbral filaments and (2) motion afterward. The former motion is directed away from expanding flare ribbons and lasts for about 4 minutes. The latter motion is directed in the opposite direction and lasts for more than 40 minutes. Further, we locate a patch in adjacent opposite polarity spot moving in opposite direction to the penumbral filaments. Together these patches represent conjugate footpoints on either side of the polarity inversion line, moving toward each other. This converging motion could be interpreted as shrinkage of field lines.

Gosain, S.; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 198, Dewali, Badi Road, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Acceptance of Classified Excess Components for Disposal at Area 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide-show discusses weapons dismantlement and disposal, issues related to classified waste and their solutions.

Poling, Jeanne [National Security Technologies, LLC (United States); Saad, Max [Sandia National Lab., NM (United States)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

450

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system.

451

Disposability Assessment: Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a technical assessment of the Melt-Dilute and Direct Al-SNF forms in disposable canisters with respect to meeting the requirements for disposal in the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) and for interim dry storage in the Treatment and Storage Facility (TSF) at SRS.

Vinson, D.W.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris: Arsenic phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills

Florida, University of

453

Chemoresistive gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemoresistive gas sensor is provided which has improved sensitivity. A layer of organic semiconductor is disposed between two electrodes which, in turn, are connected to a voltage source. High conductivity material is dispersed within the layer of organic semiconductor in the form of very small particles, or islands. The average interisland spacing is selected so that the predominant mode of current flow is by way of electron funneling. Adsorption of gaseous contaminant onto the layer of organic semiconductor modulates the tunneling current in a quantitative manner. 2 figs.

Hirschfeld, T.B.

1987-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

454

Regularized energy-dependent solar flare hard x-ray spectral index  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deduction from solar flare X-ray photon spectroscopic data of the energy dependent model-independent spectral index is considered as an inverse problem. Using the well developed regularization approach we analyze the energy dependency of spectral index for a high resolution energy spectrum provided by Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The regularization technique produces much smoother derivatives while avoiding additional errors typical of finite differences. It is shown that observations imply a spectral index varying significantly with energy, in a way that also varies with time as the flare progresses. The implications of these findings are discussed in the solar flare context.

Eduard P. Kontar; Alexander L. MacKinnon

2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

A NEW CORRELATION BETWEEN GRB X-RAY FLARES AND THE PROMPT EMISSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a sample of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi and Swift missions, we have extracted the minimum variability timescales for temporal structures in the light curves associated with the prompt emission and X-ray flares. A comparison of this variability timescale with pulse parameters such as rise times, determined via pulse-fitting procedures, and spectral lags, extracted via the cross-correlation function, indicates a tight correlation between these temporal features for both the X-ray flares and the prompt emission. These correlations suggest a common origin for the production of X-ray flares and the prompt emission in GRBs.

Sonbas, E. [Department of Physics, University of Adiyaman, 02040 Adiyaman (Turkey); MacLachlan, G. A.; Shenoy, A.; Dhuga, K. S.; Parke, W. C., E-mail: edasonbas@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

456

Simbol-X capability of detecting the non-thermal emission of stellar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the capability of detecting, with Simbol-X, non-thermal emission during stellar flares, and distinguishing it from hot thermal emission. We find that flare non-thermal emission is detectable when at least ~20 cts are detected with the CZT detector in the 20-80 keV band. Therefore Simbol-X will detect the non-thermal emission from some of the X-ray brightest nearby stars, whether the thermal vs. non-thermal relation, derived for solar flares, holds.

C. Argiroffi; G. Micela; A. Maggio

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

457

New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB`S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

460

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB'S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Multiwavelength Coverage of a Bright Flare from Sgr A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamical center of our galaxy hosts a supermassive black hole, Sgr A*, which has been the target of an extensive multiwavelength campaign for a week in April 2007. We report here the detection of a bright flare from the vicinity of the horizon, observed simultaneously in X-rays (XMM-Newton) and NIR (VLT/NACO) on April 4{sup th}. For the first time, such an event also benefitted from a soft {gamma}-rays (INTEGRAL/ISGRI) and MIR (VLT/VISIR) coverage, which enabled us to derive upper limits at both ends of Sgr A* spectral energy distribution (SED). We discuss the physical implications of the contemporaneous light curves as well as the SED, in terms of synchrotron, synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton emission processes.

Trap, G.; Goldwurm, A. [Service d'Astrophysique (SAp)/IRFU/DSM/CEA Saclay-Bat. 709, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); AstroParticule and Cosmologie (APC)/Universite Paris VII/CNRS/CEA/Observatoire de Paris-Bat. Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Terrier, R. [AstroParticule and Cosmologie (APC)/Universite Paris VII/CNRS/CEA/Observatoire de Paris-Bat. Condorcet, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

462

Far-IR and radio thermal continua in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the invention of new far-infrared (FIR) and radio mm and sub-mm instruments (DESIR on SMESE satellite, ESO-ALMA), there is a growing interest in observations and analysis of solar flares in this so far unexplored wavelength region. Two principal radiation mechanisms play a role: the synchrotron emission due to accelerated particle beams moving in the magnetic field and the thermal emission due to the energy deposit in the lower atmospheric layers. In this contribution we explore the time-dependent effects of beams on thermal FIR and radio continua. We show how and where these continua are formed in the presence of time dependent beam heating and non-thermal excitation/ionisation of the chromospheric hydrogen plasma.

Kašparová, J; Karlický, M; Moravec, Z; Varady, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

Stephen M. Masutani

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

464

Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Di sposai . Geological aspects Physical aspects Chemical aspects Biological aspects CHAPTER II. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF OCEAN DISPOSAL Types of Waste Materials. Dredged materiais. Industrial wastes, DomestIc sewage wa tes Solid wastes Radloact..., can reduce the passage of light through the water column and cause damaging effects to the marine ecosystem. Each of five major oceans has pronounced gyral, or circular current motion (Fiaure 1. 1). The North Atlantic current system is comprised...

Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Is converting landfill gas to energy the best option?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Is converting landfill gas to energy the best option? ... But when it comes to new discards, critics say that the hype over landfill-gas-to-energy(LFGTE) projects may have perverse outcomes, such as discouraging the diversion of organic waste from landfills and actually increasing the amount of methane being released. ... In the notice, EDF suggests that EPA tighten current controls, which require the capture and flaring of landfill gas at sites with more than 2.5 million metric tons of waste, by bringing regulation to smaller landfills and defining LFGTE projects as the best demonstrated technology (BDT). ...

Janet Pelley

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

466

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book addresses various topics related to the geochemistry of waste disposal: natural radioactivity, kinds of radioactive waste, details of possible disposal sites, low-level waste, uranium mill tailing, natural analogs, waste forms, and engineered barriers. Emphasis throughout is on the importance of natural analogs, the behavior of elements resembling those to be put in a waste repository as they occur in natural situations where the temperature, pressure, and movement of ground water are similar to those expected near a repository. The author is convinced that conclusions drawn from the study of analog elements are directly applicable to predictions about radionuclide behavior, and that the observed near-immobility of most of these elements in comparable geologic environments is good evidence that radioactive waste can be disposed of underground with negligible effects on the biosphere. Much of his own research has been in this area, and the best parts of the book are the descriptions of his work on trace elements in the salt minerals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, on the movement of radionuclides and their daughter elements from the famous Precambrian reactor at Oklahoma in Gabon, and on the distribution of analog elements in rocks near the contacts of igneous intrusions.

Brookins, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

469

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility June 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. ANDREWS, Texas - DOE officials participated in an event today to celebrate the opening of the first commercial disposal facility of its kind. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event at Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews and witnessed the first container being placed in the new state-of-the-art facility. WCS is a waste processing and disposal company. "I am proud to be here today to celebrate this historic event. We

470

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

471

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility June 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. ANDREWS, Texas - DOE officials participated in an event today to celebrate the opening of the first commercial disposal facility of its kind. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event at Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews and witnessed the first container being placed in the new state-of-the-art facility. WCS is a waste processing and disposal company. "I am proud to be here today to celebrate this historic event. We

472

Study of Solar Flares and Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Helicon Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detailed data on temporal profiles, energy spectra, and spectral variability of hard X-ray and gamma-ray flares of solar origin have been obtained ... , the Helicon experiment has also investigated cosmic gamma-ray

E. P. Mazets; R. L. Aptekar; S. V. Golenetskii…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

The correlation of solar flare production with magnetic energy in active regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation of 531 active regions was made to determine the correlation between energy released by flares and the available energy in magnetic fields of the regions. Regions with magnetic flux greater tha...

E. B. Mayfield; John K. Lawrence

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Ionospheric Effects associated with the Solar Flare of July 10, 1959  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... with the flare were observed at the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research Radio Research Substation at Singapore by using an automatic ionosonde1. Fig. 1 shows measured values off0F2 and ...

V. A. W. HARRISON

1960-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

475

Astrophysical explosions: from solar flares to cosmic gamma-ray bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from solar flares to cosmic gamma-ray bursts J. Craig Wheeler * * wheel...collapse supernovae and cosmic gamma-ray bursts, each representing a different...black holes|supernovae|gamma-ray bursts|deflagration|detonation...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Helioseismic analysis of the solar flare-induced sunquake of 2005 January 15  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......flaring region into the solar interior, but most of this energy is refracted back to the...the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager...obtained by the GONG++ project, managed by the National Solar Observatory, a Division......

H. Moradi; A.-C. Donea; C. Lindsey; D. Besliu-Ionescu; P. S. Cally

2007-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

477

Thermal and Magnetic Parameters in Solar Flares Derived from GOES X-Ray Light Curves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......released amount of energy in a solar flare, and there...the derived thermal energy with the magnetic free energy. It is found that...Japan and Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory...is a collaborative project involving the NRL......

Tetsuya T. Yamamoto; Takashi Sakurai

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

478

Observations of Unresolved Photospheric Magnetic Fields in Solar Flares Using Fe i and Cr i Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of the photospheric magnetic field during solar flares is examined using echelle spectropolarimetric observations. The study is based on several Fe i and Cr i lines observed at locations correspondi...

M. Gordovskyy; V. G. Lozitsky

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Indirect estimation of energy disposition by non-thermal electrons in solar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The broad-band EUV and microwave fluxes correlate strongly with hard X-ray fluxes in the impulsive phase of a solar flare. This note presents numerical aids for the estimation of the non-thermal electron fluxe...

H. S. Hudson; R. C. Canfield; S. R. Kane

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radiative Hydrodynamic Models of the Optical and Ultraviolet Emission from Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on radiative hydrodynamic simulations of moderate and strong solar flares. The flares were simulated by calculating the atmospheric response to a beam of non-thermal electrons injected at the apex of a one-dimensional closed coronal loop, and include heating from thermal soft X-ray, extreme ultraviolet and ultraviolet (XEUV) emission. The equations of radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium were treated in non-LTE and solved for numerous transitions of hydrogen, helium, and Ca II allowing the calculation of detailed line profiles and continuum emission. This work improves upon previous simulations by incorporating more realistic non-thermal electron beam models and includes a more rigorous model of thermal XEUV heating. We find XEUV backwarming contributes less than 10% of the heating, even in strong flares. The simulations show elevated coronal and transition region densities resulting in dramatic increases in line and continuum emission in both the UV and optical regions. The optical continuum reaches a peak increase of several percent which is consistent with enhancements observed in solar white light flares. For a moderate flare (~M-class), the dynamics are characterized by a long gentle phase of near balance between flare heating and radiative cooling, followed by an explosive phase with beam heating dominating over cooling and characterized by strong hydrodynamic waves. For a strong flare (~X-class), the gentle phase is much shorter, and we speculate that for even stronger flares the gentle phase may be essentially non-existent. During the explosive phase, synthetic profiles for lines formed in the upper chromosphere and transition region show blue shifts corresponding to a plasma velocity of ~120 km/s, and lines formed in the lower chromosphere show red shifts of ~40 km/s.

J. C. Allred; S. L. Hawley; W. P. Abbett; M. Carlsson

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flared gas disposed" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Magnetic Reconnection During the Two-Phase Evolution of a Solar Eruptive Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed multi-wavelength analysis and interpretation of the evolution of an M7.6 flare on October 24, 2003. The X-ray observations of the flare taken from the RHESSI spacecraft reveal two phases of the flare evolution. The first phase is characterized by the altitude decrease of the X-ray looptop (LT) source for $\\sim$11 minutes. Such a long duration of the descending LT source motion is reported for the first time. The EUV loops, located below the X-ray LT source, also undergo contraction with similar speed ($\\sim$15 km s$^{-1}$) in this interval. During the second phase the two distinct hard X-ray footpoints (FP) sources are observed which correlate well with UV and H$\\alpha$ flare ribbons. The X-ray LT source now exhibits upward motion. The RHESSI spectra during the first phase are soft and indicative of hot thermal emission from flaring loops with temperatures $T>25$ MK at the early stage. On the other hand, the spectra at high energies ($\\varepsilon \\gtrsim$25 keV) follow hard power laws during the second phase ($\\gamma = 2.6-2.8$). We show that the observed motion of the LT and FP sources can be understood as a consequence of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection at a separator in the corona. During the first phase of the flare, the reconnection releases an excess of magnetic energy related to the magnetic tensions generated before a flare by the shear flows in the photosphere. The relaxation of the associated magnetic shear in the corona by the reconnection process explains the descending motion of the LT source. During the second phase, the ordinary reconnection process dominates describing the energy release in terms of the standard model of large eruptive flares.

Bhuwan Joshi; Astrid Veronig; K. -S. Cho; S. -C. Bong; Y. -J. Moon; Jeongwoo Lee; B. V. Somov; P. K. Manoharan; Y. -H. Kim

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

MAGNETIC STRUCTURE PRODUCING X- AND M-CLASS SOLAR FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 11158  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the three-dimensional magnetic structure of the solar active region 11158, which produced one X-class and several M-class flares on 2011 February 13-16. We focus on the magnetic twist in four flare events, M6.6, X2.2, M1.0, and M1.1. The magnetic twist is estimated from the nonlinear force-free field extrapolated from the vector fields obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory using the magnetohydrodynamic relaxation method developed by Inoue et al. We found that strongly twisted lines ranging from half-turn to one-turn twists were built up just before the M6.6 and X2.2 flares and disappeared after that. Because most of the twists remaining after these flares were less than a half-turn twist, this result suggests that the buildup of magnetic twist over the half-turn twist is a key process in the production of large flares. On the other hand, even though these strong twists were also built up just before the M1.0 and M1.1 flares, most of them remained afterward. Careful topological analysis before the M1.0 and M1.1 flares shows that the strongly twisted lines were surrounded mostly by the weakly twisted lines formed in accordance with the clockwise motion of the positive sunspot, whose footpoints are rooted in strong magnetic flux regions. These results imply that these weakly twisted lines might suppress the activity of the strongly twisted lines in the last two M-class flares.

Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Choe, G. S. [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University 1, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hayashi, K. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Shiota, D., E-mail: inosato@khu.ac.kr [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)