National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fissile materials disposition

  1. LANL's Role in the U.S. Fissile Material Disposition Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, Julia; Kay, Virginia

    2015-02-18

    The process of Fissile Material Disposition is in part a result of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES), which is an agreement between the U.S. and Russia to dispose of excess plutonium used to make weapons. LANL is one sight that aides in the process of dismantling, storage and repurposing of the plutonium gathered from dismantled weapons. Some uses for the repurposed plutonium is fuel for commercial nuclear reactors which will provide energy for citizens.

  2. Plutonium-bearing materials feed report for the DOE Fissile Materials Disposition Program alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brough, W.G.; Boerigter, S.T.

    1995-04-06

    This report has identified all plutonium currently excess to DOE Defense Programs under current planning assumptions. A number of material categories win clearly fan within the scope of the MD (Materials Disposition) program, but the fate of the other categories are unknown at the present time. MD planning requires that estimates be made of those materials likely to be considered for disposition actions so that bounding cases for the PEIS (Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement) can be determined and so that processing which may be required can be identified in considering the various alternatives. A systematic analysis of the various alternatives in reachmg the preferred alternative requires an understanding of the possible range of values which may be taken by the various categories of feed materials. One table identifies the current total inventories excess to Defense Program planning needs and represents the bounding total of Pu which may become part of the MD disposition effort for all materials, except site return weapons. The other categories, principally irradiated fuel, rich scrap, and lean scrap, are discussed. Another table summarizes the ranges and expected quantities of Pu which could become the responsibility of the MD program. These values are to be used for assessing the impact of the various alternatives and for scaling operations to assess PEIS impact. Determination of the actual materials to be included in the disposition program will be done later.

  3. Technical evaluation panel summary report. Ceramic and glass immobilization options fissile materials disposition program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, B. R.; Brummond, W.; Armantrout, G.; Shaw, H.; Jantzen, C. M.; Jostons, A.; McKibben, M.; Strachan, D.; Vienna, J. D.

    1997-12-23

    This report documents the results of a technical evaluation of the merits of ceramic and glass immobilization forms for the disposition of surplus weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluation was conducted by a Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP), whose members were selected to cover a relevant range of scientific and technical expertise and represented each of the technical organizations involved in the Plutonium Immobilization Program. The TEP held a formal review at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory (LLNL) from July 2%August 1, 1997. Following this review, the TEP documented the review and its evaluation of the two immobilization technologies in this report to provide a technical basis for a recommendation by LLNL to the Department of Energy (DOE) for the preferred immobilization form. The comparison of the glass and ceramic forms and manufacturing processes was a tremendous challenge to the TEP. The two forms and their processes are similar in many ways. The TEP went to great effort to accurately assess what were, in many cases, fine details of the processes, unit operations, and the glass and ceramic forms themselves. The set of criteria used by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) in past screenings and down-selections was used to measure-the two options. One exception is that the TEP did not consider criteria that were largely nontechnical (namely international impact, public acceptance, and effects on other : DOE programs). The TEP' s measures and assessments are documented in detail. Care was taken to ensure that the data used were well documented and traceable to their source. Although no final conclusion regarding the preferred form was reached or explicitly stated in this report (this was not within the TEP' s charter), no "show stoppers" were identified for either form. Both forms appear capable of satisfying all the criteria, as interpreted by the TEP. The TEP identified a number of distinct and quantifiable differences between the forms

  4. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  5. EIS-0229: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EIS will evaluate the reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition.

  6. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I.; Lushchikov, Vladislav I.; Shabalin, Eugeny P.; Maznyy, Nikita G.; Khvastunov, Michael M.; Rowland, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  7. Immobilization as a route to surplus fissile materials disposition. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; McKibben, J.M.

    1996-03-15

    The safe management of surplus weapons plutonium is a very important and urgent task with profound environmental, national and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Police Directive 13 and various analysis by renown scientific, technical and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths forward for the long term disposition of surplus weapons usable plutonium. The central, overarching goal is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons, as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in civilian spent reactor fuel. One disposition alternative considered for surplus Pu is immobilization, in which plutonium would be emplaced in glass, ceramic or glass-bonded zeolite. This option, along with some of the progress over the last year is discussed.

  8. Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep borehole disposal Facility PEIS date input report for immobilized disposal. Immobilized disposal of plutonium in coated ceramic pellets in grout with canisters. Version 3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

    1996-01-15

    Following President Clinton`s Non-Proliferation Initiative, launched in September, 1993, an Interagency Working Group (IWG) was established to conduct a comprehensive review of the options for the disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials from nuclear weapons dismantlement activities in the United States and the former Soviet Union. The IWG review process will consider technical, nonproliferation, environmental budgetary, and economic considerations in the disposal of plutonium. The IWG is co-chaired by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the National Security Council. The Department of Energy (DOE) is directly responsible for the management, storage, and disposition of all weapons-usable fissile material. The Department of Energy has been directed to prepare a comprehensive review of long-term options for Surplus Fissile Material (SFM) disposition, taking into account technical, nonproliferation, environmental, budgetary, and economic considerations.

  9. Nuclear Materials Disposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel.  These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for...

  10. Shipping container for fissile material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crowder, H.E.

    1984-12-17

    The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

  11. Recovery of fissile materials from nuclear wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for recovering fissile materials such as uranium, and plutonium, and rare earth elements, from complex waste feed material, and converting the remaining wastes into a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. The waste feed is mixed with a dissolution glass formed of lead oxide and boron oxide resulting in oxidation, dehalogenation, and dissolution of metal oxides. Carbon is added to remove lead oxide, and a boron oxide fusion melt is produced. The fusion melt is essentially devoid of organic materials and halogens, and is easily and rapidly dissolved in nitric acid. After dissolution, uranium, plutonium and rare earth elements are separated from the acid and recovered by processes such as PUREX or ion exchange. The remaining acid waste stream is vitrified to produce a waste glass suitable for storage or disposal. Potential waste feed materials include plutonium scrap and residue, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, organic material and other carbon-containing material.

  12. Delayed gamma technique for fissile material assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mozin, Vladimir; Tobin, Stephen; Vujie, Jasmina; Hunt, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Research sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative are investigating several non-destructive assay techniques for the quantification of fissile plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. AppHcation of the delayed gamma signatures is investigated in this context. The objective of the research is to assess whether the delayed gamma assay instrument can provide sufficient sensitivity, isotope specificity and accuracy as required in nuclear material safeguards. This effort includes theoretical and experimental components for the optimal combination of interrogation parameters. A new modeling algorithm offering a high level of detail was developed specifically for this purpose and was validated in series of benchmark experiments. Preliminary modeling of the delayed gamma response from spent fuel assemblies was accomplished offering a future direction for the design process.

  13. Nonintrusive verification attributes for excess fissile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholas, N.J.; Eccleston, G.W.; Fearey, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Under US initiatives, over two hundred metric tons of fissile materials have been declared to be excess to national defense needs. These excess materials are in both classified and unclassified forms. The US has expressed the intent to place these materials under international inspections as soon as practicable. To support these commitments, members of the US technical community are examining a variety of nonintrusive approaches (i.e., those that would not reveal classified or sensitive information) for verification of a range of potential declarations for these classified and unclassified materials. The most troublesome and potentially difficult issues involve approaches for international inspection of classified materials. The primary focus of the work to date has been on the measurement of signatures of relevant materials attributes (e.g., element, identification number, isotopic ratios, etc.), especially those related to classified materials and items. The authors are examining potential attributes and related measurement technologies in the context of possible verification approaches. The paper will discuss the current status of these activities, including their development, assessment, and benchmarking status.

  14. Assessment of the US regulations for fissile exemptions and fissile material general licenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, C.V.; Hopper, C.M.; Lichtenwalter, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Easton, E.P.; Brochman, P.G. [NRC, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The paragraphs for general licenses for fissile material and exemptions (often termed exceptions in the international community) for fissile material have long been a part of the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR Part 71, Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. More recently, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a final rule on Part 71 via emergency rule-making procedures in order to address an identified deficiency related to one of the fissile exemptions. To address the specified deficiency in a general fashion, the emergency rule adopted the approach of the 1996 Edition of the IAEA: Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (IAEA 1996), which places restrictions on certain moderating materials and limits the quantity of fissile material in a consignment. The public comments received by the NRC indicated general agreement with the need for restrictions on certain moderators (beryllium, deuterium, and graphite). The comments indicated concern relative to both the degree of restriction imposed (not more than 0.1% of fissile material mass) and the need to limit the fissile material mass of the consignment, particularly in light of the subsequent NRC staff position that the true intent was to provide control for limiting the fissile mass of the conveyance. The purpose of the review is to identify potential deficiencies that might be adverse to maintaining adequate subcriticality under normal conditions of transport and hypothetical accident conditions. In addition, ORNL has been asked to identify changes that would address any identified safety issues, enable inherently safe packages to continue to be unencumbered in transport, and seek to minimize the impact on current safe practices.

  15. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste ...

  16. Scope and verification of a Fissile Material (Cutoff) Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hippel, Frank N. von

    2014-05-09

    A Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT) would ban the production of fissile material - in practice highly-enriched uranium and separated plutonium - for weapons. It has been supported by strong majorities in the United Nations. After it comes into force, newly produced fissile materials could only be produced under international - most likely International Atomic Energy Agency - monitoring. Many non-weapon states argue that the treaty should also place under safeguards pre-existing stocks of fissile material in civilian use or declared excess for weapons so as to make nuclear-weapons reductions irreversible. This paper discusses the scope of the FMCT, the ability to detect clandestine production and verification challenges in the nuclear-weapons states.

  17. Material Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The Office of Material Disposition also manages the resulting LEU supply from its HEU disposition efforts, providing material to support peaceful uses such as research reactor ...

  18. Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep Borehole Disposal Facility PEIS data input report for direct disposal. Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound metal canisters. Version 3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

    1996-01-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for disposing of excess weapons-usable nuclear materials [principally plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to recover and reuse in weapons production. This report is the data input report for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS examines the environmental, safety, and health impacts of implementing each disposition alternative on land use, facility operations, and site infrastructure; air quality and noise; water, geology, and soils; biotic, cultural, and paleontological resources; socioeconomics; human health; normal operations and facility accidents; waste management; and transportation. This data report is prepared to assist in estimating the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility, an alternative currently included in the PEIS. The facility projects under consideration are, not site specific. This report therefore concentrates on environmental, safety, and health impacts at a generic site appropriate for siting a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, David M.; Lindquist, Lloyd O.

    1985-01-01

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and non-invasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. No external neutron-emitting interrogation source or fissile material is used and no scanning is required, although if a profile is desired scanning can be used. As in active assays, here both reactivity and content of fissionable material can be measured. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly. The return flux is altered by changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  20. Method and apparatus for measuring reactivity of fissile material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.M.; Lindquist, L.O.

    1982-09-07

    Given are a method and apparatus for measuring nondestructively and noninvasively (i.e., using no internal probing) the burnup, reactivity, or fissile content of any material which emits neutrons and which has fissionable components. The assay is accomplished by altering the return flux of neutrons into the fuel assembly by means of changing the reflecting material. The existing passive neutron emissions in the material being assayed are used as the source of interrogating neutrons. Two measurements of either emitted neutron or emitted gamma-ray count rates are made and are then correlated to either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed, thus providing a measurement of either reactivity, burnup, or fissionable content of the material being assayed. Spent fuel which has been freshly discharged from a reactor can be assayed using this method and apparatus. Precisions of 1000 MWd/tU appear to be feasible.

  1. Correlation Measurements with {sup 252}Cf to Characterize Fissile Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattingly, J.K.

    2000-01-04

    Measurements using {sup 252}Cf as a timed source of neutrons and gammas have in recent years undergone significant maturation. These methods use {sup 252}Cf as an observable source of spontaneous fission neutrons and gammas in conjunction with one or more neutron- and/or gamma-sensitive detectors to measure the time-distribution of correlated detector counts following (a) an observed {sup 252}Cf-fission event and/or (b) a counting event in another detector. Detection of {sup 252}Cf spontaneous fission is frequently achieved via use of a small ionization chamber in which the {sup 252}Cf is contained--in this case the timing of source emission events is random. However, one application subsequently described uses a neutron-absorbent ''shutter'' to modulate {sup 252}Cf emissions to produce a neutron source with deterministic timing. Other applications, frequently termed noise-analysis measurements, transform the time-distributions to the frequency domain. Collectively, these correlation methods use {sup 252}Cf to ''excite'' the fissile material and the response of the material is measured by an array of detectors and analyzed using standard time-correlation and/or frequency-analysis techniques. In recent years numerous advances have been made in the application of these methods to in-situ, or field measurements directed at characterizing various configurations of fissile material in operational facilities.

  2. Ensuring the 50 year life of a fissile material container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, R.E.; Towne, T.L.

    1997-12-01

    Sandia was presented with an opportunity in 1993 to design containers for the long term storage and transport of fissile material. This program was undertaken at the direction of the US Department of Energy and in cooperation with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory which were tasked with developing the internal fixturing for the contents. The hardware is being supplied by Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, and the packaging will occur at Mason and Hangar Corporation`s Pantex Plant. The unique challenge was to design a container that could be sealed with the fissile material contents; and, anytime during the next 50 years, the container could be transported with only the need for the pre-shipment leak test. This required not only a rigorous design capable of meeting the long term storage and transportation requirements, but also resulted in development of a surveillance program to ensure that the container continues to perform as designed over the 50-year life. This paper addresses the design of the container, the testing that was undertaken to demonstrate compliance with US radioactive materials transport regulations, and the surveillance program that has been initiated to ensure the 50-year performance.

  3. The environmental assessment of nuclear materials disposition options: A transportation perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R.K.; Clauss, D.B.; Moyer, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy has undertaken a program to evaluate and select options for the long-term storage and disposition of fissile materials declared surplus to defense needs as a result of the end of the Cold War. The transport of surplus fissile material will be an important and highly visible aspect of the environmental impact studies and other planning documents required for implementation of the disposition options. This report identifies the roles and requirements for transportation of fissile materials in the program and discusses an existing methodology for determining the environmental impact in terms of risk. While it will be some time before specific alternatives are chosen that will permit the completion of detailed risk calculations, the analytical models for performing the probabilistic risk assessments already exist with much of the supporting data related to the transportation system. This report summarizes the various types of data required and identifies sources for that data.

  4. ES-3100: A New Generation Shipping Container for Bulk Highly Enriched Uranium and Other Fissile Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbital, J.G.; Byington, G.A.; Tousley, D.R.

    2004-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is shipping bulk quantities of surplus fissile materials, primarily highly enriched uranium (HEU), over the next 15 to 20 years for disposition purposes. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 6M container is the package of choice for most of these shipments. However, the 6M does not conform to the Type B packaging requirements in the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10CFR71) and, for that reason, is being phased out for use in the secure transportation system of DOE. BWXT Y-12 is currently developing a package to replace the DOT 6M container for HEU disposition shipping campaigns. The new package is based on state-of-the-art, proven, and patented insulation technologies that have been successfully applied in the design of other packages. The new package, designated the ES-3100, will have a 50% greater capacity for HEU than the 6M and will be easier to use. Engineering analysis on the new package includes detailed dynamic impact finite element analysis (FEA). This analysis gives the ES-3100 a high probability of complying with regulatory requirements.

  5. Processing and Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Processing and Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials Authors: Robinson, ...

  6. Waste and Materials Disposition Information | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste and Materials Disposition Information Waste and Materials Disposition Information Waste and Materials Disposition Information As the Office of Environmental Management (EM) fulfills its mission, waste and materials disposition plays a vital role in the cleanup of radioactive waste and the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons production and nuclear energy research. Disposal of waste frequently falls on the critical path of cleanup projects. Significant planning resources are spent to

  7. Five minutes past midnight: The clear and present danger of nuclear weapons grade fissile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, G.B.

    1996-02-01

    Growing stockpiles of nuclear weapons grade fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium) are a `clear and present danger` to international security. Much of this material is uncontrolled and unsecured in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Access to these materials is the primary technical barrier to a nuclear weapons capability since the technology know-how for a bomb making is available in the world scientific community. Strategies to convince proliferators to give up their nuclear ambitions are problematic since those ambitions are a party of largest regional security. There is no national material control and accounting in Russia. No one knows exactly how much fissile materials they have, and if any is missing. A bankrupt atomic energy industry, unpaid employees and little or no security has created a climate in which more and more fissile materials will likely be sold in black markets or diverted to clandestine nuclear weapons programs or transnational terrorist groups. Control over these materials will ultimately rely on the continuous and simultaneous exercise of several measures. While there is little one can do now to stop a determined proliferator, over time international consensus and a strengthened non-proliferation regime will convince proliferators that the costs outweigh the gains.

  8. History of the US weapons-usable plutonium disposition program leading to DOE`s record of decision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, D.J.; Thomas, J.F.; Bugos, R.G.

    1997-04-01

    This report highlights important events and studies concerning surplus weapons-usable plutonium disposition in the United States. Included are major events that led to the creation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition in 1994 and to that DOE office issuing the January 1997 Record of Decision for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Useable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Emphasis has been given to reactor-based plutonium disposition alternatives.

  9. Processing fissile material mixtures containing zirconium and/or carbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael Ernest; Maloney, Martin David

    2013-07-02

    A method of processing spent TRIZO-coated nuclear fuel may include adding fluoride to complex zirconium present in a dissolved TRIZO-coated fuel. Complexing the zirconium with fluoride may reduce or eliminate the potential for zirconium to interfere with the extraction of uranium and/or transuranics from fission materials in the spent nuclear fuel.

  10. Criticality safety analysis on fissile materials in Fukushima reactor cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xudong; Lemaitre-Xavier, E.; Ahn, Joonhong; Hirano, Fumio

    2013-07-01

    The present study focuses on the criticality analysis for geological disposal of damaged fuels from Fukushima reactor cores. Starting from the basic understanding of behaviors of plutonium and uranium, a scenario sequence for criticality event is considered. Due to the different mobility of plutonium and uranium in geological formations, the criticality safety is considered in two parts: (1) near-field plutonium system and (2) far-field low enriched uranium (LEU) system. For the near-field plutonium system, a mathematical analysis for pure-solute transport was given, assuming a particular buffer material and waste form configuration. With the transport and decay of plutonium accounted, the critical mass of plutonium was compared with the initial load of a single canister. Our calculation leads us to the conclusion that our system with the initial loading being the average mass of plutonium in an assembly just before the accident is very unlikely to become critical over time. For the far-field LEU system, due to the uncertainties in the geological and geochemical conditions, calculations were made in a parametric space that covers the variation of material compositions and different geometries. Results show that the LEU system could not remain sub-critical within the entire parameter space assumed, although in the iron-rich rock, the neutron multiplicity is significantly reduced.

  11. Assessment and recommendations for fissile-material packaging exemptions and general licenses within 10 CFR Part 71

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, C.V.; Hopper, C.M.; Lichtenwalter, J.L.

    1998-07-01

    This report provides a technical and regulatory assessment of the fissile material general licenses and fissile material exemptions within Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. The assessment included literature studies and calculational analyses to evaluate the technical criteria; review of current industry practice and concerns; and a detailed evaluation of the regulatory text for clarity, consistency and relevance. Recommendations for potential consideration by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff are provided. The recommendations call for a simplification and consolidation of the general licenses and a change in the technical criteria for the first fissile material exemptions.

  12. fissile material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MT of surplus HEU has been down-blended for use as fuel in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors (completed in October 2011);

  13. 22 MT of surplus HEU has been set aside for...

  14. Draft - DOE G 410.2-1, Nuclear Material Disposition

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    This document provides a roadmap for implementing the requirements for disposition of nuclear material as outlined in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 410.2, Management of Nuclear Materials, and DOE Order 474.2, Nuclear Material Control and Accountability. This Guide provides the basic framework for the nuclear material disposition process, includes information related to the Programmatic Value Determination (PVD) process, and identifies Discard Limits (DL) for specific low-equity nuclear materials.

  15. Progress toward mutual reciprocal inspections of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W.; Gosnell, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    In March 1994, the United States and the Russian Federation announced their intention to conduct mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI) to confirm inventories of fissile materials from dismantled nuclear weapons. Subsequent interactions between the two countries have established the basis for an MRI regime, covering instrumentation, candidate sites for MRI, and protection of information deemed sensitive by the countries. This paper discusses progress made toward MRI, stressing measurement technologies and observables, as well as prospects for MRI implementation. An analysis is presented of observables that might be exploited to provide assurance that the material being measured could have come from a dismantled weapon rather than other sources. Instrumentation to exploit these observables will also be discussed, as will joint US/Russian efforts to demonstrate such instrumentation. Progress toward a so-called ``program of cooperation`` between the two countries in protecting each other`s sensitive information will be reviewed. All of these steps are essential components of an eventual comprehensive regime for controlling fissile materials from weapons.

  16. Nuclear Material Disposition | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disposition Nuclear Material Disposition In 1994 the United States declared 174 metric tons of highly enriched uranium as surplus to national security needs. A 2005 declaration added another 200 metric tons, making approximately 182 metric tons of HEU available to be down blended to low-enriched uranium for reactor use. Y-12 tops the short list of the world's most secure, reliable uranium feedstock suppliers for dozens of research and test reactors on six continents. These reactors can be used

  17. Fissile solution measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crane, T.W.; Collinsworth, P.R.

    1984-06-11

    An apparatus for determining the content of a fissile material within a solution by detecting delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material after it is temporarily irradiated by a neutron source. The apparatus comprises a container holding the solution and having a portion defining a neutron source cavity centrally disposed within the container. The neutron source cavity temporarily receives the neutron source. The container has portions defining a plurality of neutron detector ports that form an annular pattern and surround the neutron source cavity. A plurality of neutron detectors count delayed fission neutrons emitted by the fissile material. Each neutron detector is located in a separate one of the neutron detector ports.

  18. THE EFFECT OF INCREASING TEMPERATURE ON K-EFF FOR FISSILE MATERIAL OUTSIDE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S.

    2009-06-09

    Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluations typically employ room temperature cross sections, material densities, and dimensions. Processes that have been and are in development for conversion of legacy wastes in tanks, e.g., Waste Treatment Project (WTP) at the Hanford Remediation Site and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, utilize melters that operate at elevated temperatures, 1500 to 1900 C. The applicability of room temperature data to processes such as these has been questioned. Also questioned was the applicability of room temperature data for the analyses across the Savannah River Site (SRS) where the temperature may be elevated, such as in a postulated fire. This analysis was performed to examine the effect of temperature over the relatively small range encountered in normal and abnormal operations at SRS that does not include DWPF melters. This analysis documented herein is limited to fast systems of fissile metal and oxide cylinders on concrete at temperatures no greater than 640 C, the melting point of plutonium. Because thermal expansion data for various types of structural materials was not readily available, structural materials were not included in the analysis.

  19. Open literature review of threats including sabotage and theft of fissile material transport in Japan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, John Russell; Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2005-06-01

    This report is a review of open literature concerning threats including sabotage and theft related to fissile material transport in Japan. It is intended to aid Japanese officials in the development of a design basis threat. This threat includes the external threats of the terrorist, criminal, and extremist, and the insider threats of the disgruntled employee, the employee forced into cooperation via coercion, the psychotic employee, and the criminal employee. Examination of the external terrorist threat considers Japanese demographics, known terrorist groups in Japan, and the international relations of Japan. Demographically, Japan has a relatively homogenous population, both ethnically and religiously. Japan is a relatively peaceful nation, but its history illustrates that it is not immune to terrorism. It has a history of domestic terrorism and the open literature points to the Red Army, Aum Shinrikyo, Chukaku-Ha, and Seikijuku. Japan supports the United States in its war on terrorism and in Iraq, which may make Japan a target for both international and domestic terrorists. Crime appears to remain low in Japan; however sources note that the foreign crime rate is increasing as the number of foreign nationals in the country increases. Antinuclear groups' recent foci have been nuclear reprocessing technology, transportation of MOX fuel, and possible related nuclear proliferation issues. The insider threat is first defined by the threat of the disgruntled employee. This threat can be determined by studying the history of Japan's employment system, where Keiretsu have provided company stability and lifetime employment. Recent economic difficulties and an increase of corporate crime, due to sole reliability on the honor code, have begun to erode employee loyalty.

  20. Fissile material measurements using the differential die-away self interrogation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schear, Melissa A; Menlove, Howard O; Tobin, Stephen J; Evans, Louise G; Lee, S Y

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is substantial research effort focused on quantifying plutonium (Pu) mass in spent fuel using non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques. Of the several techniques being investigated for this purpose, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation (DDSI) is a recently proposed, neutron-based NDA technique capable of quantifying the total fissile content in an assembly. Unlike the conventional Differential Die-Away (DDA) technique, DOSI does not require an external neutron source for sample interrogation, but rather, uses the spontaneous fission neutrons originating from {sup 244}Cm within the spent fuel for self-interrogation. The essence of the technique lies in the time separation between the detection of spontaneous fission neutrons from {sup 244}Cm and the detection of induced fission neutrons at a later time. The DDSI detector design imposes this time separation by optimizing the die-away times ({tau}) of the detector and sample interrogation regions to obtain an early and late neutron distribution respectively. The ratio of the count rates in the late gate to the early gate for singles, doubles, and triples is directly proportional to the fissile content present in the sample, which has already been demonstrated for simplified fuel cases using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The current work applies the DDSI concept to more complex samples, specifically spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies with varying isotopics resulting from a range of initial enrichment, bumup, and cooling time. We assess the feasibility of using the late gate to early gate ratio as a reliable indicator of overall fissile mass for a range of assemblies by defining a {sup 239}Pu effective mass which indicates the mass of {sup 239}Pu that would yield the same DDSI signal as the combined mass of major fissile isotopes present in the sample. This work is important for assessing the individual capability of the DDSI instrument in quantifying fissile mass in

  21. FATE OF FISSILE MATERIAL BOUND TO MONOSODIUM TITANATE DURING COOPER CATALYZED PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2012-08-09

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), Tank 48H currently holds approximately 240,000 gallons of slurry which contains potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (TPB). A copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) reaction is currently being examined as a method for destroying the TPB present in Tank 48H. Part of the development of that process includes an examination of the fate of the Tank 48H fissile material which is adsorbed onto monosodium titanate (MST) particles. This report details results from experiments designed to examine the potential degradation of MST during CCPO processing and the subsequent fate of the adsorbed fissile material. Experiments were conducted to simulate the CCPO process on MST solids loaded with sorbates in a simplified Tank 48H simulant. Loaded MST solids were placed into the Tank 48H simplified simulant without TPB, and the experiments were then carried through acid addition (pH adjustment to 11), peroxide addition, holding at temperature (50 C) for one week, and finally NaOH addition to bring the free hydroxide concentration to a target concentration of 1 M. Testing was conducted without TPB to show the maximum possible impact on MST since the competing oxidation of TPB with peroxide was absent. In addition, the Cu catalyst was also omitted, which will maximize the interaction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the MST; however, the results may be non-conservative assuming the Cu-peroxide active intermediate is more reactive than the peroxide radical itself. The study found that both U and Pu desorb from the MST when the peroxide addition begins, although to different extents. Virtually all of the U goes into solution at the beginning of the peroxide addition, whereas Pu reaches a maximum of {approx}34% leached during the peroxide addition. Ti from the MST was also found to come into solution during the peroxide addition. Therefore, Ti is present with the fissile in solution. After the peroxide addition is complete, the Pu and Ti are found to

  1. ESTIMATING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Moore, E.

    2013-07-17

    The United States holds at least 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition of the National Nuclear Security Administration and the DOE Office of Environmental Management. Many of the items that require disposition are only partially characterized, and SRNL uses a variety of techniques to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that are important for processing through the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility and alternative disposition paths. Recent advances in laboratory tools, including Prompt Gamma Analysis and Peroxide Fusion treatment, provide data on the existing inventories that will enable disposition without additional, costly sampling and destructive analysis.

  2. Project planning at the Hanford Site for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards of excess fissile material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.W.; McRae, L.P.; Walker, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    In his September 1993 address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Clinton proposed several initiatives to promote nuclear nonproliferation. One element is of these initiatives was that the United States offered to place excess fissile material under International Atomic Energy Agency @A) safeguards. Three Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were identified as part of a phased approach for initial implementation. This paper describes the planning process used to provide information to assist the DOE in making decisions for the initial offer, outlines tasks to be performed, and develops a budget request. The process consisted of: (1) Characterizing the Hanford Site from the perspective of IAEA safeguards; (2) identify key issues to be resolved; (3) developing budget estimates and schedules; (4) interfacing with other DOE components and the IAEA to clarify expected activities; and (5) initiating additional data collection and preparatory activities to reduce planning uncertainties.

  3. SELECTION OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FOR DISPOSITION TO WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Mcclard, J.; Christopher, J.

    2012-06-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a Surplus Plutonium Disposition (SPD) Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS). Included in the evaluation are up to 6 metric tons (MT) of plutonium in the form of impure oxides and metals for which a disposition plan has not been decided, among options that include preparation as feed for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility; disposing to high-level waste through the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB Line and H Canyon; can-in-canister disposal using the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility; and preparation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE and SRS have identified at least 0.5 MT of plutonium that, because of high levels of chemical and isotopic impurities, is impractical for disposition by methods other than the WIPP pathway. Characteristics of these items and the disposition strategy are discussed.

  4. Supporting Technology for Chain of Custody of Nuclear Weapons and Materials throughout the Dismantlement and Disposition Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunch, Kyle J.; Jones, Anthony M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Benz, Jacob M.; Denlinger, Laura Schmidt

    2014-05-04

    The ratification and ongoing implementation of the New START Treaty have been widely regarded as noteworthy global security achievements for both the Obama Administration and the Putin (formerly Medvedev) regime. But deeper cuts that move beyond the United States and Russia to engage the P-5 and other nuclear weapons possessor states are envisioned under future arms control regimes, and are indeed required for the P-5 in accordance with their Article VI disarmament obligations in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Future verification needs will include monitoring the cessation of production of new fissile material for weapons, monitoring storage of warhead components and fissile materials and verifying dismantlement of warheads, pits, secondary stages, and other materials. A fundamental challenge to implementing a nuclear disarmament regime is the ability to thwart unauthorized material diversion throughout the dismantlement and disposition process through strong chain of custody implementation. Verifying the declared presence, or absence, of nuclear materials and weapons components throughout the dismantlement and disposition lifecycle is a critical aspect of the disarmament process. From both the diplomatic and technical perspectives, verification under these future arms control regimes will require new solutions. Since any acceptable verification technology must protect sensitive design information and attributes to prevent the release of classified or other proliferation-sensitive information, non-nuclear non-sensitive modalities may provide significant new verification tools which do not require the use of additional information barriers. Alternative verification technologies based upon electromagnetic and acoustics could potentially play an important role in fulfilling the challenging requirements of future verification regimes. For example, researchers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have demonstrated that low frequency electromagnetic

  5. The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

  6. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE G 410.2-1, Nuclear Materials Disposition Guidance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-10-01

    DOE O 410.2, Management of Nuclear Materials, identifies the Office of Nuclear Materials Integration (ONMI) asthe organization responsible for nuclear materials management policy, guidance, and integration of DOEagency-wide management, consolidation, and/or disposition of nuclear materials. Specifically,the Order directs ONMI to provide guidance to DOE field elements, as required, for Defined Use and No Defined Use nuclear materials. Further, the Order authorizes this office to review and evaluate justifications for nuclear materials designated as No Defined Use. DOE O 410.2 also requires ONMI to provide guidance to DOE field elements regarding nuclear material discard limits in coordination with relevant DOE headquarters organizations.

  7. Epithermal interrogation of fissile waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coop, K.L.; Hollas, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    Self-shielding of interrogating thermal neutrons in lumps of fissile material can be a major source of error in transuranic waste assay using the widely employed differential dieaway technique. We are developing a new instrument, the combined thermal/epithermal neutron (CTEN) interrogation instrument to detect the occurrence of self- shielding and mitigate its effects. Neutrons are moderated in the graphite walls of the CTEN instrument to provide an interrogating flux of epithermal and thermal neutrons. The induced prompt fission neutrons are detected in proportional counters. We report the results of measurements made with the CTEN instrument, using minimal and highly self-shielding plutonium and uranium sources in 55 gallon drums containing a variety of mock waste matrices. Fissile isotopes and waste forms for which the method is most applicable, and limitations associated with the hydrogen content of the waste package/matrix are described.

  8. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-06-03

    The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

  9. Characterizing Surplus US Plutonium for Disposition - 13199

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, Jeffrey S.; Moore, Edwin N.

    2013-07-01

    The United States (US) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). SRNL manages a broad program of item tracking through process history, laboratory analysis, and non-destructive assay. A combination of analytical techniques allows SRNL to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that qualify materials for disposition through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The research also defines properties that are important for other disposition paths, including disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as transuranic waste (TRUW) or to high-level waste (HLW) systems. (authors)

  10. Characterizing surplus US plutonium for disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, Jeffrey S.; Moore, Edwin N.

    2013-02-26

    The United States (US) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). SRNL manages a broad program of item tracking through process history, laboratory analysis, and non-destructive assay. A combination of analytical techniques allows SRNL to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that qualify materials for disposition through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The research also defines properties that are important for other disposition paths, including disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as transuranic waste (TRUW) or to high-level waste (HLW) systems.

  11. Regulatory issues for deep borehole plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halsey, W.G.

    1995-03-01

    As a result of recent changes throughout the world, a substantial inventory of excess separated plutonium is expected to result from dismantlement of US nuclear weapons. The safe and secure management and eventual disposition of this plutonium, and of a similar inventory in Russia, is a high priority. A variety of options (both interim and permanent) are under consideration to manage this material. The permanent solutions can be categorized into two broad groups: direct disposal and utilization. The deep borehole disposition concept involves placing excess plutonium deep into old stable rock formations with little free water present. Issues of concern include the regulatory, statutory and policy status of such a facility, the availability of sites with desirable characteristics and the technologies required for drilling deep holes, characterizing them, emplacing excess plutonium and sealing the holes. This white paper discusses the regulatory issues. Regulatory issues concerning construction, operation and decommissioning of the surface facility do not appear to be controversial, with existing regulations providing adequate coverage. It is in the areas of siting, licensing and long term environmental protection that current regulations may be inappropriate. This is because many current regulations are by intent or by default specific to waste forms, facilities or missions significantly different from deep borehole disposition of excess weapons usable fissile material. It is expected that custom regulations can be evolved in the context of this mission.

  12. ANL-W MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement (EIS). This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. The paper describes the following: Site map and the LA facility; process descriptions; resource needs; employment requirements; wastes, emissions, and exposures; accident analysis; transportation; qualitative decontamination and decommissioning; post-irradiation examination; LA fuel bundle fabrication; LA EIS data report assumptions; and LA EIS data report supplement.

  13. Controlling Beryllium Contaminated Material And Equipment For The Building 9201-5 Legacy Material Disposition Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, T. D.; Easterling, S. D.

    2010-10-01

    This position paper addresses the management of beryllium contamination on legacy waste. The goal of the beryllium management program is to protect human health and the environment by preventing the release of beryllium through controlling surface contamination. Studies have shown by controlling beryllium surface contamination, potential airborne contamination is reduced or eliminated. Although there are areas in Building 9201-5 that are contaminated with radioactive materials and mercury, only beryllium contamination is addressed in this management plan. The overall goal of this initiative is the compliant packaging and disposal of beryllium waste from the 9201-5 Legacy Material Removal (LMR) Project to ensure that beryllium surface contamination and any potential airborne release of beryllium is controlled to levels as low as practicable in accordance with 10 CFR 850.25.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC FORMS FOR DISPOSITION OF EXCESS PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, James; Cozzi, A; Crawford, C.; Herman, C.; Marra, John; Peeler, D.

    2009-09-10

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tons of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing impurity materials making it unsuitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. Glass and crystalline ceramics have been developed and studied as candidate forms to immobilize these impure plutonium feeds. A titanate-based ceramic was identified as an excellent actinide material host. This composition was based on Synroc compositions previously developed for nuclear waste immobilization. These titanate ceramics were found to be able to accommodate extremely high quantities of fissile material and exhibit excellent aqueous durability. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was developed to accommodate high concentrations of plutonium and to be very tolerant of impurities yet still maintain good aqueous durability. Recent testing of alkali borosilicate compositions showed promise of using these compositions to disposition lower concentrations of plutonium using existing high level waste vitrification processes. The developed waste forms all appear to be suitable for Pu disposition. Depending on the actual types and concentrations of the Pu residue streams slated for disposition, each waste form offers unique advantages.

  15. Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

    2004-10-03

    The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim

  16. LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required.

  17. Fissile solution dynamics: Student research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetrick, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    There are two research projects in criticality safety at the University of Arizona: one in dynamic simulation of hypothetical criticality accidents in fissile solutions, and one in criticality benchmarks using transport theory. We have used the data from nuclear excursions in KEWB, CRAC, and SILENE to help in building models for solution excursions. An equation of state for liquids containing gas bubbles has been developed and coupled to point-reactor dynamics in an attempt to predict fission rate, yield, pressure, and kinetic energy. It appears that radiolytic gas is unimportant until after the first peak, but that it does strongly affect the shape of the subsequent power decrease and also the dynamic pressure.

  18. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production ...

  19. Final Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The cladding from the FFTF fuel from the Hanford Site would be removed, and the fuel pellets would be sorted according to fissile material content. Pellets containing plutonium or ...

  20. fissile material | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy ... (DOE) announced plans to reduce the proliferation threat from stockpiles of surplus ...

  1. Evaluation of options for disposition of dispersible material in B-Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarz, R.D.; Defferding, L.J.; Adickes, M.D.; Keene, K.E.; Pilger, J.P.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Paxton, M.M.

    1993-10-01

    The radioactive contaminants in the dispersible material in B-cell of the 324 Building Radiochemical Energy (RE) hot-cell complex at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington exceed the allowable level. In 1986, there was a spill of 1.3 million curies of concentrated cesium and strontium in B-cell. Cleanup is required, and candidate technologies for cleaning up or otherwise addressing problems associated with the dispersible material are being evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The RE hot-cell complex in 324 Building was constructed in the late 1950s. From the early 1960s until today the complex has been the site of numerous research, development, and demonstration programs using radioactive and hazardous materials. In mid-FY 1988, a program to clean B-cell was initiated. At present, dispersible material has been collected from 45% of the cell floor area, and 64% of the equipment and support racks have been removed from the cell. The evaluation of decontamination procedures are described.

  2. Records Disposition

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-09-13

    To assign responsibilities and authorities and to prescribe policies, procedures, standards, and guidelines for the orderly disposition of records of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its management and operating contractors. Cancels DOE O 1324.2 dated 5-28-80. Chg 1 dated 4-9-92. Canceled by DOE O 1324.2B dated 1-12-95.

  3. Integration of health physics, safety and operational processes for management and disposition of recycled uranium wastes at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, James; Buckley, James

    2003-02-23

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald), the contractor for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), recently submitted a new baseline plan for achieving site closure by the end of calendar year 2006. This plan was submitted at DOE's request, as the FEMP was selected as one of the sites for their accelerated closure initiative. In accordance with the accelerated baseline, the FEMP Waste Management Project (WMP) is actively evaluating innovative processes for the management and disposition of low-level uranium, fissile material, and thorium, all of which have been classified as waste. These activities are being conducted by the Low Level Waste (LLW) and Uranium Waste Disposition (UWD) projects. Alternatives associated with operational processing of individual waste streams, each of which poses potentially unique health physics, industrial hygiene and industrial hazards, are being evaluated for determination of the most cost effective and safe met hod for handling and disposition. Low-level Mixed Waste (LLMW) projects are not addressed in this paper. This paper summarizes historical uranium recycling programs and resultant trace quantity contamination of uranium waste streams with radionuclides, other than uranium. The presentation then describes how waste characterization data is reviewed for radiological and/or chemical hazards and exposure mitigation techniques, in conjunction with proposed operations for handling and disposition. The final part of the presentation consists of an overview of recent operations within LLW and UWD project dispositions, which have been safely completed, and a description of several current operations.

  4. Records Disposition

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1980-05-28

    To assign responsibilities and authorities and to prescribe policies, procedures, standards, and guidelines for the orderly disposition of records of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its operating and onsite service contractors. Cancels DOE O 1324.1 dated 7-10-78. Chg 1 dated 7-2-81. Chg 2 dated 11-9-82. Canceled by DOE O 1324.2A dated 9-13-88.

  5. Life cycle costs for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.A.

    1999-10-01

    Projected constant dollar life cycle cost (LCC) estimates are presented for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition program being managed by the US Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD). The scope of the LCC estimate includes: design, construction, licensing, operation, and deactivation of a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility (FFF) that will be used to purify and convert weapons-derived plutonium oxides to MOX fuel pellets and fabricate MOX fuel bundles for use in commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWRs); fuel qualification activities and modification of facilities required for manufacture of lead assemblies that will be used to qualify and license this MOX fuel; and modification, licensing, and operation of commercial PWRs to allow irradiation of a partial core of MOX fuel in combination with low-enriched uranium fuel. The baseline cost elements used for this document are the same as those used for examination of the preferred sites described in the site-specific final environmental impact statement and in the DOE Record of Decision that will follow in late 1999. Cost data are separated by facilities, government accounting categories, contract phases, and expenditures anticipated by the various organizations who will participate in the program over a 20-year period. Total LCCs to DOE/MD are projected at approximately $1.4 billion for a 33-MT plutonium disposition mission.

  6. Nuclear Material Disposition

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-12-18

    This Guide describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Guides are not requirements documents and are not to be construed as requirements in any audit or appraisal for compliance with associated rule or directives.

  7. Global nuclear material flow/control model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.S.; Fasel, P.K.; Riese, J.M.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The nuclear danger can be reduced by a system for global management, protection, control, and accounting as part of an international regime for nuclear materials. The development of an international fissile material management and control regime requires conceptual research supported by an analytical and modeling tool which treats the nuclear fuel cycle as a complete system. The prototype model developed visually represents the fundamental data, information, and capabilities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in a framework supportive of national or an international perspective. This includes an assessment of the global distribution of military and civilian fissile material inventories, a representation of the proliferation pertinent physical processes, facility specific geographic identification, and the capability to estimate resource requirements for the management and control of nuclear material. The model establishes the foundation for evaluating the global production, disposition, and safeguards and security requirements for fissile nuclear material and supports the development of other pertinent algorithmic capabilities necessary to undertake further global nuclear material related studies.

  8. Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

  9. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M

    1999-01-28

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  10. Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-05-14

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS)''. ''The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' (SPD Draft EIS) (DOWEIS-0283-D) was prepared in accordance with NEPA and issued in July 1998. It identified the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three facilities for plutonium disposition. These three facilities would accomplish pit disassembly and conversion, immobilization, and MOX fuel fabrication. For the alternatives that included MOX fuel fabrication, the draft also described the potential environmental impacts of using from three to eight commercial nuclear reactors to irradiate MOX fuel. The potential impacts were based on a generic reactor analysis that used actual reactor data and a range of potential site conditions. In May 1998, DCE initiated a procurement process to obtain MOX fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services. The request for proposals defined limited activities that may be performed prior to issuance of the SPD EIS Record of Decision (ROD) including non-site-specific work associated with the development of the initial design for the MOX fuel fabrication facility, and plans (paper studies) for outreach, long lead-time procurements, regulatory management, facility quality assurance, safeguards, security, fuel qualification, and deactivation. No construction on the proposed MOX facility would begin before an SPD EIS ROD is issued. In March 1999, DOE awarded a contract to Duke Engineering & Services; COGEMA, Inc.; and Stone & Webster (known as DCS) to provide the requested services. The procurement process included

  11. Nuclear waste actinides as fissile fuel in hybrid blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahin, S.; Al-Kusayer, T.A.

    1983-12-01

    The widespread use of the present LWRs produces substantial quantities of nuclear waste materials. Among those, actinide nuclear waste poses a serious problem of stockage because the associated half life times for actinides is measured in terms of geological time periods (several millions of years) so that no waste disposal guarantee over such time intervals can be given, except for space disposal. On the other hand, these nuclear waste actinides are very good fissionable materials for high energetic (D,T) fusion neutrons. It is therefore worthwhile to investigate their quality as potential nuclear fuel in hybrid blankets. The present study investigates the neutronic performance of hybrid blankets containing Np/sup 237/ and Cm/sup 244/ as fissile materials. The isotopic composition of Americium has been adjusted to the spent fuel isotope composition of a LWR. The geometrical design has been made, according to the AYMAN fussion-fission (hybrid) experimental facility, now in the very early phase of planning.

  12. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

    2012-01-02

    Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in the critical reactors

  13. CRUSH TESTING OF 9977 GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.

    2010-07-28

    The 9977 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP) was designed in response to the adoption of the crush test requirement in the US regulations for packages for radioactive materials (10 CFR 71). This presentation on crush testing of the 9977 GPFP Reviews origins of Crush Test Requirements and implementation of crush test requirements in 10 CFR 71. SANDIA testing performed to support the rule making is reviewed. The differences in practice, on the part of the US Department of Energy from those required by the NRC for commercial purposes, are explained. The design features incorporated into the 9977 GPFP to enable it to withstand the crush test and the crush tests performed on the 9977 are described. Lessons learned from crush testing of GPFP packagings are given.

  14. TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGING FOR AIR TRANSPORT PROJECT OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberl, K.; Blanton, P.

    2013-10-11

    This paper presents the project status of the Model 9980, a new Type A fissile packaging for use in air transport. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed this new packaging to be a light weight (<150-lb), drum-style package and prepared a Safety Analysis for Packaging (SARP) for submission to the DOE/EM. The package design incorporates unique features and engineered materials specifically designed to minimize packaging weight and to be in compliance with 10CFR71 requirements. Prototypes were fabricated and tested to evaluate the design when subjected to Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) and Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). An overview of the design details, results of the regulatory testing, and lessons learned from the prototype fabrication for the 9980 will be presented.

  15. Material Science and Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Disposition Material returning to the United States will fall under the purview of the Office of Material Disposition which is also responsible for the disposition of domestic plutonium and HEU. It also works with international partners on plutonium management and fulfillment of nonproliferation commitments made under the U.S.-Russia Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA). The Office of Material Disposition also manages the resulting LEU supply from its HEU disposition

  16. Disposition Schedules | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposition Schedules Disposition Schedules keyboard-70506__180.jpg Records Disposition Schedules The DOE Records Disposition Schedules provide the authority for transfer and disposal of records created and maintained by the Department. Disposition Schedules and the citations to the disposition authorities are available at the following links: DOE Administrative Records Schedules -- provides a list of records contained in the NARA General Records Schedule as customized to the needs of the

  17. Development for fissile assay in recycled fuel using lead slowing down spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Je Park, C.; Kim, Ho-Dong; Song, Kee Chan

    2013-07-01

    A future nuclear energy system is under development to turn spent fuels produced by PWRs into fuels for a SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) through the pyrochemical process. The knowledge of the isotopic fissile content of the new fuel is very important for fuel safety. A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS) is under development to analyze the fissile material content (Pu{sup 239}, Pu{sup 241} and U{sup 235}) of the fuel. The LSDS requires a neutron source, the neutrons will be slowed down through their passage in a lead medium and will finally enter the fuel and will induce fission reactions that will be analysed and the isotopic content of the fuel will be then determined. The issue is that the spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by spontaneous fission. The threshold fission detector screens the prompt fast fission neutrons and as a result the LSDS is not influenced by the high level radiation background. The energy resolution of LSDS is good in the range 0.1 eV to 1 keV. It is also the range in which the fission reaction is the most discriminating for the considered fissile isotopes. An electron accelerator has been chosen to produce neutrons with an adequate target through (e{sup -},γ)(γ,n) reactions.

  18. Request For Records Disposition | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request For Records Disposition Request For Records Disposition Spent Nuclear Fuels Request For Records Disposition (270.54 KB) More Documents & Publications Report on Separate ...

  19. LANL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. LANL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within both Category 1 and 2 areas. Technical Area (TA) 55/Plutonium Facility 4 will be used to store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, assemble rods, and store fuel bundles. Bundles will be assembled at a separate facility, several of which have been identified as suitable for that activity. The Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building (at TA-3) will be used for analytical chemistry support. Waste operations will be conducted in TA-50 and TA-54. Only very minor modifications will be needed to accommodate the LA program. These modifications consist mostly of minor equipment upgrades. A commercial reactor operator has not been identified for the LA irradiation. Postirradiation examination (PIE) of the irradiated fuel will take place at either Oak Ridge National Laboratory or ANL-W. The only modifications required at either PIE site would be to accommodate full-length irradiated fuel rods. Results from this program are critical to the overall plutonium distribution schedule.

  20. Hanford MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site (SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. Hanford has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 1 facility. In all, a total of three LA MOX fuel fabrication options were identified by Hanford that could accommodate the program. In every case, only minor modification would be required to ready any of the facilities to accept the equipment necessary to accomplish the LA program.

  1. Fissile interrogation using gamma rays from oxygen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Donald; Micklich, Bradley J.; Fessler, Andreas

    2004-04-20

    The subject apparatus provides a means to identify the presence of fissionable material or other nuclear material contained within an item to be tested. The system employs a portable accelerator to accelerate and direct protons to a fluorine-compound target. The interaction of the protons with the fluorine-compound target produces gamma rays which are directed at the item to be tested. If the item to be tested contains either a fissionable material or other nuclear material the interaction of the gamma rays with the material contained within the test item with result in the production of neutrons. A system of neutron detectors is positioned to intercept any neutrons generated by the test item. The results from the neutron detectors are analyzed to determine the presence of a fissionable material or other nuclear material.

  2. Neutron-gamma hodoscope detection of fissile materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVolpi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron-gamma hodoscope has been developed to make use of two aspects of the fission process that occur during severe safety testing of nuclear reactor fuel; fission-product heating that induces realistic effects in the fuel and penetrating radiation that enables the imaging of fuel behavior. During in-pile transient reactor experiments, the radiation which escapes from the test fuel, its surrounding coolant, and a thick-walled container is detected by a large collimated array that produced cineradiographic images. Phenomena observed in hundreds of destructive experiments have included pre-failure fuel motion, cladding breach, and post-failure fuel motion. On the basis of this successful 25-year experience, application of hodoscope techniques to arms control treaty verification is now being studied. 7 refs., 13 figs.

  3. Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM | Department of Energy the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program

  4. Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 ...

  5. Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear Design of Fissile Pu and HEU LIFE Engine - NA22 You ...

  6. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, John T.; Kunz, Walter E.; Cates, Michael R.; Franks, Larry A.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fissions are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for .sup.239 Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  7. Americium/Curium Disposition Life Cycle Planning Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, W.N.; Krupa, J.; Stutts, P.; Nester, S.; Raimesch, R.

    1998-04-30

    At the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Office (DOE- SR), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) evaluated concepts to complete disposition of Americium and Curium (Am/Cm) bearing materials currently located at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  8. Facility Disposition Safety Strategy RM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Disposition Safety Strategy (FDSS) Review Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the facility documentation, preparations or...

  9. Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Plutonium Disposition Program June 26, 2013 SUPPORTING NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION Weapon-grade plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) are the critical ingredients for making a nuclear weapon. With the end of the Cold War, hundreds of tons of these materials were determined to be surplus to U.S. and Russian defense needs. Denying access to plutonium and HEU is the best way to prevent nuclear proliferation to rogue states and terrorist organizations. The most certain method to

  10. The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemons, T.R.

    1991-12-31

    Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

  11. Random effects of fissile lumps in molten salt reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.; Prinja, A. K.

    2013-07-01

    The problem of the effect of fissile lumps spatially appearing in a random fashion inside a fluid fuel reactor is addressed. The effect on reactivity is evaluated by means of first-order perturbation theory. The analysis is carried out in diffusion theory with the presence of delayed neutron emissions in one dimensional plane geometry. The estimation of the mean value and standard deviation of the reactivity inserted is performed by Monte Carlo simulations and a deterministic quadrature approach, to compare the methods in terms of computational effort and the accuracy of the results. The results presented show that the effects constitute an important issue in the assessment of these innovative systems. (authors)

  12. USED FUEL DISPOSITION CAMPAIGN

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperatures on the DBTT of High-Burnup PWR Cladding Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign M.C. Billone, T.A. Burtseva, and M.A. Martin-Rengel Argonne National Laboratory August 28, 2015 FCRD-UFD-2015-000008 ANL-15/21 About Argonne National Laboratory Argonne is a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. The Laboratory's main facility is outside Chicago, at 9700 South

  13. Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions are available for ...

  14. Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Terrel J. Spears Assistant Manager Waste Disposition Project DOE Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River Site Savannah River Site Waste Disposition Project Waste ...

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J; Edwin Moore, E; Scott Davies, S

    2008-07-15

    The United States (U.S.) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Except for materials that remain in use for programs outside of national defense, including programs for nuclear-energy development, the surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. Some items will be disposed as transuranic waste, low-level waste, or spent fuel. The remaining surplus plutonium will be managed through: (1) the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (FFF), to be constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS), where the plutonium will be converted to fuel that will be irradiated in civilian power reactors and later disposed to a high-level waste (HLW) repository as spent fuel; (2) the SRS H-Area facilities, by dissolving and transfer to HLW systems, also for disposal to the repository; or (3) alternative immobilization techniques that would provide durable and secure disposal. From the beginning of the U.S. program for surplus plutonium disposition, DOE has sponsored research to characterize the surplus materials and to judge their suitability for planned disposition options. Because many of the items are stored without extensive analyses of their current chemical content, the characterization involves three interacting components: laboratory sample analysis, if available; non-destructive assay data; and rigorous evaluation of records for the processing history for items and inventory groups. This information is collected from subject-matter experts at inventory sites and from materials stabilization and surveillance programs, in cooperation with the design agencies for the disposition facilities. This report describes the operation and status of the characterization program.

  16. Accelerator spallation reactors for breeding of fissile fuel and transmuting fission products. Status and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1981-01-01

    This report constitutes a summary review of the status and prospects of the development of accelerator spallation reactors for breeding fissile fuel and for transmuting fission products.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF THE HS99 AIR TRANSPORT TYPE A FISSILE PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2012-07-10

    An air-transport Type A Fissile radioactive shipping package for the transport of special form uranium sources has been developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the Department of Homeland Security. The Package model number is HS99 for Homeland Security Model 99. This paper presents the major design features of the HS99 and highlights engineered materials necessary for meeting the design requirements for this light-weight Type AF packaging. A discussion is provided demonstrating how the HS99 complies with the regulatory safety requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper summarizes the results of structural testing to specified in 10 CFR 71 for Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Conditions events. Planned and proposed future missions for this packaging are also addressed.

  18. SRS MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site(SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. SRS has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 2 or 3 facility with storage of bulk PuO{sub 2} and assembly, storage, and shipping of fuel bundles in an S and S Category 1 facility. The total Category 1 approach, which is the recommended option, would be done in the 221-H Canyon Building. A facility that was never in service will be removed from one area, and a hardened wall will be constructed in another area to accommodate execution of the LA fuel fabrication. The non-Category 1 approach would require removal of process equipment in the FB-Line metal production and packaging glove boxes, which requires work in a contamination area. The Immobilization Hot Demonstration Program

  19. REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER To: NATIONAL ARCHIVES & RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 8601 ADELPHI ROAD, COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740-6001 Date Received 1. FROM (Agency or establishment) NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C 3303a, the disposition request, including amendments is approved except for items that may be marked "disposition not approved" or "withdrawn" in column 10. 2. MAJOR SUB DIVISION 3.

  20. REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY Request for Records Disposition Authority REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY (82.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Request For Records Disposition Authority Request For Records Disposition Request For Records Disposition Authority

  1. FS65 Disposition Option Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenz, Tracy R.

    2015-09-25

    This report outlines the options for dispositioning the MOX fuel stored in FS65 containers at LANL. Additional discussion regarding the support equipment for loading and unloading the FS65 transport containers is included at the end of the report.

  2. Apparatus and method for quantitatively evaluating total fissile and total fertile nuclide content in samples. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, J.T.; Kunz, W.E.; Cates, M.R.; Franks, L.A.

    1982-07-07

    Simultaneous photon and neutron interrogation of samples for the quantitative determination of total fissile nuclide and total fertile nuclide material present is made possible by the use of an electron accelerator. Prompt and delayed neutrons produced from resulting induced fission are counted using a single detection system and allow the resolution of the contributions from each interrogating flux leading in turn to the quantitative determination sought. Detection limits for /sup 239/Pu are estimated to be about 3 mg using prompt fission neutrons and about 6 mg using delayed neutrons.

  3. REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY RS-Weapons X-Rays PDF icon REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY More Documents & Publications...

  4. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Steven Karl; Bernardin, John David; Kimpland, Robert Herbert; Spernjak, Dusan

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  5. Simulator for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Steven Karl; Day, Christy M.; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    LANL has developed a process to generate a progressive family of system models for a fissile solution system. This family includes a dynamic system simulation comprised of coupled nonlinear differential equations describing the time evolution of the system. Neutron kinetics, radiolytic gas generation and transport, and core thermal hydraulics are included in the DSS. Extensions to explicit operation of cooling loops and radiolytic gas handling are embedded in these systems as is a stability model. The DSS may then be converted to an implementation in Visual Studio to provide a design team the ability to rapidly estimate system performance impacts from a variety of design decisions. This provides a method to assist in optimization of the system design. Once design has been generated in some detail the C++ version of the system model may then be implemented in a LabVIEW user interface to evaluate operator controls and instrumentation and operator recognition and response to off-normal events. Taken as a set of system models the DSS, Visual Studio, and LabVIEW progression provides a comprehensive set of design support tools.

  6. Direct fissile assay of highly enriched UF/sub 6/ using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, J.E.; Menlove, H.O.

    1983-01-01

    A new nondestructive method for direct assay of /sup 235/U mass contained in Model 5A uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) product storage cylinders has been successfully tested in the laboratory and under field conditions. The technique employs passive neutron self-interrogation and uses the ratio of coincidences-to-totals counts as a measure of bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1 sigma) based on field measurements of 44 Model 5A cylinders, 11 of which were either only partially filled or contained reactor return material. The cylinders contained UF/sub 6/ with enrichments from 5.96% to 97.6%. Count times were 3 to 6 min depending on /sup 235/U mass. Samples ranged from below 1 kg to over 16 kg of /sup 235/U. Because the method relies primarily on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF/sub 6/ takes place. This feature alleviates inhomogeneity problems and offers increased assurance of the presence of stated amounts of bulk fissile material as compared with current verification methods.

  7. Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development A typical spent nuclear fuel cask sitting on a railcar. Since the early 1960s, the United States has safely conducted more than 3,000 shipments of used nuclear fuel without any harmful release of radioactive material. A typical spent nuclear fuel cask sitting on a railcar. Since the early 1960s, the United States has safely conducted more than 3,000 shipments of used nuclear fuel without any harmful

  8. Determining fissile content in PWR spent fuel assemblies using a passive neutron Albedo reactivity with fission chambers technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    State regulatory bodies and organizations such as the IAEA that are concerned with preventing the proliferation of nuclear weapons are interested in a means of quantifying the amount of plutonium in a given spent fuel assembly. The complexity of spent nuclear fuel makes the measurement of plutonium content challenging. There are a variety of techniques that can measure various properties of spent nuclear fuel including burnup, and mass of fissile content. No single technique can provide all desired information, necessitating an approach using multiple detector systems and types. This paper presents our analysis of the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity Fission Chamber (PNAR-FC) detector system. PNAR-FC is a simplified version of the PNAR technique originally developed in 1997. This earlier research was performed with a high efficiency, {sup 3}He-based system (PNAR-3He) with which multiplicty analysis was performed. With the PNAR technique a portion of the spent fuel assembly is wrapped in a 1 mm thick cadmium liner. Neutron count rates are measured both with and without the cadmium liner present. The ratio of the count rate with the cadmium liner to the count rate without the cadmium liner is calculated and called the cadmium ratio. In the PNAR-3He technique, multiplicity measurements were made and the cadmium ratio was shown to scale with the fissile content of the material being measured. PNAR-FC simplifies the PNAR technique by using only a few fission chambers instead of many {sup 3}He tubes. Using a simplified PNAR-FC technique provides for a cheaper, lighter, and thus more portable detector system than was possible with the PNAR-3He system. The challenge with the PNAR-FC system are two-fold: (1) the change in the cadmium ratio is weaker as a afunction of the changing fissile content relative to multiplicity count rates, and (2) the efficiency for the fission chamber based system are poorer than for the {sup 3}He based detectors. In this paper, we present our

  9. Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment | Department of Energy Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Uranium Downblending and Disposition Project Technology Readiness Assessment (1.11 MB) Summary - Uranium233 Downblending and Disposition Project (146.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Compilation of TRA Summaries EA-1574: Final

  10. DISPOSITION AUTHORITIES FROZEN UNDER THE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MORATORIUM |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy DISPOSITION AUTHORITIES FROZEN UNDER THE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MORATORIUM DISPOSITION AUTHORITIES FROZEN UNDER THE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MORATORIUM Listed on this document are all the disposition authorities which are under the moratorium on the destruction of health related records as of March 2008. DISPOSITION AUTHORITIES FROZEN UNDER THE EPIDEMIOLOGICAL MORATORIUM (41.28 KB) More Documents & Publications ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 17: CARTOGRAPHIC, AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHIC,

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (United States) USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE ... carbon dioxide storage medium comprising porous concrete having a macroporous and ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (United States) USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE ... Hoeschele, Marc (2) Chitwood, Rick (1) Dakin, Bill (1) Weitzel, Elizabeth (1) Save Results ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (United States) USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE ... radiosonde observations, tropical storm bill, planetary boundary layer, thermodynamic ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (United States) USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE ... Norman, Benjamin (1) Peterka, Tom (1) Sailor, Bill (1) Sehrish, Saba (1) Tornga, Shawn R ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (United States) USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE ... Filter Results Filter by Subject radiosonde observations, tropical storm bill, planetary ...

  16. SPD SEIS References for Appendix C | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina, November. 47 DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1996c, Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final...

  17. SPD SEIS References for Appendix A | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Operations Office, Albuquerque, New Mexico, September. 50 DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1996c, Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) (United States) USDOE Office of Hearings and Appeals (HG) (United...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States) USDOE Office of Field Management (FM) (United States) USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) (United...

  20. Final Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement, July 19, 1996 Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    under CERCLA, RCRA, and the Colorado Hazardous Waste Act in a single agreement to streamline compliance. * Disposition weapons usable fissile materials and transuranic wastes,...

  1. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice46.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nulton Director, NEPA Compliance and Outreach Office of Fissile Materials Disposition Department of Energy PO Box 23786 Washington, DC 20026-3786 Sent by Facsimile to...

  2. Integrated Facilities Disposition Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Examples of IFDP legacy materials * RTG inventory - Sr activity - 700,000 Ci Sr-90 RTG - 5' x 5' x 4' * Melton Valley inventory - Size and weight - Concrete vault - 9' x 9' x 9' - ...

  3. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus EM Updates Congress on Nuclear Cleanup Progress in 18th Annual Caucus March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its cleanup contractors present briefings each year to the U.S. House Nuclear Cleanup Caucus on remediation operations at its major sites across the DOE complex. The briefings are organized by Rep. Doc Hastings (R-Wash.), who chairs the bipartisan caucus. For nearly two decades,

  4. DOE Records Disposition Schedule Changes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Records Disposition Schedule Changes DOE Records Disposition Schedule Changes Disposition Schedule Changes DOE Records Disposition Schedule Changes (88.66 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Administrative Records Schedules Changes DOERS Records Schedule Cross Index to DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 18: SECURITY, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND SAFETY RECORDS

  5. Temperature Profile of the Solution Vessel of an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical Fissile Solution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Steven Karl; Determan, John C.

    2015-09-14

    Dynamic System Simulation (DSS) models of fissile solution systems have been developed and verified against a variety of historical configurations. DSS techniques have been applied specifically to subcritical accelerator-driven systems using fissile solution fuels of uranium. Initial DSS models were developed in DESIRE, a specialized simulation scripting language. In order to tailor the DSS models to specifically meet needs of system designers they were converted to a Visual Studio implementation, and one of these subsequently to National Instrument’s LabVIEW for human factors engineering and operator training. Specific operational characteristics of subcritical accelerator-driven systems have been examined using a DSS model tailored to this particular class using fissile fuel.

  6. Radium Disposition Options for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, D. L.; Thiel, E. C.; Seidel, B. R.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed plans to disposition its excess nuclear materials, including radium-containing materials. Within DOE, there is no significant demand for radium at this time. However, DOE is exploring reuse options, including uses that may not exist at this time. The Nonactinide Isotopes and Sealed Sources Management Group (NISSMG) has identified 654 radium-containing items, and concluded that there are no remaining radium items that do not have a pathway to disposition. Unfortunately, most of these pathways end with disposal, whereas reuse would be preferable. DOE has a number of closure sites that must remove the radium at their sites as part of their closure activities. NISSMG suggests preserving the larger radium sources that can easily be manufactured into targets for future reuse, and disposing the other items. As alternatives to disposal, there exist reuse options for radium, especially in nuclear medicine. These options were identified by NISSMG. The NISSMG recommends that DOE set up receiver sites to store these radium materials until reuse options become available. The NISSMG recommends two pathways for dispositioning radium sources, depending on the activity and volume of material. Low activity radium sources can be managed as low level radioactive waste per DOE Order 5820.2A. Higher activity radium sources are more appropriate for reuse in nuclear medicine applications and other applications.

  7. Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations (CROs) MEMORANDUM TO: DISTRIBUTION FROM: Michael Owen (signed) Director, Office of Worker and Community Transition Department of Energy Washington, DC 20505 January 22, 2003 Disposition of Excess Personal Property BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE CROs have been operating asset conversion and personal property transfer programs since shortly after the

  8. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan The primary objective of this report is to ...

  9. Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition NNSS Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pat Arnold

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked the WDD working group to disposition the large inventory of legacy classified weapon components scattered across the complex.

  10. Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) Oak Ridge, TN Why DOE-EM Did...

  11. 8.0 FACILITY DISPOSITION PROCESS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility transition, surveillance and maintenance (S&M), and disposition phase activities. ... handling and processing, storage, maintenance, administrative, or support activities ...

  12. EIS-0283: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10, 2008 EIS-0283: Amended Record of Decision Surplus Plutonium Disposition: Waste Solidification Building November 26, 2008 EIS-0283-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Surplus Plutonium...

  13. Request For Records Disposition Authority | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fossil Energy Equity Re-determination Records Request For Records Disposition Authority (102.94 KB) More Documents & Publications REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY Inspection Report: INS-O-98-01 Request For Records Disposition

  14. Barriers and Issues Related to Achieving Final Disposition of Depleted Uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillas, D. L.; Chambers, B. K.

    2002-02-26

    Approximately 750,000 metric tons (MT) of surplus depleted uranium (DU) in various chemical forms are stored at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites throughout the United States. Most of the DU is in the form of DU hexafluoride (DUF6) that resulted from uranium enrichment operations over the last several decades. DOE plans to convert the DUF6 to ''a more stable form'' that could be any one or combination of DU tetrafluoride (DUF4 or green salt), DU oxide (DUO3, DUO2, or DU3O8), or metal depending on the final disposition chosen for any given quantity. Barriers to final disposition of this material have existed historically and some continue today. Currently, the barriers are more related to finding uses for this material versus disposing as waste. Even though actions are beginning to convert the DUF6, ''final'' disposition of the converted material has yet to be decided. Unless beneficial uses can be implemented, DOE plans to dispose of this material as waste. This expresses the main barrier to DU disposition; DOE's strategy is to dispose unless uses can be found while the strategy should be only dispose as a last resort and make every effort to find uses. To date, only minimal research programs are underway to attempt to develop non-fuel uses for this material. Other issues requiring resolution before these inventories can reach final disposition (uses or disposal) include characterization, disposal of large quantities, storage (current and future), and treatment options. Until final disposition is accomplished, these inventories must be managed in a safe and environmentally sound manner; however, this is becoming more difficult as materials and facilities age. The most noteworthy final disposition technical issues include the development of reuse and treatment options.

  15. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment and Disposition Framework Completing the Office of River Protection (ORP) ...

  16. CXD 4605, Disposition Excess Equipment from Alpha 1 (4605)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disposition Excess Equipment from Alpha 1 (4605) Y-12 Site Office Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee The proposed action is to characterize and disposition equipment that was...

  17. Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Topic Index to the DOE Administrative...

  18. REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: Cyclotron Records PDF icon REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY More Documents & Publications REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY...

  19. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase...

  20. disposition

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MT of surplus HEU has been down-blended for use as fuel in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors (completed in October 2011);

  21. 22 MT of surplus HEU has been set aside for...

  1. Plutonium disposition via immobilization in ceramic or glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.F.; Armantrout, A.

    1997-03-05

    The management of surplus weapons plutonium is an important and urgent task with profound environmental, national, and international security implications. In the aftermath of the Cold War, Presidential Policy Directive 13, and various analyses by renown scientific, technical, and international policy organizations have brought about a focused effort within the Department of Energy to identify and implement paths for the long term disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The central goal of this effort is to render surplus weapons plutonium as inaccessible and unattractive for reuse in nuclear weapons as the much larger and growing stock of plutonium contained in spent fuel from civilian reactors. One disposition option being considered for surplus plutonium is immobilization, in which the plutonium would be incorporated into a glass or ceramic material that would ultimately be entombed permanently in a geologic repository for high-level waste.

  2. Evaluation Of Glass Density To Support The Estimation Of Fissile Mass Loadings From Iron Concentrations In SB8 Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.; Kot, W. K.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.

    2013-04-30

    The Department of Energy Savannah River (DOE-SR) has provided direction to Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3}. In support of that guidance, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a technical basis and a supporting Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for the evaluation of fissile loading in Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) glass based on the iron (Fe) concentration in glass as determined by the measurements from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability analysis. SRR has since requested that the necessary density information be provided to allow SRR to update the Excel spreadsheet so that it may be used to maintain fissile concentration in glass below 897 g/m{sup 3} during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). One of the primary inputs into the fissile loading spreadsheet includes an upper bound for the density of SB8-based glasses. Thus, these bounding density values are to be used to assess the fissile concentration in this glass system. It should be noted that no changes are needed to the underlying structure of the Excel-based spreadsheet to support fissile assessments for SB8. However, SRR should update the other key inputs to the spreadsheet that are based on fissile and Fe concentrations reported from the SB8 Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) sample.

  3. TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

    2013-07-16

    Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  4. EIS-0240: Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department proposes to eliminate the proliferation threat of surplus highly enriched uranium (HEU) by blending it down to low enriched uranium (LEU), which is not weapons-usable. The EIS assesses the disposition of a nominal 200 metric tons of surplus HEU. The Preferred Alternative is, where practical, to blend the material for use as LEU and use overtime, in commercial nuclear reactor field to recover its economic value. Material that cannot be economically recovered would be blended to LEU for disposal as low-level radioactive waste.

  5. EIS-0283: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with alternatives for the disposition of surplus plutonium.

  6. IDENTIFYING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS NON PIT PLUTONIUM FEEDS FOR MOX OR ALTERNATIVE DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J; Moore, E

    2010-07-14

    This report provides a technical basis for estimating the level of corrosion products in materials stored in DOE-STD-3013 containers based on extrapolating available chemical sample results. The primary focus is to estimate the levels of nickel, iron, and chromium impurities in plutonium-bearing materials identified for disposition in the United States Mixed Oxide fuel process.

  7. Research To Underpin The UK Plutonium Disposition Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, B.C.; Scales, C.R.; Worrall, A.; Thomas, M.; Davies, P.; Gilchrist, P.

    2006-07-01

    In April 2005, the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) took ownership of most of the civil nuclear liabilities and assets in the UK. These include separated civil plutonium stocks, which are expected to rise to over 100 tonnes. Future UK national policy for disposition remains to be finalised. The feasibility of management options needs to be determined in order to allow the NDA to advise government on the ultimate disposition of this material. Nexia Solutions has a contract with NDA to develop and carry out a research project which will result in a recommendation on the technical feasibility of a number of disposition options, focussing on re-use and immobilisation of plutonium as a waste for disposal. Initial work is already underway evaluating re-use with MOX and IMF fuels and immobilisation using ceramics, glasses and MOX for disposal. The programme is expected to result, circa 2010, in a recommendation of a preferred route for immobilisation and a preferred route for re-use for the UK's civil Pu stocks. (authors)

  8. SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NORTON SH

    2010-02-23

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL PRC) is proud to submit the Slightly Irradiated Fuel (SIF) Interim Disposition Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2010. The SIF Project was a set of six interrelated sub-projects that delivered unique stand-alone outcomes, which, when integrated, provided a comprehensive and compliant system for storing high risk special nuclear materials. The scope of the six sub-projects included the design, construction, testing, and turnover of the facilities and equipment, which would provide safe, secure, and compliant Special Nuclear Material (SNM) storage capabilities for the SIF material. The project encompassed a broad range of activities, including the following: Five buildings/structures removed, relocated, or built; Two buildings renovated; Structural barriers, fencing, and heavy gates installed; New roadways and parking lots built; Multiple detection and assessment systems installed; New and expanded communication systems developed; Multimedia recording devices added; and A new control room to monitor all materials and systems built. Project challenges were numerous and included the following: An aggressive 17-month schedule to support the high-profile Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) decommissioning; Company/contractor changeovers that affected each and every project team member; Project requirements that continually evolved during design and construction due to the performance- and outcome-based nature ofthe security objectives; and Restrictions imposed on all communications due to the sensitive nature of the projects In spite of the significant challenges, the project was delivered on schedule and $2 million under budget, which became a special source of pride that bonded the team. For years, the SIF had been stored at the central Hanford PFP. Because of the weapons-grade piutonium produced and stored there, the PFP had some of the tightest security on the Hanford

  9. Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project The scope of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) needs to comprehensively address a wide range of environmental management risks at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORO). Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project (227.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge

  10. Excess plutonium disposition using ALWR technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, A.; Buckner, M.R.; Radder, J.A.; Angelos, J.G.; Inhaber, H.

    1993-02-01

    The Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy chartered the Plutonium Disposition Task Force in August 1992. The Task Force was created to assess the range of practicable means of disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. Within the Task Force, working groups were formed to consider: (1) storage, (2) disposal,and(3) fission options for this disposition,and a separate group to evaluate nonproliferation concerns of each of the alternatives. As a member of the Fission Working Group, the Savannah River Technology Center acted as a sponsor for light water reactor (LWR) technology. The information contained in this report details the submittal that was made to the Fission Working Group of the technical assessment of LWR technology for plutonium disposition. The following aspects were considered: (1) proliferation issues, (2) technical feasibility, (3) technical availability, (4) economics, (5) regulatory issues, and (6) political acceptance.

  11. Waste Disposition Update by Christine Gelles

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Disposition Update Christine Gelles Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management (EM-30) EM SSAB Chairs Meeting Washington, DC 2 October 2012 www.em.doe.gov 2 o ...

  12. Chemical Disposition of Plutonium in Hanford Site Tank Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Jones, Susan A.

    2015-05-07

    This report examines the chemical disposition of plutonium (Pu) in Hanford Site tank wastes, by itself and in its observed and potential interactions with the neutron absorbers aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and sodium (Na). Consideration also is given to the interactions of plutonium with uranium (U). No consideration of the disposition of uranium itself as an element with fissile isotopes is considered except tangentially with respect to its interaction as an absorber for plutonium. The report begins with a brief review of Hanford Site plutonium processes, examining the various means used to recover plutonium from irradiated fuel and from scrap, and also examines the intermediate processing of plutonium to prepare useful chemical forms. The paper provides an overview of Hanford tank defined-waste–type compositions and some calculations of the ratios of plutonium to absorber elements in these waste types and in individual waste analyses. These assessments are based on Hanford tank waste inventory data derived from separately published, expert assessments of tank disposal records, process flowsheets, and chemical/radiochemical analyses. This work also investigates the distribution and expected speciation of plutonium in tank waste solution and solid phases. For the solid phases, both pure plutonium compounds and plutonium interactions with absorber elements are considered. These assessments of plutonium chemistry are based largely on analyses of idealized or simulated tank waste or strongly alkaline systems. The very limited information available on plutonium behavior, disposition, and speciation in genuine tank waste also is discussed. The assessments show that plutonium coprecipitates strongly with chromium, iron, manganese and uranium absorbers. Plutonium’s chemical interactions with aluminum, nickel, and sodium are minimal to non-existent. Credit for neutronic interaction of plutonium with these absorbers

  13. Fissile Flow and Enrichment Monitor for GCEP Advanced Safeguards Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, Jose A; Uckan, Taner

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data that demonstrate a concept for a {sup 235}U flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO) based on passive measurements of process equipment in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The primary goal of the FEMO is to prevent, without using pipe penetrations or active interrogation with external sources, the production and diversion of undeclared nuclear material. This FEMO concept utilizes: (1) calibrated measurements of {sup 235}U density in cascade headers, and (2) measurements of pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate, which are correlated to the electrical power consumed by the GCEP pumps that transport UF{sub 6} from the cascade to the condensation cylinders. The {sup 235}U density is measured by counting 186 keV emissions using a NaI gamma detector located upstream of the pump. The pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate are determined using a correlation that is a function of the measured pump operational parameters (e.g., electric power consumption and rotational frequency) and the pumping configuration. The concept has been demonstrated in a low-pressure flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Waste Disposition News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Disposition News Waste Disposition News July 28, 2016 ERDF is known as the "hub" of Hanford cleanup. EM Marks 20 years of Cleanup Success at Hanford Disposal Facility RICHLAND, Wash. - July marked 20 successful years of environmental cleanup at one of EM's largest disposal facilities - the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) on the Hanford Site. July 28, 2016 Michael Casbon's first job for Hanford's ERDF was helping with its conceptual design. This month, he

  15. Commissioning Measurements and Experience Obtained from the Installation of a Fissile Mass Flow monitor in the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, V.

    1999-07-25

    The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) equipment sent earlier to the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) at Novouralsk, Russia, was installed and implemented successfully on February 2, 1999. The BDMS installation supports the highly enriched uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program for material subject to monitoring under the HEU purchase agreement between the United States of America (USA) and the Russian Federation (RF). The BDMS consists of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile (uranium-235) Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Enrichment Monitor (EM). Two BDMS?s for monitoring the Main and Reserve HEU blending process lines were installed at UEIP. Independent operation of the FMFM Main and FMFM Reserve was successfully demonstrated for monitoring the fissile mass flow as well as the traceability of HEU to the product low enriched uranium. The FMFM systems failed when both systems were activated during the calibration phase due to a synchronization problem between the systems. This operational failure was caused by the presence of strong electromagnetic interference (EMI) in the blend point. The source-modulator shutter motion of the two FMFM systems was not being properly synchronized because of EMI producing a spurious signal on the synchronization cable connecting the two FMFM cabinets. The signature of this failure was successfully reproduced at ORNL after the visit. This unexpected problem was eliminated by a hardware modification and software improvements during a recent visit (June 9-11, 1999) to UEIP, and both systems are now operating as expected.

  16. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4. Plutonium dispositioning in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

    1993-06-01

    This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2}-CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO{sub 2}) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}) or europium oxide (Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl{sub 4}-Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams.

  17. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    Title 44 US Code, ``Public Printing and Documents,`` regulations issued by the General Service Administration (GSA) in 41 CFR Chapter 101, Subchapter B, ``Management and Use of Information and Records,`` and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter 12, Subchapter B, ``Records Management,`` require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA`s General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 3, contains ``NRC`s Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,`` and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 3 incorporates NARA approved changes and additions to the NRC schedules that have been implemented since the last revision dated March, 1992, reflects recent organizational changes implemented at the NRC, and includes the latest version of NARA`s General Records Schedule (dated August 1995).

  18. EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Amended Record of Decision EIS-0229: Amended Record of Decision Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0229, 1996; Storage and Disposition PEIS). Specifically, DOE has decided to take the actions necessary to transfer

  19. WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE WASTE DISPOSITION PROJECT MAKES GREAT STRIDES AT THE IDAHO SITE April 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis An operator uses ...

  20. Request For Records Disposition Authority | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Records Schedule Contractor Checks Request For Records Disposition Authority (109.84 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE-STD-4001-2000 DOE Records Disposition Schedule Changes Audit Letter Report: INS-L-07-05

  1. Draft EA for the Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA for the Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly ... AND DISPOSITION OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL CONTAINING U.S.-ORIGIN HIGHLY ENRICHED ...

  2. H. R. S. 182 - Reservation and Disposition of Government Mineral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from Hawaii Revised Statute 182-1, Definitions for Reservation and Disposition of Government Mineral Rights)...

  3. Mission Need Statement: Calcine Disposition Project Major Systems Acquisition Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. T. Beck

    2007-04-26

    This document identifies the need to establish the Calcine Disposition Project to determine and implement the final disposition of calcine including characterization, retrieval, treatment (if necessary), packaging, loading, onsite interim storage pending shipment to a repository or interim storage facility, and disposition of related facilities.

  4. Influence of the Density Law on Various Fissile Single Unit and Array Storage Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, S T

    2011-03-02

    The advancement of computational technology has resulted in the wide-spread availability of powerful radiation transport Monte Carlo codes. Prevailing practices today rely heavily on Monte Carlo codes to provide the basis for assessing the reactivity of various fissile systems for nuclear criticality safety (NCS). In 1958, Weinberg and Wigner expressed their concerns on a 'deplorable trend in reactor design - the tendency to substitute a code for a theory'. Unfortunately, their concerns have largely become a reality in many modern NCS practices. lacking the time or information to understand the underlying neutron physics of the fissile system under consideration is indeed a deplorable trend. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that many features of criticality hand calculation methods are indeed based upon the fundamentals of the density law and that many correlations of important physics parameters can be more easily understood from such a perspective. Historically, the density law was recognized by many pioneers in the field, including during the Manhattan Project. However, it was by and large an 'oral tradition' in that bits and pieces of great physical insights of the pioneers were scattered in many earlier publications. This paper attempts to bring together some of the 'jewels' of the pioneers which might have been lost or forgotten.

  5. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, John R.; Halbig, James K.; Menlove, Howard O.; Klosterbuer, Shirley F.

    1985-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  6. Apparatus for in situ determination of burnup, cooling time and fissile content of an irradiated nuclear fuel assembly in a fuel storage pond

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.R.; Halbig, J.K.; Menlove, H.O.; Klosterbuer, S.F.

    1984-01-01

    A detector head for in situ inspection of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies submerged in a water-filled nuclear fuel storage pond. The detector head includes two parallel arms which extend from a housing and which are spaced apart so as to be positionable on opposite sides of a submerged fuel assembly. Each arm includes an ionization chamber and two fission chambers. One fission chamber in each arm is enclosed in a cadmium shield and the other fission chamber is unshielded. The ratio of the outputs of the shielded and unshielded fission chambers is used to determine the boron content of the pond water. Correcting for the boron content, the neutron flux and gamma ray intensity are then used to verify the declared exposure, cooling time and fissile material content of the irradiated fuel assembly.

  7. Analysis of disposition alternatives for radioactively contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1997-01-01

    Millions of tonnes of slightly radioactive, scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper are likely to become available as nuclear and other facilities and equipment are withdrawn from service. Disposition of this material is an international policy issue under consideration currently. The major alternatives for managing this material are to either develop a regulatory process for decontamination and recycling that will safeguard human health or to dispose of the scrap and replace the metal stocks. To evaluate the alternatives, we estimate quantities of scrap arising from nuclear power plant decommissioning, evaluate potential price impacts of recycling on regional markets, and assess the health and environmental impacts of the management alternatives. We conclude that decontaminating and recycling the scrap is the superior alternative.

  8. EM QA Working Group September 2011 Meeting Materials | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear Materials & Waste Tank Waste and Waste Processing Waste Disposition Packaging and Transportation Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D)...

  9. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menlove, Howard O.; Stewart, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the .sup.235 U nuclide content of samples containing UF.sub.6, UF.sub.4, or UO.sub.2 utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1.sigma.) for cylinders containing UF.sub.6 with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF.sub.6 takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures.

  10. Direct fissile assay of enriched uranium using random self-interrogation and neutron coincidence response

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menlove, H.O.; Stewart, J.E.

    1985-02-04

    Apparatus and method for the direct, nondestructive evaluation of the /sup 235/U nuclide content of samples containing UF/sub 6/, UF/sub 4/, or UO/sub 2/ utilizing the passive neutron self-interrogation of the sample resulting from the intrinsic production of neutrons therein. The ratio of the emitted neutron coincidence count rate to the total emitted neutron count rate is determined and yields a measure of the bulk fissile mass. The accuracy of the method is 6.8% (1sigma) for cylinders containing UF/sub 6/ with enrichments ranging from 6% to 98% with measurement times varying from 3-6 min. The samples contained from below 1 kg to greater than 16 kg. Since the subject invention relies on fast neutron self-interrogation, complete sampling of the UF/sub 6/ takes place, reducing difficulties arising from inhomogeneity of the sample which adversely affects other assay procedures. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. THERMAL TESTING OF PROTOTYPE GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGES USING A FURNACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A; Lawrence Gelder, L; Paul Blanton, P

    2007-02-16

    The 9977/9978 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP) was designed by SRNL to replace the DOT 6M Specification Package and ship Plutonium and Uranium metals and oxides. Urethane foam was used for the overpack to ensure the package would withstand the 10CFR71.73(c)(2) crush test, which is a severe test for drum-type packages. In addition, it was necessary to confirm that the urethane foam configuration provided adequate thermal protection for the containment vessel during the subsequent 10CFR71.73(c)(4) thermal test. Development tests were performed on early prototype test specimens of different diameter overpacks and a range of urethane foam densities. The thermal test was performed using an industrial furnace. Test results were used to optimize the selection of package diameter and foam density, and provided the basis for design enhancements incorporated into the final package design.

  12. ADDING REALISM TO NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISSOLVING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, B.

    2011-08-15

    Two new criticality modeling approaches have greatly increased the efficiency of dissolver operations in H-Canyon. The first new approach takes credit for the linear, physical distribution of the mass throughout the entire length of the fuel assembly. This distribution of mass is referred to as the linear density. Crediting the linear density of the fuel bundles results in using lower fissile concentrations, which allows higher masses to be charged to the dissolver. Also, this approach takes credit for the fact that only part of the fissile mass is wetted at a time. There are multiple assemblies stacked on top of each other in a bundle. On average, only 50-75% of the mass (the bottom two or three assemblies) is wetted at a time. This means that only 50-75% (depending on operating level) of the mass is moderated and is contributing to the reactivity of the system. The second new approach takes credit for the progression of the dissolving process. Previously, dissolving analysis looked at a snapshot in time where the same fissile material existed both in the wells and in the bulk solution at the same time. The second new approach models multiple consecutive phases that simulate the fissile material moving from a high concentration in the wells to a low concentration in the bulk solution. This approach is more realistic and allows higher fissile masses to be charged to the dissolver.

  13. 2016 Used Fuel Disposition Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Used Fuel Disposition Working Group - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs

  14. DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy DOE Seeks Industry Input on Nickel Disposition Strategy March 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Energy Department's prime contractor, Fluor-B&W Portsmouth (FBP), managing the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP), issued a request for Expressions of Interest (EOI) seeking industry input to support the development of an acquisition strategy for potential disposition of DOE nickel. The EOI requests technical,

  15. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Phase I Ring Compression Testing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phase I Ring Compression Testing of High Burnup Cladding Used Fuel Disposition Campaign ... of the technical basis for extended storage and transportation of high-burnup fuel. ...

  16. Independent Analysis of Alternatives for Disposition of the Idaho...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independent Analysis of Alternatives for Disposition of the Idaho Calcined High-Level ... The scope of the CDP includes the design and construction of a capability for retrieval ...

  17. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  18. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Annual Supply and Disposition Balance"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Supply and Disposition Balance" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

  19. Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    must prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Copies of the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement are available at the...

  20. Used Fuel Disposition R&D Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    28, 2012 Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation Phase I Report The natural barrier system (NBS) is an integral part of a geologic nuclear...

  1. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear...

  2. REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Power Plant Docket Records PDF icon REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY More Documents & Publications PIA - Savannah River Remediation Accreditation Boundary (SRR AB) ...

  3. EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Supplemental EIS (SEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated ...

  4. EIS-0327: Disposition of Scrap Metals Programmatic EIS | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    intent to prepare an EIS that would evaluate the environmental impacts of policy alternatives for the disposition of scrap metals (primarily carbon steel and stainless steel)...

  5. EA-1488: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    88: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee ...

  6. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Surplus Plutonium Disposition AGENCY: National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6450-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Surplus Plutonium Disposition AGENCY: National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of Decision. SUMMARY: On ...

  7. Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Copies of the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact ... of alternatives for managing high- level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste...

  8. Request For Records Disposition Autnority | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Posters depicting Department of Energy facilities, research projects, security awareness themes, and related topics. PDF icon Request For Records Disposition Autnority More...

  9. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-04-30

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  10. THERMAL TESTING OF 9977 GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGE USING A POOL FIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A; Cecil May, C; Lawrence Gelder, L; Glenn Abramczyk, G

    2007-02-15

    The 9977/9978 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP), has been designed as a cost-effective, user-friendly replacement for the DOT 6M Specification Package for transporting Plutonium and Uranium metals and oxides. To ensure the capability of the 9977 GPFP to withstand the regulatory crush test, urethane foam was chosen for the impact absorbing overpack. As part of the package development it was necessary to confirm that the urethane foam overpack would provide the required protection for the containment vessel during the thermal test portion of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions Sequential Tests. Development tests of early prototypes were performed, using a furnace. Based on the results of the development tests, detailed design enhancements were incorporated into the final design. Examples of the definitive 9977 design configuration were subjected to an all-engulfing pool fire test, as part of the HAC Sequential Tests, to support the application for certification. Testing has confirmed the package's ability to withstand the HAC thermal tests.

  11. DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    State of Idaho Title: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Draft ... or call: Abstract: This Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Draft EIS ...

  12. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  13. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Understanding and manipulating the most fundamental properties of materials can lead to major breakthroughs in solar power, reactor fuels, optical computing, telecommunications. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Yu Seung Kim (left) and Kwan-Soo Lee (right) New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost A new class of fuel cells based on a newly discovered polymer-based material could bridge

  14. Contact Nonproliferation Program Offices | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and are not part of the media*, feel free to call the program office's main ... Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (202) 586-2695 Address: U.S. Department of Energy ...

  15. SPD SEIS References for Appendix D | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Facilities, DOE-HDBK-3010-94, Washington, DC, December. 346 DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1996, Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (United States) USDOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) (United States) USDOE ... a determination of 2C2u - C2d with an improved precision of a factor ...

  17. Disposition of ORNL's Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. W.; DeMonia, B. C.; Horton, L. L.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the process of retrieving, repackaging, and preparing Oak Ridge spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for off-site disposition. The objective of the Oak Ridge SNF Project is to safely, reliably, and efficiently manage SNF that is stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation until it can be shipped off-site. The project required development of several unique processes and the design and fabrication of special equipment to enable the successful retrieval, transfer, and repackaging of Oak Ridge SNF. SNF was retrieved and transferred to a hot cell for repackaging. After retrieval of SNF packages, the storage positions were decontaminated and stainless steel liners were installed to resolve the vulnerability of water infiltration. Each repackaged SNF canister has been transferred from the hot cell back to dry storage until off-site shipments can be made. Three shipments of aluminum-clad SNF were made to the Savannah River Site (SRS), and five shipments of non-aluminum-clad SNF are planned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Through the integrated cooperation of several organizations including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and various subcontractors, preparations for the disposition of SNF in Oak Ridge have been performed in a safe and successful manner.

  18. PROGRESS IN REDUCING THE NUCLEAR THREAT: UNITED STATES PLUTONIUM CONSOLIDATION AND DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allender, J.; Koenig, R.; Davies, S.

    2009-06-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the United States identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and larger quantities of enriched uranium that are permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs. The Department of Energy (DOE) also began shutting down, stabilizing, and removing inventories from production facilities that were no longer needed to support weapons programs and non-weapons activities. The storage of 'Category I' nuclear materials at Rocky Flats, Sandia National Laboratories, and several smaller sites has been terminated to reduce costs and safeguards risks. De-inventory continues at the Hanford site and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Consolidation of inventories works in concert with the permanent disposition of excess inventories, including several tonnes of plutonium that have already been disposed to waste repositories and the preparation for transfers to the planned Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (for the bulk of the excess plutonium) and alternative disposition methods for material that cannot be used readily in the MOX fuel cycle. This report describes status of plutonium consolidation and disposition activities and their impacts on continuing operations, particularly at the Savannah River Site.

  19. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

  20. Development of a techno-economic model to optimization DOE spent nuclear fuel disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramer, R.J.; Plum, M.M.; Adams, J.P.; Dahl, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel (NSNF) Program conducted by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co. (LMITCO) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is to evaluate what to do with the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Final disposition of the SNF may require that the fuel be treated to minimize material concerns. The treatments may range from electrometallurgical treatment and chemical dissolution to engineering controls. Treatment options and treatment locations will depend on the fuel type and the current locations of the fuel. One of the first steps associated with selecting one or more sites for treating the SNF in the DOE complex is to determine the cost of each option. An economic analysis will assist in determining which fuel treatment alternative attains the optimum disposition of SNF at the lowest possible cost to the government and the public. For this study, a set of questions was developed for the electrometallurgical treatment process for fuels at several locations. The set of questions addresses all issues associated with the design, construction, and operation of a production facility. A matrix table was developed to determine questions applicable to various fuel treatment options. A work breakdown structure (WBS) was developed to identify a treatment process and costs from initial design to shipment of treatment products to final disposition. Costs will be applied to determine the life-cycle cost of each option. This technique can also be applied to other treatment techniques for treating spent nuclear fuel.

  1. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  2. ISMS/EMS Lessons Learned Disposition Projects at SRS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ISMS/EMS Lessons Learned Disposition Projects at SRS ISMS/EMS Lessons Learned Disposition Projects at SRS August 2009 Presenter: Joan Bozzone, NNSA SRS Track 7-5 Topics Covered: Pu Disposition Projects US Surplus Plutonium Disposition Paths Challenging Characteristics of NNSA Plutonium Disposition Projects MFFF Environmental Features Project Permitting Lessons Learned #1 MOX Environmental Management Project Permitting Lessons Learned #2 MOX Environmental Sustainability Policy ISMS/EMS Lessons

  3. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin...

  4. U.S. and Russia Sign Plutonium Disposition Agreement | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline U.S. and Russia Sign Plutonium Disposition Agreement U.S. and Russia Sign Plutonium...

  5. Low Level Waste Disposition – Quantity and Inventory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This study has been prepared by the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program. The purpose of this study is to provide an estimate of the...

  6. Draft Environmental Assessment on the Remote-handled Waste Disposition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Draft Environmental Assessment on the Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project available for public review and comment The U.S. Department of Energy invites the public to review...

  7. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and...

  8. Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign will identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles.

  9. Office of UNF Disposition International Program- Strategic Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Research and Development Office (UFD), performs the critical mission of addressing the need for an integrated...

  10. PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROCEDURE FOR PREPARING RECORDS INVENTORY AND DISPOSITION SCHEDULES (RIDS) (48.78 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE F 1324.10 Computer System Retirement Guidelines DOE F 1324.9

  11. EIS-0327: Disposition of Scrap Metals Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE announced its intent to prepare an EIS that would evaluate the environmental impacts of policy alternatives for the disposition of scrap metals (primarily carbon steel and stainless steel) that may have residual surface radioactivity. DOE cancelled this EIS.

  12. Repackaging of High Fissile TRU Waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center - 13240

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakley, Brian; Heacker, Fred; McMillan, Bill

    2013-07-01

    Twenty-six drums of high fissile transuranic (TRU) waste from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) operations were declared waste in the mid-1980's and placed in storage with the legacy TRU waste inventory for future treatment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Repackaging and treatment of the waste at the TRU Waste Packaging Center (TWPC) will require the installation of additional equipment and capabilities to address the hazards for handling and repackaging the waste compared to typical Contact Handled (CH) TRU waste that is processed at the TWPC, including potential hydrogen accumulation in legacy 6M/2R packaging configurations, potential presence of reactive plutonium hydrides, and significant low energy gamma radiation dose rates. All of the waste is anticipated to be repackaged at the TWPC and certified for disposal at WIPP. The waste is currently packaged in multiple layers of containers which presents additional challenges for repackaging activities due to the potential for the accumulation of hydrogen gas in the container headspace in quantities than could exceed the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL). The outer container for each waste package is a stainless steel 0.21 m{sup 3} (55-gal) drum which contains either a 0.04 m{sup 3} or 0.06 m{sup 3} (10-gal or 15-gal) 6M drum. The inner 2R container in each 6M drum is ?12 cm (5 in) outside diameter x 30-36 cm (12-14 in) long and is considered to be a > 4 liter sealed container relative to TRU waste packaging criteria. Inside the 2R containers are multiple configurations of food pack cans, pipe nipples, and welded capsules. The waste contains significant quantities of high burn-up plutonium oxides and metals with a heavy weight percentage of higher atomic mass isotopes and the subsequent in-growth of significant quantities of americium. Significant low energy gamma radiation is expected to be present due to the americium in-growth. Radiation dose rates on inner containers are estimated to be

  13. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan | Department of Energy Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan The primary objective of this report is to determine whether the existing Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) is sufficient for work to be performed in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), and where the existing QAPD is not sufficient, supply recommendations for changes to the QAPD to

  14. Used Fuel Disposition Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Overview Steve Marschman Field Demonstration Lead Idaho National Laboratory NEET ASI Review Meeting September 17, 2014 Used Fuel Disposition Today's Discussion n Our R&D Objectives n What Guides Our Work n FY14 and FY15 Work - Full-Scale High Burn-Up Demo - Experiments - Transportation - Analysis Used Fuel Disposition 3 Overall Objectives * Develop the technical bases to demonstrate the continued safe and secure storage of used nuclear

  15. Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework Hanford Tank Waste Retrieval, Treatment, and Disposition Framework Forty years of plutonium production at the Hanford Site has yielded a challenging nuclear waste legacy approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes stored in 177 underground tanks (tank farms) located on Hanford's Central Plateau. The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is

  16. EA-1488: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee | Department of Energy 8: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1488: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  17. DISPOSITION PATHS FOR ROCKY FLATS GLOVEBOXES: EVALUATING OPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobdell, D.; Geimer, R.; Larsen, P.; Loveland, K.

    2003-02-27

    The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC has the responsibility for closure activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). One of the challenges faced for closure is the disposition of radiologically contaminated gloveboxes. Evaluation of the disposition options for gloveboxes included a detailed analysis of available treatment capabilities, disposal facilities, and lifecycle costs. The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC followed several processes in determining how the gloveboxes would be managed for disposition. Currently, multiple disposition paths have been chosen to accommodate the needs of the varying styles and conditions of the gloveboxes, meet the needs of the decommissioning team, and to best manage lifecycle costs. Several challenges associated with developing a disposition path that addresses both the radiological and RCRA concerns as well as offering the most cost-effective solution were encountered. These challenges included meeting the radiological waste acceptance criteria of available disposal facilities, making a RCRA determination, evaluating treatment options and costs, addressing void requirements associated with disposal, and identifying packaging and transportation options. The varying disposal facility requirements affected disposition choices. Facility conditions that impacted decisions included radiological and chemical waste acceptance criteria, physical requirements, and measurement for payment options. The facility requirements also impacted onsite activities including management strategies, decontamination activities, and life-cycle cost.

  18. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-03-26

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 for the Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 5 strategy are identified. Results of the analyses of the Tank 21H samples from this report in conjunction with the findings of the previous report, indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics.

  19. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION MST, ESS AND PODD SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-04-24

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 5 processing. This qualification material was a composite created from recent samples from Tank 21H and archived samples from Tank 49H to match the projected blend from these two tanks. Additionally, samples of the composite were used in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and extraction-scrub-strip (ESS) tests. ARP and ESS test results met expectations. A sample from Tank 21H was also analyzed for the Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) requirements. SRNL was able to meet all of the requirements, including the desired detection limits for all the PODD analytes. This report details the results of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP), Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) and Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) samples of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP).

  20. Detecting fission from special nuclear material sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rowland, Mark S.; Snyderman, Neal J.

    2012-06-05

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source. The system includes a graphing component that displays the plot of the neutron distribution from the unknown source over a Poisson distribution and a plot of neutrons due to background or environmental sources. The system further includes a known neutron source placed in proximity to the unknown source to actively interrogate the unknown source in order to accentuate differences in neutron emission from the unknown source from Poisson distributions and/or environmental sources.

  1. FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.; Carter, J.

    2010-10-13

    The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

  2. FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.

    2011-01-03

    The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

  3. Predicting fissile content of spent nuclear fuel assemblies with the passive neutron Albedo reactivity technique and Monte Carlo code emulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Tobin, Stephen J

    2010-10-13

    There is a great need in the safeguards community to be able to nondestructively quantify the mass of plutonium of a spent nuclear fuel assembly. As part of the Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative, we are investigating several techniques, or detector systems, which, when integrated, will be capable of quantifying the plutonium mass of a spent fuel assembly without dismantling the assembly. This paper reports on the simulation of one of these techniques, the Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity with Fission Chambers (PNAR-FC) system. The response of this system over a wide range of spent fuel assemblies with different burnup, initial enrichment, and cooling time characteristics is shown. A Monte Carlo method of using these modeled results to estimate the fissile content of a spent fuel assembly has been developed. A few numerical simulations of using this method are shown. Finally, additional developments still needed and being worked on are discussed.

  4. Portsmouth RI/FS Report for the Site-Wide Waste Disposition Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site-Wide Waste Disposition Evaluation Project Portsmouth RIFS Report for the Site-Wide ... RIFS Report for the Site-Wide Waste Disposition Evaluation Project for Portsmouth incl. ...

  5. Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Implementation at the ElectroChemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uckan, T.

    2005-11-11

    The implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the ElectroChemical Plant (ECP), Zelenogorsk, Russia, are presented in this report. The FMFM, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS), developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower-assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (P-LEU) to the United States from down-blended weapons-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU Purchase Agreement, signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999 and is successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The second BDMS was installed at ECP in February 2003. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) spontaneous neutron sources for a modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments. The FMFM provides unattended, nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow in the HEU, LEU blend stock, and P-LEU process legs. The FMFM also provides the traceability of the HEU flow to the product process leg. This report documents the technical installation requirements and the expected operational characteristics of the ECP FMFM.

  6. Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Implementation for Transparency in HEU Blenddown at the URAL Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) in Novouralsk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, J.; Mastal, E.; Powell, D.; Sumner, J.; Uckan, T.; Vines, B.

    1999-07-25

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) was deployed at the Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant (UEIP) highly enriched uranium (HEU) blending facility in January and February 1999 at Novouralsk in Russia for the DOE HEU Transparency Program. The FMFM provides unattended monitoring of the fissile mass flow of the uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) gas in the process lines of HEU, the low enriched uranium (LEU) blend stock, and the product LEU (P-LEU) of the blending tee non-intrusively. To do this, uranium-235 (U-235) fissions are induced in the UF{sub 6} by a thermalized and modulated californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron source placed on each process line. A set of detectors, located downstream of source, measure delayed gamma rays emitted by the resulting fission fragments. The observed delay in the time correlated measurement between the source and the detector signal provides the velocity of UF{sub 6} and its amplitude is related to the U- 235 content in UF{sub 6}. An on-line computer controls the source modulator, processes the collected detector data, and displays the results. The UEIP Main and the Reserved process lines were implemented with minor modifications. The FMFM monitors the HEU blending operation by measuring UF{sub 6} flows in the process blending lines, and the traceability of the HEU flow from the blend point to the P-LEU. The detail operational characteristics of the FMFM software (FM2) and the measurement methodology used are presented.

  7. Topic: Cesium Management and Disposition Alternatives for the Low Activity Waste Pre-Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules (235.82 KB) More Documents & Publications ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 20: ELECTRONIC RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 20: ELECTRONIC RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 12:

  8. Recommendation 219: Recommendation Regarding the Creation of a Graphic Representation of Waste Disposition Paths

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board recommends that DOE develop graphic representations of waste disposition paths.

  9. Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Uranium Disposition Services, LLC - NCO-2010-01 March 26, 2010 Issued to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC related to Construction Deficiencies at the DUF6 Conversion Buildings at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants On March 26, 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement issued a Consent Order (NCO-2010-01) to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC

  10. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material detection – Active stimulation of highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paff, Marc G.; Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Kiff, Scott; Nowack, Aaron; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-06-21

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.

  11. Gamma/neutron time-correlation for special nuclear material detection – Active stimulation of highly enriched uranium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paff, Marc G.; Monterial, Mateusz; Marleau, Peter; Kiff, Scott; Nowack, Aaron; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2014-06-21

    A series of simulations and experiments were undertaken to explore and evaluate the potential for a novel new technique for fissile material detection and characterization, the timecorrelated pulse-height (TCPH) method, to be used concurrent with active stimulation of potential nuclear materials. In previous work TCPH has been established as a highly sensitive method for the detection and characterization of configurations of fissile material containing Plutonium in passive measurements. By actively stimulating fission with the introduction of an external radiation source, we have shown that TCPH is also an effective method of detecting and characterizing configurations of fissile material containing Highlymore » Enriched Uranium (HEU). The TCPH method is shown to be robust in the presence of the proper choice of external radiation source. An evaluation of potential interrogation sources is presented.« less

  12. Dismantlement and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administrati...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... The Office of Secure Transportation 7 plays a key role throughout the entire process by moving the special nuclear material and classified parts between sites, ensuring that the ...

  13. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iverson, D.C.

    1987-11-20

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

  14. Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iverson, Daniel C.

    1990-01-01

    A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

  15. Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet March 23, 2012 Almost all known cases of theft of nuclear material involved an insider. The threat of a nuclear facility insider, either individually or in collusion with an outsider, stealing fissile material or committing sabotage at a nuclear facility is a difficult one to accept and prevent. The skills, knowledge, access, and authority held by some insiders make the threat difficult

  16. Material Management/Strategic Reserve | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Material Management/Strategic Reserve Y-12 ensures safe, secure and compliant storage of the nation's strategic reserve of nuclear materials at Y-12. Our Nuclear Materials Management and Storage Program receives, stores, protects, dispositions and manages strategic and special nuclear materials and provides programmatic planning, analysis and forecasting for national security material requirements supporting Stockpile Stewardship and other DOE programs

  17. Highly Enriched Uranium Disposition | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the economic value of the material by using the resulting LEU as nuclear reactor fuel. ... HEU from Russian nuclear weapons into LEU used as fuel in U.S. commercial power reactors. ...

  18. Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor and its Implementation at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise, Seversk, Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uckan, T

    2005-07-28

    In this paper the implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise (SChE), Seversk, Russia, are presented. The FMFM, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (PLEU) to the United States from down-blended weapon-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU purchase agreement signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999. The second BDMS has been operational at Electro Chemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, since March 2003. These systems are successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The third BDMS was successfully installed on the HEU down-blending tee in the SChE Enrichment Plant in October 2004. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized {sup 252}Cf spontaneous neutron sources for modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments retained in the flow. The FMFM provides unattended nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow of the UF{sub 6} gas in the blending tee legs of HEU, the LEU blend stock, and the resulting P-LEU. The FMFM also confirms that highly enriched UF{sub 6} gas identified in the HEU leg flows through the blending tee into the P-LEU leg. This report contains details of

  19. Materials of Criticality Safety Concern in Waste Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, S.L.; Day, B.A.

    2006-07-01

    10 CFR 71.55 requires in part that the fissile material package remain subcritical when considering 'the most reactive credible configuration consistent with the chemical and physical form of the material'. As waste drums and packages may contain unlimited types of materials, determination of the appropriately bounding moderator and reflector materials to ensure compliance with 71.55 requires a comprehensive analysis. Such an analysis was performed to determine the materials or elements that produce the most reactive configuration with regards to both moderation and reflection of a Pu-239 system. The study was originally performed for the TRUPACT-II shipping package and thus the historical fissile mass limit for the package, 325 g Pu-239, was used [1]. Reactivity calculations were performed with the SCALE package to numerically assess the moderation or reflection merits of the materials [2]. Additional details and results are given in SAIC-1322-001 [3]. The development of payload controls utilizing process knowledge to determine the classification of special moderator and/or reflector materials and the associated fissile mass limit is also addressed. (authors)

  20. Dynamical description of the moments of the energy distribution of fission fragments and scission of a fissile nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borunov, M. V., E-mail: bmv@opsb.ru; Nadtochy, P. N.; Adeev, G. D. [Omsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2007-11-15

    A multidimensional stochastic approach to fission dynamics on the basis of three-dimensional Langevin equations is applied systematically to calculating the first four moments of the energy distribution of fission fragments over a broad range of Coulomb parameter values (700 < Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} < 1700). For the scission of a fissile nucleus into fragments, use was made of various criteria traditional in modern fission theory: the vanishing of the neck radius at the scission instant and the equality of the neck radius to about 0.3R{sub 0} at this instant. In calculating the energy distribution, both of the criteria used lead to a fairly good description of experimental data on the first two moments and to a satisfactory description of data on the third and fourth moments of the distribution. However, the quality of the description of available experimental data is insufficiently good for giving preference to any of these criteria. Within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics, it is shown that the vanishing-radius criterion leads to unexpectably good agreement with experimental data on the first four moments of the energy distribution. A modified version of one-body dissipation where the coefficient that takes into account the reduction of the wall-formula contribution was set to k{sub s} = 0.25 was used in the calculations.

  1. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six ³He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine ²³³U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  2. A system for the measurement of delayed neutrons and gammas from special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, M. T.; Corcoran, E. C.; Goorley, J. T.; Kelly, D. G.

    2014-11-27

    The delayed neutron counting (DNC) system at the Royal Military College of Canada has been upgraded to accommodate concurrent delayed neutron and gamma measurements. This delayed neutron and gamma counting (DNGC) system uses a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor to irradiate fissile materials before their transfer to a counting arrangement consisting of six He and one HPGe detector. The application of this system is demonstrated in an example where delayed neutron and gamma emissions are used in complement to examine U content and determine fissile mass with an average relative error and accuracy of -2.2 and 1.5 %, respectively.

  3. Hight-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program November 13, 2013 The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program reduces nuclear risk by monitoring the conversion of 500 metric tons (MT) of Russian HEU, enough material for 20,000 nuclear weapons, into low enriched uranium (LEU). This LEU is put into peaceful use in the United States, generating nearly 10% of all U.S. electrical power. The HEU Purchase

  4. Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jens Birkholzer; Robert MacKinnon; Kevin McMahon; Sylvia Saltzstein; Ken Sorenson; Peter Swift

    2014-09-01

    This Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) supports achievement of the overarching mission and objectives of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Technologies Program The implementation plan begins with the assumption of target dates that are set out in the January 2013 DOE Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (http://energy.gov/downloads/strategy-management-and-disposal-used-nuclear-fuel-and-high-level-radioactive-waste). These target dates and goals are summarized in section III. This implementation plan will be maintained as a living document and will be updated as needed in response to progress in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign and the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program.

  5. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification MST Solids Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2013-09-19

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 7 processing. The Marcrobatch 7 material was received with visible fine particulate solids, atypical for these samples. The as received material was allowed to settle for a period greater than 24 hours. The supernatant was then decanted and utilized as our clarified feed material. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test using the clarified feed material. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake after filtration from H-Tank Farm (HTF) feed salt solution. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

  6. Used Fuel Disposition Stainless Steel Canister Challenges Steve Marschman

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stainless Steel Canister Challenges Steve Marschman Field Demonstration Lead Idaho National Laboratory NEET ASI Review Meeting September 17, 2014 Used Fuel Disposition Date 2 Overview n Chloride-Induced Stress Corrosion Cracking (CISCC) has been identified by the NRC as a potential degradation mechanism for welded, stainless steel used fuel canisters (not bare fuel storage casks). n Systems are difficult to inspect and monitor n Three in-service inspections have been performed - Results

  7. Disposition of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators Currently Located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory - 12232

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, J.; Patterson, J.; DeRoos, K.; Patterson, J.E.; Mitchell, K.G.

    2012-07-01

    Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded SEC Federal Services Corporation (SEC) a 34-building demolition and disposal (D and D) project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that included the disposition of six Strontium (Sr-90) powered Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) stored outside of ORNL Building 3517. Disposition of the RTGs is very complex both in terms of complying with disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC) and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements for packaging and transportation in commerce. Two of the RTGs contain elemental mercury which requires them to be Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) compliant prior to disposal. In addition, all of the RTGs exceed the Class C waste concentration limits under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Waste Classification Guidelines. In order to meet the LDR requirements and Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) WAC, a site specific treatability variance for mercury was submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to allow macro-encapsulation to be an acceptable treatment standard for elemental mercury. By identifying and confirming the design configuration of the mercury containing RTGs, the SEC team proved that the current configuration met the macro-encapsulation standard of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 268.45. The SEC Team also worked with NNSS to demonstrate that all radioisotope considerations are compliant with the NNSS low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment and WAC. Lastly, the SEC team determined that the GE2000 Type B cask met the necessary size, weight, and thermal loading requirements for five of the six RTGs. The sixth RTG (BUP-500) required a one-time DOT shipment exemption request due to the RTG's large size. The DOT exemption justification for the BUP-500 relies on the inherent robust construction and material make-up of the BUP- 500 RTG. DOE-ORO, SEC, and

  8. Nuclear Materials Stewardship Within the DOE Environmental Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilyeu, J. D.; Kiess, T. E.; Gates, M. L.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has made significant progress in planning disposition of its excess nuclear materials and has recently completed several noteworthy studies. Since establishment in 1997, the EM Nuclear Material Stewardship Program has developed disposition plans for excess nuclear materials to support facility deactivation. All nuclear materials have been removed from the Miamisburg Environmental Management Project (Mound), and disposition planning is nearing completion for the Fernald Environmental Management Project and the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. Only a few issues remain for materials at the Hanford and Idaho sites. Recent trade studies include the Savannah River Site Canyons Nuclear Materials Identification Study, a Cesium/Strontium Management Alternatives Trade Study, a Liquid Technical Standards Trade Study, an Irradiated Beryllium Reflectors with Tritium study, a Special Performance Assessment Required Trade Study, a Neutron Source Trade Study, and development of discard criteria for uranium. A Small Sites Workshop was also held. Potential and planned future activities include updating the Plutonium-239 storage study, developing additional packaging standards, developing a Nuclear Material Disposition Handbook, determining how to recover or dispose of Pu-244 and U-233, and working with additional sites to define disposition plans for their nuclear materials.

  9. Angular Distributions of Fragments Originating from the Spontaneous Fission of Oriented Nuclei and Problem of the Conservation of the Spin Projection onto the Symmetry Axis of a Fissile Nucleus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S.G.; Rodionova, L.V. [Voronezh State University, Universitetskaya pl. 1, Voronezh, 394693 (Russian Federation)

    2005-09-01

    The concept of transition fission states, which was successfully used to describe the angular distributions of fragments for the spontaneous and low-energy induced fission of axisymmetric nuclei, proves to be correct if the spin projection onto the symmetry axis of a fissile nucleus is an integral of the motion for the external region from the descent of the fissile nucleus from the external fission barrier to the scission point. Upon heating a fissile nucleus in this region to temperatures of T {approx_equal} 1 MeV (this is predicted by many theoretical models of the fission process), the Coriolis interaction uniformly mixes the possible projections of the fissile-nucleus spin for the case of low spin values, this leading to the loss of memory about transition fission states in the asymptotic region where the angular distributions of fragments are formed. Within quantum-mechanical fission theory, which takes into account deviations from A. Bohr's formula, the angular distributions of fragments are calculated for spontaneously fissile nuclei aligned by an external magnetic field at ultralow temperatures, and it is shown that an analysis of experimental angular distributions of fragments would make it possible to solve the problem of spin-projection conservation for fissile nuclei in the external region.

  10. Used fuel disposition campaign international activities implementation plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-06-29

    The management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste is required for any country using nuclear energy. This includes the storage, transportation, and disposal of low and intermediate level waste (LILW), used nuclear fuel (UNF), and high level waste (HLW). The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT), is responsible for conducting research and development pertaining to the management of these materials in the U.S. Cooperation and collaboration with other countries would be beneficial to both the U.S. and other countries through information exchange and a broader participation of experts in the field. U.S. participation in international UNF and HLW exchanges leads to safe management of nuclear materials, increased security through global oversight, and protection of the environment worldwide. Such interactions offer the opportunity to develop consensus on policy, scientific, and technical approaches. Dialogue to address common technical issues helps develop an internationally recognized foundation of sound science, benefiting the U.S. and participating countries. The UNF and HLW management programs in nuclear countries are at different levels of maturity. All countries utilizing nuclear power must store UNF, mostly in wet storage, and HLW for those countries that reprocess UNF. Several countries either utilize or plan to utilize dry storage systems for UNF, perhaps for long periods of time (several decades). Geologic disposal programs are at various different states, ranging from essentially 'no progress' to selected sites and pending license applications to regulators. The table below summarizes the status of UNF and HLW management programs in several countriesa. Thus, the opportunity exists to collaborate at different levels ranging from providing expertise to those countries 'behind' the U.S. to obtaining access to information and expertise from those