Sample records for fish screening improvement

  1. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  2. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  3. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  4. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

  5. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  6. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  7. NEW AND IMPROVED DEVICES FOR FISH CULTURISTS By Alfred E. Fuller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NEW AND IMPROVED DEVICES FOR FISH CULTURISTS By Alfred E. Fuller u. S. Fisheries Station. A., September 22 to 26, 1908 991 #12;CONTENTS. Page. I. Artificial bass nest, ----- __--- _--- -- _-- _--- - --- -- -- --------------------------- ------ 993 2. Bass fry retaining screen and trap u -- -- uuu - - - 994 3. Collecting tub

  8. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

  9. Weakly screened thermonuclear reactions in astrophysical plasmas: Improving Salpeter's model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore E. Liolios

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a detailed study of the electron degeneracy and nonlinear screening effects which play a crucial role in the validity of Salpeter's weak-screening model. The limitations of that model are investigated and an improved one is proposed which can take into account nonlinear screening effects. Its application to the solar pp reaction derives an accurate screening enhancement factor and provides a very reliable estimation of the associated neutrino flux uncertanties.

  10. Improved screen-bowl centrifuge recovery using polymer injection technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchett, R.T.; McGough, K.M.; Luttrell, G.H.

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reports the improved screen-bowl centrifuge recovery process using polymer injection technology. Field test and economic analysis are also included in the paper. 3 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Improvement of an Esocid Bioenergetics Model for Juvenile Fish CASEY W. SCHOENEBECK*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improvement of an Esocid Bioenergetics Model for Juvenile Fish CASEY W. SCHOENEBECK* Department temperature are known to influence the accuracy of fish bioenergetics models. In an effort to improve the accuracy of a juvenile esocid bioenergetics model, we used a regression-based approach to develop

  12. GRANDE RONDE RIVER BASIN FISH HABITAT IMPROVEMENT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Kathy Anderson U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration #12;CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . · · . . · . . . . . . i INTRODUCTION

  13. Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1991-1995 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maynard, Desmond J.; Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnken, Conrad V.W.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), presents research findings and guidelines for development and evaluation of innovative culture techniques to increase postrelease survival of hatchery fish. The Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) described in this report is a collection of experimental approaches designed to produce hatchery-reared chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that exhibit wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology. The NATURES culture research for salmonids included multiple tests to develop techniques such as: raceways equipped with cover, structure, and natural substrates to promote development of proper body camouflage coloration; feed-delivery systems that condition fish to orient to the bottom rather than the surface of the rearing vessel; predator conditioning of fish to train them to avoid predators; and supplementing diets with natural live foods to improve foraging ability. The underlying assumptions are that NATURES will: (1) promote the development of natural cryptic coloration and antipredator behavior; (2) increase postrelease foraging efficiency; (3) improve fish health and condition by alleviating chronic, artificial rearing habitat-induced stress; and (4) reduce potential genetic selection pressures induced by the conventional salmon culture environment. A goal in using NATURES is to provide quality fish for rebuilding depleted natural runs.

  14. Screening

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Screening is typically performed by an outside party or an independent renewable energy expert or team. It is a review of the possible technology options that identifies dead-ends and further...

  15. Pre-Screen Loss and Fish Facility Efficiency for Delta Smelt at the South Delta's State Water Project, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 striped bass may rely on invertebrates and fish as prey (bass, and white catfish collected at the Federal and State Fishbass in the San Francisco Estuary, 1973-2002. California Fish

  16. Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1996-1998 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maynard, Desmond J.

    2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the 1996-1998 Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) research for increasing hatchery salmon postrelease survival and producing fish with more wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology prior to release. Experiments were conducted evaluating automatic subsurface feeders; natural diets; exercise systems; seminatural raceway habitat enriched with cover, structure, and substrate; and predator avoidance conditioning for hatchery salmonids. Automatic subsurface feed delivery systems did not affect chinook salmon depth distribution or vulnerability to avian predators. Live-food diets only marginally improved the ability of chinook salmon to capture prey in stream enclosures. A prototype exercise system that can be retrofitted to raceways was developed, however, initial testing indicated that severe amounts of exercise may increase in culture mortality. Rearing chinook salmon in seminatural raceway habitat with gravel substrate, woody debris structure, and overhead cover improved coloration and postrelease survival without impacting in-culture health or survival. Steelhead fry reared in enriched environments with structure, cover, and point source feeders dominated and outcompeted conventionally reared fish. Exposing chinook salmon to caged predators increased their postrelease survival. Chinook salmon showed an antipredator response to chemical stimuli from injured conspecifics and exhibited acquired predator recognition following exposure to paired predator-prey stimuli. The report also includes the 1997 Natural Rearing System Workshop proceedings.

  17. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement A: Habitat Enhancement Evaluation of Fish and Wash Creeks, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everest, Fred

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat improvements for anadromous salmonids on Fish Creek in the upper Clackamas Basin were evaluated. The primary objectives of the evaluation effort include: (1) evaluate and quantify the changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements; (2) evaluate and quantify the changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements; and (3) evaluate the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and KV funds on Fish Creek. This report integrates data for the evaluation efforts collected in the Fish Creek Basin in 1982 and 1983. 3 references, 34 figures, 23 tables.

  18. A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healey, Christopher G.

    A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume: (1) head-mounted display (HMD); (2) fish tank VR (fish tank); and (3) fish tank VR augmented its structure. Fish tank and haptic participants saw the entire volume on-screen and rotated

  19. Development of pre-screening indices to improve energy analysis of public K-12 schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landman, David Shea

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , an information-based audit (PNNL 1995). The next audit process is the walk-through audit (Hefflngton et al. 1992). The third type of audit, and the most common, is the traditional audit. (Heffington et al. 1992), (XENERGY 1990), (US-DOE 1978), (Haberl... and Komor 1989), (Harrje and Dutt 1988). The last type of audit, which is also the most detailed and most expensive approach, is the maxi-audit (CES/Way 1997), (PNNL 1995). All audits may use various software and indices to improve the results...

  20. FISH SPERMATOLOGY FISH SPERMATOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    FISH SPERMATOLOGY #12;FISH SPERMATOLOGY Alpha Science International Ltd. Oxford, U.K. = Editors Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia, Vodnany, Czech Republic of the publisher. ISBN 978-1-84265-369-2 Printed in India #12;Fish Spermatology is dedicated to Professor Roland

  1. When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

  2. Fish Biologist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a fish biologist within the Fish and Wildlife Policy and Planning organization. Your primarily focus will be on assessing the impacts...

  3. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  4. First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Roger

    First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010 HydroPêche: a way to improve energy efficiency of fishing devices Grégory Germain 1 , Philippe Druault 2 should provide a substantial gain on the fuel consumed of actual fishing devices while maintaining

  5. Improvement of Anadromous Fish Habitat and Passage in Omak Creek, 2008 Annual Report : February 1, 2008 to January 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dasher, Rhonda; Fisher, Christopher [Colville Confederated Tribes

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 2008 season, projects completed under BPA project 2000-100-00 included installation of riparian fencing, maintenance of existing riparian fencing, monitoring of at-risk culverts and installation of riparian vegetation along impacted sections of Omak Creek. Redd and snorkel surveys were conducted in Omak Creek to determine steelhead production. Canopy closure surveys were conducted to monitor riparian vegetation recovery after exclusion of cattle since 2000 from a study area commonly known as the Moomaw property. Additional redd and fry surveys were conducted above Mission Falls and in the lower portion of Stapaloop Creek to try and determine whether there has been successful passage at Mission Falls. Monitoring adult steelhead trying to navigate the falls resulted in the discovery of shallow pool depth at an upper pool that is preventing many fish from successfully navigating the entire falls. The Omak Creek Habitat and Passage Project has worked with NRCS to obtain additional funds to implement projects in 2009 that will address passage at Mission Falls, culvert replacement, as well as additional riparian planting. The Omak Creek Technical Advisory Group (TAG) is currently revising the Omak Creek Watershed Assessment. In addition, the group is revising strategy to focus efforts in targeted areas to provide a greater positive impact within the watershed. In 2008 the NRCS Riparian Technical Team was supposed to assess areas within the watershed that have unique problems and require special treatments to successfully resolve the issues involved. The technical team will be scheduled for 2009 to assist the TAG in developing strategies for these special areas.

  6. Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutant, Charles C [ORNL; Mann, Roger [RMecon, Davis, California; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

  7. Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish DAILY SECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernald, Russell

    Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish Home DAILY SECTIONS News Sports Opinion Arts America! Study Spanish & Volunteer ONE FISH, TWO FISH, DUMB FISH, DEAD FISH | Print | E- mail Written scientists say fish are capable of deducing how they stack up against the competition by simply watching

  8. Preliminary Screening

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first step in assessing renewable energy options is to conduct a preliminary screening to decide which technologies are worth investigating and which can be eliminated immediately. Preliminary...

  9. Robot Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast transcript: Usually you expect this kind of news from Japan but this time it's South Korea where scientists have just created a robotic fish. Yes, folks, this is an electronic fish that can live underwater. At depths of up to 100 meters...

  10. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River Estuary. Volume II. Impingement impact analyses, evaluations of alternative screening devices, and critiques of utility testimony relating to density-dependent growth, the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock, and the LMS real-time life cycle model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnthouse, L. W.; Van Winkle, W.; Golumbek, J.; Cada, G. F.; Goodyear, C. P.; Christensen, S. W.; Cannon, J. B.; Lee, D. W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes a series of four exhibits relating to impacts of impingement on fish populations, together with a collection of critical evaluations of testimony prepared for the utilities by their consultants. The first exhibit is a quantitative evaluation of four sources of bias (collection efficiency, reimpingement, impingement on inoperative screens, and impingement survival) affecting estimates of the number of fish killed at Hudson River power plants. The two following exhibits contain, respectively, a detailed assessment of the impact of impingement on the Hudson River white perch population and estimates of conditional impingement mortality rates for seven Hudson River fish populations. The fourth exhibit is an evaluation of the engineering feasibility and potential biological effectiveness of several types of modified intake structures proposed as alternatives to cooling towers for reducing impingement impacts. The remainder of Volume II consists of critical evaluations of the utilities' empirical evidence for the existence of density-dependent growth in young-of-the-year striped bass and white perch, of their estimate of the age-composition of the striped bass spawning stock in the Hudson River, and of their use of the Lawler, Matusky, and Skelly (LMS) Real-Time Life Cycle Model to estimate the impact of entrainment and impingement on the Hudson River striped bass population.

  11. Projection screen having reduced ambient light scattering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for improving the contrast between incident projected light and ambient light reflected from a projection screen are described. The efficiency of the projection screen for reflection of the projected light remains high, while permitting the projection screen to be utilized in a brightly lighted room. Light power requirements from the projection system utilized may be reduced.

  12. Fish Tales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not really the central issue, however. It is more to the point that both fishermen and scientists enjoy creating a good story, and we also enjoy a story well told. The correct mixture of truth, lie, fantasy and excitement is a witches brew.

  13. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

  14. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  15. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michak, Patty

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1986 Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This interagency project was developed to provide a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. Agencies involved in the project are: WDF, Washington Department of Wildlife, Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its third year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1989. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989 and will compare sampling results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on stocks. 2 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. To appear in Proc. 2012 ICRA Putting the Fish in the Fish Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    with animals in groups. Virtual reality provides a novel opportunity for high-output biological data collection studies in humans [11]. A virtual-reality paradigm may be used to understand local interactions a computer screen based on criteria on the animal's pose. Fish-tank virtual-reality (VR) uses the viewer

  17. Reverberatory screen for a radiant burner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Paul E. (North East, MD)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to porous mat gas fired radiant burner panels utilizing improved reverberatory screens. The purpose of these screens is to boost the overall radiant output of the burner relative to a burner using no screen and the same fuel-air flow rates. In one embodiment, the reverberatory screen is fabricated from ceramic composite material, which can withstand higher operating temperatures than its metallic equivalent. In another embodiment the reverberatory screen is corrugated. The corrugations add stiffness which helps to resist creep and thermally induced distortions due to temperature or thermal expansion coefficient differences. As an added benefit, it has been unexpectedly discovered that the corrugations further increase the radiant efficiency of the burner. In a preferred embodiment, the reverberatory screen is both corrugated and made from ceramic composite material.

  18. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eakle, Robert F. (New Ellenton, SC); Pak, Donald J. (Martine, GA)

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  19. Nearshore fish assemblages associated with introduced predatory fishes in lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    investigated the relationship between the presence of introduced largebodied predatory fishes (largemouth bass: impact; invasive species; native fishes; pike; largemouth bass; rock bass; smallmouth bass; walleyeNearshore fish assemblages associated with introduced predatory fishes in lakes JUSTIN TRUMPICKASa

  20. HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 2 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH 428 Washington 25, D, C. December 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART TWO HANDLING FRESH FISH By Charles in a series of five on "Refrigeration of Fish." Titles of the other four leaflets are: - 38 - 84 Part 1

  1. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  2. Evaluation of an integrated fish-protection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, G.; Nestler, J. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Weeks, G. [AScI, Inc., Calhoun Falls, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish-protection system (FPS) components in the tailrace of Richard B. Russell Pumped Storage Project, Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, were tested at various times in 1993-94. Components included avoidance of daytime pumping, a high-frequency (118-130 KHz) sound system, strobe lights, a bar-screen veneer on trash racks, and high-pressure sodium lights. Tests compared numbers and lengths of entrained fish collected in a full-recovery net in the forebay under several treatments: (1) day versus night, (2) sound on versus off, (3) strobe-light on versus off, and (4) before versus after installation of the bar-screen. Attracting-light tests compared relative densities of fish in lit and adjacent unlit tailrace areas. Tailrace fish were sampled monthly with gill nets and mobile hydroacoustics to help account for entrainment differences resulting from changes in tailrace fish populations. Mean daytime rates were higher than nighttime rates primarily due to the closer vertical proximity of blueback herring to deep draft-tube openings during the day than at night. In sound tests with four high-frequency transducers per turbine bay, sound-on treatments reduced mean hourly entrainment of blueback herring by 56%. Bar screens were present throughout strobe-light and sound tests. The bar screen appeared to reduce mean entrainment of striped bass and white-bass x striped bass hybrids. However, mean relative densities of these fish in the tailrace also decreased 64%. Nevertheless, variance of density estimates was high in contrast to consistently low entrainment for 12 subsequent months. After bar-screen installation, entrainment decreased. The reduction in hourly entrainment of blueback herring suggested by statistical models derived in a few nights of strobe-light and sound testing was close to the observed 78% reduction in the mean for 18 pre-test pumps versus the mean for 30 post-test pumps.

  3. COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinkers 44 Fish Hooks 45 to 46 Tuna Jigs 47 Fishing Spoons 47 Swivels 48 Floats and Buoys 48 List and Diesel power. Shipbuilding techniques and fishing exper- iences are reflected in the modern fishing navigation and fish-finding de- vices. A recent development in fishing gear is the power block used

  4. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All Brands ExceptCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch

  5. SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

  6. Screening tests for improved methane cracking materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J. E.; Hoelder, J. S. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{sup R} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 deg.C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 seem feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAESr getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas. (authors)

  7. iFISH -Conceptually What is iFISH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Jon

    iFISH - Conceptually What is iFISH? iFISH is an underlying technology that can form the basis and effective manner. It provides users with a unique exploration experience. iFISH offers a playful environment that encourages a further quick and deeper investigation. iFISH provides all of the above. It employs sliders

  8. Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

  9. 'ELECTRIC FISH SCREEN By F. O. McMILLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are killed by mechanical injury or sudden pressure change incident to passing through hydraulic turbines

  10. Building bridges for fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building-bridges-for-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

  11. Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

  12. One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Greg

    One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video Andrew Rova Simon template object recognition method for classifying fish species in un- derwater video. This method can be a component of a system that automatically identifies fish by species, im- proving upon previous works which

  13. FISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    ) from a natal stream and is applied as a case study in California's Shasta River. Restoration activitiesFISH HABITAT OPTIMIZATION TO PRIORITIZE RIVER RESTORATION DECISIONS S. E. NULLa * and J. R. LUNDb restoration alternatives for improving fish habitat by evaluating tradeoffs between fish production

  14. Augmented Fish Monitoring, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michak, Patty

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1986 Washington department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project. This project provides a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its second year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1988. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1988 to December 31, 1988 and will compare sampling results from 1987 and 1988. The analysis will be divided in two sections: adult analysis and juvenile analysis. The adult analysis will include results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on index stocks. Additionally, highlights from monthly monitoring exams will identify any significant and unusual findings from the routine exams completed in 1988. 6 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. FISH U REGISTRATION Name: ___________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    registration and deposit (Make checks payable to SIUC) to: FISH U (Attn: Candie Glover) Fisheries & Illinois. Carbondale, IL 62901 Fish U Fisheries & Illinois Aquaculture Attn: Candie Glover Life Science II, Rm 173. Contact Candie Glover if you are interested in coordinating efforts for carpooling and/or lodging. #12;

  16. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETAIL PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna. (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All BrandsCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU PRICES APRIL 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market Development FISHERY

  17. Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

  18. EIS-0265-SA-57: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Watershed Management Program - Idaho Fish Screening Improvement (Champion, Iron, Fourth of July, Goat Creeks)

  19. Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Colin B.

    "One fish, Two fish, Red fish, Blue fish" Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector Ibrahim using a device designed to determine the freshness of fish. Through an electric current applied fresh fish from those which are not. Key words. Mathematical modelling, differential equations, noise re

  20. Application of a new screening model to thermonuclear reactions of the rp process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore Liolios

    2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new screening model for astrophysical thermonuclear reactions was derived recently which improved Salpeter's weak-screening one. In the present work we prove that the new model can also give very reliable screening enhancement factors (SEFs) when applied to the rp process. According to the results of the new model, which agree well with Mitler's SEFs, the screened rp reaction rates can be, at most, twice as fast as the unscreened ones.

  1. THE FISH LIVER OIL INDUSTRY FISH ERY LEAFLET 233

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of livers with respect to oil content and vitamin A potency · · Relationship of oil content and vitamin A by molecular dietillation · Concentration of vitamin A by saponification · Vitamin-oil specifications, pricesQY THE FISH LIVER OIL INDUSTRY FISH ERY LEAFLET 233 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE United States

  2. Conventional Medical Screening Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician.

  3. Hydropower Potential Screening Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydropower Potential Screening Study Gillian Charles GRAC 5/28/14 #12;Latest Hydropower Potential Study Creating a Buzz 2014 DOE study on undeveloped stream reaches 84.7 GW undeveloped hydropower in undeveloped stream reaches hydropower in the PNW #12;Studies at both National

  4. Boyer-Tillamook Access Road Improvement Project 1 Finding of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    dangerous. In addition, improvements to access road stream crossings would facilitate fish passage. Construction is expected to last from 2 to 4 months, although work may need to...

  5. A new screen scanning system based on clustering screen objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Peter

    A new screen scanning system based on clustering screen objects Pradipta Biswas Research Student with a computer through one or two switches with the help of a scanning mechanism. In this paper we present a new scanning technique based on clustering screen objects and then compare it with two other scanning systems

  6. Fish passage and protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of reprints on fish passage and protection topics from: American Fisheries Society; American Society of Civil Engineers; Harza Engineering Company; Hydro Review Magazine; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Independent Energy Magazine; National Hydropower Association; Northwest Hydroelectric Association; United States Army Corps of Engineers; United States Committee on large dams; and the United States Department of the Interior.

  7. FISH U REGISTRATION Name: ___________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Aquatic Sciences Attn: Candie Glover, Outreach Coordinator Life Science II, Rm 173 ­ Mail Code 6511 Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture & Aquatic Sciences Attn: Candie Glover, Outreach Coordinator Life MUST have a current Fishing License. Contact Candie Glover if you are interested in coordinating

  8. DISPLAY SCREEN EQUIPMENT REGULATIONS 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , charts or computer-generated graphics are included. Screens whose main use is to show television or film the standards required by the Regulations. 4 RISKS FROM USING DISPLAY SCREENS The principal risk associated when

  9. One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

  10. Can infrared gravitons screen $?$?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Garriga; Takahiro Tanaka

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that infrared gravitons in de Sitter space may lead to a secular screening of the effective cosmological constant. This seems to clash with the naive expectation that the curvature scalar should stay constant due to the Heisenberg equation of motion. Here, we show that the tadpole correction to the local expansion rate, which has been used in earlier analyses as an indicator of a decaying effective $\\Lambda$, is not gauge invariant. On the other hand, we construct a gauge invariant operator which measures the renormalized curvature scalar smeared over an arbitrary window function, and we find that there is no secular screening of this quantity (to any given order in perturbation theory).

  11. Dynamic Screening and Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei V. Gruzinov

    1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that there are no dynamic screening corrections to the Salpeter's enhancement factor in the weak-screening limit.

  12. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

  13. Updating Technical Screens for PV Interconnection: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coddington, M.; Ellis, A.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Key, T.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Hill, R.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) is the dominant type of distributed generation (DG) technology interconnected to electric distribution systems in the United States, and deployment of PV systems continues to increase rapidly. Considering the rapid growth and widespread deployment of PV systems in United States electric distribution grids, it is important that interconnection procedures be as streamlined as possible to avoid unnecessary interconnection studies, costs, and delays. Because many PV interconnection applications involve high penetration scenarios, the process needs to allow for a sufficiently rigorous technical evaluation to identify and address possible system impacts. Existing interconnection procedures are designed to balance the need for efficiency and technical rigor for all DG. However, there is an implicit expectation that those procedures will be updated over time in order to remain relevant with respect to evolving standards, technology, and practical experience. Modifications to interconnection screens and procedures must focus on maintaining or improving safety and reliability, as well as accurately allocating costs and improving expediency of the interconnection process. This paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offers potential short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen.

  14. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  15. RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

  16. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

  17. Domain Fishing and 3D-JIGSAW: tools for protein comparative modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreira, Bruno Contreras

    Fishing up to 7 alternative alignments #12;3D-JIGSAW Example #12;EVA: continuous evaluation of servers · improved alignments · multidomain modelling We want to do next: · better template selection (energies

  18. Convergent Evolution in Livebearing Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troendle, Nicholas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    CONVERGENT EVOLUTION IN LIVEBEARING FISHES A Thesis by NICHOLAS JOSEPH TROENDLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2012 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Convergent Evolution in Livebearing Fishes Copyright 2012 Nicholas Joseph Troendle CONVERGENT EVOLUTION IN LIVEBEARING...

  19. 1 E Fish out recruitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E Fish out Harvest Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon Hatchery 1A Juvenile/Smolt production Habitat 1G Rearing distribution 2K Estuarine life histories among returning adults 3E Productivity survival 1B Adult hydrosystem survival 1C Project survival (juvenile) 1D Fish guidance efficiency 1E

  20. 1 E Fish out recruitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E Fish out Harvest Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon Hatchery 1A Juvenile/Smolt production Habitat 1G Rearing distribution 2K Estuarine life histories among returning adults 3E Productivity (juvenile) 1D Fish guidance efficiency 1E Forebay delay 2A, 3F Dam passage delay 2B Dam passage fallback

  1. Fuel assembly debris screen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, J.; Ewing, R.H.; Patterson, J.F.

    1991-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a debris screen for a fuel assembly for a reactor to which coolant fluid is supplied. It comprises a substantially planar plate member of material impervious to fluid having an array of coolant openings extending through the plate member dimensioned to trap at least a portion of debris particles carried by the coolant; and a skirt member enclosing the periphery of the plate member; each the coolant flow opening having a coolant entry region at a lower surface of the plate member, a coolant exit region at an upper surface of the plate member and a coolant flow path extending between the entry and exit regions, the flow path including an intermediate segment laterally offset from the entry and exit regions to cause coolant to change direction of flow in the intermediate segment and thereby prevent at least a portion of the debris particles from passing through the plate member.

  2. Electron screening in nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajevic, Jelena; Lipoglavsek, Matej; Petrovic, Toni; Pelicon, Primoz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia) and Cosylab d.d, Teslova ulica 30, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to further investigate electron screening phenomenon we studied proton induced nuclear reactions over an energy range from 1.35 to 3.08 MeV for different environments: Ni metal and NiO insulator. The measurements were based on observation of the {gamma}-ray yields of {sup 59,61,63,64,65}Cu and {sup 58,60,62}Ni. Also, we have studied the decay of {sup 61}Cu produced in the reaction {sup 60}Ni(p,{gamma}), in order to find a possible decay rate perturbation by atomic electrons and found a small difference in half-life for metallic compared to oxide environment, respectively. The present results clearly show that the metallic environment affects the fusion reactions at low energy and that it might also affect the decay rate.

  3. Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett...

  4. Santa Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2002). Socio-economic profile of the California wetfishCommercial Fishing Community Profile, July 2008 Mangelsdorf,Commercial Fishing Community Profile, July 2008 Santa Cruz

  5. 10/5/08 9:56 AMRed Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish --Shekhar 2008 (1001): 2 --ScienceNOW Page 1 of 2http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2008/1001/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton, Karen L.

    10/5/08 9:56 AMRed Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish -- Shekhar 2008 (1001): 2 -- Science. Blue male cichlids (top) live close to the surface of Lake Victoria, whereas red males dwell in deeper water. CREDIT: OLE SEEHAUSEN Red Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish By Chandra Shekhar Science

  6. Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

  7. Through A Fish's Eye: The Status of Fish Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . More than 3,000 species of fish inhabit America's streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, marshes, swamps important factors such as small dams and abandoned mines could not be incorporate

  8. Medical Screening Protocol for the Former Worker Medical Screening...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with B-reading Spirometry Physical examination Up to every 3 years Lung cancer Low-dose chest CT scan, where offered 1 Re-screening offered at 3 or 6 months for...

  9. A chrestomathy Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avise, John

    A chrestomathy on fishes Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia of Ichthyology, Ecology and Evolution,200,000 words of science, of which roughly 45,000 (nearly 1%) refer directly or indirectly to fishes. These have now been compiled, annotated, cross-refer- enced and elaborated on by Daniel Pauly in Darwin's Fishes

  10. Consumer Expenditure Patterns for Fish and Shellfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on/ish and shellfish. March )WJ2. 44(.7) Table 1. - Price, per capita consumption, and share of fish Service. 1981). Per capita Consumer price Per capita total Consumer price index Fish/shellfish fish/shellfish index for red meat/poultry/ for tofal red meat/ expenditure consumption fish/sheIIIish seafood

  11. Native Fish Society Molalla, OR 97308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Native Fish Society PO Box 568 Molalla, OR 97308 Conserving biological diversity of native fish are the state, federal and tribal fish management agencies that have limited authority over habitat conditions in the basin. That authority resides with other agencies, but the fish management agencies can certainly

  12. Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Protein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Now playing at a supercomputer near you: proteins in action June 29, 2005 Contact: Dan Krotz,...

  13. HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

  14. BIODIVERSITY Freshwater fish introductions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Freshwater fish introductions in mediterranean-climate regions and fragmenta- tion, hydrological alteration, climate change, overexploitation, pollution and the global mediterranean-climate regions: California (USA), central Chile, south-western Australia, the Iberian peninsula

  15. Optimal Screening for Preclinical Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ang

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    for our model, and that it can be quickly found by any greedy-search algorithm. We further conduct numerical experimentations by which we identify sensitive model inputs. We lastly apply our model to breast cancer screening using practical information...

  16. Six-Degree-of-Freedom Sensor Fish Design: Governing Equations and Motion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Simmons, Carver S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sensor Fish device is being used at Northwest hydropower projects to better understand the conditions fish experience during passage through hydroturbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone numerous design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the three degree of freedom (3DOF) device, has been used successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when passing through turbines, in spill, or in engineered fish bypass facilities at dams. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of redesigning the current 3DOF Sensor Fish device package to improve its field performance. Rate gyros will be added to the new six degree of freedom (6DOF) device so that it will be possible to observe the six linear and angular accelerations of the Sensor Fish as it passes the dam. Before the 6DOF Sensor Fish device can be developed and deployed, governing equations of motion must be developed in order to understand the design implications of instrument selection and placement within the body of the device. In this report, we describe a fairly general formulation for the coordinate systems, equations of motion, force and moment relationships necessary to simulate the 6DOF movement of an underwater body. Some simplifications are made by considering the Sensor Fish device to be a rigid, axisymmetric body. The equations of motion are written in the body-fixed frame of reference. Transformations between the body-fixed and interial reference frames are performed using a formulation based on quaternions. Force and moment relationships specific to the Sensor Fish body are currently not available. However, examples of the trajectory simulations using the 6DOF equations are presented using existing low and high-Reynolds number force and moment correlations. Animation files for the test cases are provided in an attached CD. The next phase of the work will focus on the refinement and application of the 6DOF simulator developed in this project. Experimental and computational studies are planned to develop a set of force and moment relationships that are specific to the Sensor Fish body over the range of Reynolds numbers that it experiences. Lab testing of prototype 6DOF Sensor Fish will also allow for refinement of the trajectory simulations through comparison with observations in test flumes. The 6DOF simulator will also be an essential component in tools to analyze field data measured using the next generation Sensor Fish. The 6DOF simulator will be embedded in a moving-machinery computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for hydroturbines to numerically simulate the 6DOF Sensor Fish.

  17. Fishes Of Las Gemelas Seamounts And Isla Del Coco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Richard M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groupers Threadfin Bass Wrasses Total Fish Biomass (kg/100mJawfishes Jellynose fish Leather bass Longfinned bullseyeGoosefishes Jellynose fish Leather bass Longfinned bullseye

  18. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and North76. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Gotshall, D. W. 1966.Eureka Fishing Community Profile Monroe, G. M. , S. J.

  19. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Maple, T. Grant (Sunnyvale, CA); Sklensky, Alden F. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  20. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harbor Fishing Community Profile Ralston, S. 2002. WestTrinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile Endnotes http://information. Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

  1. Decision trees and integrated features for computer aided mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kegelmeyer, W.P. Jr.; Groshong, B.; Allmen, M.; Woods, K.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Breast cancer is a serious problem, which in the United States causes 43,000 deaths a year, eventually striking 1 in 9 women. Early detection is the only effective countermeasure, and mass mammography screening is the only reliable means for early detection. Mass screening has many shortcomings which could be addressed by a computer-aided mammographic screening system. Accordingly, we have applied the pattern recognition methods developed in earlier investigations of speculated lesions in mammograms to the detection of microcalcifications and circumscribed masses, generating new, more rigorous and uniform methods for the detection of both those signs. We have also improved the pattern recognition methods themselves, through the development of a new approach to combinations of multiple classifiers.

  2. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  3. Microelectroporation device for genomic screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perroud, Thomas D.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Negrete, Oscar; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an microelectroporation device that combines microarrays of oligonucleotides, microfluidic channels, and electroporation for cell transfection and high-throughput screening applications (e.g. RNA interference screens). Microarrays allow the deposition of thousands of different oligonucleotides in microscopic spots. Microfluidic channels and microwells enable efficient loading of cells into the device and prevent cross-contamination between different oligonucleotides spots. Electroporation allows optimal transfection of nucleic acids into cells (especially hard-to-transfect cells such as primary cells) by minimizing cell death while maximizing transfection efficiency. This invention has the advantage of a higher throughput and lower cost, while preventing cross-contamination compared to conventional screening technologies. Moreover, this device does not require bulky robotic liquid handling equipment and is inherently safer given that it is a closed system.

  4. Design, prototyping, and testing of an apparatus for establishing a linear temperature gradient in experimental fish tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadri, Romi Sinclair

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immunology researchers require a new type of fish tank that provides a linear thermal gradient for experimental zebrafish in order to improve the accuracy and validity of their research. Zebrafish require the ability to ...

  5. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  6. MFR PAPER 1230 Finding Fish With Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors, fishing vessels , spotter pilots, research vessels, and offshore oil platforms were used Investigation? A. It is an attempt to find out if satellites can help fishermen find fish. Our assumption

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH Jindong Liu, Ian Dukes CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom Email: {jliua, idukes, rrknig, hhu}@essex.ac.uk Keywords: Robotic fish the fish movement into several basic behaviours, namely straight cruise, cruise in turn and sharp turn

  8. Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation a specific stock-effort dynamic model. The stock corresponds to two fish populations growing and moving between two fishing zones, on which they are harvested by two different fleets. The effort represents

  9. Screening systems adapt to changing conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prep plants are installing larger screening systems and synthetic media is meeting those challenges. The largest manufacturer of synthetic screen media is Polydeck located in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The company's primary product lines include modular polyurethane and rubber screen panels and the frame systems to support the media. The modular approach overcomes a wear problem in one area of the deck common on Banana screens and facilitates maintenance. A rubber formation used in 1- x 2-pt screen panels called the Flexi design is softer and allows more vibration than standard urethane panels. The Maxi screen panel design combined with the PipeTop II frame makes the system highly versatile. 1 photo.

  10. The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa + 0 ) 2 6 - 4 9 Jacky J. Cosson I. INTRODUCTION Spermatozoa are unique among cells generated by the metazoans and are haploid unicells. Fish sperm is released with extremely harmful conditions (fresh water, sea or brackish water) in the case for many fish species (Huxley

  11. COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Derek S.

    COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend Department/Number: NONC F040 F01 Credits: 0 to the art and science of fly casting, fishing and tying. Students will learn how use a fly rod to place a fly with pinpoint accuracy, tie fishing knots and construct their own leaders, and, most importantly

  12. Fish Oil Industry in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the international market. Refined anchovy oil is an excellent product for many applIcations or it can be transformedFish Oil Industry in South America UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Fish Oil Industry in South America By -J. R. SANCHEZ TORRES Chief

  13. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos the approach, we develop a physics­based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their vir­ tual habitat are not entirely predictable

  14. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

  15. Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes Xiaoyuan Tu Demetri Terzopoulos Department worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrody­ namically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit

  16. Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sterling K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooc Z TA245.7 8873 N0.1380 r--- u ----!i -- B-1380 Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes Sterling K. Johnson* Fish grubs are the immature forms of parasitic worms that invade the flesh of fishes. Grubs appear as round or bead...

  17. Circular 57 Streptococcal Infections of Fish1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    , and striped bass (Inglis et al. 1993). Strep has also been isolated from a variety of ornamental fishCircular 57 Streptococcal Infections of Fish1 Roy P.E. Yanong and Ruth Francis-Floyd2 1 of the common disease-causing bacteria of fish are Gram-negative (appear pink with a Gram stain

  18. Mercury concentrations in Maine sport fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, C.P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)] [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Haines, T.A. [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)] [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess mercury contamination of fish in Maine, fish were collected from 120 randomly selected lakes. The collection goal for each lake was five fish of the single most common sport fish species within the size range commonly harvested by anglers. Skinless, boneless fillets of fish from each lake were composited, homogenized, and analyzed for total mercury. The two most abundant species, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, were also analyzed individually. The composite fish analyses indicate high concentrations of mercury, particularly in large and long-lived nonsalmonid species. Chain pickerel Esox niger, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and white perch Morone americana had the highest average mercury concentrations, and brook trout and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the lowest. The mean species composite mercury concentration was positively correlated with a factor incorporating the average size and age of the fish. Lakes containing fish with high mercury concentrations were not clustered near known industrial or population centers but were commonest in the area within 150 km of the seacoast, reflecting the geographical distribution of species that contained higher mercury concentrations. Stocked and wild brook trout were not different in length or weight, but wild fish were older and had higher mercury concentrations. Fish populations maintained by frequent introductions of hatchery-produced fish and subject to high angler exploitation rates may consist of younger fish with lower exposure to environmental mercury and thus contain lower concentrations than wild populations.

  19. Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Walleye · Smallmouth bass · Northern pike · Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12;· At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control · Implement

  20. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  1. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  2. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish *preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:07 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section D. 7 Title: Resident Fish Mitigation (pg 22-23) Overview Generally, entities recommend that the existing language

  3. Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord­ ing to Newton's laws's method to integrate. ffl Accumulate the mean­square­velocity of all the fish 2 6 4 #fish X i=1 velocity 2 i #fish 3 7 5 1=2 and plot it as a function of time. ffl Choose the time step dt in the integrator

  4. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  5. HUD CHP GUIDE #2 - FEASIBILITY SCREENING FOR CHP IN MULTIFAMILY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    screening exercise and shows the screens for the feasibility screening tool, computer software prepared for HUD by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). chpguide2.pdf...

  6. Portuguese Ships on Japanese Namban Screens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamafune, Kotaro

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    scenes of the first European activities in Japan. Among the subjects depicted on Namban screens, some of the most intriguing are ships: the European ships of the Age of Discovery. Namban screens were created by skillful Japanese traditional painters who...

  7. DOE: Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FWP provides no-cost medical screenings to all former DOE Federal, contractor and subcontractor employees. The screening exams are offered by third party providers from universities, labor unions,...

  8. Portuguese Ships on Japanese Namban Screens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamafune, Kotaro

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    scenes of the first European activities in Japan. Among the subjects depicted on Namban screens, some of the most intriguing are ships: the European ships of the Age of Discovery. Namban screens were created by skillful Japanese traditional painters who...

  9. C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of Swimming Performance in Fishes: Predicting Evolution with Biomechanics R. Brian Langerhans1, * and David N. Reznick2 NT NINTRODUCTIONTN NINTRODUCTION Residing within the immense diversity of fishes

  10. Fish Protection: Cooperative research advances fish-friendly turbine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Foust, Jason

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable hydropower is a tremendous resource within the Pacific Northwest that is managed with considerable cost and consideration for the safe migration of salmon. Recent research conducted in this region has provided results that could lower the impacts of hydro power production and make the technology more fish-friendly. This research is now being applied during a period when a huge emphasis is being made to develop clean, renewable energy sources.

  11. Distribution, relative abundance and species composition of shrimp, crabs and fish in the intake area, discharge canal and cooling lake of the Cedar Bayou generating station, Baytown, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Clair, Lou Ann

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nearly all the sea 21 catfish vulnerable to entrainment or impingement (Landry 1977). His trawl tows (181) in the P. H. Robinson discharge canal yielded only 16 individuals and, yet, 1, 616 sea cat- fish were collected in the revolving screen samples...

  12. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796]).

  13. Rationale and design of the ADDITION-Leicester study, a systematic screening programme and Randomised Controlled Trial of multi-factorial cardiovascular risk intervention in people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus detected by screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, D R; Khunti, K; Srinivasan, B; Gray, L J; Taub, N; Campbell, S; Barnett, J; Henson, J; Hiles, S; Farooqi, A; Griffin, Simon J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Davies, M J

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Background Earlier diagnosis followed by multi-factorial cardiovascular risk intervention may improve outcomes in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Latent phase identification through screening requires structured, appropriately targeted...

  14. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Kim, Rosalind (Moraga, CA); Jancarik, Jamila (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  15. Electric and Magnetic Screening Masses at Finite Temperature from Generalized Polyakov-Line Correlations in Two-flavor Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Maezawa; S. Aoki; S. Ejiri; T. Hatsuda; N. Ishii; K. Kanaya; N. Ukita; T. Umeda

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Screenings of the quark-gluon plasma in electric and magnetic sectors are studied on the basis of generalized Polyakov-line correlation functions in lattice QCD simulations with two flavors of improved Wilson quarks. Using the Euclidean-time reflection ($\\R$) and the charge conjugation ($\\Ca$), electric and magnetic screening masses are extracted in a gauge invariant manner. Long distance behavior of the standard Polyakov-line correlation in the quark-gluon plasma is found to be dictated by the magnetic screening. Also, ratio of the two screening masses agrees with that obtained from the dimensionally-reduced effective field theory and the ${\\cal N}=4$ supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  16. Fish Passage though Hydropower Turbines: Simulating Blade Strike using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    mong the hazardous hydraulic conditions affecting anadromous and resident fish during their passage though turbine flows, two are believed to cause considerable injury and mortality: collision on moving blades and decompression. Several methods are currently available to evaluate these stressors in installed turbines, i.e. using live fish or autonomous sensor devices, and in reduced-scale physical models, i.e. registering collisions from plastic beads. However, a priori estimates with computational modeling approaches applied early in the process of turbine design can facilitate the development of fish-friendly turbines. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency of blade strike and nadir pressure environment by modeling potential fish trajectories with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) applied to fish-like composite particles. In the DEM approach, particles are subjected to realistic hydraulic conditions simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and particle-structure interactions—representing fish collisions with turbine blades—are explicitly recorded and accounted for in the calculation of particle trajectories. We conducted transient CFD simulations by setting the runner in motion and allowing for better turbulence resolution, a modeling improvement over the conventional practice of simulating the system in steady state which was also done here. While both schemes yielded comparable bulk hydraulic performance, transient conditions exhibited a visual improvement in describing flow variability. We released streamtraces (steady flow solution) and DEM particles (transient solution) at the same location from where sensor fish (SF) have been released in field studies of the modeled turbine unit. The streamtrace-based results showed a better agreement with SF data than the DEM-based nadir pressures did because the former accounted for the turbulent dispersion at the intake but the latter did not. However, the DEM-based strike frequency is more representative of blade-strike probability than the steady solution is, mainly because DEM particles accounted for the full fish length, thus resolving (instead of modeling) the collision event.

  17. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  18. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

  19. Foreign Fishery Developments The Norwegian Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EEC fisheries agreement, which prevented Norwegian purse seiners from fishing North Sea brisling during the peak,200 t of meal (up 0.6 percent) and 164,600 t of oil (down 9.1 per- cent). Arctic Cod Quotas Quotas for Arctic.3 Fish oil 79,400 180.5 107,300 241.4 Cod liver oil 12,700 63.1 10,900 51.3 Canned fish 14,100 233.8 15

  20. Capability Improvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement As stated in Section 3.5 of the Technical Requirements, The performance of the ASC and NERSC...

  1. Pile driving and bioacoustic impacts on fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Deborah C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the nexus to use steel piles as the preferred structuralbegan driving the steel piles, we realized that underwaterdeath to fish near the pile. Pressure waves are generated

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: avoid altering fish behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fish behavior Current Energy Converter Array Optimization Framework On March 13, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable...

  3. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document was printed on recycled paper. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines M. A. Weiland T. J. Carlson October 2003 Prepared for: Pacific...

  4. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  5. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  6. Spooner creek restoration and fish ladder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tom

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPOONER CREEK RESTORATION AND FISH LADDER Tom Moore (Phone:847-3132 Abstract Spooner Creek is a dendritic second orderflows into Cattaraugus Creek, a tributary of Lake Erie.

  7. FISHING INDUSTRY OF THE GULF OF ADEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisor t o the Br itish Secret ary of State ,the best fishing gr ounds s eem t o ? e of f t he har b r

  8. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  9. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

  10. Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet and Heart Attacks MAURICE E. STANSBY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet and Heart Attacks MAURICE E. STANSBY Introduction Research has shown- unsaturates but also often equivalent amounts of saturates. Vegetable oils, on the other hand, contain principally polyunsaturates. Nevertheless, fish oils reduce serum cholesterol levels to a greater extent than

  11. Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    345 Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON 1,240 individuals of 28 species of waterbirds were examined in the United States for ingested lead fishing weights. A combination of radiography and visual examination of stomachs was used to search for lead weights and blood

  12. Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    1 Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning in a Simulated inhabited by realistic artificial fishes. Our algorithms emulate not only the appearance, movement model each animal holistically. An artificial fish is an autonomous agent situated in a simulated

  13. Fish Bulletin No. 45. The Sharks and Rays of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walford, Lionel A

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of each dorsal fin, the fish is a Horned Shark (Heterodontusdorsal fins are without spines, the fish is a Sleeper Shark (dorsal fin is above the root of the pectoral fins, the fish is a Mackerel Shark (

  14. Are mangroves a limiting resource for two coral reef fishes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, B S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reef fish. Proc 6th Int Coral Reef Symp 1:149–155 Wilsona limiting resource for two coral reef fishes? Benjamin S.of adult populations of 2 coral reef fish species (the

  15. Toward Joint Hypothesis-Tests Seismic Event Screening Analysis: Ms|mb and Event Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Selby, Neil [AWE Blacknest

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Well established theory can be used to combine single-phenomenology hypothesis tests into a multi-phenomenology event screening hypothesis test (Fisher's and Tippett's tests). Commonly used standard error in Ms:mb event screening hypothesis test is not fully consistent with physical basis. Improved standard error - Better agreement with physical basis, and correctly partitions error to include Model Error as a component of variance, correctly reduces station noise variance through network averaging. For 2009 DPRK test - Commonly used standard error 'rejects' H0 even with better scaling slope ({beta} = 1, Selby et al.), improved standard error 'fails to rejects' H0.

  16. Screening of Hydrocarbon Sources in JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Strachan; W. Fundamenski; M. Charlet; K. Erents; J. Gafert; C. Giroud; M. von Hellermann; G. Matthews; G. McCracken; V. Philipps; J. Spence; M.F. Stamp; K-D. Zastrow; and EFDA-JET Work Programme Collaborators

    2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon is the principal impurity in the Joint European Torus (JET). Methane screening experiments quantify the ability of the scrape-off layer (SOL)/divertor system to ionize carbon and transport it to the divertor, preventing core plasma contamination. Previous JET publications studied edge-localized-mode-averaged high-confinement mode screening, and separately, evaluated the methodology of low-confinement mode (L-mode) screening measurements. This paper extends the L-mode measurements to include relevant plasma parameter scans and DIVIMP modeling of the L-mode screening.

  17. Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies...

  18. Updating Interconnection Screens for PV System Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abraham Ellis, Roger Hill Sandia National Laboratories Tom Key, Kristen Nicole, Jeff Smith Electric Power Research Institute Updating Interconnection Screens for PV System...

  19. Almost Linear Complexity Methods for Delay-Doppler Channel Alexander Fish and Shamgar Gurevich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sydney, University of

    provide a striking improvement over current methods in the presence of a substantial Doppler effect1 Almost Linear Complexity Methods for Delay-Doppler Channel Estimation Alexander Fish and Shamgar of delay-Doppler channel, i.e., a signal undergoes only delay and Doppler shifts, a widely used method

  20. Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget »TraveleBooks FindFirstFirst-time

  1. Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest Total Annual Average Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions1/ 226 5 24 41 8 310 137 750 1/ FY 2012 White Sturgeon. These actions may include such things as dredging, restoration of channel complexity

  2. Kalispel Resident Fish Project Annual Report, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented.

  3. DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY Marine Biological Laboratory APR 21 1953 WOODS HOLE, Albert M. Day, Director DIRECTING THE MOVH-IENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY by Alberton L. McLain Fishery of an electrical leading device 21 Literature cited. ..,...,..,..........·· 2k ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1. Diagram

  4. Fish Physiology, Toxicology, and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    was "Eutrophication: The toxic effects of ammonia, nitrite and the detrimental effects of hypoxia on fish." These proceedings include 22 papers presented over a 3-day period and discuss eutrophication, ammonia and nitrite toxicity and the effects of hypoxia on fish with the aim of understanding the effects of eutrophication

  5. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

  6. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  7. FISH POPULATION STUDIES LEWIS AND CLARK LAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their full contribution to the progress, prosperity, and security of the United States, now and in the future, and shore seine catches in the months of June, July, and August by South Dakota Department of Game, Fish Dakota Depart - ment of Game, Fish and Parks, and continued each year through 1961 as part of the Dingell

  8. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AUGUST 2009 A report prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council #12;#12;Bitterroot Subbasin Inventory for Fish (Inventory Volume), and Part III (Management Plan Volume), its appendices, and electronically linked

  9. Making a Big Splash with Louisiana Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    .S.A. All Rights Reserved. #12;#12;Table of Contents Preface Table of Contents Overview of the LSU MNS Fish Chapter IV. The Gulf of Mexico Section IV.A. The Louisiana Pancake Batfish Section IV.B. Tripod Fish and the SERPENT Project Section IV.C. The 2010 Oil Spill Chapter V. The Mississippi River Section V.A Background

  10. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS [Marine Biological Laboratoryj WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL A, Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suoraela, Commissioner CORROSION RESISTANCE were tagged with nickel and Type 304 stainless steel pins to compare the corrosion resistance

  11. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  12. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  13. african cichlid fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Somatostatin Regulates Aggressive Behavior in an African Cichlid Fish Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: be- havioral states. In the African cichlid fish...

  14. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines This report evaluated the feasibility of two types of...

  15. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  16. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

  17. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  18. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  19. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  20. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

  1. Lasers, fish ears and environmental change | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lasers, fish ears and environmental change ORNL and TVA team up to study Kingston spill restoration efforts Researchers analyze fish otoliths using a laser to understand...

  2. Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDole, Tracey Shannon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    versus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems Aversus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems bywas to investigate the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

  3. australian freshwater fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in fish is a regulated, cellular process. The ambient water is an additional magnesium source for fish, implicating the gills as a secondary route for magnesium uptake. Certainly,...

  4. atherinopsid freshwater fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in fish is a regulated, cellular process. The ambient water is an additional magnesium source for fish, implicating the gills as a secondary route for magnesium uptake. Certainly,...

  5. australian freshwater fish: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in fish is a regulated, cellular process. The ambient water is an additional magnesium source for fish, implicating the gills as a secondary route for magnesium uptake. Certainly,...

  6. Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G. P.

    2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It should be noted that ESV's are continuously revised by the various issuing agencies. The references in this report provide the citations of each source and, where applicable, the internet address where they can be accessed. Although radiological screening values are not included herein due to space limitations, these have been recently derived by a technical working committee sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE 2002, 2004). The recommended ecological screening values represent the most conservative concentrations of the cited sources, and are to be used for screening purposes only. They do not represent remedial action cleanup levels. Their use at locations other than SRS should take into account environmental variables such as water quality, soil chemistry, flora and fauna, and other ecological attributes specific to the ecosystem potentially at risk.

  7. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Crescent City Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and NorthCity Fishing Community Profile Leidersdorf, C. 1975.City Fishing Community Profile Woodbury, D. 1999. Reduction

  8. Page 1 of 100 Full Screen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    ()d. #12;Home Page Title Page Contents Page 7 of 100 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit The behavior of bothHome Page Title Page Contents Page 1 of 100 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Scenario Generation Uncertainty Quantification in Industrial and Energy Applications: Experiences and Challenges, Minneapolis

  9. NARES CULTURE FOR MRSA SCREENING I. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    NARES CULTURE FOR MRSA SCREENING I. INTRODUCTION Active Surveillance Testing (AST) to detect newly admitted patients who are nasally colonized with MRSA is required in 2009 to comply with California Health an anterior nares specimen for MRSA screening. III. SUPPLIES 1. For children, adolescents and adults: BD BBL

  10. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  11. Training considerations for the intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags in fish with a summary of common surgical errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Wagner, Glenn N.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Training is a fundamental part of all scientific and technical disciplines. This is particularly true for all types of surgeons. For surgical procedures, a number of skills are necessary to reduce mistakes. Trainees must learn an extensive yet standardized set of problem-solving and technical skills to handle challenges as they arise. There are currently no guidelines or consistent training methods for those intending to implant electronic tags in fish; this is surprising, considering documented cases of negative consequences of fish surgeries and information from studies having empirically tested fish surgical techniques. Learning how to do fish surgery once is insufficient for ensuring the maintenance or improvement of surgical skill. Assessment of surgical skills is rarely incorporated into training, and is needed. Evaluation provides useful feedback that guides future learning, fosters habits of self-reflection and self-remediation, and promotes access to advanced training. Veterinary professionals should be involved in aspects of training to monitor basic surgical principles. We identified attributes related to knowledge, understanding, and skill that surgeons must demonstrate prior to performing fish surgery including a “hands-on” assessment using live fish. Included is a summary of common problems encountered by fish surgeons. We conclude by presenting core competencies that should be required as well as outlining a 3-day curriculum for training surgeons to conduct intracoelomic implantation of electronic tags. This curriculum could be offered through professional fisheries societies as professional development courses.

  12. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  13. FRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE. REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART THREE FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE OF FISHERY PRODUCTS Taking Place During Cold Storage of Fish Section 3 - Protective Coverings for Frozen Fish · · Pages 1

  14. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

  15. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  16. The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group MIT Media Laboratory 20 Ames Street E15 OF CONTENTS ----------------- 1. ASCII SERIAL FISH PROTOCAL 2. HOW TO MAKE FISH ANTENNA 3. CALIBRATION SOFTWARE INSTALLATION 4. HOW TO CALIBRATE A FISH 5. COMPONENT PLACEMENT 6. SCHEMATICS 7. PARTS LIST HOW

  17. Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

  18. Cape Fear River Basin Action Plan for Migratory Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    those built to produce hydroelectric power and store drinking water, which block fish from returning

  19. ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA By E. A. Tulian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA .", By E. A. Tulian Chief ofthe Section ofFish Culture, Ministry of Agriculture, Argentina Paper presented before the Fourth International Fishery #12;ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA. ~ By E. A. TULIAN, Chief of the Section of Fish

  20. INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Production Advisory Committee PNFHPC: Pacific Northwest Fish Health Protection Committee PP&L: Paafic Power

  1. CLOUD SCREENING METHODOLOGY FOR MERIS/AATSR SYNERGY PRODUCTS Luis Gomez-Chova, Gustavo Camps-Valls, Jordi Mu~noz-Mari, Javier Calpe, and Jose Moreno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camps-Valls, Gustavo

    CLOUD SCREENING METHODOLOGY FOR MERIS/AATSR SYNERGY PRODUCTS Luis G´omez-Chova, Gustavo Camps (Valencia), Spain. ABSTRACT This paper describes the current development status of a cloud-screening method to improve current cloud mask- ing products for both sensors. Preliminary results based on simulated TOA

  2. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  3. National Security Science and Technology Initiative: Air Cargo Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; White, Tim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cespedes, Ernesto [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bowerman, Biays [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Bush, John [Battelle

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-intrusive inspection (NII) of consolidated air cargo carried on commercial passenger aircraft continues to be a technically challenging, high-priority requirement of the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate (DHS S&T), the Transportation Security Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. The goal of deploying a screening system that can reliably and cost-effectively detect explosive threats in consolidated cargo without adversely affecting the flow of commerce will require significant technical advances that will take years to develop. To address this critical National Security need, the Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle), under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with four of its associated US Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories (Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, Idaho, and Brookhaven), conducted a research and development initiative focused on identifying, evaluating, and integrating technologies for screening consolidated air cargo for the presence of explosive threats. Battelle invested $8.5M of internal research and development funds during fiscal years 2007 through 2009. The primary results of this effort are described in this document and can be summarized as follows: (1) Completed a gap analysis that identified threat signatures and observables, candidate technologies for detection, their current state of development, and provided recommendations for improvements to meet air cargo screening requirements. (2) Defined a Commodity/Threat/Detection matrix that focuses modeling and experimental efforts, identifies technology gaps and game-changing opportunities, and provides a means of summarizing current and emerging capabilities. (3) Defined key properties (e.g., elemental composition, average density, effective atomic weight) for basic commodity and explosive benchmarks, developed virtual models of the physical distributions (pallets) of three commodity types and three explosive benchmarks combinations, and conducted modeling and simulation studies to begin populating the matrix of commodities, threats, and detection technologies. (4) Designed and fabricated basic (homogeneous) commodity test pallets and fabricated inert stimulants to support experiments and to validate modeling/simulation results. (5) Developed/expanded the team's capabilities to conduct full-scale imaging (neutron and x-ray) experiments of air cargo commodities and explosive benchmarks. (6) Conducted experiments to improve the collection of trace particles of explosives from a variety of surfaces representative of air cargo materials by means of mechanical (air/vibration/pressure), thermal, and electrostatic methods. Air cargo screening is a difficult challenge that will require significant investment in both research and development to find a suitable solution to ensure the safety of passengers without significantly hindering the flow of commodities. The initiative funded by Battelle has positioned this group to make major contributions in meeting the air cargo challenge by developing collaborations, developing laboratory test systems, improving knowledge of the challenges (both technical and business) for air cargo screening, and increasing the understanding of the capabilities for current inspection methods (x-ray radiography, x-ray backscatter, etc.) and potential future inspection methods (neutron radiography, fusion of detector modalities, advanced trace detection, etc.). Lastly, air cargo screening is still an issue that will benefit from collaboration between Department of Energy Laboratories and Battelle. On January 7, 2010, DHS Secretary Napolitano joined White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs and Assistant to the President for Counterterrorism and Homeland Security John Brennan to announce several recommendations DHS has made to the President for improving the technology and procedures used to protect air travel from acts of terrorism. (This announcement followed the 25 Dec'09 Delta/Northwest Airlines Flight 253 terror attack.) Secretary Napolitano out

  4. Smart Screening System (S3) In Taconite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryoush Allaei

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The conventional screening machines used in processing plants have had undesirable high noise and vibration levels. They also have had unsatisfactorily low screening efficiency, high energy consumption, high maintenance cost, low productivity, and poor worker safety. These conventional vibrating machines have been used in almost every processing plant. Most of the current material separation technology uses heavy and inefficient electric motors with an unbalanced rotating mass to generate the shaking. In addition to being excessively noisy, inefficient, and high-maintenance, these vibrating machines are often the bottleneck in the entire process. Furthermore, these motors, along with the vibrating machines and supporting structure, shake other machines and structures in the vicinity. The latter increases maintenance costs while reducing worker health and safety. The conventional vibrating fine screens at taconite processing plants have had the same problems as those listed above. This has resulted in lower screening efficiency, higher energy and maintenance cost, and lower productivity and workers safety concerns. The focus of this work is on the design of a high performance screening machine suitable for taconite processing plants. SmartScreens{trademark} technology uses miniaturized motors, based on smart materials, to generate the shaking. The underlying technologies are Energy Flow Control{trademark} and Vibration Control by Confinement{trademark}. These concepts are used to direct energy flow and confine energy efficiently and effectively to the screen function. The SmartScreens{trademark} technology addresses problems related to noise and vibration, screening efficiency, productivity, and maintenance cost and worker safety. Successful development of SmartScreens{trademark} technology will bring drastic changes to the screening and physical separation industry. The final designs for key components of the SmartScreens{trademark} have been developed. The key components include smart motor and associated electronics, resonators, and supporting structural elements. It is shown that the smart motors have an acceptable life and performance. Resonator (or motion amplifier) designs are selected based on the final system requirement and vibration characteristics. All the components for a fully functional prototype are fabricated and have been tested.

  5. Updating Interconnection Screens for PV System Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coddington, M.; Mather, B.; Kroposki, B.; Lynn, K.; Razon, A.; Ellis, A.; Hill, R.; Key, T.; Nicole, K.; Smith, J.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper evaluates the origins and usefulness of the capacity penetration screen, offer short-term solutions which could effectively allow fast-track interconnection to many PV system applications, and considers longer-term solutions for increasing PV deployment levels in a safe and reliable manner while reducing or eliminating the emphasis on the penetration screen. Short-term and longer-term alternatives approaches are offered as examples; however, specific modifications to screening procedures should be discussed with stakeholders and must ultimately be adopted by state and federal regulatory bodies.

  6. antenatal screening lessons: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subsequent screening should be done in accordance with CDC guidelines. Specific testing for HIV-2 should be conducted for refugees who screen positive for HIV and are native...

  7. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)...

  8. HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage HT Combinatorial Screening of Novel Materials for High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Presentation for...

  9. Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resource Maps and Screening Tools Renewable Energy Resource Maps and Screening Tools Renewable energy resources are available across the United States but vary greatly depending on...

  10. Disposable Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor for Amperometric Detection of Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Disposable Carbon Nanotube Modified Screen-Printed Biosensor...

  11. Voltammetric Analysis of Europium at Screen-Printed Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Voltammetric Analysis of Europium at Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with Salicylamide Self-Assembled on Mesoporous Silica. Voltammetric Analysis of Europium at Screen-Printed...

  12. Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . There is also a shortage of pro- cessing equipment such as ice factories and cold storage facilities.Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry Polish fishennen caught about 700

  13. Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  14. FISHERY LEAFLET 260 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE INTERIOR #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, J. A. ICn;ig, Secretary Fish and Wildlife LEGISLATION Compiled by MILTOK J. LIHDNEE Aquatic Biologist, Office of Foreign Activities and Chief, United

  15. Laser technique detects pollutants in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a laser and a mass spectrometer, trace pollutants can be detected in fish scales and the time and place of exposure can be determined. The technique has been demonstrated using striped bass from the Clinch and Tennessee rivers.

  16. Kootenai River Native Fish Conservation Aquaculture Master

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /incomplete incubation · predation · larval food limitation/starvation · over-wintering energy deficiency Result: Aging Idaho Dept of Fish and Game #12;Burbot conservation strategy · conservation aquaculture · habitat) · Continue small scale extensive rearing experiments in local ponds · Monitor experimental releases

  17. Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

  18. Bose-Einstein Condensation on Holographic Screens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Behrouz; Raissi, Zahra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a boson gas on holographic screens of the Rindler and Schwartzschild spacetimes. It is shown that the gas on the stretched horizon is in a Bose-Einstein condensed state with the Hawking temperature $T_c=T_H$ if the particle number of the system be equal to the number of quantum bits of spacetime $ N \\simeq {A}/{{\\l_{p}}^{2}}$. A boson gas on a holographic screen $(r>2M)$ with the same number of particles and at Unruh temperature is also in a condensed state. Far from the horizon, the Unruh temperature is much lower than the condensation temperature $(T_c=T_{{Unruh}}+\\sqrt {f(r)} T_{Planck})$. This analysis implies a possible physical model for quantum bits of spacetime on a holographic screen. We propose a unique and physical interpretation for equipartition theorem on holographic screens. Also, we will argue that this gas is a fast scrambler.

  19. Fish Passage Center 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele [Fish Passage Center of the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Authority

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The January-July runoff volume above the Dalles Dam in 2007 was 89% of the average runoff volume for the 1971-2000 historical record. The April-July runoff volume at Lower Granite Dam was 68% of the 1971-2000 historical record. Over the 79 year historical record from 1929 through 2007, the 2007 January-July runoff volume at the Dalles was the 50th lowest year out of the 79th year record. The January through July runoff volume at Lower Granite was the 65th lowest runoff year out of 79 on record. This year can be characterized by steadily decreasing snowpack which was below average in the Columbia Basin by the end of April. The combination of runoff volume, decreasing snowpack and reservoir operations resulted in spring migration flows at McNary Dam averaging 239 Kcfs, slightly above the Biological Opinion flow objective of 237 Kcfs. However the spring period migration flows in the Snake River averaged 61 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam, substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 85 Kcfs. Summer migration period Biological Opinion flow objectives averaged 163 Kcfs at McNary Dam, substantially below the summer flow objective of 200 Kcfs. Summer migration period flows in the Snake River at Lower Granite Dam averaged 29 Kcfs, also substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 50 Kcfs. Overall spring migrants in the Columbia River experienced better migration flows than spring migrants in the Snake River reach. Summer migration flow objectives were not achieved in either the Columbia or Snake rivers. The 2007 FCRPS Operations Agreement represents an expanded and improved spill program that goes beyond the measures contained in the 2004 Biological Opinion. During the spring period, spill now occurs for twenty-four hours per day at all projects, except for John Day Dam where the daily program remains at 12 hours. A summer spill program provides spill at all the fish transportation collector projects (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams), whereas prior to 2005 spill was terminated at these projects after the spring period. In addition, the 2007 operations agreement provided regardless of flow conditions. For the first time spill for fish passage was provided in the low flow conditions that prevailed in the Snake River throughout the spring and summer migration periods. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) monitoring continued throughout the spill period. A higher incidence of rank 1, GBT signs were observed in late arriving steelhead smolts arriving after the 95% passage date had occurred. During this time dissolved gas levels were generally below the 110% water quality standard in the forebay where fish were sampled. This occurrence was due to prolonged exposure and extended travel times due to low migration flows. The 2007 migration conditions differed from any year in the historic record. The migration conditions combined low river flows in the Snake River with spill throughout the spring and summer season. The juvenile migration characteristics observed in 2007 were unique compared to past years in that high levels of 24 hour spill for fish passage were provided in low flow conditions, and with a delayed start to the smolt transportation program a smaller proportion of the total run being transported. This resulted in relatively high spring juvenile survival despite the lower flows. The seasonal spring average flow in the Snake River was 61 Kcfs much lower than the spring time average of 120 Kcfs that occurred in 2006. However juvenile steelhead survival through the Lower Granite to McNary reach in 2007 was nearly 70% which was similar to the juvenile steelhead survival seen in 2006 under higher migration flows. The low flows in the May-July period of 2007 were similar to the 2001 low flow year, yet survival for fall chinook juveniles in this period in 2007 was much higher. In 2001 the reach survival estimate for juvenile fall Chinook from Lower Granite to McNary Dam ranged from 0.25-0.34, while survival in the same reach ranged between 0.54-0.60 in 2007. In addition travel time estimat

  20. Screening citrus rootstocks for alkalinity tolerance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudahono

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCREENING CITRUS ROOTSTOCKS FOR ALKALINITY TOLERANCE A Thesis by SUDAHONO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major... Subject: Horticulture SCREENING CITRUS ROOTSTOCKS FOR ALKALINITY TOLERANCE A Thesis by SUDAHONO Approved as to style and content by: David H. yr (Chair of Com ttee) Robert E. Rouse (Member) ~. Err. tg~i ~PI. ~~ Frank M. Hone (Member) Calvin G...

  1. Infrastructure Required for Tag/Mark Application, Detection, and Recovery Tag/Mark & release Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency Adipose fin clip Marking trailers N processing Otolith Insulated box, thermal chilling system, lab processing, smolt traps N/A Fish traps, fish *Fish mortality data may be collected at any stage of the fish life cycle from harvest, recovered

  2. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and high-level waste (HLW). Average and outlying (high burnup, high initial enrichment, low age, or otherwise exceptional) forms of each waste-form type are considered. This analysis has been prepared in accordance with a technical work plan (BSC 2002c). In a review of Revision 00 of this radionuclide screening analysis, the NRC found that ''processes that affect transport in the biosphere, such as uptake by plants and bioaccumulation are not accounted for'' and that ''the direct exposure pathway is not accounted for'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). The NRC also found that the solubility and sorption classes were too broadly defined, noting, for example, that Se is in the same solubility and sorptivity groups as Np and U, yet is ''more soluble than Np and U by several orders of magnitude'' (Beckman 2001, Section 5.3.2.1). This revision seeks to build upon the strengths of the earlier screening method while responding to the specific concerns raised by the NRC and other reviewers. In place of simple inhalation and ingestion dose conversion factors, the revised radionuclide screening uses screening factors that also take into account soil accumulation, uptake by plants, exposure to contaminated ground, and other features of the biosphere that were neglected in the previous screening. Whereas the previous screening analysis allowed only two solubility classes (soluble and insoluble), the revised screening introduces an intermediate solubility class to better segregate the radionuclides into transport groups.

  3. The effects of habitat composition, quality, and breaks on home ranges of exploited nearshore reef fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Christopher G.; Caselle, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bass Sheephead Kelp bass Ocean whitefish Of the fish thatsand bass and trying to recapture previously tagged fish forgamefish. Kelp bass data are only from fish tracked along

  4. Asthma patients with specific genotypes identified for fish oil treatment trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    genotypes identified for fish oil treatment trial Thecommon chronic disease. Fish oils containing omega-3 fattyinflammatory diseases. Fish oil inhibits the production of

  5. Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Lauren J.

    Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation by differences in fishing pressure and catchment deforestation; and we related relative condition factor to gradients of environmental variation across lakes. Lakes charac- terized by severe catchment deforestation

  6. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  7. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  8. Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

  9. Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, as Influenced by Habitat Enhancement, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, John (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR); Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Heller, David A. (Mount Hood National Forest, Gresham, OR)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, was continued in fiscal year 1985 by the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The study began in 1982 when PNW entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to evaluate fish habitat improvements in the Fish Creek basin on the Estacada Ranger District. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (19824986) to be financed by Forest Service funds. Several factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin were identified during the first year of the study, and the scope of the habitat improvement effort was subsequently enlarged. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to provide additional funding for work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is designed to increase the annual number of chinook and coho salmon, and steelhead trout smolt outmigrants. The primary objectives of the evaluation include the: (1) Evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat Improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and Forest Service funds on Fish Creek. Several prototype enhancement projects were constructed and tested during the first three years of the study. The Intention was to identify successful techniques that could then be broadly applied within the bash. This stepwise procedure has been largely successful in identifying the most promising enhancement techniques for the Fish Creek basin. To date, 7-10 percent of the habitat area in the basin has been treated. When work on Fish Creek is completed, it is estimated that 50-60 percent of the total habitat area used by anadromous salmonids will have received some form of treatment. This annual progress report will focus on the projects completed in the basin In 1983, 1984, and 1985, and their evaluation. Winter habitat use and coho salmon and steelhead trout smolt production will also be emphasized.

  10. EFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH, SHELLFISH Washington 25, D. C. 1956 REFRI GERATION OF FISH: PART FOUR PREPARATION, FREEZING, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH

  11. Quantum corrections to screening at strong coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajay Singh; Aninda Sinha

    2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute a certain class of corrections to (specific) screening lengths in strongly coupled nonabelian plasmas using the AdS/CFT correspondence. In this holographic framework, these corrections arise from various higher curvature interactions modifying the leading Einstein gravity action. The changes in the screening lengths are perturbative in inverse powers of the 't Hooft coupling or of the number of colours, as can be made precise in the context where the dual gauge theory is superconformal. We also compare the results of these holographic calculations to lattice results for the analogous screening lengths in QCD. In particular, we apply these results within the program of making quantitative comparisons between the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma and holographic descriptions of conformal field theory.

  12. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

  13. The pendulum dilemma of fish orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HongSheng Zhao

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The shape of a galaxy is constrained both by mechanisms of formation (dissipational vs. dissipationless) and by the available orbit families (the shape and amount of regular and stochastic orbits). It is shown that, despite the often very flattened shapes of banana and fish orbits, these boxlet orbits generally do not fit a triaxial galaxy in detail because, similar to loop orbits, they spend too little time at the major axis of the model density distribution. This constraint from the shape of fish orbits is relaxed at (large) radii where the density profile of a galaxy is steep.

  14. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford`s nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list.

  15. archer fishes toxotes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrodynamics of jumping in archer fish, Toxotes microlepis MIT - DSpace Summary: The maneuvering of fish is not only of...

  16. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  17. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through...

  18. Hydrodynamics of jumping in archer fish, Toxotes microlepis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Anna Margaret

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The maneuvering of fish is not only of interest to those wishing to better understand how fish function, but also is a great inspiration for designing underwater vehicles. This thesis provides the first characterization ...

  19. Fishery Notes Great Lakes 1976 Commercial Fish Catch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., will become operational to pro- vide navigation service in the Gulf of Mexico . Exi ting LORAN-C chains-value fish is processed into fish meal , oil , and pet food . The whitefish was the leading income

  20. Seagrass habitat utilization by fishes in Christmas Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crotwell, Patricia Lynn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fishes in Christmas Bay, TX were collected during April 1994 through March 1995 to: 1) assess temporal variability in their density, biomass, and diversity; 2) define the relationship between variability in fish population parameters...

  1. Seagrass habitat utilization by fishes in Christmas Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crotwell, Patricia Lynn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fishes in Christmas Bay, TX were collected during April 1994 through March 1995 to: 1) assess temporal variability in their density, biomass, and diversity; 2) define the relationship between variability in fish population parameters...

  2. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  3. A METHOD OF SIMULTANEOUSLY TAGGING LARGE OCEANIC FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -range sportfishing boats, which fre- quently capture large tuna but lack gear to han- dle live fish on deck

  4. Supervisor: Odd M. Faltinsen The influence of fish on the mooring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    1 Zhao He Supervisor: Odd M. Faltinsen The influence of fish on the mooring loads of a floating fish farm CeSOS Highlights #12;2 · Dead fish experiment · Simulations related to the dead fish experiment · Real fish experiment · Simulations related to the real fish experiment · Conclusions Experiments

  5. SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory APR 2 '^ 1958 WOODS HOLE, MASS CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON By W. R. Bridges Cooperative Fishery Research Laboratory Southern Illinois as a fish poison. At concentrations of 1 p. p.m. sodium cyanide and at a variety of temperature and p

  6. Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

  7. Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one-out and impounded waters, limerock pits, and sand or gravel pits, commonly called borrow pits. Fishing pressure in fishing as a source of recreation and food. Competition for public fishery resources, coupled

  8. Fish Nutrition1 Ruth Francis-Floyd, DVM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    VM114 Fish Nutrition1 Ruth Francis-Floyd, DVM2 1. This document is VM114, one of a series Introduction For many years water quality has been the most important limitation to fish production. Advances. Most successfully reared ornamental fish are omnivores, and these are the species that have adapted

  9. Pentastomid Infections in Fish1 Roy P. E. Yanong2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA90 Pentastomid Infections in Fish1 Roy P. E. Yanong2 1. This document is Fact Sheet FA-90, one of worm-like parasites that infect many different species of fish. Infections have been found in several families of fish including the Cichlidae (tilapia), Cyprinidae (danios), Cyprinodontidae (flagfish

  10. upcfish.nw 29 September 2003 1 Fish and Sharks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    upcfish.nw 29 September 2003 1 Fish and Sharks Hiromi Suenaga and Phil Merkey Introduction correlation with actual predator-prey problems in the real world. In our model we have the fish swimming to explore was the interaction between two different primary data structures. The collection of fish

  11. A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning Chao Zhou, Zhiqiang Cao, Shuo a novel miniature biomimetic robotic fish based on single link with compact structure, high maneuverability and multiple sensors. The robotic fish mimics the motion of Thunniform mode, and the methods

  12. PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease Striped bass (Morone saxitilis) and hybrid striped bass these fish are commonly raised in high densities under intensive aquaculture situations (e.g., cages, ponds of the viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens, but the fish become increasingly susceptible

  13. Enhancing Fish Tank VR Jurriaan D. Mulder, Robert van Liere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liere, Robert van

    Enhancing Fish Tank VR Jurriaan D. Mulder, Robert van Liere Center for Mathematics and Computer Science CWI Amsterdam, the Netherlands mullie¡ robertl¢ @cwi.nl Abstract Fish tank VR systems provide that resides at a fixed location. Therefore, fish tank VR systems provide only a limited virtual workspace

  14. DETECTING ABNORMAL FISH TRAJECTORIES USING CLUSTERED AND LABELED DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    DETECTING ABNORMAL FISH TRAJECTORIES USING CLUSTERED AND LABELED DATA Cigdem Beyan, Robert B We propose an approach for the analysis of fish trajectories in unconstrained underwater videos. Trajectories are classified into two classes: normal trajectories which contain the usual behavior of fish

  15. Simulator Building and Parameter Optimization of an Autonomous Robotic Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Simulator Building and Parameter Optimization of an Autonomous Robotic Fish Jindong Liu, Huosheng@essex.ac.uk Abstract-- This paper presents a short review on the research of robotic fish. A simulation environment for robotic fish is built and the experiment shows that it is a convenient way to make research on the robotic

  16. Fish Foraging on an Artificial Reef in Puget Sound, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish Foraging on an Artificial Reef in Puget Sound, Washington GREGORY J. HUECKEL and R. LEE with an artificial reef in Puget Sound to increase our knowledge of the changes in the structure of the fish com with an artificial reef in Puget Sound, Wash. Stomachs ofthesefish species, dissectedfrom 609 fish speared on, around

  17. Summer Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience in Coastal Fish Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    ·Tagging and tracking striped bass using acoustic technology ·Fish habitat surveys ·Stomach pumpingSummer Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience in Coastal Fish Ecology We seek 1 and estuarine fish ecology in northeastern Massachusetts What you get: ·Field research experience ·3 credit

  18. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

  19. Annual Fish Population Surveys of Lewis and Clark Lake, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nearly the same as 1998, but preferred-length fish were more abundant in the sample. Smallmouth bass/ " 202. -F SOUTH DAKOTA c ) Annual Fish Population Surveys of Lewis and Clark Lake, 1999 Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Joe Foss Building Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182 o o

  20. Contaminant Concentrations in Fish SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Fish and Game) arranged for age determination of largemouth bass. Henry Lee (U.S. EPA) reviewed a draftContaminant Concentrations in Fish from the Sacramento­San Joaquin Delta and Lower San Joaquin ......................................................................................... 45 Contaminant Concentrations in Fish from the Sacramento­San Joaquin Delta and Lower San Joaquin

  1. Phytoplankton blooms and fish recruitment rate: Effects of spatial distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biktashev, Vadim N.

    Phytoplankton blooms and fish recruitment rate: Effects of spatial distribution V. N. Biktashev a consider the spatio-temporal dynamics of a spatially-structured generalisa- tion of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-fish. In particular, we study the dependence of the fish recruitment on carrying capacities of the plankton subsystem

  2. Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish Habib Ammari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish Habib Ammari Thomas Boulier Josselin in weakly electric fishes. We first investigate the forward complex conductivity problem and derive the approx- imate boundary conditions on the skin of the fish. Then we provide a dipole approximation

  3. "Bone Softening," a Practical Way to Utilize Small Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Even in Japan, where per-capita fish consumption is about 5 times that of the United States, small tons in 1986) is used primarily for fish meal rather than for direct human consumption. Looking for ways to increase direct consumption of sar dines and other small fishes, Japanese researchers

  4. The Fish Passage Center Annual Report of Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fish Passage Center Annual Report of Accomplishments 2012 Salmon River Smolt Monitoring Program Trap Submitted To The Fish Passage Center Oversight Board December 30, 2012 #12;G:\\STAFF\\DOCUMENT\\2012 Documents\\2012 Files\\156-12.doc Profile The Fish Passage Center (Center) was first established in 1984

  5. Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, and in the Gulf of Mexico, but prices for high-potency shark-liver oil made fishing for soupfinShark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner UNITED 5T ATE5 DEPART MENT.A OF l'O~I,a;RCI!,L Fr RERIES, Donald L. 'McKernan, Director · Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review

  6. Prediction of biomass in Norwegian fish farms Anders Llanda,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrin, Magne

    involves systematic fluctuations in biomass and quantity of slaughtered fish. When the new fish have beenPrediction of biomass in Norwegian fish farms Anders Lřlanda, , Magne Aldrina , Gunnhildur H). The model provided good predictions of future biomass of Norwegian farmed salmon and can also be used

  7. Helical Turbine and Fish Safety By Alexander Gorlov, August, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    1 Helical Turbine and Fish Safety By Alexander Gorlov, August, 2010 Abstract The objective of this paper is to describe research using the Helical Turbine for hydropower with particular focus on fish). Correspondingly, the following two conclusions are formulated. Probability of fish kill by kinetic turbines

  8. MFR PAPER 1278 Flavors in Fish From Petroleum Pickup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1278 Flavors in Fish From Petroleum Pickup MAURICE E. STANSBY ABSTRACT - All flavors noted in fish resembling petroleum oil are not derived from oil in water. Origins of various flavors to understand the differentiation between baseline flavor of fish in the absence of petroleum from flavors di

  9. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3/29/10. Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community ProfileHarbor Fishing Community Profile Henning. 1966. FeasibilityVaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and North

  10. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Eureka Ice and Cold Storage in 2008, and increasinglyclosure of Eureka Ice and Cold Storage in 2008 is a reminderFrancisco Eureka Ice and Cold Storage opens Tom Lazio Fish

  11. Fish Bulletin 160. Observations On Fishes Associated With Kelp Beds in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feder, Howard M; Turner, Charles H; Limbaugh, Conrad

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. Limbaugh, Conrad. 1955. Fish life in the kelp beds andthe effects of kelp harvesting. Univ. Calif. , Inst. Mar.Hubbs, [ed. ]. Utilization of kelp-bed resources in southern

  12. Response of PCB contamination in stream fish to abatement actions at an industrial site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, G.R.; Peterson, M.J.; McCarthy, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Milne, G. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, used large quantities of PCBs in equipment associated with the great electric power requirements of isotopic enrichment of uranium. Historic losses of PCBs in the 1950s and 1960s have left a legacy of contamination at the site. A biological monitoring program implemented in 1987 found PCBs in PGDP effluents and in fish downstream from facility discharges. As a consequence, a fish consumption advisory was posted on Little Bayou Creek by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1987, and regulatory discharge limits for PCBs at PGDP were reduced. Monitoring at multiple locations in receiving streams indicated that PGDP discharges were more important than in stream sediment contamination as sources of PCBs to fish. Environmental management and compliance staff at PGDP led an effort to reduce PCB discharges and monitor the effects of those actions. The active discharge of uncontaminated process water to historically PCB-contaminated drainage systems was found to mobilize PCBs into KPDES (Clean Water Act) regulated effluents. Efforts to locate PCB sources within the plant, coupled with improvements in management practices and remedial actions, appear to have been successful in reducing PCB discharges from these sources. Actions included emplacing passive monitors in the plant drainage system to identify this as a chronic source, and consolidating and re-routing effluents to minimize flow through PCB-contaminated channels. As a consequence, PCB contamination in fish in small streams receiving plant discharges decreased 75% over from 1992--1995.

  13. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  14. TECHNICAL NOTE FISH PROTEINS AS BINDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products . Recently in th meat and poultry industry, there has been interest in binding tog th r pieces and storage at temperatures above freezing . The following describes some of the re- search on the use of fish various flavoring agents such as ocean quahogs, ,Iaine shrimp, and crab meat. All these were highly

  15. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  16. Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT .. Introduction Dried-squid (surume) has been an item of commerce, ceremony, and diet in Japan for hundreds of years, and squid is caught of the fishery. In 1952 squid landings reached 646,730 tons and, at 15 percent of the total, became Japan's most

  17. Fish production: integrating growth, mortality, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 Fish production: integrating growth, mortality, and population density K. Limburg lecture notes, Fisheries Science Outline: 1. Biological production ­ a critical ecological parameter 2. How to compute production from a simple biomass model 3. Production:biomass ratios 4. Growth: mortality ratios Reading

  18. Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Management Act of 1996 requires the identification of essential fish habitat (EFH) for species included, and the Arctic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Catch data in this atlas were compiled from a suite of studies in the same year or in different years. A geographic position is obtained in the middle of each seine site

  19. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  20. 199403300 response.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -house since 1985. These data are printed out in hard copy and filed everyday as well as stored electronically-4752 Phone: (503) 230-4099 Fax: (503) 230-7559 http://www.fpc.org e-mail us at fpcstaff@fpc.org MEMORANDUM TO that they are documented for future use of data. The Fish Passage Center (FPC) maintains written documentation

  1. Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Internship FBI Fingerprint Procedures and Additional Screenings ALL INTERNS: Required by DESE/Full-Year Internship) or August 1st (Spring Internship) o Web application https to get your fingerprints taken for your internship: 4 digit Registration #2301 Cost - $44.80 Valid

  2. Quantum Key Distribution with Screening and Analyzing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Won-Ho Kye

    2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a quantum key distribution scheme by using screening angles and analyzing detectors which enable to notice the presence of Eve who eavesdrops the quantum channel, as the revised protocol of the recent quantum key distribution [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 040501 (2005)]. We discuss the security of the proposed quantum key distribution against various attacks including impersonation attack and Trojan Horse attack.

  3. Electron Screening and Alpha-Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agatino Musumarra

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The interplay between nuclear and electromagnetic forces in astrophysical relevant reactions at very low energies is nowadays one of the major subjects of investigation in nuclear astrophysics. Puzzling results concerning the role of Electron Screening (ES) on cross sections of reactions involving light nuclei at low energy open a Pandora pot and many new questions rise on the limits and reliability of the present interpretation of the screening enhancement factor. In the present paper we discuss the simplest physical case where the ES plays an important role in order to have unambiguous determination of ES energy in a clear theoretical scenario. This is the case of alpha-decay of heavy mass nuclei. We deduce the correct sudden and adiabatic limit for such a system including the important relativistic corrections. Then we demonstrate rigorously how in this case the calculation of the sudden and the adiabatic limits leads to the same result. In order to get this result we use the Hellmann-Feynman theorem. After computing the electron screening energy for some systems we discuss the strong modifications of alpha-decay systematic due to electron screening. We conclude proposing a measurement of alpha-decay lifetime of bare nuclei in order to directly deduce ES Energy for heavy nuclei laying in the mass region around 210-240 u.

  4. Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET) Users Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Layne Pincock

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the users guide to using the Screening and Evaluation Tool (SET). SET is a tool for comparing multiple fuel cycle options against a common set of criteria and metrics. It does this using standard multi-attribute utility decision analysis methods.

  5. Page 1 of 9 Full Screen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levene, Mark

    Evolution of Database Systems Graph-Based Relational Object-Relational 1960's-1970's 1980's-1990's 1990's-Oriented programming language with a DBMS 3 One approach is to implement on top of a relational DBMS. · Object #12;Home Page Title Page Page 5 of 9 Go Back Full Screen Close Quit Object-Relational Evolution

  6. Screening Tool for Desiccant Dehumidification Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czachorski, M.; Worek, W. M.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A state-of-the-art software tool that calculates the benefits of desiccant-based air-treatment equipment is described. The software, a Desiccant Systems Application Screening Tool, is written in the WindowsTM environment to promote user...

  7. Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCaire, Richard

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a substantial impact to the economy. During the past several years the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement project has been collecting data pertaining to fish entraining out of the lake through Grand Coulee Dam. During 1996 and 1997 the lake was deeply drawn down to accommodate the limited available water during a drought year and for the highly unusual draw-down of Lake Roosevelt during the critical Northwest power shortage. The goal of the project is to enhance the resident rainbow trout fishery in Lake Roosevelt lost as a result of the unusual operation of Grand Coulee dam during the drought/power shortage.

  8. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  9. FISHES OF THE GULF OF MAINE 401 with long seanes or basse nets, which stop in the fish; and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHES OF THE GULF OF MAINE 401 with long seanes or basse nets, which stop in the fish; and the w' While 700 were taken at Provincetown in a day i~ October 1859. Fishing for bass from the rocks with hook in their homes or use them for their grounds. He also describes 3 how "shoales of basse have driven up shoales

  10. Introduced Fish Species: "What do Introduced Fish Species: "What do the locals think?"the locals think?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    bass grass carp Currently 56 species of introduced fish in Tennessee waters 12 exotic to US12 exotic release Bait bucket Game fish introductions Procambarus acutus Two local examples brook troutstriped bass #12;10/19/2009 4 striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Anadromous fish native to Atlantic and Gulf coasts

  11. Fish mercury distribution in Massachusetts, USA lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Hutcheson, M.S.; West, C.R.; Pancorbo, O.; Hulme, K.; Cooperman, A.; DeCesare, G.; Isaac, R.; Screpetis, A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment, water, and three species of fish from 24 of Massachusetts' (relatively) least-impacted water bodies were sampled to determine the patterns of variation in edible tissue mercury concentrations and the relationships of these patterns to characteristics of the water, sediment, and water bodies (lake, wetland, and watershed areas). Sampling was apportioned among three different ecological subregions and among lakes of differing trophic status. The authors sought to partition the variance to discover if these broadly defined concepts are suitable predictors of mercury levels in fish. Average muscle mercury concentrations were 0.15 mg/kg wet weight in the bottom-feeding brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus); 0.31 mg/kg in the omnivorous yellow perch (Perca flavescens); and 0.39 mg/kg in the predaceous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Statistically significant differences in fish mercury concentrations between ecological subregions in Massachusetts, USA, existed only in yellow perch. The productivity level of the lakes (as deduced from Carlson's Trophic Status Index) was not a strong predictor of tissue mercury concentrations in any species. pH was a highly (inversely) correlated environmental variable with yellow perch and brown bullhead tissue mercury. Largemouth bass tissue mercury concentrations were most highly correlated with the weight of the fish (+), lake size (+), and source area sizes (+). Properties of individual lakes appear more important for determining fish tissue mercury concentrations than do small-scale ecoregional differences. Species that show major mercury variation with size or trophic level may not be good choices for use in evaluating the importance of environmental variables.

  12. D & D screening risk evaluation guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robers, S.K.; Golden, K.M.; Wollert, D.A.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) facilities. Although this method has been developed for D&D facilities, it can be used for transition (EM-60) facilities as well. The SRE guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the current risk to human health and the environment, exterior to the building, from ongoing or probable releases within a one-year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the current risk to workers, occupants and visitors inside contaminated D&D facilities due to contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the hypothetical risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risks to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form, and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, as determined on a project-by-project basis.

  13. Corps Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Upper Trinity River Basin was mainly from findings in a Corps environmental impact statement (EIS) report in the 1980s, according to Gene Rice, Corps project manager of the Dallas Floodway and Dallas Floodway Extension projects, two of the Trinity River... to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed...

  14. Synthetic Hexaploid Wheat as a Source of Improvement for Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Jessica Kay

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of this research was to evaluate the potential and performance of synthetic wheat in Texas. Ten elite primary synthetics from the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), screened for desirable traits, were backcrossed to two Texas cultivars, TAM...

  15. Heavy quark free energies and screening at finite temperature and density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Doring; S. Ejiri; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; E. Laermann

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the free energies of heavy quarks calculated from Polyakov loop correlation functions in full 2-flavour QCD using the p4-improved staggered fermion action. A small but finite Baryon number density is included via Taylor expansion of the fermion determinant in the Baryo-chemical potential mu. For temperatures above Tc we extract Debye screening masses from the large distance behaviour of the free energies and compare their mu-dependence to perturbative results.

  16. High-throughput Microfluidic Screening Platforms for Microalgae Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    parallel studies are needed, however, current microalgae culture systems are lack of high-throughput screening capabilities, and thus not suitable for the parallel studies. Here, three different high-throughput microfluidic microalgae screening platforms...

  17. Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Changes to vehicle traffic-screening Laboratory to change vehicle traffic-screening regimen at vehicle inspection station Lanes two through five will be open 24 hours a day and...

  18. Development and optimization of high-throughput zebrafish screening platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Bryan Kyo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-throughput zebrafish screening platform is a revolutionary tool that enables subcellular precision in vivo whole animal screening of Danio Rerio. It can perform laser surgery and/or imaging in less than twenty ...

  19. High-throughput Microfluidic Screening Platforms for Microalgae Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    parallel studies are needed, however, current microalgae culture systems are lack of high-throughput screening capabilities, and thus not suitable for the parallel studies. Here, three different high-throughput microfluidic microalgae screening platforms...

  20. Microfluidic in vivo screen identifies compounds enhancing neuronal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggarty, Stephen

    Compound screening is a powerful tool to identify new therapeutic targets, drug leads, and elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of biological processes. We report here the results of the first in vivo small-molecule screens ...

  1. Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

  2. Trace contaminant determination in fish scale by laser ablation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, I.; Coutant, C.C.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation on rings of fish scale has been used to analyze the historical accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in striped bass in the Watts Bar Reservoir. Rings on a fish scale grow in a pattern that forms a record of the fish`s chemical intake. In conjunction with the migration patterns of fish monitored by ecologists, relative PCB concentrations in the seasonal rings of fish scale can be used to study the PCB distribution in the reservoir. In this study, a tightly-focused laser beam from a XeCl excimer laser was used to ablate and ionize a small portion of a fish scale placed in a vacuum chamber. The ions were identified and quantified by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Studies of this type can provide valuable information for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) off-site clean-up efforts as well as identifying the impacts of other sources to local aquatic populations.

  3. Corps Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H 2 O | pg. 6 O ne of the key federal players in the restoration of the Trinity River Basin is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, whose primary civil mission is developing and managing the nation?s water resources, including projects to reduce... flood damage; improve navigation channels and harbors; protect wetlands; and preserve, safeguard and enhance the environment. The Corps has been involved in the Trinity River Basin for more than 50 years, but the impetus for the current projects...

  4. Increased Mercury Bioaccumulation Follows Water Quality Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogle, M.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in physical and chemical characteristics of aquatic habitats made to reduce or eliminate ecological risks can sometimes have unforeseen consequences. Environmental management activities on the U.S. Dept. of Energy reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee,have succeeded in improving water quality in streams impacted by discharges fi-om industrial facilities and waste disposal sites. The diversity and abundance of pollution-sensitive components of the benthic macroinvertebrate communities of three streams improved after new waste treatment systems or remedial actions reduced inputs of various toxic chemicals. Two of the streams were known to be mercury-contaminated from historical spills and waste disposal practices. Waterborne mercury concentrations in the third were typical of uncontaminated systems. In each case, concentrations of mercury in fish, or the apparent biological availability of mercury increased over the period during which ecological metrics indicated improved water quality. In the system where waterborne mercury concentrations were at background levels, increased mercury bioaccumulation was probably a result of reduced aqueous selenium concentrations; however, the mechanisms for increased mercury accumulation in the other two streams remain under investigation. In each of the three systems, reduced inputs of metals and inorganic anions was followed by improvements in the health of aquatic invertebrate communities. However, this reduction in risk to aquatic invertebrates was accompanied by increased risk to humans and piscivorous wildlife related to increased mercury concentrations in fish.

  5. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  6. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

  7. Electron Cloud with Inverted Beam Screens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maury Cuna, H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of computer simulations studying the effect of wrongly oriented LHC beam screens on the local electron-cloud heat load and density. At 3.5 or 7-TeV energy and for maximum secondary emission-yield values below 1.5, with the inverted sawtooth orientation about ten times higher heat load is expected than for the standard orientation, and the wrongly oriented sawtooth chambers could lead to a local heat-load bottleneck during the process of surface conditioning at 25-ns bunch spacing. The available cooling margin can be significantly increased by correcting the sawtooth orientations at least for two dipole magnets in LHC arc cells 26 and 32 R3, in order that there be no half-cell cooling loop containing more than one inverted screen.

  8. Impact of Screening on Behavior During Storage and Cost of Ground Small-Diameter Pine Trees: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin Searcy; Brad D Blackwelder; Mark E Delwiche; Allison E Ray; Kevin L Kenney

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole comminuted trees are known to self-heat and undergo quality changes during storage. Trommel screening after grinding is a process that removes fines from the screened material and removes a large proportion of high-ash, high-nutrient material. In this study, the trade-off between an increase in preprocessing cost from trommel screening and an increase in quality of the screened material was examined. Fresh lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) was comminuted using a drum grinder with a 10-cm screen, and the resulting material was distributed into separate fines and overs piles. A third pile of unscreened material, the unsorted pile, was also examined. The three piles exhibited different characteristics during a 6-week storage period. The overs pile was much slower to heat. The overs pile reached a maximum temperature of 56.88 degrees C, which was lower than the maximum reached by the other two piles (65.98 degrees C and 63.48 degrees C for the unsorted and fines, respectively). The overs also cooled faster and dried to a more uniform moisture content and had a lower ash content than the other two piles. Both piles of sorted material exhibited improved airflow and more drying than the unsorted material. Looking at supply system costs from preprocessing through in-feed into thermochemical conversion, this study found that trommel screening reduced system costs by over $3.50 per dry matter ton and stabilized material during storage.

  9. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1997.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, Christopher; Lockwoood, Jr., Neil

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998.

  10. Screening technology reduces ash in spiral circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P. [Derrick Corp., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, the James River Coal Co. selected the Stack Sizer to remove the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits at the McCoy-Elkhorn Bevins Branch prep plant and at the Blue Diamond Leatherwood prep plant in Kentucky. The Stack Sizer is a multi-deck, high-frequency vibrating screen capable of separations as fine as 75 microns when fitted with Derrick Corp.'s patented high open area urethane screen panels. Full-scale lab tests and more than 10 months of continuous production have confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 100 micron urethane screen panels consistently produces a clean coal fraction that ranges from 8 to 10% ash. Currently, each five-deck Stack Sizer operating at the Bevins Branch and Leatherwood prep plants is producing approximately 33 tons per hour of clean coal containing about 9% ash. This represents a clean coal yield of about 75% and an ash reduction of about 11% from the feed slurry. 3 figs. 2 tabs.

  11. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued assessing habitat and population enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in recommendations from the 1996, 1997, and 1998 annual reports, were monitored during field season 1999, 2000, and 2001. Post assessments were used to evaluate habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations where enhancement projects were implemented.

  12. Anatomy and evolution of chirocentrid fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardack, David

    1965-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this shale with the Austin Chalk on the Bosque River near Waco, Texas. Numer- ous specimens assigned to Xiphactinus, lchthyodectes, and Gillicus are found in the Smoky Hill Chalk Mem- ber of the Niobrara Formation. Few, if any, specimens of these fishes have... been obtained from the underlying Fort Hays Limestone Member. Exact localities for most fossil vertebrates from the Niobrara Formation are unknown. Xiphactinus specimens are recorded from the Austin Chalk near Britton, Celina, and Sa- voy, Texas...

  13. Feasibility study: a proposed recreational fishing enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, James D

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chosen to locate immediately adjacent to or inside the city limits of major metropolitan centers in the region. Indeed, Cichra and Carpenter, 1989, point out there are now over 1500 commercial fee fishing operations in business in the southern U. S.... Figure 8 shows both paid and non-paid advertising and promotional activities (non-purchased does not necessarily infer no-cost), which will be balanced across most major commercial media on a seasonally adjusted basis. This approach will emphasize...

  14. Improved aethalometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1988-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

  15. Dynamic screening correction for solar p-p reaction rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mussack, Katie; 10.1088/0004-637X/729/2/96

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar abundance controversy inspires renewed investigations of the basic physics used to develop solar models. Here we examine the correction to the proton-proton reaction rate due to dynamic screening effects. Starting with the dynamic screening energy from the molecular-dynamics simulations of Mao et al., we compute a reaction-rate correction for dynamic screening. We find that, contrary to static screening theory, this dynamic screening does not significantly change the reaction rate from that of the bare Coulomb potential.

  16. Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

  17. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

  18. Introduction to Fish Health Management 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR921 Introduction to Fish Health Management 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd2 1. This document is CIR921, one Is Fish Health Management? Fish health management is a term used in aquaculture to describe management practices which are designed to prevent fish disease. Once fish get sick it can be difficult to salvage them

  19. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

  20. anadromous fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: INTEGRATED HATCHERY...

  1. adrar mountains fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gravures de la rgion vont ensuite Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 2 Determinants of fish assemblage structure in Mount Itoupe mountain streams (French Guiana) Biology and...

  2. antarctic notothenioid fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Transcriptomic and genomic evolution under constant cold in Antarctic notothenioid fish Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: in protein biosynthesis, protein...

  3. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river...

  4. Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalLiteratureReviewAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid510804...

  5. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

  6. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

  7. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleModeling-ComputerSimulationsAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid387627...

  9. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

  10. Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleStaticTemperatureSurveyAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid511143...

  11. A fish model of renal regeneration and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renate Reimschuessel

    The fish kidney provides a unique model for investigating renal injury, repair, and development. Like mammalian kidneys, fish kidneys have the remarkable ability to repair injured nephrons, designated renal regeneration. This response is marked by a recovery from acute renal failure by replacing the injured cells with new epithelial cells, restoring tubule integrity. In addition, fish have the ability to respond to renal injury by de novo nephron neogenesis. This response occurs in multiple fish species including goldfish, zebrafish, catfish, trout, tilapia, and the aglomerular toadfish. New nephrons develop in the weeks after the initial injury. This nephrogenic response can be induced in adult fish, providing a more abundant source of developing renal tissue compared with fetal mammalian kidneys. Investigating the roles played by different parts of the nephron during development and repair can be facilitated using fish models with differing renal anatomy, such as aglomerular fish. The fish nephron neogenesis model may also help to identify novel genes involved in nephrogenesis, information that could eventually be used to develop alternative renal replacement therapies. Key Words: development; fish; kidney; model; nephron; regeneration; repair

  12. Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities. The property would be owned and managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. September 2008 Land to get management plan Once this property has been...

  13. Cosmic Web and Environmental Dependence of Screening: Vainshtein vs. Chameleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridget Falck; Kazuya Koyama; Gong-bo Zhao

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories which modify general relativity to explain the accelerated expansion of the Universe often use screening mechanisms to satisfy constraints on Solar System scales. We investigate the effects of the cosmic web and the local environmental density of dark matter halos on the screening properties of the Vainshtein and chameleon screening mechanisms. We compare the cosmic web morphology of dark matter particles, mass functions of dark matter halos, mass and radial dependence of screening, velocity dispersions and peculiar velocities, and environmental dependence of screening mechanisms in $f(R)$ and nDGP models. Using the ORIGAMI cosmic web identification routine we find that the Vainshtein mechanism depends on the cosmic web morphology of dark matter particles, since these are defined according to the dimensionality of their collapse, while the chameleon mechanism shows no morphology dependence. The chameleon screening of halos and their velocity dispersions depend on halo mass, and small halos and subhalos can be environmentally screened in the chameleon mechanism. On the other hand, the screening of halos in the Vainshtein mechanism does not depend on mass nor environment, and their velocity dispersions are suppressed. The peculiar velocities of halos in the Vainshtein mechanism are enhanced because screened objects can still feel the fifth force generated by external fields, while peculiar velocities of chameleon halos are suppressed when the halo centers are screened.

  14. Pre-Screen Loss and Fish Facility Efficiency for Delta Smelt at the South Delta's State Water Project, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    266:753-762. Grimaldo LF, Sommer T, Van Ark N, Jones G,614-622. Feyrer F, Nobriga ML, Sommer TR. 2007. MultidecadalConservation Biology 4:275-284. Sommer T, Armor C, Baxter R,

  15. Screening analysis of solar thermochemical hydrogen concepts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Kolb, Gregory J.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A screening analysis was performed to identify concentrating solar power (CSP) concepts that produce hydrogen with the highest efficiency. Several CSP concepts were identified that have the potential to be much more efficient than today's low-temperature electrolysis technology. They combine a central receiver or dish with either a thermochemical cycle or high-temperature electrolyzer that operate at temperatures >600 C. The solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies of the best central receiver concepts exceed 20%, significantly better than the 14% value predicted for low-temperature electrolysis.

  16. Electron screening effect on stellar thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potekhin, A Y

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the impact of plasma correlation effects on nonresonant thermonuclear reactions for various stellar objects, namely in the liquid envelopes of neutron stars, and the interiors of white dwarfs, low-mass stars, and substellar objects. We examine in particular the effect of electron screening on the enhancement of thermonuclear reactions in dense plasmas within and beyond the linear mixing rule approximation as well as the corrections due to quantum effects at high density. In addition, we examine some recent unconventional (Yukawa-potential and "quantum-tail") theoretical results on stellar thermonuclear fusions and show that these scenarios do not apply to stellar conditions.

  17. Apparatus for combinatorial screening of electrochemical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    A high throughput combinatorial screening method and apparatus for the evaluation of electrochemical materials using a single voltage source (2) is disclosed wherein temperature changes arising from the application of an electrical load to a cell array (1) are used to evaluate the relative electrochemical efficiency of the materials comprising the array. The apparatus may include an array of electrochemical cells (1) that are connected to each other in parallel or in series, an electronic load (2) for applying a voltage or current to the electrochemical cells (1), and a device (3), external to the cells, for monitoring the relative temperature of each cell when the load is applied.

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high throughput combinatorial screening method and apparatus for the evaluation of electrochemical materials using a single voltage source (2) is disclosed wherein temperature changes arising from the application of an electrical load to a cell array (1) are used to evaluate the relative electrochemical efficiency of the materials comprising the array. The apparatus may include an array of electrochemical cells (1) that are connected to each other in parallel or in series, an electronic load (2) for applying a voltage or current to the electrochemical cells (1), and a device (3), external to the cells, for monitoring the relative temperature of each cell when the load is applied.

  18. National Supplemental Screening Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement ofConverDyn NOPRNancyNational Supplemental Screening Program

  19. BCHP Screening Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP Screening Tool Jump to:

  20. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  1. SCREENING METHODS FOR SELECTION OF SURFACTANT FORMULATIONS FOR IOR FROM FRACTURED CARBONATE RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William A. Goddard III; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu; Seung Soon Jang

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report presents details of the laboratory work performed to complete Task 1 of this project; developing rapid screening methods to assess surfactant performance for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) from fractured carbonate reservoirs. The desired outcome is to identify surfactant formulations that increase the rate and amount of aqueous phase imbibition into oil-rich, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. Changing the wettability from oil-wet to water-wet is one key to enhancing this water-phase imbibition process that in turn recovers additional oil from the matrix portion of a carbonate reservoir. The common laboratory test to evaluate candidate surfactant formulations is to measure directly the aqueous imbibition rate and oil recovery from small outcrop or reservoir cores, but this procedure typically requires several weeks. Two methods are presented here for the rapid screening of candidate surfactant formulations for their potential IOR performance in carbonate reservoirs. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant performance reported in the literature.

  2. Visual censuses of reef fish have been used to monitor fish communities as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :72­80 (2001). Abstract­We calculated the power of visual length estimates by novice and experienced scientific of environmental degrada- tion (Hourigan et al., 1988; Fausch et al., 1990) and as a fisheries manage- ment tool of a population of reef fish? The advantages of assessing the sta- tistical power of environmental moni- toring

  3. three Atlantic fishing areas. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 11:171-197.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island Kingston, RI02881 DAVID H. KESLER Division ofBiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor homeostasis. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 33:63-75. W. HUNTrING HOWELL Department ofZoology University of.I) with or without an iodophor (Wyandotte Co.) con- tained in ice for controlling microbial outgrowth of a mixture

  4. fishing fleets were allegedly hampering their mackerel-fishing operations. Pa-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ)'. The Presidential mes- sages requested the amendment of Arti- cle 27 of a species exceeds the capacity of the national fishing fleet, the Mexican Gov- ernment will permit foreign Olicia/ de /a Fedemcion . At a joint press conference following the signing of the Presidential message

  5. Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    they do, but boy aren’t they sexy?) Editor: Daniel Gee Contributors: Martin Marshall, Emma Donovan, Thomas Cookson, Grant Bull, Elizabeth Peloso, Richard Wiggins, Frank Collins, Patrick Riley, Tim Drury, Stephan Black, Thomas Spychalski, Steven...://www.cathoderaytube.blogspot.com) Photos by Tim Drury - http://bit.ly/proms2010photos Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 2 17 ALL THE TABLOID NEWSPAPER RUMOURS – ALL THE TIME Matt Smith Is Rubbish And Is Getting Sacked Doctor Who fans have seemingly got their way. A bloke I...

  6. Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was a wrong un’ right from the off (DON’T GET IN THAT LIFT! Sarah didn’t hear my shouts of warning at the television though. Maybe because it was in 1974? Or maybe I should just grow up?) Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 5 18 As mentioned... of the program. Reading all the tributes from fans and television professionals alike, you can see how talented and important people like Lis and Nick are and just shows how popular and important Doctor Who is. People from around the world have been...

  7. Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish Fingers and Custard Issue 8 2 D Is For… I was actually going to put this in the Series 6 reviews bit, but I repeat myself far too much in this issue as it is! We’re at the end of another series, the reactions of fans... are as mixed as always, and I think the key word that we’re all looking for here is development. Doctor Who will always change and develop. I genuinely think the Moffat era will really kick off next year, as we're getting the supposed series...

  8. How does one weakly electric fish locate and find another electric fish in its environment? One way is to orient to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Carl D.

    How does one weakly electric fish locate and find another electric fish in its environment? One way is to orient to the electric discharges that the second fish produces using passive electrolocation. Passive electrolocation differs from active electrolocation in that the fish relies entirely upon exafferent rather than

  9. Fish die as a result of a wide variety of natural and unnatural causes. Fish may die of old age, starvation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish die as a result of a wide variety of natural and unnatural causes. Fish may die of old age, severe weather, and other reasons. A few dead fish floating on the surface of a pond or lake is not necessarily cause for alarm. Expect some fish to die of old age, injury, winter starvation, or even post

  10. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSJON. 263 t,housandsof shallow lakes end streams that this fish may do wellcin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that this fish may do wellcin, while such fishas bass, pickerel, perch, and fleshleating fish seek deeper, but never found a fish in onsof them or In a catfish, as I have in bass, pickerel, perch, and some otfierBULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSJON. 263 t,housandsof shallow lakes end streams

  11. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

  12. FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153167 The behavioural dynamics of fishers: management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153 by his/her own goals or constraints. Despite this reality, the complex dynamics of fishing has and behavioural dynamics of fishing to provide insight into fisher behaviour and its implications

  13. Fish Bulletin No. 29. The Striped Bass of California (Roccus lineatus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, Eugene C

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the striped bass, provided the fish from which the scales5˝-inch mesh bass nets select female fish at 55 centimetersmeshes these bass average longer than the fish taken in the

  14. Fish Bulletin 122. The Kelp Bass (Paralabrax clathratus) and Its Fishery, 1947–1958

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Parke H

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    incidental to kelp bass and game fish. These included, butAppendix 3H). Kelp bass and game fish dominated the catch in1936. Rock bass, In the commercial fish catch of California

  15. Fish Bulletin No. 39. Fluctuations in the Abundance of Striped Bass (Roccus lineatus) in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, G H

    1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were to disregard shad and fish for bass, such an occurrenceStriped Bass and Salmon. In The Commercial Fish Catch ofStriped Bass of California. California Division of Fish and

  16. Cosmic Web and Environmental Dependence of Screening: Vainshtein vs. Chameleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falck, Bridget; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theories which modify general relativity to explain the accelerated expansion of the Universe often use screening mechanisms to satisfy constraints on Solar System scales. We investigate the effects of the cosmic web and the local environmental density of dark matter halos on the screening properties of the Vainshtein and chameleon screening mechanisms. We compare the cosmic web morphology of dark matter particles, mass functions of dark matter halos, mass and radial dependence of screening, velocity dispersions and peculiar velocities, and environmental dependence of screening mechanisms in $f(R)$ and nDGP models. Using the ORIGAMI cosmic web identification routine we find that the Vainshtein mechanism depends on the cosmic web morphology of dark matter particles, since these are defined according to the dimensionality of their collapse, while the chameleon mechanism shows no morphology dependence. The chameleon screening of halos and their velocity dispersions depend on halo mass, and small halos and subhal...

  17. Strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions: Electron drop model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kravchuk, P A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze enhancement of thermonuclear fusion reactions due to strong plasma screening in dense matter using a simple electron drop model. The model assumes fusion in a potential that is screened by an effective electron cloud around colliding nuclei (extended Salpeter ion-sphere model). We calculate the mean field screened Coulomb potentials for atomic nuclei with equal and nonequal charges, appropriate astrophysical S factors, and enhancement factors of reaction rates. As a byproduct, we study analytic behavior of the screening potential at small separations between the reactants. In this model, astrophysical S factors depend not only on nuclear physics but on plasma screening as well. The enhancement factors are in good agreement with calculations by other methods. This allows us to formulate the combined, pure analytic model of strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions. The results can be useful for simulating nuclear burning in white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  18. Strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions: Electron drop model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Kravchuk; D. G. Yakovlev

    2014-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze enhancement of thermonuclear fusion reactions due to strong plasma screening in dense matter using a simple electron drop model. The model assumes fusion in a potential that is screened by an effective electron cloud around colliding nuclei (extended Salpeter ion-sphere model). We calculate the mean field screened Coulomb potentials for atomic nuclei with equal and nonequal charges, appropriate astrophysical S factors, and enhancement factors of reaction rates. As a byproduct, we study analytic behavior of the screening potential at small separations between the reactants. In this model, astrophysical S factors depend not only on nuclear physics but on plasma screening as well. The enhancement factors are in good agreement with calculations by other methods. This allows us to formulate the combined, pure analytic model of strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions. The results can be useful for simulating nuclear burning in white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  19. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of gravitational screens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Freidel; Yuki Yokokura

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Einstein gravity equations projected on a timelike surface, which represents the time evolution of what we call a gravitational screen. We show that such a screen possesses a surface tension and an internal energy, and that the Einstein equations reduce to the thermodynamic equations of a viscous bubble. We also provide a complete dictionary between gravitational and thermodynamical variables. In the non-viscous cases there are three thermodynamic equations which characterise a bubble dynamics: These are the first law, the Marangoni flow equation and the Young-Laplace equation. In all three equations the surface tension plays a central role: In the first law it appears as a work term per unit area, in the Marangoni flow its gradient drives a force, and in the Young-Laplace equation it contributes to a pressure proportional to the surface curvature. The gravity equations appear as a natural generalization of these bubble equations when the bubble itself is viscous and dynamical. In particular, it shows that the mechanism of entropy production for the viscous bubble is mapped onto the production of gravitational waves. We also review the relationship between surface tension and temperature, and discuss the usual black-hole thermodynamics from this point of view.

  20. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric aspects of the passage event ---which the probabilistic method does--- as well as the fluid-particle interactions ---which the Lagrangian particle method does. The DEM-based survival rates were comparable to laboratory results for small fish but not for mid-size fish because of the considerably different turbine diameters. The modeling framework can be used for applications that aim at evaluating the biological performance of MHK turbine units during the design phase and to provide information to regulatory agencies needed for the environmental permitting process.

  1. Former worekrs' notification adn medical screening Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Quinn

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    CPWR is carrying out a screening program for former Hanford construction workers. This program includes continuing screening and re-screening services for the former worker population. The Program contains the following general components: Start-up planning/needs assessment: A modified exposure assessment will be conducted to identify high-risk buildings or areas, primary exposures, and worker populations at risk. Outreach: CPWR, as the research arm of the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO, has direct access to workers. CPWR will rely on direct mailings to lists of former workers, and work through and rely on existing organizations (unions, union pension funds, employers, DOE site administrators, etc.) to reach former workers and "get the word out." CPWR will establish/maintain an outreach office at each site listed above. This office will serve as the face of the Program to workers and their communities. Communications and intake center: CPWR has two established toll-free phone numbers (1-800-866-9663 and 1-888-464-0009). There is also a dedicated website for the program (btmed.org). Workers can register with the Program by mail, telephone, or on-line. Work history: A standardized, structured work history is administered with modules that accommodate unique exposure scenarios for different occupations and different DOE sites. A work history interview is administered by a trained program interviewer. The work histories are used to determine whether a participant is eligible for the medical examination and to interpret the findings from the medical examination. Medical evaluation: The Program contracts with local medical providers qualified to deliver occupational medical screening services. All providers are credentialed. The Program contracts with a certified national laboratory and with NIOSH certified B-readers to review x-rays. Based on the work history, the participant is referred to a credentialed medical provider who is located close to the participant's home. If it is not convenient to use a credentialed provider, the Program will make arrangements, if necessary, for the participant to receive a physical exam through the National Supplemental Screening Program. Eligible participants will receive the same core medical exam (including a Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test, BeLPT), and in addition, based on their work history, they may be assigned to exposure specific modules for asbestos, silica, lead, noise, cadmium, and chromium. Lab work will be sent to a national laboratory for processing, except the blood samples for the BeLPT, which will be sent to a DOE-approved laboratory for evaluation. Determination of work-relatedness and follow-up: A letter of findings will be sent to the participant within 60 days of the exam. The letter is written and/or reviewed by occupational medical health personnel with knowledge of the DOE site(s) where the participant has worked and will include specific follow-up recommendations. Urgent findings are followed up by the provider without delay. Evaluation and quality assurance: All data are entered into the Program Data Management System (DMS). The DMS is web-based and relies on electronic submission of results, whenever possible. A de-identified data set on all participants is provided to Duke University Medical Center for evaluation and analysis. Each participant is asked to complete a satisfaction survey. The DMS will be used for quality assurance purposes and to also report summary data to the DOE. The BTMED.ORG website is encrypted using the industry-standard Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) technology (128-bit encryption keys). Each individual that accesses the website is assigned a unique login ID, password, and token. Passwords are required to meet standards for "strength," including minimum length, multi-case, and use of numbers. The website is also protected by additional security layers including additional encryption, hardware and software firewalls, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and virus protection.

  2. Fish-Friendly Hydropower Turbine Development & Deployment: Alden Turbine Preliminary Engineering and Model Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alden turbine was developed through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) former Advanced Hydro Turbine Systems Program (1994-2006) and, more recently, through the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the DOE's Wind & Water Power Program. The primary goal of the engineering study described here was to provide a commercially competitive turbine design that would yield fish passage survival rates comparable to or better than the survival rates of bypassing or spilling flow. Although the turbine design was performed for site conditions corresponding to 92 ft (28 m) net head and a discharge of 1500 cfs (42.5 cms), the design can be modified for additional sites with differing operating conditions. During the turbine development, design modifications were identified for the spiral case, distributor (stay vanes and wicket gates), runner, and draft tube to improve turbine performance while maintaining features for high fish passage survival. Computational results for pressure change rates and shear within the runner passage were similar in the original and final turbine geometries, while predicted minimum pressures were higher for the final turbine. The final turbine geometry and resulting flow environments are expected to further enhance the fish passage characteristics of the turbine. Computational results for the final design were shown to improve turbine efficiencies by over 6% at the selected operating condition when compared to the original concept. Prior to the release of the hydraulic components for model fabrication, finite element analysis calculations were conducted for the stay vanes, wicket gates, and runner to verify that structural design criteria for stress and deflections were met. A physical model of the turbine was manufactured and tested with data collected for power and efficiency, cavitation limits, runaway speed, axial and radial thrust, pressure pulsations, and wicket gate torque. All parameters were observed to fall within ranges expected for conventional radial flow machines. Based on these measurements, the expected efficiency peak for prototype application is 93.64%. These data were used in the final sizing of the supporting mechanical and balance of plant equipment. The preliminary equipment cost for the design specification is $1450/kW with a total supply schedule of 28 months. This equipment supply includes turbine, generator, unit controls, limited balance of plant equipment, field installation, and commissioning. Based on the selected head and flow design conditions, fish passage survival through the final turbine is estimated to be approximately 98% for 7.9-inch (200-mm) fish, and the predicted survival reaches 100% for fish 3.9 inches (100 mm) and less in length. Note that fish up to 7.9- inches (200 mm) in length make up more than 90% of fish entrained at hydro projects in the United States. Completion of these efforts provides a mechanical and electrical design that can be readily adapted to site-specific conditions with additional engineering development comparable to costs associated with conventional turbine designs.

  3. Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance A Recommended Code of Governance for Schools: A flexible framework for strategic planning October 2012 Pilot version 1 #12;Improving School Governance | 2 #12;Improving School Governance | 3 This pilot version of the Recommended Code of Governance

  4. United States Department of the Interior, J .A. Kr , Secretary Fish and Jildli!e Service, Albert M. Day, Dir c or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of preparing and preserving fish by freezing, improved means of trans- portation, and more adequate local. In addition, wartime scarcities of several foods and postwar increases in meat prices resulted in increased of meats, chicken and turkey, ice cream, butter, fresh deciduous fruits, fresh vegetables, sweet potatoes

  5. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

  6. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    groups at: U. Geneva (Switzerland), MPI (Germany), Stockholm University (Sweden), IFE (Norway), SRNL (USA), U. Tohoku, AIST (Japan) High-pressure Sintering Technique for Screening...

  7. active screen plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactions: Electron drop model CERN Preprints Summary: We analyze enhancement of thermonuclear fusion reactions due to strong plasma screening in dense matter using a...

  8. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials: UOP Approaches High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches Presentation by Adriaan Sachtler from the High Throughput...

  9. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials (presentation) High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting...

  10. High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami UNREL DoDDLA Project) (presentation) High...

  11. Roof screening for underground coal mines: recent developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, C.S.; Gallagher, S.; Molinda, G.M.; Mark, C.; Wilson, G.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of screens to control falls of the immediate roof or roof skin (that is between the installed primary and secondary roof supports) is described. 5 figs.

  12. Combining in vivo and in silico screening for protein stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barakat, Nora Hisham

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implications for the Protein Folding Code". Biochemistry 44(Proteolytic selection for protein folding using filamentousin vivo screening for protein folding and increased protein

  13. abuse screening tool: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (HPV Druzdzel, Marek J. 3 The Feasibility of Tablet Computer Screening for Opioid Abuse in the Emergency Department University of California eScholarship Repository...

  14. abuse screening tools: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (HPV Druzdzel, Marek J. 3 The Feasibility of Tablet Computer Screening for Opioid Abuse in the Emergency Department University of California eScholarship Repository...

  15. assessing screening practices: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Katherine B. Gibney; Karin Leder; Daniel P. Obrien; Caroline Marshall; Beverley-ann Biggs 16 The Pittsburgh Cervical Cancer Screening Model A Risk Assessment Tool Computer...

  16. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  17. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biochemical indices of quality. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Engineering studies on freezing and cold storage systems . · · . . . . . . . · . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Storage of fish in refrigerated sea water . . . 5 Time-temperature tolerance of frozen seafoods 5 to meet the needs of industry. Funda- ment al research has been continued in the field of fish - mus cle

  18. american fish passage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    american fish passage First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK...

  19. amazonian fish pseudotylosurus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amazonian fish pseudotylosurus First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fishing activity, health...

  20. african snake fish: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    african snake fish First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 SPORT-FISHING USE AND VALUE: LOWER...

  1. aqueous fish extract: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous fish extract First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Extracting Fish and Water Velocity...

  2. adult fish passage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adult fish passage First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK...

  3. abudefduf saxatilis fish: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    abudefduf saxatilis fish First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Replacement of fish meal in...

  4. anadronous fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadronous fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  5. aqueous fish protein: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fish protein First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Acylation of Fish Protein: Effect of...

  6. assess fish secondary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assess fish secondary First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Lab 4 GEO Assessing fish...

  7. anadromus fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromus fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  8. annual fish austrolebias: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    annual fish austrolebias First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 GUIDED ANGLER FISH ANNUAL...

  9. affecting fish passage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    affecting fish passage First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK...

  10. acids fish oils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acids fish oils First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Fatty Acid Composition of Fish Oils...

  11. EIS-0397: Lyle Falls Fish Passage Project, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to modify funding to the existing Lyle Falls Fishway on the lower Klickitat River in Klickitat County, WA. The proposed project would help BPA meet its off-site mitigation responsibilities for anadromous fish affected by the development of the Federal Columbia River Power System and increase overall fish production in the Columbia Basin.

  12. REFRIGERATION OF FISH PART 5 DISTRIBUTION AND MARKETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REFRIGERATION OF FISH· PART 5 DISTRIBUTION AND MARKETING OF FROZEN FISHERY PRODUCTS UNITED STATES in a series of five on "Refrigeration of Fish." Titles of the other four leaflets are: Part 1 (Fishery Leaflet., and edited by Joseph W. Slavin, Refrigeration Engineer, Fishery Technological Laborator,y, East Boston

  13. Consumption of freshwater fish in Kahnawake: Risks and benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, H.M.; Trifonopoulos, M.; Ing, A.; Receveur, O. [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec (Canada)] [McGill Univ., Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec (Canada); Johnson, E. [Kahnawake Environment, Quebec (Canada)] [Kahnawake Environment, Quebec (Canada)

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kahnawake is a Mohawk community located on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River near Montreal. A comprehensive study was conducted in 1996--1997 to address the local concern regarding health risks of contaminant exposure associated with freshwater fish consumption. Forty-two participants, including most of the identified active fishermen were interviewed. Walleye, perch, bullhead, and smallmouth bass were the species most consumed. Average daily intake of locally caught fish was 23 g/day. Nutrient and contaminant levels of locally collected fish were analyzed. Fish were good sources of protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, calcium, zinc, and iron. Levels of cadmium, lead, arsenic, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other chlorinated pesticides were at least 10 times lower than the guideline levels. Mercury levels of some predatory fish exceeded the guideline of 0.5 {micro}g/g. Average daily intakes of all contaminants were below the guideline levels by a factor of 10 except for mercury. Average mercury intake rate was about one-third that of the guideline level. Contrary to residents` perception, Kahnawake fish were not particularly contaminated. In view of the nutritional as well as cultural benefits, fishing and fish consumption may be promoted.

  14. Near-Shore and Bottom Fish Tahoe sucker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Near-Shore and Bottom Fish Tahoe sucker Lahontan redsidePaiute sculpin Speckled dace Benthic Macroinvertebrate Asian clam Craysh Mountain whitesh Mackinaw Kokanee salmon Tui chub Off-Shore Fish BosminaDaphnia Diaptomus Epischura Mysis shrimp Current Food Web of Lake Tahoe Bluegill Zooplankton Largemouth bass

  15. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data Äş Đ 1 ¸ Ö Ň ×ą Ň ÝÖąĘ Ň 2 1 processing algo- rithms normally used to extract water velocity. We present an alternative method for velocity homogeneity precludes the extraction of fish velocities. Water velocities can sometimes still

  16. FINDINGS IN BRIEF THEME: Water, aquaculture and fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to farming protocols, local environment effects, food safety and nutritive quality of fish as food. Jana carnivorous fish can thrive and grow on alternative food sources such as mussel meal and fungal protein. Photo treatment,with bacteria that break down organic matter. *EHEC is an aggre

  17. Toxic Contaminants and Their Effects on Resident Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science-Policy Exchange September 10, 2009 #12;Take-away themes Toxic contaminants are present are source areas for toxic contaminants for multiple fish stocks A better understanding of the effects and restore fish and ecosystem health #12;Take-away themes Toxic contaminants are present in the Columbia

  18. EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    391 392 EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH AND AQUATIC INSECTS IN GALLATIN RIVER DRAINAGE IN MONTANA EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON STREAM BOTTOM ORGANISMS IN TWO MOUNTAIN STREAMS IN GEORGIA SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Commissioner Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director EFFECTS OF DDT SPRAY ON FISH

  19. Environment-contingent sexual selection in a colour polymorphic fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    Environment-contingent sexual selection in a colour polymorphic fish Suzanne M. Gray1,*, Lawrence M environment can influence sexual selection on colourful male secondary traits such that selective advantage is environment contingent. Using a small fish endemic to Sulawesi, Indonesia (Telmatherina sarasinorum) that has

  20. Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations....

  1. Which fish? The search for direction in a sea of sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molteni, Megan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chilean sea bass, and found that not all the fish were fromthat some of the fish weren’t sea bass at all. Other

  2. Abundance and distribution of nocturnal fishes over a coral reef during the night

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzman, Roi; Ohavia, Moty; Vaknin, Royi; Genin, Amatzia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nocturnal fishes over a coral reef during the night Authors:nocturnal fishes Abstract Coral reefs are characterized byand reproduction of coral reefs inhabitants. Despite the

  3. Screening-level approach for estimating contaminant export from tributaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velleux, M. [Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison, WI (United States); Gailani, J. [Army Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS (United States); Endicott, D. [EPA Large Lakes Research Station, Grosse Ile, MI (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-place pollutant export model (IPX) is a screening-level model for estimating contaminant export from tributaries with contaminated sediments to receiving waterbodies. IPX is a modified version of the USEPA`s WASP4 modeling framework. IPX synthesizes sediment transport processes for sediment aging, decreased sediment resuspendability with increasing age, and resuspension of freshly deposited sediments as a function of water velocity, into an expanded WASP4 contaminant transport and fate chassis while retaining the computational flexibility of the original framework. These process descriptions are needed to accurately simulate contaminant transport and substantially improve the framework for application to tributary systems subject to significant deposition and resuspension events. The potential for applying IPX is broad; water quality impairments attributable to contaminated sediments are widespread due to discharges from industry, agriculture, and mining and ore processing. IPX has been successfully applied to the upper and lower Fox River in Wisconsin, and the Buffalo and Oswego Rivers in New York, all impaired by contaminated sediments.

  4. Are BKME effects on fish caused by chlorinated compounds?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnison, B.K.; Hodson, P.V.; Parrott, J. [National Water Research Institute, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the debate about the use and environmental impacts of chlorinated compounds has been fueled by attempts to regulate the effluents discharged by pulp and paper mills. Swedish field studies have associated effects on fish health and reproduction with the discharge of AOX. A recent study has demonstrated that the effect of black liquor is three orders of magnitude more potent than the first chlorine dioxide bleachery effluent on fish. Black liquors from various pulp mills, including a mill which uses alcohol to extract lignin, also suggest that effects on fish could be caused by non-chlorinated wood extractives, Chemical analysis of isolated fractions from final BKME effluent and pure compound bioassays also indicate the high probability that non-chlorinated compounds may be responsible for fish effects. While chlorination may increase the potency of these compounds, it is clear that chlorine is not essential for effects on fish.

  5. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  6. Apparatus and method for radioactive waste screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W.; Roybal, Lyle G.; Salomon, Hopi; Williams, Charles Leroy

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method relating to screening radioactive waste are disclosed for ensuring that at least one calculated parameter for the measurement data of a sample falls within a range between an upper limit and a lower limit prior to the sample being packaged for disposal. The apparatus includes a radiation detector configured for detecting radioactivity and radionuclide content of the of the sample of radioactive waste and generating measurement data in response thereto, and a collimator including at least one aperture to direct a field of view of the radiation detector. The method includes measuring a radioactive content of a sample, and calculating one or more parameters from the radioactive content of the sample.

  7. Screening method for wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, R.D.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A screening method is presented for evaluating wind energy conversion systems (WECS) logically and consistently. It is a set of procedures supported by a data base for large conventional WECS. The procedures are flexible enough to accommodate concepts lacking cost and engineering detail, as is the case with many innovative wind energy conversion systems (IWECS). The method uses both value indicators and simplified cost estimating procedures. Value indicators are selected ratios of engineering parameters involving energy, mass, area, and power. Cost mass ratios and cost estimating relationships were determined from the conventional WECS data base to estimate or verify installation cost estimates for IWECS. These value indicators and cost estimating procedures are shown for conventional WECS. An application of the method to a tracked-vehicle airfoil concept is presented.

  8. Screening system and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, David A; Gresham, Christopher A; Basiliere, Marc L; Spates, James J; Rodacy, Philip J

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated apparatus and method for screening an object for a target material is provided. The integrated apparatus comprises a housing and an integrated screener. The housing is positionable adjacent the object, and has a channel therethrough. The integrated screener is positionable in the housing, and comprises a fan, at least one filter, a heater and an analyzer. The fan is for drawing air carrying particles and vapor through the channel of the housing. The filter(s) is/are positionable in the channel of the housing for passage of the air therethrough. The filter(s) comprise(s) at least one metal foam having a plurality of pores therein for collecting and adsorbing a sample from the particles and vapor passing therethrough. The heater is for applying heat to the at least one metal foam whereby the collected sample is desorbed from the metal foam. The analyzer detects the target material from the desorbed sample.

  9. Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields $H_s$ of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness $\\sim 0.1\\; \\mu$m at the Nb surface could increase $H_s\\simeq 240$ mT of a clean Nb up to $H_s\\simeq 290$ mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

  10. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be of sufficient quality and quantity to meet specific monitoring and evaluation goals and objectives outlines in the 2002 statement of work (SOW).

  11. Results of the material screening program of the NEXT experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafni, T; Bandac, I; Bettini, A; Borges, F I G M; Camargo, M; Carcel, S; Cebrian, S; Cervera, A; Conde, C A N; Diaz, J; Esteve, R; Fernandes, L M P; Fernandez, M; Ferrario, P; Ferreira, A L; Freitas, E D C; Gehman, V M; Goldschmidt, A; Gomez, H; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Gutierrez, R M; Hauptman, J; Morata, J A Hernando; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Labarga, L; Laing, A; Liubarsky, I; Lorca, D; Losada, M; Luzon, G; Mari, A; Martin-Albo, J; Martinez, A; Martinez-Lema, G; Miller, T; Monrabal, F; Monserrate, M; Monteiro, C M B; Mora, F J; Moutinho, L M; Vidal, J Munoz; Nebot-Guinot, M; Nygren, D; Oliveira, C A B; Perez, J; Aparicio, J L Perez; Renner, J; Ripoll, L; Rodriguez, A; Rodriguez, J; Santos, F P; Santos, J M F dos; Segui, L; Serra, L; Shuman, D; Simon, A; Sofka, C; Sorel, M; Toledo, J F; Torrent, J; Tsamalaidze, Z; Veloso, J F C A; Villar, J A; Webb, R C; White, J T; Yahlali, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC (NEXT)', intended to investigate neutrinoless double beta decay, requires extremely low background levels. An extensive material screening and selection process to assess the radioactivity of components is underway combining several techniques, including germanium gamma-ray spectrometry performed at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory; recent results of this material screening program are presented here.

  12. Simplex-based screening designs for estimating metamodels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    by one factor. In this article, we introduce a non-OAT simplex-based design for the elementary effectsSimplex-based screening designs for estimating metamodels Gilles Pujol Ecole Nationale Superieure experiments, sensitivity analysis, factor screening, elementary effect, simplex design 1 Introduction

  13. allergy screen test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    allergy screen test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 LATEX ALLERGY SCREENING...

  14. Environmental Screening and Evaluation of Energy-using Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 ENVIRONMENTAL SCREENING BASED ON THE ECOINVENT DATABASE 40 5.3 ECOLABEL REQUIREMENTS 48 5.4 TECHNOLOGY.2 ENVIRONMENTAL SCREENING BASED ON THE ECOINVENT DATABASE 58 6.3 ECOLABEL REQUIREMENTS 61 6.4 TECHNOLOGY ON THE ECOINVENT DATABASE 73 8.3 ECOLABEL REQUIREMENTS 73 8.4 TECHNOLOGY AND MARKET TRENDS 73 8.5 CONCLUSION 74 8

  15. Building up the screening below the femtosecond scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muińo, Ricardo Díez

    Building up the screening below the femtosecond scale A. Borisov a;b D. S#19;anchez-Portal b;c R. D that the screening is built-up locally on a time scale well below the femtosecond for typical metallic densities. At this ultrashort time scale, the time evolution is not a#11;ected by the cluster boundary conditions, and our

  16. Pre-Employment Screening: How New EEOC Guidance Affects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

    Pre-Employment Screening: How New EEOC Guidance Affects Criminal Background Checks & Potentially Increases Employer Risks An HRWebAdvisor Webinar by Mark A. de Bernardo, Esq. Jackson Lewis LLP #12;HRWebAdvisor Webinar: Pre-Employment Screening 2 Our webinars are designed to be accurate

  17. Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methodology to compare supply and demand-side resources. The screening curve approach supplements with load curve approach supplements with load shape information the data contained in a supply curve of conservedLBL-27286 Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants Jonathan

  18. Results of the material screening program of the NEXT experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Dafni; V. Alvarez; I. Bandac; A. Bettini; F. I. G. M. Borges; M. Camargo; S. Carcel; S. Cebrian; A. Cervera; C. A. N. Conde; J. Diaz; R. Esteve; L. M. P. Fernandes; M. Fernandez; P. Ferrario; A. L. Ferreira; E. D. C. Freitas; V. M. Gehman; A. Goldschmidt; H. Gomez; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; R. M. Gutierrez; J. Hauptman; J. A. Hernando Morata; D. C. Herrera; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; L. Labarga; A. Laing; I. Liubarsky; D. Lorca; M. Losada; G. Luzon; A. Mari; J. Martin-Albo; A. Martinez; G. Martinez-Lema; T. Miller; F. Monrabal; M. Monserrate; C. M. B. Monteiro; F. J. Mora; L. M. Moutinho; J. Munoz Vidal; M. Nebot-Guinot; D. Nygren; C. A. B. Oliveira; J. Perez; J. L. Perez Aparicio; J. Renner; L. Ripoll; A. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez; F. P. Santos; J. M. F. dos Santos; L. Segui; L. Serra; D. Shuman; A. Simon; C. Sofka; M. Sorel; J. F. Toledo; J. Torrent; Z. Tsamalaidze; J. F. C. A. Veloso; J. A. Villar; R. C. Webb; J. T. White; N. Yahlali

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC (NEXT)', intended to investigate neutrinoless double beta decay, requires extremely low background levels. An extensive material screening and selection process to assess the radioactivity of components is underway combining several techniques, including germanium gamma-ray spectrometry performed at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory; recent results of this material screening program are presented here.

  19. Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications Thesis by Todd Thorsen, patiently giving me advice on a large variety of subjects, ranging from microfluidics to optics of microfluidic devices for high-throughput screening applications, such as mutant enzyme libraries expressed

  20. Lead Screening for NH Soils: Minimizing Health Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    family. On your soil test report, if the lead screening levels are elevated, you will receive in populated areas include the use of lead paint around homes (pre- 1970s), the use of lead-arsenate for pest does a "lead screening" test that indicates whether or not lead could pose a health risk for your

  1. METHODS AND APPLICATIONS White and green screening with circular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regan, Lynne

    METHODS AND APPLICATIONS White and green screening with circular polymerase extension cloning frustrating. Here, we present a stream- lined cloning strategy that incorporates a powerful white and green, or substitution libraries. Keywords: GFP; blue-white screening; circular polymerase extension cloning; Phusion

  2. A Personal Touch -Recognizing Users Based on Touch Screen Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of user interaction of personal smart phones and touch screen based devices are often shared among severalA Personal Touch - Recognizing Users Based on Touch Screen Behavior Sarah Martina Kolly Computer, there are still many open research questions concerning the basic input properties of these devices. We performed

  3. Collimator application for microchannel plate image intensifier resolution improvement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Stanley W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A collimator is included in a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI). Collimators can be useful in improving resolution of MCPIs by eliminating the scattered electron problem and by limiting the transverse energy of electrons reaching the screen. Due to its optical absorption, a collimator will also increase the extinction ratio of an intensifier by approximately an order of magnitude. Additionally, the smooth surface of the collimator will permit a higher focusing field to be employed in the MCP-to-collimator region than is currently permitted in the MCP-to-screen region by the relatively rough and fragile aluminum layer covering the screen. Coating the MCP and collimator surfaces with aluminum oxide appears to permit additional significant increases in the field strength, resulting in better resolution.

  4. Screening in Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei V. Gruzinov; John N. Bahcall

    1998-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the effect of electrostatic screening by ions and electrons on low-Z thermonuclear reactions in the sun. We use a mean field formalism and calculate the electron density of the screening cloud using the appropriate density matrix equation of quantum statistical mechanics. Because of well understood physical effects that are included for the first time in our treatment, the calculated enhancement of reaction rates does not agree with the frequently used interpolation formulae. Our result does agree, within small uncertainties, with Salpeter's weak screening formula. If weak screening is used instead of the commonly employed screening prescription of Graboske et al., the predicted $^8$B neutrino flux is increased by 7% and the predicted chlorine rate is increased by 0.4 SNU.

  5. A review of tricaine methanesulfonate for anesthesia of fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Kathleen M.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tricaine methanesulfonate (TMS) is the only FDA approved anesthetic for use in a select number of fish species, including salmonids. It is used widely in hatcheries and research to immobilize fish for marking or transport and to suppress sensory systems during invasive procedures. Improper use can decrease fish viability and possibly distort physiological data. Since animals may be anesthetized by junior staff or students who may have little experience in fish anesthesia, training in the proper use of TMS may decrease variability in results and increase fish survival. This document acts as a primer on the use of TMS for anesthetizing juvenile salmonids, with an emphasis on its use in surgical applications. Within, we briefly discuss many aspects TMS. We describe the legal uses for TMS, and what is currently known about the proper storage and preparation of the anesthetic. We outline methods and precautions for administration and changes in fish behavior during progressively deeper anesthesia. We also discuss the physiological effects of TMS and its potential for decreasing fish health.

  6. Fish distribution studies near N Reactor, Summer 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Page, T.L.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes field studies that were initiated in July 1983 to provide estimates of the relative distribution of late-summer outmigrant juvenile salmonids and juvenile resident fish upstream of the N Reactor 009 Outfall. Chinook salmon are among the fish species most sensitive to thermal effects, and impacts to the juvenile outmigrant populations are of particular concern to state and federal regulatory and fisheries management agencies. Therefore, the distribution studies were conducted from late July through September, a period when high ambient river temperatures and low river flows make these salmonid populations most susceptible to thermal effects. In addition, data were not available on the spatial distribution of outmigrant juvenile chinook salmon in late summer. Information on the relative distribution of resident fish populations was also gathered. Previous studies of midstream distribution of juvenile resident fish were limited to a description of ichthyoplankton populations (Beak Consultants, Inc. 1980 Page et al. 1982), and no data were available on vertical or horizontal distribution of juvenile resident fish species near N Reactor. Relative densities and spatial distribution estimates of juvenile salmonid and resident fish species will be used in conjunction with laboratory thermal effects studies (Neitzel et al. 1984) and with plume characterization studies (Ecker et al. 1983) to assess potential impacts of thermal discharge on fish populations near N Reactor.

  7. Improving the dielectric and piezoelectric properties of screen-printed Low temperature PZT/polymer composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of piezoelectric ceramic powders and a polymer matrix. The polymer used can itself be piezoelectric [3 materials, ceramics, polymers and composites. Ceramic piezoelectric materials (e.g. lead zirconate titanate. This porosity increases when increasing the weight percentages of the ceramic phase above 50% [7]. It occurs

  8. Development of pre-screening indices to improve energy analysis of public K-12 schools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landman, David Shea

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the eleven schools for 1992 and 1993 . . 91 5. 2 Annual power levels: Average W/sf, peak W/sf, and gas levels in BTU/(hr-sf) for 1992 and 1993. 94 5. 3 Monthly peak demand in W/sf versus peak monthly temperatures for September 1991 through December 1993... percentiles. . . . . . . . . . 166 6. 17 25th percentile for 28 months and monthly and daily weekend school year baseline data in W/sf . 169 6. 18 25th percentile and monthly school year baseline data for 28 months of natural gas data in Btu/(hr-sf). 171...

  9. Improved Algae-based Biorefining and High-throughput Screening of Algal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |HotImpact ofVisiting20143101 101

  10. Self-powered Gating and Other Improvements for Screening-engineered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is Taking OverEvaluatingField-effect Photovoltaics -

  11. FLYING FISH GLIDE AS WELL We're all familiar with birds that are as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moss, Cynthia

    Inside JEB i FLYING FISH GLIDE AS WELL AS BIRDS We're all familiar with birds that are as comfortable diving as they are flying but only one family of fish has made the reverse journey. Flying fish Choi, a mechanical engineer from Seoul National University, Korea, became fascinated by flying fish

  12. Preparing Your Own Fish Feeds1 Juli-Anne B. Royes and Frank Chapman2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Cir 97 Preparing Your Own Fish Feeds1 Juli-Anne B. Royes and Frank Chapman2 1. This document is Cir Commissioners Cooperating. Thomas A. Obreza, Interim Dean Introduction Most fish farmers and ornamental fish feeds are often needed for experimental purposes, feeding difficult-to- maintain aquarium fishes, larval

  13. SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM · determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

  14. Marine and freshwater fish support important angling industries that provide substantial benefit to local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Marine and freshwater fish support important angling industries that provide substantial benefit, it is important to evaluate how different stressors associated with this type of fishing affect fish survival. What follows is a brief Q & A review on the effects of air exposure. How long can a fish live out

  15. Appendix A -1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A - 1 Appendix A: The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program The 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program is the fifth revision of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program since the NPCC principles. The 2000 NPCC Fish and Wildlife Program marks a significant departure from past versions, which

  16. Building a 3D Simulator for Autonomous Navigation of Robotic Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Building a 3D Simulator for Autonomous Navigation of Robotic Fishes Jindong Liu Department control and autonomous navigation of a robotic fish. The simplified kinematics and hydrodynamics models way to develop autonomous navigation algorithms for robotic fishes. I. INTRODUCTION In nature, fish

  17. Using Sparse Representation for Fish Recognition and Verification in Real World Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chaur-Chin

    Using Sparse Representation for Fish Recognition and Verification in Real World Observation Yi, Hsinchu, Taiwan Abstract - The purpose of this paper is to present an innovated fish recognition and verification method suited for the real world automatic underwater fish observation. Based on the fish

  18. Whether for aesthetics or for fishing pleasure, most pond owners are interested in stocking and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    combination of fishes in Pennsylvania ponds. Either smallmouth or largemouth bass are suitable although ponds. Bass offer excellent sport fishing opportunities, while bluegills provide a food base for bass and good fishing for youngsters. When stocking these fish together, bass should be one year older than

  19. Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partnership ofPartnership of Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Washington Dept. of Fish for compensatory predation by smallmouth bass and walleye. 4 Evaluate effect of program on salmonid4. Evaluate 4 Decreased amount of older/larger fish4. Decreased amount of older/larger fish. 5. Reduced

  20. Fisherman's Guide to Astronomy 1 Four friends went out on a night fishing expedition.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    #12;Fisherman's Guide to Astronomy 1 Preface Four friends went out on a night fishing expedition around them has a myriad of impacts on his fishing productivity. More importantly-water fishing. We hope with this short guide, some questions relating salt-water fishing and astronomy

  1. A Poisson Fishing Model1 Thomas S. Ferguson, 08/30/942

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    A Poisson Fishing Model1 Thomas S. Ferguson, 08/30/942 Abstract: A fishing model of Starr, Wardrop an arbitrary joint distribution of capture times and fish sizes. Implications to the foraging models of Oaten, the fishing problem, the proofreading problem, auditing, foraging, search, etc. Authors in different areas

  2. FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINDINGS SECTION 16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 16-1 September 13, 1995 1 Section 162 3 Findings on the Recommendations for Amendments to the4 Resident Fish and Wildlife Portions of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program5 and Response to Comments6 September 13, 19957 8 9 In late 1994 the Council requested that fish and wildlife

  3. NET FEEDING IN MESOPELAGIC FISHES THOMAS L. HOPKINS AND RONALD C. BAIRD!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NET FEEDING IN MESOPELAGIC FISHES THOMAS L. HOPKINS AND RONALD C. BAIRD! ABSTRACT In an investigation of n'et feeding, 11 species of fish (5 gonostomatids, 6 myctophids) captured in a double-net Tucker trawl were examined. Stomach contents of fish retained by a coarse mesh "fish- catcher" in one net

  4. Katz et al. 2009 Fish induced sediment focusing Sediment resuspension by groundfish facilitates the transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yahel, Gitai

    Katz et al. 2009 Fish induced sediment focusing 1| P a g e Sediment resuspension by groundfish focusing Key words: sediment resuspension, sediment transport, fish, Saanich Inlet #12;Katz et al. 2009 to the base of the fish distribution zone. This resuspension by fish facilitates the transport of large

  5. Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Danville, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Brice{hacek over (n)}o, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xiao-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  6. Electrostatically screened, voltage-controlled electrostatic chuck

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott (San Ramon, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing an electrostatically screened, voltage-controlled electrostatic chuck particularly suited for holding wafers and masks in sub-atmospheric operations will significantly reduce the likelihood of contaminant deposition on the substrates. The electrostatic chuck includes (1) an insulator block having a outer perimeter and a planar surface adapted to support the substrate and comprising at least one electrode (typically a pair of electrodes that are embedded in the insulator block), (2) a source of voltage that is connected to the at least one electrode, (3) a support base to which the insulator block is attached, and (4) a primary electrostatic shield ring member that is positioned around the outer perimeter of the insulator block. The electrostatic chuck permits control of the voltage of the lithographic substrate; in addition, it provides electrostatic shielding of the stray electric fields issuing from the sides of the electrostatic chuck. The shielding effectively prevents electric fields from wrapping around to the upper or front surface of the substrate, thereby eliminating electrostatic particle deposition.

  7. ANALYSIS OF DUST DELIQUESCENCE FOR FEP SCREENING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Bryan

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential for penetration of the Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) waste package outer barrier by localized corrosion due to the deliquescence of soluble constituents in dust present on waste package surfaces. The results support a recommendation to exclude deliquescence-induced localized corrosion (pitting or crevice corrosion) of the outer barrier from the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA). Preparation of this report, and supporting laboratory studies and calculations, were performed as part of the planned effort in Work Package AEBM21, as implemented in ''Technical Work Plan for: Screening Evaluation for Dust Deliquescence and Localized Corrosion'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 172804]), by Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC, and staff from three national laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis and conclusions presented in this report are quality affecting, as determined in the controlling technical work plan. A summary of background information, based on work that was not performed under a quality assurance program, is provided as Appendix E. In this instance, the use of unqualified information is provided for transparency and corroboration only, and is clearly separated from uses of qualified information. Thus, the qualification status of this information does not affect the conclusions of this report. The acceptance criteria addressed in Sections 4.2 and 7.2 were changed from the technical work plan in response to review comments received during preparation of this report.

  8. Coulomb screening in graphene with topological defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Baishali; Sen, Siddhartha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the screening of an external Coulomb charge in gapless graphene cone, which is taken as a prototype of a topological defect. In the subcritical regime, the induced charge is calculated using both the Green's function and the Friedel sum rule. The dependence of the polarization charge on the Coulomb strength obtained from the Green's function clearly shows the effect of the conical defect and indicates that the critical charge itself depends on the sample topology. Similar analysis using the Friedel sum rule indicates that the two results agree for low values of the Coulomb charge but differ for the higher strengths, especially in the presence of the conical defect. For a given subcritical charge, the transport cross-section has a higher value in the presence of the conical defect. In the supercritical regime we show that the coefficient of the power law tail of polarization charge density can be expressed as a summation of functions which vary log periodically with the distance from the Coulomb imp...

  9. Combinatorial screening of inorganic and organometallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  10. Synthesis and screening combinatorial arrays of zeolites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Xiang, Xiaodong; Goldwasser, Isy

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  11. Coulomb screening in graphene with topological defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baishali Chakraborty; Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2015-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the screening of an external Coulomb charge in gapless graphene cone, which is taken as a prototype of a topological defect. In the subcritical regime, the induced charge is calculated using both the Green's function and the Friedel sum rule. The dependence of the polarization charge on the Coulomb strength obtained from the Green's function clearly shows the effect of the conical defect and indicates that the critical charge itself depends on the sample topology. Similar analysis using the Friedel sum rule indicates that the two results agree for low values of the Coulomb charge but differ for the higher strengths, especially in the presence of the conical defect. For a given subcritical charge, the transport cross-section has a higher value in the presence of the conical defect. In the supercritical regime we show that the coefficient of the power law tail of polarization charge density can be expressed as a summation of functions which vary log periodically with the distance from the Coulomb impurity. The period of variation depends on the conical defect. In the presence of the conical defect, the Fano resonances begin to appear in the transport cross-section for a lower value of the Coulomb charge. For both sub and supercritical regime we derive the dependence of LDOS on the conical defect. The effects of generalized boundary condition on the physical observables are also discussed.

  12. An introduction to the practical and ethical perspectives on the need to advance and standardize the intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Eppard, M. B.; Murchie, Karen J.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intracoelomic surgical implantation of electronic tags (including radio and acoustic telemetry transmitters, passive integrated transponders and archival biologgers) is frequently used for conducting studies on fish. Electronic tagging studies provide information on the spatial ecology, behavior and survival of fish in marine and freshwater systems. However, any surgical procedure, particularly one where a laparotomy is performed and the coelomic cavity is opened, has the potential to alter the survival, behavior or condition of the animal which can impair welfare and introduce bias. Given that management, regulatory and conservation decisions are based on the assumption that fish implanted with electronic tags have similar fates and behavior relative to untagged conspecifics, it is critical to ensure that best surgical practices are being used. Also, the current lack of standardized surgical procedures and reporting of specific methodological details precludes cross-study and cross-year analyses which would further progress the field of fisheries science. This compilation of papers seeks to identify the best practices for the entire intracoelomic tagging procedure including pre- and post-operative care, anesthesia, wound closure, and use of antibiotics. Although there is a particular focus on salmonid smolts given the large body of literature available on that group, other life-stages and species of fish are discussed where there is sufficient knowledge. Additional papers explore the role of the veterinarian in fish surgeries, the need for minimal standards in the training of fish surgeons, providing a call for more complete and transparent procedures, and identifying trends in procedures and research needs. Collectively, this body of knowledge should help to improve data quality (including comparability and repeatability), enhance management and conservation strategies, and maintain the welfare status of tagged fish.

  13. ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -66 Effect of conditioning on experimental fish The "wampus" in operation The water pump and air compressor Research Biologist One of the most uncertain and difficult problems in providing for the safe passage

  14. United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the knife blade so that it will scrape along the backbone, then, splits the fish along the back without from the washing tank they are allowed t o drain for a short time. They are then rubbed thoroughly

  15. act provisions fishing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    context and implications Road map of today's discussion: Power plan 8 USFWS Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act Grant301811J187 CiteSeer Summary: I would like to thank...

  16. atlantic reef fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Latitudinal gradients in Atlantic reef fish communities: trophic structure and spatial use patterns Biology and Medicine Websites...

  17. United states Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stagnant or muddy pools where their breathing movements attract attention on warm af,ternoons. The swimming, is known to pass readily to and from fresh and saltwater. \\ .JJ In general, information is from Fishes

  18. Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and (5) gravity data. Software for using this data has been installed at the Dyer, NV Fish Lake Green PowerEsmeralda Energy Company office with geologic data being transferred...

  19. Title 5 Alaska Administrative Code Chapter 95 Protection of Fish...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chapter 95 Protection of Fish and Game Habitat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Title 5 Alaska...

  20. EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to enter into a use permit or lease agreement with the Yakama Indian Nation or other parties who would rear fish in the 100-K Area Pools.

  1. Behaviour of settling coral reef fishes and supplementary mamagement tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heenan, Adel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral reef fish larvae take an active role in selecting their settlement site and sensory cues may help them to orientate during this process. As settlement is a period of transition through which the majority of individuals ...

  2. Hydroacoustic Estimates of Fish Density Distributions in Cougar Reservoir, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Batten, George W.; Mitchell, T. D.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Day and night mobile hydroacoustic surveys were conducted once each month from April through December 2011 to quantify the horizontal and vertical distributions of fish throughout Cougar Reservoir, Lane County, Oregon.

  3. Nutrient Enhancement Peter A. Bisson, Research Fish Biologist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to freshwater food webs showed that nutrients from salmon carcasses were an important contributor to aquatic to transmit fish diseases or persistent organic pollutants to streams, and to increase nutrient loading

  4. Intensive fishing with bottom trawls and dredges can have significant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    production at impacted sites (Lindholm et al., 1999). In con- tinental shelf waters off the United States groundline partially covered with 6.4-cm diameter rubber discs, but are configured to elevate the fish- ing

  5. Habitat associations of fish assemblages in the Sulphur River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Michael Neal

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an instream flow study, information on summer distribution of fishes and habitat variables was collected from six sites at each of three flows in the Sulphur River, Texas. I evaluated (1) spatiotemporal relationships between instream...

  6. Sustainable Fishing in West Africa: Combating Piracy and Poverty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPhee-Shaw, Erika

    presents Sustainable Fishing in West Africa: Combating Piracy and Poverty an Evening with Mariah to help combat the poverty, piracy, and corruption. About the Speaker: Mariah Boyle is an alumna of MLML

  7. Ecological significance of bacteria associated with coral reef fish feces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smriga, Steven Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assemblages associated with coral reef fish guts and feces.and their effect on coral reef microbes. EnvironmentalMicrobial ecology of four coral atolls in the Northern Line

  8. Technical background document for soil screening guidance. Review draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides the technical background behind the development of the November 1994 Soil Screening Guidance for Superfund. These documents define the Soil Screening framework, a suite of methodologies for developing Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) for 107 chemicals commonly found at Superfund sites. The document is an updated version of the background document developed in support of the September 30, 1993, draft SSL guidance (PB93-963508). The document and the Guidance is available for public comment and is currently undergoing extensive peer review. Because the guidance is still under review, it and this document should not be used until they are finalized following this rigorous technical review and public comment.

  9. Mitigation measures for fish habitat improvement in Alpine rivers affected by hydropower operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science and Technology, Seestrasse 79, CH-6047 Kastanienbaum, Switzerland 2 Laboratory of Hydraulic and young-of-the-year). Simulations showed that operational measures such as limiting maximum turbine and concentrated turbine operations allow electricity to be produced on demand. The sudden opening and closing

  10. Coupling of ecological and water quality models for improved water resource and fish management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillman, Dorothy Hamlin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years new ideas for nutrient management to control eutrophication in estuarine environments have been under consideration. One popular approach being considered in the Chesapeake Bay Program is called the “top down” approach based...

  11. Improved Lighthill fish swimming model for bio-inspired robots -Modelling, computational aspects and experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Tel.: +33 2 51 85 85 75, Fax: +33 2 51 85 83 02 (E-mail: mathieu.porez@mines-nantes.fr). F. Boyer and experimental comparisons. Mathieu Porez , Frédéric Boyer and Auke Jan Ijspeert February 14, 2014 Abstract through a series of studies [Boyer et al., 2008, 2010; Candelier et al., 2011] ranging from hydrodynamic

  12. Vaccine to Control the Viral Infection of Fish.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, JoAnn Ching

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Subunit vaccines and their use for immunizing fish against infection by viruses are disclosed. In particular, plasmid pG8 is constructed by joining, with the plasmid pUC8, DNA which encodes the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). E. coli cells are transformed by pG8, whereby pure viral antigen is produced to provide a vaccine for the control of IHNV in fish. 10 figs.

  13. Mercury Contamination in Pelagic Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuklyte, Ligita

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation and moisture. At higher pH and temperature Hg mobilization and emission from soil increases (Gabriel & Williamson 2004). Mercury is deposited into aquatic ecosystems by the same processes. In surface waters it occurs as dissolved free ions...), length at year one (cm) and percentage (%) of bony fish in their diet. Species name Trophic adult position Max age Max length Length at year one Fish % in diet References blackfin tuna 4.13 5 93 45 70% (Doray et al. 2004) (Robert...

  14. Fish assemblages on coral reefs in Guanaja, Bay Islands, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendran, Christopher Kandiah

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FISH ASSEMBLAGES ON CORAL REEFS IN GUANAJA, BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER KANDIAH MAHENDRAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences FISH ASSEMBLAGES ON CORAL REEFS IN GUANAJA, BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER KANDIAH MAHENDRAN Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  15. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volumes in 2003 were below average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (79%) and The Dalles Dam (82%). The year 2003 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that met the spring seasonal Biological Opinion flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam, McNary Dam and Priest Rapids Dam. However, summer seasonal flows at Lower Granite Dam and McNary Dam were considerably below the Biological Opinion objectives of 50.7 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam and 2000 Kcfs at McNary Dam. Actual summer seasonal flows were just 32.3 Kcfs and 135.5 Kcfs, respectively. In most instances spill was provided as described by the Biological Opinion program for fish passage, within the constraints of the State waivers for total dissolved gas supersaturation levels. Spill was altered during spill testing and most notably during the month of August at Ice Harbor dam. At this project spill was modified from a 24-hour program to a 12-hour nightly spill period pending the evaluation of studies being conducted in-season. Spill was not returned to full implementation of the Biological Opinion levels even after data showed that spillway passage had the highest associated fish survival. This experience demonstrated the difficulty of managing the hydrosystem for fish passage based on preliminary data and data collected in-season. Increased hatchery releases and higher wild fish production resulted in a population of yearling chinook at Lower Granite Dam being one of the highest observed in recent years. However, the increased hatchery production may have been offset to some extent by decreased survival from release to Lower Granite Dam as suggested by the lower than average survival observed for the PIT tagged trap released fish to Lower Monumental Dam. Travel times were also longer for hatchery spring chinook compared to recent past years. The short duration of high flows that occurred in the Lower Snake River was too late for yearling chinook, but likely was a benefit for steelhead. Survivals for spring fish in the Lower Granite to McNary Dam and the McNary to Bonneville Dam reach were similar to recent years. Returning numbers of adult spring and summer chinook, coho and steelhead were less than observed in 2002, but far exceeded the ten-year average return numbers. Sockeye numbers were less than both the 2002 returning adults and the ten-year average number. However, fall chinook numbers surpassed all previous counts at Bonneville Dam since 1938. In 2003, about 81 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This was slightly less than the number released last year, but about average for the past several years.

  16. LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT, HAWAII, DERIVED FROM COMMERCIAL FISH RECORDS, 1959-1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Anthony T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the first deployment of Mini-OTEC. Ocean Research Consulting64 LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT,LIST OF FISH AT A PROPOSED OTEC SITE OFF KE-AHOLE POINT,

  17. Six-degree-of-freedom Sensor Fish design and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish passing through dams may be injured or killed despite advances in turbine design, project operations and other fish bypass systems. The Six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) Sensor Fish device is an autonomous sensor package designed to characterize the physical conditions and physical stresses fish are exposed to when they pass through complex hydraulic environments. It has been used to identify the locations and operations where conditions are severe enough to injure or kill fish. During the design process, a set of governing equations of motion for the device was derived and simulated in order to understand the design implications of instrument selection and placement within the body of the device. The sensor package includes three rotation sensors, three acceleration sensors, a pressure sensor, and a temperature sensor with a sampling frequency of 2,000 Hz. Its housing is constructed of clear polycarbonate plastic. It is 24.5 mm in diameter and 90 mm in length, weighs about 43 grams, similar to the size and density of a yearling salmon smolt. The relative errors of both the linear acceleration and angular velocity measurements were determined to be less than 5% from laboratory acceptance tests. Since its development in 2005, the 6DOF Sensor Fish device has been successfully deployed at many major dams in the United States.

  18. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

  19. Influence of Habitat Modifications on Habitat Composition and Anadromous Salmonid Populations in Fish Creek, Oregon, 1983-1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Gordon H.; Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of degraded habitats to increase populations of anadromous salmonids is a major focus of management agencies throughout the Pacific Northwest. Millions of dollars are spent annually on such efforts. Inherent in implementing habitat improvements is the need for quantitative evaluation of the biological and physical effects of such work. Reeves et al. (in press), however, noted that such evaluations are rare, making it difficult to assess the true results of habitat work. While it is not economically possible to thoroughly evaluate every habitat project, it is essential that intensive evaluations be done on selected representative projects. One such evaluation program has been underway since 1982 on Fish Creek, a tributary of the Clackamas River near Estacada, OR. Habitat modification has been done by the USDA Forest Service, Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest with funding provided in part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The USDA Forest Service, Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit, Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), Corvallis, OR is charged with: (1) evaluating the biological and physical responses to habitat modifications on a basin scale; and (2) developing a cost-benefit analysis of the program. Preliminary results have been reported in a series of annual publications, Everest and Sedell 1983, 1984 and Everest et al. 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) report 1988 observations of biological and physical changes in habitat, salmonid populations, and smolt production in Fish Creek, and (2) examine preliminary trends in fish habitat and populations related to habitat improvement over the period 1983-1988. We have prefaced the trends in the latter objective as preliminary because we believe it could take a minimum of 10 years before the full biological and physical responses to habitat work are realized. We therefore urge caution in interpreting these preliminary results.

  20. Improving Stormwater Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of water resources. Stormwater, when produced by rain or snowmelt flowing over the land, captures debris, chemicals, hazardous wastes, and/or sediment. These contaminants then make their way to drainage systems that flow directly into rivers, lakes..., wetlands, or bays. The polluted stormwa- ter runoff can affect the health of plants, fish, animals, and people, as well as reduce the recreational value of water resources. Urbanization also has a major impact on the quality of local streams because...

  1. Sensor Fish Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through John Day Dam Spillbay 20 with a Modified Flow Deflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish passage conditions over a modified deflector in Spillbay 20 at John Day Dam were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objectives of the study were to describe and compare passage exposure conditions at two spill discharges, 2.4 and 4.0 thousand cubic feet per second (kcfs), identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes, and to evaluate a low-tailwater condition at the 2.4-kcfs discharge. The study was performed in April 2010 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events; 2) differences in passage conditions between treatments; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Nearly all Sensor Fish significant events were classified as collisions; the most severe occurred at the gate, on the spillbay chute, or at the deflector transition. Collisions in the gate region were observed only during the 2.4-kcfs discharge, when the tainter gate was open 1.2 ft. One shear event was observed during the evaluation, occurring at the deflector transition during passage at the 2.4-kcfs discharge at low tailwater. Flow quality, computed using the Sensor Fish turbulence index, was best for passage at the low-flow low-tailwater condition as well. The worst flow quality was observed for the 4.0-kcfs test condition. Contrasting the passage exposure conditions, the 2.4-kcfs low-tailwater treatment would be most deleterious to fish survival and well-being.

  2. A Complete Microfluidic Screening Platform for Rational Protein Crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Carl L.

    A Complete Microfluidic Screening Platform for Rational Protein Crystallization Billy T. C. Lau integration, and low reagent consumption, microfluidic devices have emerged as viable technologies for protein crystallization. Current microfluidic crystallization technologies have focused on two separate strategies: one

  3. Rapid screening of novel nanoporous materials for carbon capture separations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangano, Enzo

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the experimental results from the rapid screening and ranking of a wide range of novel adsorbents for carbon capture are presented. The samples were tested using the Zero Length Column (ZLC) method which has ...

  4. Brighter Screens for Nondestructive Digital X-ray Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Jr., A. C.; Bell, Z. W.; Carpenter, D. A.

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine resolution, bright X-ray screens are needed for digital radiography and material characterization at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Current technology is simply not adequate for transferring high-energy X-ray images to visible light for demanding digital applications. Low energy radiography and especially emerging tomographic technologies are severely hampered for Y-12 nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications by dim screens with poor resolution. Also, the development of more advanced materials characterization techniques, such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is driven by a design agency desire for tighter specifications and more uniform materials. Brighter screens would allow us to probe materials on a finer scale, leading to a better understanding of material behavior. A number of X-ray screen materials were studied that would be suitable for direct replacement in existing digital imaging systems. Spectroscopic evaluations were first made for a several candidates and indicated that lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) would be a promising candidate for MeV images. A relative comparison of brightness at various energies was then completed which showed that cesium iodide (CsI) could increase brightness by over an order of magnitude. Since image quality is also important for better screens, the resolving capabilities of candidate materials were measured. Resolution measurements were completed at X-ray peak energies up to 420KeV with magnified optical imaging systems, and indicated that LSO and Industrial Quality Incorporated glass (IQI) exhibited higher resolution than the CsI screen. The results give a choice of materials that can be tailored to the particular test under consideration. If high-speed images are necessary and some resolution can be sacrificed, the CsI screen will be a good choice. The screen can be replaced by an IQI or LSO unit if higher resolution is needed later, for instance to focus in on a region of interest. A number of significant findings were obtained from this study. Most important of the findings was that materials are commercially available that are much brighter than screens currently in use. This finding meets the original objective of the project. Two objectives of the study; however, were not met. We hoped to evaluate a 'quantum dot' (nanometer-sized particles of semiconductor material) wavelength conversion screen, but the manufacturer ceased production of the screen shortly before the project was started. The dot screen could be efficient in converting ultraviolet light to visible light which would have proved important for utilizing a Cherenkov screen. Since this was a very new, cutting-edge technology, an alternative supplier was not found during the study. Also, high-energy testing of a Cherenkov light screen was not performed due to difficulties in obtaining appropriate approvals for locating test equipment in the high-energy X-ray vault at Y-12. The test is still important, and is being pursued through follow-on funding sources. Although many film shots will be eliminated by the availability of high quality digital images, the largest potential gains result from the availability of clearer images that show fine detail in the parts under analysis. Digital radiographic data also offers the possibility of easily sharing data with other sites. This could prove invaluable when critical material, placement, assembly, or quality issues are pressing. Also, increased throughput in the NDE facility allows statistically significant numbers of units to be analyzed. Digital technologies may in fact be needed just to meet minimum requirements of future demands. Increased brightness screens allow for such innovations as 3-D tomographic images to be acquired in a reasonable time. Much of the skill required to interpret 'flattened' X-ray images is not needed to maneuver around the reconstructed tomogram. This study showed that several commercially available materials are much brighter than screens currently in use. The study also showed that materials othe

  5. http://jbx.sagepub.com Journal of Biomolecular Screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    /1/29 SAGE Journals Online and HighWire Press platforms): (this article cites 25 articles hosted on the of high-throughput screening (HTS) procedures coupled with auto- mated microscopy to generate large

  6. Biocompatible polymer microarrays for cellular high-content screening 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernagallo, Salvatore

    2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The global aim of this thesis was to study the use of microarray technology for the screening and identification of biocompatible polymers, to understand physiological phenomena, and the design of biomaterials, implant ...

  7. Stochastic dominance for project screening and selection under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyemo, Adekunle M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At any given moment, engineering and chemical companies have a host of projects that they are either trying to screen to advance to the next stage of research or select from for implementation. These choices could range ...

  8. Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2013 Annual Report, February...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies have shown that individuals are more likely to stop smoking, for example, when a health care provider counsels them to do so. Similarly, the re-screening examination is an...

  9. Properties of plain weave metallic wire mesh screens Zenghui Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    , heat pipes, solar energy collector, thermal insu- lation, etc. Structures or laminates made of wire heat transfer by coating the heat transfer surface with a mesh screen is found in [2]. In recent years

  10. Screening of Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation es028lu2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Screen Electrode...

  11. adolescent health screening: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Akagi, Cynthia G. 2005-11-30 2 Screening for adolescent alcohol and drug use in pediatric health-care settings: predictors and implications for practice and policy University of...

  12. WebThumb: Interaction Techniques for Small-Screen Browsers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    205 WebThumb: Interaction Techniques for Small-Screen Browsers Jacob O. Wobbrock* , Jodi Forlizzi are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full

  13. TA-53 UNREVIEWED SAFETY ISSUE SCREENING AND DETERMINATION PROCESS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 UNREVIEWED SAFETY ISSUE SCREENING AND DETERMINATION PROCESS TRAINING WORKSHEET CT-TA53-FRM-505-R00 102011 Page 1 of 3 LA-UR-12-10162 TRAINEE NAME: Z NUMBER: GROUP: PURPOSE AND...

  14. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirish M. Chitanvis

    2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  15. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitanvis, S M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  16. A screening technique for salt tolerance in onion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wannamaker, Mary Jordon

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A SCREENING TECHNIQUE FOR SALT TOLERANCE IN ONION A Thesis by MARY JORDAN WANNAMAKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major... Subject: Horticulture A SCREENING TECHNIQUE FOR SALT TOLERANCE IN ONION A Thesis by NARY JORDAN WANNAMAKER Approved as to style and content by: Leonard M. Pike (Chairma f Cp 'ttee) 'eg C. Cobb (Member) Ron Newton (Member) . Grant Vest (Head...

  17. Plasma-sheath effects on the Debye screening problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmah, D.; Tessarotto, M.; Salimullah, M. [Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); International Center for Theoretical Physics, ICPT/TRIL, Program, Trieste (Italy); and Consortium for Magnetofluid Dynamics, Trieste (Italy); Department of Mathematics and Informatics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy) and Consortium for Magnetofluid Dynamics, Trieste (Italy); Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical Debye-Hueckel screening effect of the electrostatic field generated by isolated charged particles immersed in a plasma is reviewed. The validity of the underlying mathematical model, and particularly of the weak-field approximation, is analyzed. It is shown that the presence of the plasma sheath around test particles and the resulting effect of charge screening are essential for the description of plasmas that are strongly coupled.

  18. First law energy balance as a data screening tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Xiaojie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................135 7.1 Introduction....................................................................................135 7.2 Pre-Screening Case 1: Harrington Tower ......................................136 7.3 Pre-Screening Case 2: The Eller O&M Building.... outside air temperature.......................68 Figure 4.18 Key characteristics of simulated results of Energy Balance Load............. 69 Figure 5.1 Main Effect plot for the Eller Oceanography & Meteorology Building....85 Figure 5...

  19. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

  20. Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.