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Sample records for fish laboratory studies

  1. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2013-06-01

    A primary issue of concern of regulatory and resource agencies is how the operation of hydrokinetic turbines will affect local and migratory fish populations. This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments.

  2. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur during passage through a Welka UPG turbine at ambient current velocities less than about 2.5 m/s. Survival and Behavior of Juvenile Atlantic Salmon and Adult American Shad on Exposure to a Hydrokinetic Turbine This report describes a series of experiments designed to measure the effect of exposure to a full-scale, vertical axis hydrokinetic turbine on downstream migrating juvenile Atlantic salmon and upstream migrating adult American shad. Studies were performed in a large-scale, open-channel flume, and all individuals approached the turbine under volitional control. No injuries were observed, and there was no measurable increase in mortality associated with turbine passage. Exposure to the turbine elicited behavioral responses from both species, however, with salmon passing primarily over the downrunning blades. Shad movement was impeded in the presence of the device, as indicated by fewer attempts of shorter duration and reduced distance of ascent up the flume. More work should be performed in both laboratory and field conditions to determine the extent to which observed effects are likely to influence fish in riverine environments. Analysis is needed to assess the potential for multiple units to lead to greater mortality rates or impacts on fish movements and migrations. Additionally, future research should focus on expanding the existing data by developing better estimates of encounter and avoidance probabilities.

  3. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including changes in pressure as they pass through turbines and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). To examine pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted specific tests using a hyperbaric chamber. Tests were designed to simulate Kaplan turbine passage conditions and to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes, with and without the complication of fish being acclimated to gas-supersaturated water.

  4. Laboratory studies of the effects of pressure and dissolved gas supersaturation on turbine-passed fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2001-03-01

    Designing advanced turbine systems requires knowledge of environmental conditions that injure or kill fish such as the stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes fish experience during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The objective of this study was to examine the relative importance of pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality. Specific tests were designed to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes typical of turbine passage, with and without the complication of the fish being acclimated to gas supersaturated water. The study investigated the responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, both singly and in combination.

  5. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G F.

    2001-03-23

    The objective of this study was to examine the relative importance of pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality. Specific tests were designed to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes typical of turbine passage, with and without the complication of the fish being acclimated to gas supersaturated water. We investigated the responses of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, both singly and in combination.

  6. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Fortner, Allison M; Riemer, Kristina P; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the effect on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by the projects. The submerged electrical generator will emit an EMF into the surrounding water, as will underwater cables used to transmit electricity from the generator to the shore, between individual units in an array (inter-turbine cables), and between the array and a submerged step-up transformer. The electric current moving through these cables will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of fish and benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011). Those experiments found little indication that the behaviors of these freshwater species were a

  7. Laboratory Studies of the Short-term Responses of Freshwater Fish to Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Cada, Glenn F; Fortner, Allison M; Schweizer, Peter E; Riemer, Kristina P

    2013-01-01

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies are being proposed as an environmentally preferred means of generating electricity from river and tidal currents. Among the potential issues that must be investigated in order to resolve environmental concerns are the effects on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields created by underwater generators and transmission cables. The behavioral responses of common freshwater fishes to static and variable electromagnetic fields (EMF) that may be emitted by hydrokinetic projects were evaluated in laboratory experiments. Various fish species were exposed to either static (DC) EMF fields created by a permanent bar magnet or variable (AC) EMF fields created by a switched electromagnet for 48 h, fish locations were recorded with a digital imaging system, and changes in activity level and distribution relative to the magnet position were quantified at 5-min intervals. Experiments with fathead minnows, redear sunfish, striped bass, lake sturgeon, and channel catfish produced mixed results. Except for fathead minnows there was no effect on activity level. Only redear sunfish and channel catfish exhibited a change in distribution relative to the position of the magnet with an apparent attraction to the EMF source. In separate experiments, rapid behavioral responses of paddlefish and lake sturgeon to onset of the AC field were recorded with high-speed video. Paddlefish did not react to a variable, 60-Hz magnetic field like that which would be emitted by an AC generator or cable, but lake sturgeon consistently responded to the variable, AC-generated magnetic field with a variety of altered swimming behaviors. These results will be useful for determining under what circumstances cables or generators need to be positioned to minimize interactions with sensitive species.

  8. Simulated Passage Through A Modified Kaplan Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Cada, G. F.

    2002-03-15

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). The responses of fall Chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to these two stresses, both singly and in combination, were investigated in the laboratory. A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the ?worst case? pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more ?fish-friendly? mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas (TDG) levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa) or 30 ft (191 kPa) of pressure, then held at surface pressure at 100% saturation for a 48-hour observation period. Sensitivity of fall Chinook salmon to gas supersaturation was slightly higher than in the previous test series, with 15% mortality for surface-acclimated fish at 120% TDG, compared to 0% in the previous tests.

  9. Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S. ); Amidan, Brett G. ); Cada, G F.

    2003-07-31

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at surface pressure for a 48-hour post exposure observation period. No fall chinook salmon died during or after exposure to the horizontal bulb turbine passage pressures, and no injuries were observed during the 48-hour post exposure observation period. As with the previous test series, it cannot be determined whether fall chinook salmon acclimated to the greater water pressure during the pretest holding period. For bluegill sunfish exposed to the horizontal bulb turbine turbine-passage pressures, only one fish died and injuries were less severe and less common than for bluegills subjected to either the"worst case" pressure or modified Kaplan turbine pressure conditions in previous tests. Injury rates for bluegills were higher at 0.7 atm nadir than for the 0.95 atm nadir. However, injuries were limited to minor internal hemorrhaging. Bluegills did not suffer swim bladder rupture in any tested scenarios. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  10. Fish passage through a simulated horizontal bulb turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the worst case pressure conditions (Abernethy et al. 2001) and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized (Abernethy et al. 2002). For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low-head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  11. Simulated passage through a modified Kaplan turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2002-04-01

    A previous test series (Abernethy et al. 2001) evaluated the effects of passage through a Kaplan turbine under the worst case pressure conditions. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a Kaplan turbine under a more fish-friendly mode of operation. The results were compared to results from Abernethy et al. (2001). These data indicate that altered operating conditions that raise the nadir (low point) of the turbine passage pressure regime could reduce the injury and mortality rates of fish during turbine passage. Fall Chinook salmon were not injured or killed when subjected to the modified pressure scenario. Bluegills were more sensitive to pressure effects than fall Chinook salmon, but injury and mortality rates were lower under the modified Kaplan pressure regime. This improvement was particularly significant among fish that were acclimated to greater water pressures (traveling at greater depth).

  12. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  13. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume ...

  14. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William; Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation by E. coli and Y. pestis LPS. The chip revealed an oscillation pattern in translocation of NF-kB indicating the presence of a negative feedback loop involving IKK. Activation of NF-kB is preceded by phosphorylation of many kinases and to correlate the kinase activity with translocation, we performed flow cytometric assays in the PhosphoChip module. Phopshorylated forms of p38. ERK and RelA were measured in macrophage cells challenged with LPS and showed a dynamic response where phosphorylation increases with time reaching a maximum at {approx}30-60min. To allow further downstream analysis on selected cells, we also implemented an optical-trapping based sorting of cells. This has allowed us to sort macrophages infected with bacteria from uninfected cells with the goal of obtaining data only on the infected (the desired) population. The various microfluidic chip modules and the accessories required to operate them such as pumps, heaters, electronic control and optical detectors are being assembled in a bench-top, semi-automated device. The data generated is being utilized to refine existing TLR pathway model by adding kinetic rate constants and concentration information. The microfluidic platform allows high-resolution imaging as well as quantitative proteomic measurements with high sensitivity (study cell-signaling involved in host-pathogen interactions and other diseases such as cancer. The advances made in this project have been presented at numerous national and international conferences and are documented in many peer-reviewed publications as listed. Finer details of many of the component technologies are described in these publications. The chapters to follow in this report are also adapted from other manuscripts that are accepted for publication, submitted or in preparation to be submitted to peer-reviewed journals.

  15. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY COMMUNITY LEADERS STUDY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY COMMUNITY LEADERS STUDY OCTOBER 2014 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY-COMMUNITY LEADERS STUDY OCTOBER 2014 PAGE 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 METHODOLOGY

  16. Study of fish response using particle image velocimetry and high-speed, high-resolution imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Z.; Richmond, M. C.; Mueller, R. P.; Gruensch, G. R.

    2004-10-01

    Fish swimming has fascinated both engineers and fish biologists for decades. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) and high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging are recently developed analysis tools that can help engineers and biologists better understand how fish respond to turbulent environments. This report details studies to evaluate DPIV. The studies included a review of existing literature on DPIV, preliminary studies to test the feasibility of using DPIV conducted at our Flow Biology Laboratory in Richland, Washington September through December 2003, and applications of high-speed, high-resolution digital imaging with advanced motion analysis to investigations of fish injury mechanisms in turbulent shear flows and bead trajectories in laboratory physical models. Several conclusions were drawn based on these studies, which are summarized as recommendations for proposed research at the end of this report.

  17. Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations.

  18. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasability of a New Fish Tagging System : Annual Report, 1986-1987.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, Earl F.; Flagg, T.A.

    1987-12-01

    In 1983, a multi-year project to evaluate the technical and biological feasibility of adapting a new identification system to salmonids was established. The system is based upon a miniaturized passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag. This report discusses the work completed and is divided into laboratory studies, field studies, and systems development. All studies were conducted using a glass-encapsulated tag implanted into the body cavity of test fish via a 12-gauge hypodermic needle. Laboratory studies with juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, showed that retention of glass-encapsulated PIT tags was 99-100% in fish weighing 3 g (mean weight) or larger. No adverse tissue response to the tag was noted. The survival of fish 5 g (mean weight) or larger was usually greater than 99%. However, fish ranging in weight from 2 to 4 g, or fish undergoing a physiological change such as smoltification may have a low mortality (usually less than 5.0%) after tagging. The mortality rate in the smaller fish was dependent upon tagging skill whereas mortality in smolting fish seemed dependent upon the level of stress. Growth comparisons between tagged and control fish indicated PIT-tagged fish had a slightly depressed growth rate at some measurement periods. The operational life of glass-encapsulated PIT tags implanted in fish was good, with 100% of the tags operating after 401 days. No tags were rejected from the fish during the observation period.

  19. Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

  20. Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates Expand...

  1. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume II of IV, Results of Laboratory and Field Research on New Concepts in Weir and Pool Fishways, 1982-1984 Final Project Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaserude, Robert G.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01

    A comprehensive review of fishway design practice led to new design concepts that had previously been untested. This concept was based on the observation that fish can be stimulated to leap when presented with certain hydraulic conditions. A laboratory test program was conducted to develop this concept into a new fishway configuration. Field testing revealed that components of the new design improved fish passage. Verification of the initial premise that fish can be stimulated to leap needs further study.

  2. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary layer of water flowing over the blade surface. The study quantified both immediate and delayed mortalities (observed immediately, 3 hours, and 24 hours after encountering the blade) among freshwater YOY fish resulting from contact with the blade or turbulent flows in the wake of the blade.

  3. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Adams, Marshall; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

  4. Study of Fish Response Using Particle Image Velocimetry and High-Speed, High-Resolution Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2004-10-23

    Existing literature of previous particle image velocimetry (PIV) studies of fish swimming has been reviewed. Historically, most of the studies focused on the performance evaluation of freely swimming fish. Technological advances over the last decade, especially the development of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) technique, make possible more accurate, quantitative descriptions of the flow patterns adjacent to the fish and in the wake behind the fins and tail, which are imperative to decode the mechanisms of drag reduction and propulsive efficiency. For flows generated by different organisms, the related scales and flow regimes vary significantly. For small Reynolds numbers, viscosity dominates; for very high Reynolds numbers, inertia dominates, and three-dimensional complexity occurs. The majority of previous investigations dealt with the lower end of Reynolds number range. The fish of our interest, such as rainbow trout and spring and fall chinook salmon, fall into the middle range, in which neither viscosity nor inertia is negligible, and three-dimensionality has yet to dominate. Feasibility tests have proven the applicability of PIV to flows around fish. These tests have shown unsteady vortex shedding in the wake, high vorticity region and high stress region, with the highest in the pectoral area. This evident supports the observations by Nietzel et al. (2000) and Deng et al. (2004) that the operculum are most vulnerable to damage from the turbulent shear flow, because they are easily pried open, and the large vorticity and shear stress can lift and tear off scales, rupture or dislodge eyes, and damage gills. In addition, the unsteady behavior of the vortex shedding in the wake implies that injury to fish by the instantaneous flow structures would likely be much higher than the injury level estimated using the average values of the dynamics parameters. Based on existing literature, our technological capability, and relevance and practicability to Department of Energy's Hydropower Program, we identified three major research areas of interest: free swimming, the boundary layer over fish, and kinematic response of fish. We propose that the highest priority is to characterize the kinematic response of fish to different turbulent environments such as high shear/turbulence and hydrodynamic disturbances created by solid structures such as deflector and turbine runner blade; the next priority is to map the boundary layer over swimming fish; the last is to document the behavior of freely swimming fish, focusing on fish of our interest. Grid turbulence and Karman vortex street will be employed to map the boundary layers over fish and investigate the effects of environmental disturbances on the swimming performance of fish, because they are well established and documented in engineering literature and are representative of fish's swimming environments. Extreme conditions characteristic of turbine environments, such as strong shear environment and collision, will be investigated. Through controlled laboratory studies, the fish injury mechanism from different sources will be evaluated in isolation. The major goals are to: gain first-hand knowledge of the biological effects under such extreme hydraulic environments in which fish could lack the capability to overcome the perturbations and be vulnerable to injury; Better understand field results by integrating the laboratory studies with the responses of sensor fish device; More importantly, provide well-defined validation cases and boundary conditions for geometry-based computational fluid-structure interaction modeling in order to simulate the complex hydraulic environments in advanced hydropower systems and their effects on fish, greatly enhancing the potential to use CFD as a bio-hydraulic design alternative.

  5. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  6. Fish behavior: applied studies to assess environmental effects of energy-related activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.

    1985-04-01

    Studies at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories have evaluated fish response to thermal discharge, gas supersaturated water, water soluble fractions of coal liquids and other environmental stresses. Approaches have included biotelemetry in the field, and avoidance/attraction and predator prey studies in the laboratory. Sonic-tracking studies in the Columbia River indicated that thermal discharges did not block upstream migration of adult salmonids (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, Salmo gairdneri). Laboratory studies showed that juvenile O. tshawytscha avoided thermal discharges when ..delta..ts exceed 9 to 11/sup 0/C above ambient. However, juvenile salmon were more susceptible to predation at 10 to 20% of the thermal dose causing loss of equilibrium. Radio-tracking studies showed that adult O. tshawytscha swam deeper in supersaturated water than normally saturated water in the Snake River and thereby avoided the upper, critical zone. Laboratory studies showed that carp (Cyprinus carpio), and black bullhead (Ictalurus melas) did not always avoid lethal gas levels and some fish died in the test apparatus. Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) avoided the water soluble fraction (WSF) of a coal liquid at concentrations causing acute effects, but not at those causing chronic effects. Rainbow trout (S. gairdneri) did not avoid coal liquid WSFs although they did avoid the major constituent, phenol, tested as a pure compound. Other studies with phenol showed that susceptibility to predation did not increase until phenol concentrations reached the acute LC/sub 50/. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet explains studies conducted in a highly reproducible manner to examine the biological effects to fish exposed to a shear environment in the laboratory.

  8. Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar ...

  9. Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar...

  10. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Flume Studies | Department of Energy Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river

  11. Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1989-10-01

    The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Presentation: Introduction to Current & Prior Studies of the DOE Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A briefing to the Comission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories on current and prior studies of the DOE Laboratories delivered by Mark Taylor, Susannah Howieson, and...

  13. Borehole thermal resistance: Laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remund, C.P.

    1999-07-01

    Vertical ground heat exchangers are a common method of linking geothermal heat pump systems to the earth, and they consist of pipe installed into a borehole that is subsequently backfilled with a material that forms the heat transfer link between the pipe and earth. In many states that material must also be a grout to form a barrier against water migration in any direction along the entire borehole length. Until recently, little attention has been given to the thermal properties of commonly used backfill and grouting materials or to the effect of the thermal conductivity of those materials on the thermal performance of the vertical ground heat exchanger. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the effect of grout thermal conductivity, borehole diameter, pipe size, and pipe configuration on the total thermal resistance in the borehole. It was found that borehole thermal resistance decreased with increasing grout thermal resistance decreased with increasing grout thermal conductivity, but increasing grout thermal conductivity above 1.0 Btu/h{center{underscore}dot}ft{center{underscore}dot}{degree}F provided very small additional reduction. The studies resulted in a set of relationships for borehole thermal resistance, depending on the pipe configuration in the borehole, that can be utilized in the calculation of design length of a vertical ground heat exchanger for a prescribed heating and cooling load. A series of independent field tests verified that the assumption of equal spacing between the pipes and the borehole wall conservatively accounted for the thermal conductivity of the backfill or grout material. The effect of increasing grout thermal conductivity from 0.43 to 0.85 Btu/h{center{underscore}dot}ft{center{underscore}dot}{degree}F resulted in overall reductions in thermal resistance between the circulating fluid and the earth by 15.3% to 19.5%.

  14. Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These case studies feature examples of energy-efficient laboratories for the 21st century. The Featured Concepts Table outlines technologies covered in each case study.

  15. Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission Control Concept Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission Control Concept ...

  16. 222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUELAS, B.H.

    2007-03-26

    The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory.

  17. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities Laboratories and Facilities National Energy Technology Laboratory - The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is the lead field center for the Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program. Scientists at its Pittsburgh, Pa., and Morgantown, W. Va., campuses conduct onsite research while contract administrators oversee nearly 700 federally-sponsored projects conducted by private sector research partners. The Houston,

  18. Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall; Fortner, Allison M

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

  19. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BeLPT Process Diagram BeLPT Process Diagram Click image for larger view Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Testing Laboratory Beryllium is a metal that is primarily used as a hardening agent in alloys. Its low density, heat stability and high melting point have made it of benefit to the aerospace and defense industries. However, beryllium dust or fumes produced during machining or manufacturing activities can cause sensitivity in some persons that may lead to chronic beryllium

  20. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory June 17, 2014 Unclassified 'Wolf' system to advance many fields of science LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 17, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory recently installed a new high-performance computer system, called Wolf, which will be used for unclassified research. "This machine modernizes our mid-tier resources available to Laboratory scientists," said Bob Tomlinson, of the Laboratory's High Performance Computing group.

  1. A Case Study of Lean Implementation at Sandia National Laboratories...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: A Case Study of Lean Implementation at Sandia National Laboratories. Abstract not provided. Authors: de Luna, Raul ; Lopez, Mike R. ; Wan, Hung-da ; Chen, Frank F. ...

  2. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Integration | Argonne National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration Share Topic Energy Energy sources Renewable energy Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Powertrain research --Building design ---Construction --Manufacturing -Energy sources

  3. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory June 26, 2011 Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 26, 2011, 6:07pm-The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12...

  4. EERE Success Story-Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Help Protect Real, Live Fish | Department of Energy Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish EERE Success Story-Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect Real, Live Fish June 4, 2014 - 1:12pm Addthis Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations. Danger to fish is a major concern when building or

  5. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    This factsheet explains studies conducted in a highly reproducible manner to examine the biological effects to fish exposed to a shear environment in the laboratory. Strain rate was used as the index of intensity to describe the hydraulic force experienced by a fish in a shear environment. It was determined that no significant injuries occurred to any fish subjected to strain rates equal to or less than 500 cm/s/cm.

  6. Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observatory data (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Authors: Trabert, E ; Beiersdorfer, P Publication Date: 2014-08-26 OSTI Identifier: 1228006 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-659433 DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal

  7. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integration | Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration August 5, 2015 - 4:47pm Addthis How can our landscapes be managed most effectively to produce crops for food, feed, and bioenergy, while also protecting our water resources by preventing the loss of nutrients from the soil? Dr. Cristina Negri and her team at the U.S. Department of Energy's

  8. Student's Doctoral Studies Grew from Internship at DOE Laboratory, Office

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of River Protection | Department of Energy Student's Doctoral Studies Grew from Internship at DOE Laboratory, Office of River Protection Student's Doctoral Studies Grew from Internship at DOE Laboratory, Office of River Protection July 29, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis Once a high school intern who completed work at ORP, Jose Marcial is now pursuing a doctorate in material science and engineering. Once a high school intern who completed work at ORP, Jose Marcial is now pursuing a doctorate in

  9. Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Experiments and Modeling for Interpreting Field Studies of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Using an Oxidation Flow Reactor This grant was

  10. Honey, I Shrunk the Plasma: Studying Astrophysical Processes in Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiments | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 14, 2015, 9:30am to 11:00am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium Honey, I Shrunk the Plasma: Studying Astrophysical Processes in Laboratory Experiments Dr. Clayton Myers, Associate Research Physicist PPPL Abstract: PDF icon Myers.pdf Science on Saturday, 14FEB2015, "Honey, I Shrunk the Plasma: Studying Astrophysical Processess in Laboratory Experiments", Dr. Clayton Myers, PPPL Contact Information Website: Science on Saturday

  11. Reproductive biomarkers responses induced by xenoestrogens in the characid fish Astyanax fasciatus inhabiting a South American reservoir: An integrated field and laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prado, Paula S.; Pinheiro, Ana Paula B.; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2014-05-01

    Field studies evaluating the effects of endocrine disruption chemicals (EDCs) on the fish reproduction are scarce worldwide. The goal of this study was to assess hepatic levels of vitellogenin (Vtg), zona radiata proteins (Zrp) and insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), and relating them to reproductive endpoints in a wild fish population habiting a reservoir that receive domestic sewage, agricultural and industrial residues. Adult fish Astyanax fasciatus were sampled during the reproductive season in five sites from the Furnas Reservoir, Grande River, and Paraguay–Paraná basin. As a control to field data, fish were experimentally exposed via dietary intake, to oestradiol benzoate (OB) for 7 days. Fish from site with little anthropogenic interference showed hepatic levels of Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II similar to those from the non-treated experimental group. In sites located immediately downstream from the municipal wastewater discharges, the water total oestrogen was >120 ng/l, and male fish displayed increased Vtg and Zrp and decreased IGF-I levels similar to OB treated fish. In females, levels of Vtg, Zrp, IGF-I and IGF-II suggest an impairment of final oocyte maturation and spawning, as also detected by frequency of over-ripening, follicular atresia and fecundity. At the sites that receive agricultural and industrial residues, the water total oestrogen was <50 ng/l and females showed decreased Zrp and increased IGF-II levels associated to reduced diameter of vitellogenic follicles, indicating an inhibition of oocyte growth. Overall, the current study reports oestrogenic contamination impairing the reproduction of a wild fish from a hydroeletric reservoir and, the data contribute to improving the current knowledge on relationship between hepatic Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II, and reproductive endpoints in a teleost fish. In addition, our data point out novel reproductive biomarkers (IGF-I, IGF-II and over-ripening) to assessing xenoestrogenic contamination in freshwater ecosystems. - Highlights: • We point out novel reproductive biomarkers to assess xenoestrogenic contamination. • Field captured fish showed altered hepatic Vtg and Zrp. • Hepatic IGF-I and II levels were associated to reproductive disturbances. • Over-ripening is a better xenoestrogen biomarker than follicular atresia.

  12. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2015 Students gain new insights into their ancestry LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 24, 2015-San Ildefonso Pueblo's Summer Education Enhancement Program brought together academic and cultural learning in the form of a recent tour of Cave Kiva Trail in Mortandad Canyon."Opening up this archaeological site and sharing it with the descendants of its first inhabitants is a

  13. National Energy Technology Laboratory Publishes Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A compilation of studies examining cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells is available on the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory website. The report, entitled Recent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Studies, provides a concise, portfolio-wide synopsis of cathode research conducted under the Office of Fossil Energy’s Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Program.

  14. Turbine-related fish mortality: Review and evaluation of studies: Final report. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eicher, G.J.

    1987-11-01

    This project collected, listed and reviewed past studies of turbine-related fish mortality and from the review qualify evaluation findings and their implications in fish passage improvement. Included were 64 reports of turbine passage investigations at specific sites. Thirty-six papers reviewing turbine mortality aspects in general, but not of individual plants, were also studied, as were 56 study reports of subjects related to turbine mortality, such as turbine design, cavitation, gas supersaturation, pressure, descaling and shear. Annotated bibliographies for these three groups are provided, as is a glossary of terms used in this work. Hydraulic turbines are described with particular reference to routes of fish through them in relation to assumed zones of fish damage. Methods and purposes of assessing such damage as well as factors affecting accuracy are discussed. Detailed critiques of the turbine passage studies examined include reasons for the studies, types of studies, methods, execution, and results. The only relatively clear linkage with mortality was that of peripheral runner speed in the case of Francis units. Tubine model studies indicate influences of tailwater level, cavitation, wicket gate opening, and speed at which fish strike turbine blades. Injury types do not provide clear evidence of their source.

  15. A Case Study of Lean Implementation at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect A Case Study of Lean Implementation at Sandia National Laboratories. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Case Study of Lean Implementation at Sandia National Laboratories. Abstract not provided. Authors: de Luna, Raul ; Lopez, Mike R. ; Wan, Hung-da ; Chen, Frank F. Publication Date: 2013-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1116099 Report Number(s): SAND2013-0908C 480106 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference:

  16. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume ... 3 U.S.G.S. S.O. Conte Anadromous Fish Research Laboratory Executive Summary ...

  17. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  18. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Intercomparison Studies of Carbonaceous Aerosol Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Paul

    2015-10-20

    Aerosols containing black carbon (and some specific types of organic particulate matter) directly absorb incoming light, heating the atmosphere. In addition, all aerosol particles backscatter solar light, leading to a net-cooling effect. Indirect effects involve hydrophilic aerosols, which serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) that affect cloud cover and cloud stability, impacting both atmospheric radiation balance and precipitation patterns. At night, all clouds produce local warming, but overall clouds exert a net-cooling effect on the Earth. The effect of aerosol radiative forcing on climate may be as large as that of the greenhouse gases, but predominantly opposite in sign and much more uncertain. The uncertainties in the representation of aerosol interactions in climate models makes it problematic to use model projections to guide energy policy. The objective of our program is to reduce the uncertainties in the aerosol radiative forcing in the two areas highlighted in the ASR Science and Program Plan. That is, (1) addressing the direct effect by correlating particle chemistry and morphology with particle optical properties (i.e. absorption, scattering, extinction), and (2) addressing the indirect effect by correlating particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity with particle size, chemistry, and morphology. In this connection we are systematically studying particle formation, oxidation, and the effects of particle coating. The work is specifically focused on carbonaceous particles where the uncertainties in the climate relevant properties are the highest. The ongoing work consists of laboratory experiments and related instrument inter-comparison studies both coordinated with field and modeling studies, with the aim of providing reliable data to represent aerosol processes in climate models. The work is performed in the aerosol laboratory at Boston College. At the center of our laboratory setup are two main sources for the production of aerosol particles: (a) two well-characterized source of soot particles and (b) a flow reactor for controlled OH and/or O3 oxidation of relevant gas phase species to produce well-characterized SOA particles. After formation, the aerosol particles are subjected to physical and chemical processes that simulate aerosol growth and aging. A suite of instruments in our laboratory is used to characterize the physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles before and after processing. The Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ToF-AMS) together with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) measures particle mass, volume, density, composition (including black carbon content), dynamic shape factor, and fractal dimension. The–ToF-AMS was developed at ARI with Boston College participation. About 120 AMS instruments are now in service (including 5 built for DOE laboratories) performing field and laboratory studies world-wide. Other major instruments include a thermal denuder, two Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMA), a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCN), a Thermal desorption Aerosol GC/MS (TAG) and the new Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). Optical instrumentation required for the studies have been brought to our laboratory as part of ongoing and planned collaborative projects with colleagues from DOE, NOAA and university laboratories. Optical instruments that will be utilized include a Photoacoustic Spectrometer (PAS), a Cavity Ring Down Aerosol Extinction Spectrometer (CRD-AES), a Photo Thermal Interferometer (PTI), a new 7-wavelength Aethalometer and a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Extinction Monitor (CAPS). These instruments are providing aerosol absorption, extinction and scattering coefficients at a range of atmospherically relevant wavelengths. During the past two years our work has continued along the lines of our original proposal. We report on 12 completed and/or continuing projects conducted during the period 08/14 to 0814/2015. These projects are described in 17 manuscripts published in refereed journals.

  19. COLLOQUIUM: Laboratory Study of Magnetic Reconnection: Recent Discoveries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on MRX | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab March 27, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Laboratory Study of Magnetic Reconnection: Recent Discoveries on MRX Dr. Masaaki Yamada Princeton University Presentation: File WC27MAR2013_MYamada.pptx Magnetic reconnection is a phenomenon of nature in which magnetic field lines change their topology in plasma and convert magnetic energy to particles by acceleration and heating. It is one of the most fundamental processes at work in

  20. Laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured Climax granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Failor, R.; Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Vandergraaf, T.

    1982-06-01

    This report documents our laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured granite cores. To simulate natural conditions, our laboratory studies used naturally fractured cores and natural ground water from the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test Site. For comparison, additional tests used artificially fractured granite cores or distilled water. Relative to the flow of tritiated water, {sup 85}Sr and /sup 95m/Tc showed little or no retardation, whereas {sup 137}Cs was retarded. After the transport runs the cores retained varying amounts of the injected radionuclides along the fracture. Autoradiography revealed some correlation between sorption and the fracture fill material. Strontium and cesium retention increased when the change was made from natural ground water to distilled water. Artificial fractures retained less {sup 137}Cs than most natural fractures. Estimated fracture apertures from 18 to 60 {mu}m and hydraulic conductivities from 1.7 to 26 x 10{sup -3} m/s were calculated from the core measurements.

  1. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    This publication is one in series of case studies for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This case study describes the Science and Technology Facility, a new laboratory at NREL that incorporated energy-efficient and sustainable design features including underfloor air distribution in offices, daylighting, and process cooling.

  2. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  3. Experimental studies on methane-fuel laboratory scale ram combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Y.; Kitajima, J.; Seki, Y.; Tatara, A.

    1995-07-01

    The laboratory scale ram combustor test program has been investigating fundamental combustion characteristics of a ram combustor, which operates from Mach 2.5 to 5 for the super/hypersonic transport propulsion system. In the previous study, combustion efficiency had been found poor, less than 70 percent, due to a low inlet air temperature and a high velocity at Mach 3 condition. To improve the low combustion efficiency, a fuel zoning combustion concept was investigated by using a subscale combustor model first. Combustion efficiency more than 90 percent was achieved and the concept was found very effective. Then a laboratory scale ram combustor was fabricated and combustion tests were carried out mainly at the simulated condition of Mach 5. A vitiation technique wa used to simulate a high temperature of 1,263 K. The test results indicate that ignition, flame stability, and combustion efficiency were not significant, but the NO{sub x} emissions are a critical problem for the ram combustor at Mach 5 condition.

  4. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  5. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  6. Advancing the surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish: a gap analysis and research agenda based on a review of trends in intracoelomic tagging effects studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2011-03-08

    Early approaches to surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish were often through trial and error, however, in recent years there has been an interest in using scientific research to identify techniques and procedures that improve the outcome of surgical procedures and determine the effects of tagging on individuals. Here we summarize the trends in 108 peer-reviewed electronic tagging effect studies focused on intracoleomic implantation to determine opportunities for future research. To date, almost all of the studies have been conducted in freshwater, typically in laboratory environments, and have focused on biotelemetry devices. The majority of studies have focused on salmonids, cyprinids, ictalurids and centrarchids, with a regional bias towards North America, Europe and Australia. Most studies have focused on determining whether there is a negative effect of tagging relative to control fish, with proportionally fewer that have contrasted different aspects of the surgical procedure (e.g., methods of sterilization, incision location, wound closure material) that could advance the discipline. Many of these studies included routine endpoints such as mortality, growth, healing and tag retention, with fewer addressing sublethal measures such as swimming ability, predator avoidance, physiological costs, or fitness. Continued research is needed to further elevate the practice of electronic tag implantation in fish in order to ensure that the data generated are relevant to untagged conspecifics (i.e., no long-term behavioural or physiological consequences) and the surgical procedure does not impair the health and welfare status of the tagged fish. To that end, we advocate for i) rigorous controlled manipulations based on statistical designs that have adequate power, account for inter-individual variation, and include controls and shams, ii) studies that transcend the laboratory and the field with more studies in marine waters, iii) incorporation of knowledge and techniques emerging from the medical and veterinary disciplines, iv) addressing all components of the surgical event, v) comparative studies that evaluate the same surgical techniques on multiple species and in different environments, vi) consideration of how biotic factors (e.g., sex, age, size) influence tagging outcomes, and vii) studies that cover a range of endpoints over ecologically-relevant time periods.

  7. Changes in the dielectric properties of medaka fish embryos during development, studied by electrorotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirakashi, Ryo; Mischke, Miriam; Fischer, Peter; Memmel, Simon; Krohne, Georg; Fuhr, Guenter R.; Zimmermann, Heiko; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L.

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrorotation offers a non-invasive tool for dielectric analysis of fish embryos. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The three-shell dielectric model matches the rotation spectra of medaka eggs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The capacitance value suggests a double-membrane structure of yolk envelope. -- Abstract: The Japanese medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, has become a powerful vertebrate model organism in developmental biology and genetics. The present study explores the dielectric properties of medaka embryos during pre-hatching development by means of the electrorotation (ROT) technique. Due to their layered structure, medaka eggs exhibited up to three ROT peaks in the kHz-MHz frequency range. During development from blastula to early somite stage, ROT spectra varied only slightly. But as the embryo progressed to the late-somite stage, the ROT peaks underwent significant changes in frequency and amplitude. Using morphological data obtained by light and electron microscopy, we analyzed the ROT spectra with a three-shell dielectric model that accounted for the major embryonic compartments. The analysis yielded a very high value for the ionic conductivity of the egg shell (chorion), which was confirmed by independent osmotic experiments. A relatively low capacitance of the yolk envelope was consistent with its double-membrane structure revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Yolk-free dead eggs exhibited only one co-field ROT peak, shifted markedly to lower frequencies with respect to the corresponding peak of live embryos. The dielectric data may be useful for monitoring the development and changes in fish embryos' viability/conditions in basic research and industrial aquaculture.

  8. Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-07-19

    Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

  9. A Preliminary Assessment of Barotrauma Injuries and Acclimation Studies for Three Fish Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Walker, Ricardo W.; Stephenson, John R.

    2015-12-15

    Fish that pass hydro structures either through turbine passage, deep spill, or other deep pathways can experience rapid decreases in pressure that can result in barotrauma. In addition to morphology and physiology of the fish’s swim bladder, the severity of barotrauma is directly related to the volume of undissolved gas in fish prior to rapid decompression and the lowest pressure the fish experience as they pass hydro structures (termed the “nadir”). The volume of undissolved gas in fish is influenced by the depth of acclimation (the pressure at which the fish is neutrally buoyant); therefore, determining the depth where fish are neutrally buoyant is a critical precursor to determining the relationship between pressure changes and injury or mortality.

  10. CO-LABS Releases Economic Impact Study of Federal Research Laboratories in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colorado - News Releases | NREL CO-LABS Releases Economic Impact Study of Federal Research Laboratories in Colorado March 31, 2011 Today, CO-LABS released the broader economic Impact Study of federal research laboratories in Colorado including data referenced by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in February. NREL's impact on Colorado's economy tripled in just three years boosting Colorado's annual economy $714 million, according to the study prepared

  11. EERE Success Story-Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passage | Department of Energy Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage EERE Success Story-Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage March 6, 2014 - 10:01am Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in partnership with Alden Research Laboratory and Voith Hydro, has developed a more environmentally friendly option for hydroelectric power generation. The Alden Fish Friendly Turbine will allow for the safe passage of fish downstream through an

  12. Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs … A Laboratory Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs … A Laboratory Study presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  13. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soloiu, Valentin

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels?? combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  14. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soloiu, Valentin

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  15. Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Airaksinen, Riikka; Rantakokko, Panu; Turunen, Anu W.; Vartiainen, Terttu; Vuorinen, Pekka J.; Lappalainen, Antti; Vihervuori, Aune; Mannio, Jaakko; Hallikainen, Anja

    2010-08-15

    Background: Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population. Methods: An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) ({Sigma}OTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates. Results: The average daily intake of {Sigma}OTCs through fish consumption was 3.2 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}, which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250 ng/kg bw day{sup -1} set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the {Sigma}OTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout. Conclusions: The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.

  16. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  17. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-29

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  18. This study was performed at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study was performed at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This study was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any

  19. To tag or not to tag: animal welfare, conservation and stakeholder considerations in fish tracking studies that use electronic tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Murchie, Karen J.; Thiem, Jason D.; Donaldson, Michael R.; Hinch, Scott G.; Brown, Richard S.; Fisk, Aaron

    2013-11-01

    The advent and widespread adoption of electronic tags (including biotelemetry and biologging devices) for tracking animals has provided unprecedented information on the biology, management, and conservation of fish in the world’s oceans and inland waters. However, use of these tools is not without controversy. Even when scientific and management objectives may best be achieved using electronic tags, it is increasingly important to further consider other factors such as the welfare of tagged animals (i.e., the role of training and science-based surgical guidelines, anesthetic use, inability to maintain sterile conditions in field environments), the ethics of tagging threatened species vs. using surrogates, stakeholder perspectives on tagging (including aboriginals), as well as use of data emanating from such studies (e.g., by fishers to facilitate exploitation). Failure to do so will have the potential to create conflict and undermine scientific, management and public confidence in the use of this powerful tool. Indeed, there are already a number of examples of where tracking studies using electronic tags have been halted based on concerns raised by researchers, authorities, or stakeholders. Here we present a candid evaluation of several factors that should be considered when determining when to tag or not to tag fish with electronic devices. It is not our objective to judge the merit of previous studies. Rather, we hope to stimulate debate and discussion regarding the use of electronic tags to study fish. Relatedly, there is a need for more research to address these questions (e.g., what level of cleanliness is needed when conducting surgeries, what type of training should be required for fish surgery) including human dimensions studies to understand perspectives of different actors including society as a whole with respect to tagging and tracking studies.

  20. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part C; Lake Roosevelt Pelagic Fish Study: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt; Bonar, Scott

    2002-11-01

    Pelagic fishes, such as kokanee and rainbow trout, provide an important fishery in Lake Roosevelt; however, spawner returns and creel results have been below management goals in recent years. Our objective was to identify factors that potentially limit pelagic fish production in Lake Roosevelt including entrainment, food limitation, piscivory, and other abiotic factors. We estimated the ratio of total fish entrained through Grand Coulee Dam to the pelagic fish abundance for September and October, 1998. If the majority of these fish were pelagic species, then entrainment averaged 10-13% of pelagic fish abundance each month. This rate of entrainment could impose considerable losses to pelagic fish populations on an annual basis. Therefore, estimates of species composition of entrained fish will be important in upcoming years to estimate the proportion of stocked pelagic fish lost through the dam. Food was not limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout populations since growth rates were high and large zooplankton were present in the reservoir. Estimates of survival for kokanee were low (< 0.01 annual) and unknown for rainbow trout. We estimated that the 1997 standing stock biomass of large (>1.1 mm) Daphnia could have supported 0.08 annual survival by kokanee and rainbow trout before fish consumption would have exceeded available biomass during late winter and early spring. Therefore, if recruitment goals are met in the future there may be a bottleneck in food supply for pelagic planktivores. Walleye and northern pikeminnow were the primary piscivores of salmonids in 1996 and 1997. Predation on salmonid prey was rare for rainbow trout and not detected for burbot or smallmouth bass. Northern pikeminnow had the greatest individual potential as a salmonid predator due to their high consumptive demand; however, their overall impact was limited because of their low relative abundance. We modeled the predation impact of 273,524 walleye in 1996, and 39,075 northern pikeminnow in 1997 because diet data revealed predation on salmonids during these years. We could not determine the absolute impact of piscivores on each salmonid species because identification of fish prey was limited to families. Our estimate of salmonid consumption by walleye in 1996 and northern pikeminnow in 1997 shows that losses of stocked kokanee and rainbow trout could be substantial (up to 73% of kokanee) if piscivores were concentrating on one salmonid species, but were most likely lower, assuming predation was spread among kokanee, rainbow trout, and whitefish. Dissolved oxygen was never limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout, but temperatures were up to 6 EC above the growth optimum for kokanee from July to September in the upper 33 meters of water. Critical data needed for a more complete analysis in the future include species composition of entrainment estimates, entrainment estimates expanded to include unmonitored turbines, seasonal growth of planktivorous salmonids, species composition of salmonid prey, piscivore diet during hatchery releases of salmonids, and collection of temperature and dissolved oxygen data throughout all depths of the reservoir during warm summer months.

  1. DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen | Department of Energy .4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen August 14, 2006 - 8:43am Addthis Projects Led by Electric Transportation Applications and GE Global Research WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that it intends to fund approximately $1.4 million (subject to

  2. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Geet, O.

    2010-04-01

    As a Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) partner, NREL set aggressive goals for energy savings, daylighting, and achieving a LEED Gold rating (through the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program) for its S&TF building.

  3. NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T.H.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established the Extreme Drilling Laboratory to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 ft. This paper details the challenges of ultradeep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL's research and development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Its physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480°F around a single drill cutter. This simulator is not yet operational; therefore, the results will be limited to the identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL's test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Laboratory's studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

  4. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

  5. Sensor Fish Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through John Day Dam Spillbay 20 with a Modified Flow Deflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-04-29

    Fish passage conditions over a modified deflector in Spillbay 20 at John Day Dam were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objectives of the study were to describe and compare passage exposure conditions at two spill discharges, 2.4 and 4.0 thousand cubic feet per second (kcfs), identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes, and to evaluate a low-tailwater condition at the 2.4-kcfs discharge. The study was performed in April 2010 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events; 2) differences in passage conditions between treatments; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Nearly all Sensor Fish significant events were classified as collisions; the most severe occurred at the gate, on the spillbay chute, or at the deflector transition. Collisions in the gate region were observed only during the 2.4-kcfs discharge, when the tainter gate was open 1.2 ft. One shear event was observed during the evaluation, occurring at the deflector transition during passage at the 2.4-kcfs discharge at low tailwater. Flow quality, computed using the Sensor Fish turbulence index, was best for passage at the low-flow low-tailwater condition as well. The worst flow quality was observed for the 4.0-kcfs test condition. Contrasting the passage exposure conditions, the 2.4-kcfs low-tailwater treatment would be most deleterious to fish survival and well-being.

  6. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  7. J. Whitfield Gibbons | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gibbons Curriculum Vitae Faculty & Scientists SREL Home SREL Herpetology J. Whitfield Gibbons Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-5852 / 725-5733 office (803) 725-3309 fax wgibbons(at)uga.edu My research interests focus on the population dynamics and ecology of aquatic and semiaquatic vertebrates and have involved detailed population studies of fish, amphibians, and reptiles, particularly turtles. One objective has been to determine functional

  8. NETL Extreme Drilling Laboratory Studies High Pressure High Temperature Drilling Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, K.D.; Honeygan, S.; Moroz, T

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) established an Extreme Drilling Lab to engineer effective and efficient drilling technologies viable at depths greater than 20,000 feet. This paper details the challenges of ultra-deep drilling, documents reports of decreased drilling rates as a result of increasing fluid pressure and temperature, and describes NETL’s Research and Development activities. NETL is invested in laboratory-scale physical simulation. Their physical simulator will have capability of circulating drilling fluids at 30,000 psi and 480 °F around a single drill cutter. This simulator will not yet be operational by the planned conference dates; therefore, the results will be limited to identification of leading hypotheses of drilling phenomena and NETL’s test plans to validate or refute such theories. Of particular interest to the Extreme Drilling Lab’s studies are the combinatorial effects of drilling fluid pressure, drilling fluid properties, rock properties, pore pressure, and drilling parameters, such as cutter rotational speed, weight on bit, and hydraulics associated with drilling fluid introduction to the rock-cutter interface. A detailed discussion of how each variable is controlled in a laboratory setting will be part of the conference paper and presentation.

  9. Fish behavior, migration and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.H.

    1988-02-01

    Studies at the Pacific Northwst Laboratory have evaluated fish behavior and migration in response to thermal discharge, gas supersaturated water, water-soluble fractions of coal liquids, and other environmental stresses. Major findings including thermal discharges did not block upstream migration of sonic-tagged adult chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) and a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) in the Columbia River. Juvenile chinook slamon avoided thermal discharges in the laboratory when ..delta..ts exceeded 9 to 11)degree)C above ambient. However juvenile salmon were more susceptible to predation at 10 to 20% of the thermal dose causing loss of equilibrium. Radio-tagged adult chinook salmon swam deeper in supersaturated water than in normally saturated water in the Snake River and, thereby, avoided the upper, critical zone. Carp (Cyprinus carpio) and black bullhead (Ictalurus melas) did not always avoid lethal gas levels in the laboratory and some fish died in the test apparatus. Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) avoided the water soluble fraction (WSF) of a coal liquid at concentrations causing acute effects but not at those causing chronic effects. Rainbow trout did not avoid coal liquid WSFs although they reportedly avid the major constituent, phenol, tested a as pure compound. Susceptibility to predation of juvenile rainbow trout did not increase until phenol concentrations reached the acute LC/sub 50/. 67 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine, Spillway, and Regulating Outlet at Detroit Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-05-06

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways, a Francis turbine, and a regulating outlet (RO) at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions within the routes. The study was performed in July, October, and December 2009 concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe strike, collision, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Detroit Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 5-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine and spillway passage. However, none of the passage routes tested is safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  11. Laboratory Studies on Surface Sampling of Bacillus anthracis Contamination: Summary, Gaps, and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2011-11-28

    This report summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the (1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and (2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed and recommendations are given for future studies.

  12. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  13. Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dynamos." (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of Dynamos." Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of Dynamos." Laboratory Studies of Dynamos: Executive Summary. The self-generation of magnetic #12;fields by astrophysical bodies like planets, stars, accretion disks, galaxies, and even galaxy clusters arises

  14. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  15. Performance of a feasibility study for remediation of WAG 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubarewicz, J.; Pfeffer, J. [CH2M Hill, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garland, S.B. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Riddle, S.P. [USDOE Oak Ridge Field Office, TN (United States); Branscom, K.S. [Radian Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the process of preparing a feasibility study (FS) for remediation of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL conducts research and development and is one of three DOE-owned facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is located in Melton Valley, approximately 2 miles southwest of the plant in Roane County, Tennessee. WAG 6 includes Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, which is still used for shallow land burial of LLW and nonradioactive materials and was the primary focus of the FS. SWSA 6 covers 68 acres, 19 of which contain wastes such as low-level radioactive liquids, solids, sludges, asbestos, and biological and associated laboratory wastes. During the first 15 years of operation, the site also received chemical wastes, but since 1986, it has been used only for LLW. Until 1986, wastes were placed in unlined trenches and auger holes, but since then, wastes have been disposed in greater confinement disposal silos, lined pipe wells and auger holes, and above-ground tumulus units. A list of the sitewide alternatives initially developed for WAG 6 remediation is presented. The alternatives combined capping, structural stabilization (dynamic compaction/grouting), waste consolidation, and groundwater collection/treatment components. In situ vitrification was also considered for areas with significant long-life source inventories.

  16. The remedial investigation/feasibility study process at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), manages and operates the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, under a cost-plus-award-fee contract administered by the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office). Energy Systems` environmental restoration program is responsible for eliminating or reducing the risk posed by inactive and surplus sites and facilities that have been contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, or mixed wastes. The remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) is being conducted as part of Energy Systems` environmental restoration program. The objective of the audit was to determine if the proposed interim source control action identified in the ``Proposed Plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Waste Area Grouping 6 Interim Remedial Action`` had been adequately justified. The audit disclosed that the proposed source control interim remedial action, three flexible membrane caps estimated to cost $140 million for waste area grouping 6, was not adequately justified. We recommended that DOE justify the proposed action before agreeing to proceed. The Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office, generally concurred with the audit recommendations.

  17. Fish Tales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not really the central issue, however. It is more to the point that both fishermen and scientists enjoy creating a good story, and we also enjoy a story well told. The correct mixture of truth, lie, fantasy and excitement is a witches brew.

  18. A network security case study; The Los Alamos National Laboratory integrated computer network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, J.S.; Stoltz, L. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to validate the Graphical Network Representation (GRPHREP) model which is being conducted on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Integrated Computer Network (ICN). The GRPHREP model is a software system application based on graph theory and object-oriented programming methodologies. It codified the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5637.1, which is concerned with classified computer secret policy, restrictions, and requirements. The Los Alamos ICN is required to control access to and support large-scale scientific and administrative computing. Thus, large-scale scientific and administrative computing. Thus we felt that this large, complex, and dynamic network would provide a good test for the graphical and functional capabilities of the model. Furthermore, the ICN is composed of multiple partitions that reflect the sensitivity and classification of the computation (data) and designate the required clearance level for the user.

  19. Laboratory Study Of Magnetic Reconnection With A Density Asymmetry Across The Current Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Joseph; Yamada, Massaaki; Ji, Hantao; Meyers,, Clayton E.; Jara-Almonte,; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The effects of an upstream density asymmetry on magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant upstream density asymmetry of up to 10, the reconnecting magnetic field pro file is not signifi cantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to the quadrupolar structure in the symmetric configuration. The in-plane ion flow pattern and the electrostatic potential pro file are also affected by the density asymmetry. Strong bulk electron heating is observed near the low-density-side separatrix together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations.

  20. Laboratory studies on surface sampling of Bacillus anthracis contamination: summary, gaps, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the 1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and 2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed. Recommendations are given for future evaluations of data from existing studies and possible new studies.

  1. Statistical Survival Analysis of Fish and Wildlife Tagging Studies; SURPH.1 Manual - Analysis of Release-Recapture Data for Survival Studies, 1994 Technical Manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Skalski, John R.; Schelechte, J. Warren

    1994-12-01

    Program SURPH is the culmination of several years of research to develop a comprehensive computer program to analyze survival studies of fish and wildlife populations. Development of this software was motivated by the advent of the PIT-tag (Passive Integrated Transponder) technology that permits the detection of salmonid smolt as they pass through hydroelectric facilities on the Snake and Columbia Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Repeated detections of individually tagged smolt and analysis of their capture-histories permits estimates of downriver survival probabilities. Eventual installation of detection facilities at adult fish ladders will also permit estimation of ocean survival and upstream survival of returning salmon using the statistical methods incorporated in SURPH.1. However, the utility of SURPH.1 far exceeds solely the analysis of salmonid tagging studies. Release-recapture and radiotelemetry studies from a wide range of terrestrial and aquatic species have been analyzed using SURPH.1 to estimate discrete time survival probabilities and investigate survival relationships. The interactive computing environment of SURPH.1 was specifically developed to allow researchers to investigate the relationship between survival and capture processes and environmental, experimental and individual-based covariates. Program SURPH.1 represents a significant advancement in the ability of ecologists to investigate the interplay between morphologic, genetic, environmental and anthropogenic factors on the survival of wild species. It is hoped that this better understanding of risk factors affecting survival will lead to greater appreciation of the intricacies of nature and to improvements in the management of wild resources. This technical report is an introduction to SURPH.1 and provides a user guide for both the UNIX and MS-Windows{reg_sign} applications of the SURPH software.

  2. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Jol [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Gophysique de lEnvironnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rmy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (?{sup 15}N, ?{sup 18}O, and ?{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}? = (?15 1.2) was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}? = (?47.9 6.8), in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from ?40 to ?74.3. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup ?} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup ?} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the shift in width and center well reproduced the values obtained in the laboratory study. These cross sections can be used in isotopic models to reproduce the stable isotopic composition of nitrate found in Antarctic snow profiles.

  3. Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

    2011-02-28

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

  4. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

    2005-12-22

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

  5. The Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar Aaron Bloom, Aaron Townsend, and David Palchak The National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL/PR-6A20-64795 IEEE PES General Meeting Denver, Colorado July 26-30, 2015 2 Simulated dispatch for high solar period in FRCC Simulated

  6. Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-08-28

    The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

  7. A Fish-eye View of Riverine Hydropower Systems: Understanding the Biological Response to Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pracheil, Brenda M; DeRolph, Christopher R; Schramm, Michael P; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Fish populations that have been traditionally thought of as completely fragmented by dams still maintain limited, one-way connectivity from upstream to downstream reaches via downstream turbine passage. This one-way connectivity may be important to population dynamics, but can also introduce a new and significant source of mortality due to turbine-induced fish injury and mortality. Mechanistically, fish injury and mortality associated with downstream turbine passage can come from several sources including blade strike, shear forces, cavitation, or pressure decreases, and parsing the contributions of these individual forces is important for advancing and deploying turbines that minimize these impacts to fishes. The overarching goals of this project are two-fold: 1. To inform biological limitations of fish for use in creating and testing advanced turbine designs (e.g., research and development) and 2. To provide insight into locations that would be good initial locations for deploying advanced turbines (e.g., marketing). This report is an initial step in linking physical forces to injury and mortality rates to provide a better understanding turbine-associated injury and mortality rates for turbine designers and manufacturers and examine the spatial distribution of hydropower, turbines, and fishes across the U.S.A. to determine locations that may be good candidates for advanced turbine designs. We also use this report to present an initial approach for selecting species for further laboratory and field studies that examine the impacts of hydropower on fishes.

  8. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ``past practice`` technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable.

  9. Critical and strategic materials proceedings of the laboratory study group meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    These Proceedings serve to identify the appropriate role for the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program concerning critical and strategic materials, identify and articulate high priority DOE-BES-DMS target areas so as to maximize programmatic responsiveness to national needs concerning critical and strategic materials, and identify research, expertise, and resources (including Collaborative Research Centers) that are relevant to critical and strategic materials that is either underway or in place under the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program. Laboratory statements of collaborative research are given.

  10. Laboratory studies evaluating CO2 flood impact on the geomechanics of whole core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.

    2005-06-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the injected CO2 in these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. Migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals may help lead to the utilization of this sequestration methodology. Co-injection of a mineral reactant slurry, either with the CO2 or in separate, secondary injection wells, could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by providing the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates along the periphery of the injection plume. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry co-injection strategies, by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  11. Plasma-Surface Interaction Research At The Cambridge Laboratory Of Accelerator Studies Of Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, G. M.; Barnard, H. S.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Stahle, P. W.; Sullivan, R. M.; Woller, K. B.; Whyte, D. G.

    2011-06-01

    The material requirements for plasma-facing components in a nuclear fusion reactor are some of the strictest and most challenging facing us today. These materials are simultaneously exposed to extreme heat loads (20 MW/m{sup 2} steady-state, 1 GW/m{sup 2} in millisecond transients) and particle fluxes (>10{sup 24} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) while also undergoing high neutron irradiation (10{sup 18} neutrons/m{sup 2} s). At the Cambridge Laboratory of Accelerator Studies of Surfaces (CLASS), many of the most important issues in plasma-surface interaction research, such as plasma-driven material erosion and deposition, material transport and irradiation and hydrogenic retention are investigated with the use of a 1.7 MV tandem ion accelerator. Ion-Beam Analysis (IBA) is used to investigate and quantify changes in materials due to plasma exposure and ion irradiation is used as a proxy for neutron irradiation to investigate plasma-surface interactions for irradiated materials. This report will outline the capabilities and current research activities at CLASS.

  12. Laboratory Studies of the Role of Amines in Particle Formation, Growth and Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2015-02-07

    Organosulfur compounds have a variety of sources, particularly biological processes in the oceans. Their oxidation in air forms sulfur dioxide, which is further oxidized to sulfuric acid, as well as methanesulfonic acid (MSA). While sulfuric acid is a well known precursor to particles in air, MSA had not been regarded as a source of new particle formation. Laboratory studies were carried out under this project that showed MSA forms new particles quite efficiently in the presence of amines and water vapor. The data could be reproduced with a relatively simple kinetics model representing cluster formation and growth, which is promising for representing this chemistry in global climate models. The initial steps in the kinetics scheme are based on quantum chemical calculations of likely clusters. The organosulfur chemistry was introduced into an atmospheric model for southern California and used to predict the impact of going to a fossil-fuel free world in which anthropogenic emissions of SO2 are removed, but the natural processes remain.

  13. Laboratory and field studies related to the radionuclide migration project. Progress report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, W.R.; Thompson, J.L.

    1984-04-01

    The FY 1983 laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration project are described. Results are presented for radiochemical analyses of water samples collected from the RNM-1 well and the RNM-2S satellite well at the Cambric site. Data are included for tritium, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 129}I, and {sup 137}Cs. Preliminary results from water collection at the Cheshire site are reported. Laboratory studies emphasize the sorptive behavior of tuff and its dependence on mineralogy. 18 references, 7 figures, 13 tables.

  14. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10

    Soot particles are generated by incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Through direct effects clear air aerosols containing black carbon (BC) such as soot aerosols, absorb incoming light heating the atmosphere, while most other aerosols scatter light and produce cooling. Even though BC represents only 1-2% of the total annual emissions of particulate mass to the atmosphere, it has been estimated that the direct radiative effect of BC is the second-most important contributor to global warming after absorption by CO2. Ongoing studies continue to underscore the climate forcing importance of black carbon. However, estimates of the radiative effects of black carbon on climate remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of particles containing black carbon. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically fractal hydrophobic aggregates. The aggregates consist of black carbon spherules with diameters typically in the range of about 15-40 nm, and they are usually coated by adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced during combustion. Diesel-generated soot particles are often emitted with an organic coating composed primarily of lubricating oil and unburned fuel, as well as well as PAH compounds. Sulfuric acid has also been detected in diesel and aircraft-emitted soot particles. In the course of aging, these particle coatings may be substantially altered by chemical reactions and/or the deposition of other materials. Such processes transform the optical and CCN properties of the soot aerosols in ways that are not yet well understood. Our work over the past seven years consisted of laboratory research, instrument development and characterization, and field studies with the central focus of improving our understanding of the black carbon aerosol climate impacts. During the sixth year as well as during this seventh year (no-cost extension period) of our grant, we extended our studies to perform experiments on the controlled production and characterization of secondary organic aerosol.

  15. Evaluation of behaviour and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Cada, Glenn F; Giza, Daniel; Jacobsen, Paul; McMahon, Brian; Pracheil, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. Similarly, by combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.less

  16. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HK turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.

  17. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.less

  18. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taffet, M.J. ); Oberdorfer, J.A. ); McIlvride, W.A. )

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  19. Statistical Analyses of Second Indoor Bio-Release Field Evaluation Study at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amidan, Brett G.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2009-12-17

    In September 2008 a large-scale testing operation (referred to as the INL-2 test) was performed within a two-story building (PBF-632) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The report “Operational Observations on the INL-2 Experiment” defines the seven objectives for this test and discusses the results and conclusions. This is further discussed in the introduction of this report. The INL-2 test consisted of five tests (events) in which a floor (level) of the building was contaminated with the harmless biological warfare agent simulant Bg and samples were taken in most, if not all, of the rooms on the contaminated floor. After the sampling, the building was decontaminated, and the next test performed. Judgmental samples and probabilistic samples were determined and taken during each test. Vacuum, wipe, and swab samples were taken within each room. The purpose of this report is to study an additional four topics that were not within the scope of the original report. These topics are: 1) assess the quantitative assumptions about the data being normally or log-normally distributed; 2) evaluate differences and quantify the sample to sample variability within a room and across the rooms; 3) perform geostatistical types of analyses to study spatial correlations; and 4) quantify the differences observed between surface types and sampling methods for each scenario and study the consistency across the scenarios. The following four paragraphs summarize the results of each of the four additional analyses. All samples after decontamination came back negative. Because of this, it was not appropriate to determine if these clearance samples were normally distributed. As Table 1 shows, the characterization data consists of values between and inclusive of 0 and 100 CFU/cm2 (100 was the value assigned when the number is too numerous to count). The 100 values are generally much bigger than the rest of the data, causing the data to be right skewed. There are also a significant number of zeros. Using QQ plots these data characteristics show a lack of normality from the data after contamination. Normality is improved when looking at log(CFU/cm2). Variance component analysis (VCA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to estimate the amount of variance due to each source and to determine which sources of variability were statistically significant. In general, the sampling methods interacted with the across event variability and with the across room variability. For this reason, it was decided to do analyses for each sampling method, individually. The between event variability and between room variability were significant for each method, except for the between event variability for the swabs. For both the wipes and vacuums, the within room standard deviation was much larger (26.9 for wipes and 7.086 for vacuums) than the between event standard deviation (6.552 for wipes and 1.348 for vacuums) and the between room standard deviation (6.783 for wipes and 1.040 for vacuums). Swabs between room standard deviation was 0.151, while both the within room and between event standard deviations are less than 0.10 (all measurements in CFU/cm2).

  20. Study of the internal structure of lithium fluoride single crystal by laboratory X-ray topo-tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotov, D. A. Buzmakov, A. V.; Asadchikov, V. E.; Voloshin, A. E.; Shkurko, V. N.; Smirnov, I. S.

    2011-05-15

    Defects in a synthetic LiF crystal have been studied by X-ray topo-tomography on laboratory X-ray sources with a spatial resolution of {approx}10 {mu}m. An algebraic reconstruction method was applied to reconstruct the defect 3D structure of the crystal based on the diffraction data. The results presented in this study are in good agreement with the topographic data obtained by the Lang method.

  1. Meeting the challenge: A case study of Sandia National Laboratories Records Inventory Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusimano, L.J.; Roberts, C.B.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories determined that the most effective method to address records management initiatives would be through a single, comprehensive facilities wide records inventory and retention schedule project. The logistic of such an undertaking (estimated at 425,000 linear feet) are demanding. The relatively short time frame required for completion and the project`s size called for sound, up front planning by Sandia and ultimately the support of an outside contractor for qualified resources to execute the plan.

  2. Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Production | Department of Energy In this episode of 90 Seconds of Discovery, Catalysis Scientist Robert Weber explains why bio-oil often gunks up during refining. Knowledge gained from this research could improve methods for refining biofuel. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have determined that water-a prevalent component of biofuel conversion processes-turns the pyrolysis oil component, phenol, into a highly reactive molecular structure that polymerizes, or

  3. Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage March 6, 2014 - 10:01am Addthis The Electric Power Research ...

  4. Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.

    2014-09-23

    The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 0.20 and averaged 1.18 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

  5. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  6. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  7. Upscaling of the waterflood reservoir properties on the core level: Laboratory study, macro and micro modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedrikovetsky, P.G.; Polyanin, A.D.; Zhurov, A.I.; Potsch, K.T.

    1995-10-01

    The aim of the paper is to develop a mathematical model for waterflooding at high velocities in short cores under laboratory conditions. The model is based on the theory of non-equilibrium two-phase flow in a porous medium. The asymptotic solution includes the capillary pressure and non-equilibrium effects. It allows for determining an expression for he stabilized zone, which leads to an optimal core length and an optimal displacement velocity. With these parameters it is possible to plan waterflooding tests for determining the relative phase permeabilities with a given accuracy.

  8. Laboratory studies on corrosion of materials for fluidized bed combustion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natesan, K.

    1990-10-01

    An extensive corrosion test program was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the corrosion performance of metallic structural materials in environments that simulate both steady-state and off-normal exposure conditions anticipated in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) systems. This report discusses the possible roles of key parameters, such as sorbent and gas chemistries, metal temperature, gas cycling conditions, and alloy pretreatment, in the corrosion process. Data on scale thickness and intergranular penetration depth are presented for several alloys as a function of the chemistry of the exposure environment, deposit chemistry, and exposure time. Test results were obtained to compare the corrosion behavior of materials in the presence of reagent grade sorbent compounds and spent-bed materials from bubbling- and circulating-fluid-bed systems. Finally, the laboratory test results were compared with metal wastage information developed over the years in several fluidized bed test facilities. Metallic alloys chosen for the tests were carbon steel, Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo and Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. Types 304 and 310 stainless steel, and Incoloy 800. 26 refs., 61 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Laboratory study related to the production and properties of pig iron nuggets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anameric, B.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2006-02-15

    Pig iron nuggets were produced in a laboratory-scale furnace at Michigan Technological University. The process was intended to replicate Kobe Steel's ITmk3 direct ironmaking process. These nuggets were produced from pellets that were made from a mixture of iron oxide, coal, flux and a binder and heated in a furnace with a chamber temperature of 1450{sup o}C. The pellets then self-reduced to produce a solid, high-density, highly metallized (96.5% Fe) pig iron. During the nugget production process, a separate liquid slag phase formed that cleanly separated from the molten metal. The physical and chemical properties of the pig iron nuggets were similar to pig iron produced by blast furnaces, which is distinct from direct reduced iron (DRI).

  10. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2011-01-26

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a new Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed lowlevel, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TA-54 Area G. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to ten sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. Three passes of the analysis were required to assess different site scenarios: 1) a fully consolidated CWC with both transfer/storage and LL W disposal in one location (45 acre minimum), 2) CWC transfer/storage only (12 acre minimum), and 3) LLW disposal only (33 acre minimum). The top site choice for all three options is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. TA-54 East, Zone 4 also deserves consideration as a LLW disposal site.

  11. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hughes, James S.; Bouchard, Kyle E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Nagy, William T.

    2006-12-04

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2005. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of two studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2005, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, and (2) smolt approach and fate at B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C from the B1 forebay. Some of the large appendices are only presented on the compact disk (CD) that accompanies the final report. Examples include six large comma-separated-variable (.CSV) files of hourly fish passage, hourly variances, and Project operations for spring and summer from Appendix E, and large Audio Video Interleave (AVI) files with DIDSON-movie clips of the area upstream of B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C (Appendix H). Those video clips show smolts approaching the outlet, predators feeding on smolts, and vortices that sometimes entrained approaching smolts into turbines. The CD also includes Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Files (PDF) of the entire report and appendices.

  12. Fish elevator and method of elevating fish

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Truebe, Jonathan; Drooker, Michael S.

    1984-01-01

    A means and method for transporting fish from a lower body of water to a higher body of water. The means comprises a tubular lock with a gated entrance below the level of the lower body of water through which fish may enter the lock and a discharge passage above the level of the upper body of water. The fish raising means in the lock is a crowder pulled upward by a surface float as water from the upper body of water gravitationally flows into the closed lock filling it to the level of the upper body. Water is then pumped into the lock to raise the level to the discharge passage. The crowder is then caused to float upward the remaining distance through the water to the level of the discharge passage by the introduction of air into a pocket on the underside of the crowder. The fish are then automatically discharged from the lock into the discharge passage by the out of water position of the crowder. The movement of the fish into the discharge passage is aided by the continuous overflow of water still being pumped into the lock. A pipe may be connected to the discharge passage to deliver the fish to a selected location in the upper body of water.

  13. A laboratory exposure system to study the effects of aging on super-micron aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarpia, Joshua; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hubbard, Joshua Allen

    2014-02-01

    A laboratory system was constructed that allows the super-micron particles to be aged for long periods of time under conditions that can simulate a range of natural environments and conditions, including relative humidity, oxidizing chemicals, organics and simulated solar radiation. Two proof-of-concept experiments using a non-biological simulant for biological particles and a biological simulant demonstrate the utility of these types of aging experiments. Green Visolite®, which is often used as a tracer material for model validation experiments, does not degrade with exposure to simulated solar radiation, the actual biological material does. This would indicate that Visolite® should be a good tracer compound for mapping the extent of a biological release using fluorescence as an indicator, but that it should not be used to simulate the decay of a biological particle when exposed to sunlight. The decay in the fluorescence measured for B. thurengiensis is similar to what has been previously observed in outdoor environments.

  14. Improving Gas Furnace Performance: A Field and Laboratory Study at End of Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.; Yee, S.; Baker, J.

    2015-02-01

    In 2010, natural gas provided 54% of total residential space heating energy the U.S. on a source basis, or 3.5 Quadrillion Btu. Natural gas burned in furnaces accounted for 92% of that total, and boilers and other equipment made up the remainder. A better understanding of installed furnace performance is a key to energy savings for this significant energy usage. In this project, the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit examined the impact that common installation practices and age-induced equipment degradation may have on the installed performance of natural gas furnaces over the life of the product, as measured by steady-state efficiency and annual efficiency. The team identified 12 furnaces of various ages and efficiencies that were operating in residential homes in the Des Moines, Iowa, metropolitan area and worked with a local heating, ventilation, and air conditioning contractor to retrieve furnaces and test them at the Gas Technology Institute laboratory for steady-state efficiency and annual efficiency. Prior to removal, system airflow, static pressure, equipment temperature rise, and flue loss measurements were recorded for each furnace as installed in the house.

  15. The Management of Silica in Los Alamos National Laboratory Tap Water - A Study of Silica Solubility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlberg, C.; Worland, V.P.; Kozubal, M.A.; Erickson, G.F.; Jacobson, H.M.; McCarthy, K.T.

    1999-07-01

    Well water at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 60 to 100 mg/L, with 4 mg/L of magnesium, 13 mg/L calcium and lesser concentrations of other ions. On evaporation in cooling towers, when the silica concentration reaches 150 to 220 mg/L, silica deposits on heat transfer surfaces. When the high silica well water is used in the reprocessing of plutonium, silica remains in solution at the end of the process and creates a problem of removal from the effluent prior to discharge or evaporation. The work described in this Report is divided into two major parts. The first part describes the behavior of silica when the water is evaporated at various conditions of pH and in the presence of different classes of anions: inorganic and organic. In the second part of this work it was found that precipitation (floccing) of silica was a function of solution pH and mole ratio of metal to silica.

  16. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R.P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-driven system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.

  17. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R.P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-drivenmore » system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.« less

  18. Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Weimin; Criddle, Craig S.

    2015-11-16

    We (the Stanford research team) were invited as external collaborators to contribute expertise in environmental engineering and field research at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN, for projects carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory and funded by US DOE. Specifically, we assisted in the design of batch and column reactors using ORNL IFRC materials to ensure the experiments were relevant to field conditions. During the funded research period, we characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments in batch microcosm and column experiments conducted at ANL, and we communicated with ANL team members through email and conference calls and face-to-face meetings at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings. Microcosm test results demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) when amended with ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but unknown U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. Due to budget reductions at ANL, Stanford contributions ended in 2011.

  19. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1987-1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, James W.

    1988-08-01

    Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Contract DE-AI79-87BP35585 was implemented on July 20, 1987. First year highlights included remodeling of the Olympia (WA) Fish Health Center to provide laboratory space for histopathological support services to participating state agencies, acquisition of gas monitoring equipment for hatchery water systems, expanded disease detection work for bacterial kidney disease and erythrocytic inclusion body syndrome in fish stocks at 13 Columbia River Basin National Fish Hatcheries and advancements in computerized case history data storage and analysis. This report summarizes the health status of fish reared at Service facilities in the Columbia River basin, briefly describes work being done to meet contract requirements for fish disease surveillance at those hatcheries and provides a summary of case history data for calendar years 1984, 1985, 1986 and 1987. 1 ref.

  20. Laboratories | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Our laboratories are available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating energy technologies. We have experienced lab technicians, scientists and engineers ready to design and run tests for you. Some labs are available for conducting your own research. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Accelerated Exposure Testing Laboratory Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced

  1. Improving Gas Furnace Performance: A Field and Laboratory Study at End of Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.; Yee, S.; Baker, J.

    2015-02-01

    In 2010, natural gas provided 54% of total residential space heating energy the U.S. on a source basis, or 3.5 Quadrillion Btu. Natural gas burned in furnaces accounted for 92% of that total, and boilers and other equipment made up the remainder. A better understanding of installed furnace performance is a key to energy savings for this significant energy usage. Natural gas furnace performance can be measured in many ways. The annual fuel utilization efficiency (AFUE) rating provides a fixed value under specified conditions, akin to the EPA miles per gallon rating for new vehicles. The AFUE rating is provided by the manufacturer to the consumer and is a way to choose between models tested on the same basis. This value is commonly used in energy modeling calculations. ASHRAE 103 is a consensus furnace testing standard developed by the engineering community. The procedure provided in the standard covers heat-up, cool down, condensate heat loss, and steady-state conditions and an imposed oversize factor. The procedure can be used to evaluate furnace performance with specified conditions or with some variation chosen by the tester. In this report the ASHRAE 103 test result will be referred to as Annualized Efficiency (AE) to avoid confusion, and any non-standard test conditions will be noted. Aside from these two laboratory tests, steady state or flue loss efficiency can be measured in the field under many conditions; typically as found or tuned to the manufacturers recommended settings. In this report, AE and steady-state efficiency will be used as measures of furnace performance.

  2. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  3. Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Orme

    2012-08-01

    Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

  4. BPA Fish Accords

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fish-Accords Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates...

  5. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Planning and Policy organization (EWP) in the Division of Environment, Fish & Wildlife, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and reports to the EWP manager....

  6. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2010-11-05

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a potential Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed low-level, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area (TA)-54. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to seven sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. The top site choice is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. The seven sites are as follows. TA-18/36 (62 acres) is located on Potrillo Drive that intersects Pajarito Road at the bottom of a steep grade. It has some blast zone issues on its southwest side and some important archeological sites on the southeast section. TA-60 (50 acres) is located at the end of Eniwetok Road off Diamond Drive, east of TA-3. Most of the site is within a fifty foot-deep ravine (that may have contamination in the drainage), with a small section on the mesa above. TA-63/52/46 (110 acres) lies to the north of Pajarito Road along Puye Road. It is centrally located in a brown field industrial area, with good access to generators on a controlled road. TA-46 (22 acres) is a narrow site on the south side of Pajarito Road across from TA-46 office buildings. TA-48 (14 acres) is also narrow, and is located on the north side of Pajarito Road near the west vehicle access portal (VAP). TA-51 (19 acres) is located on the south side of Pajarito Road at the top of the hill above TA-18 near the current entrance to the TA-54. TA-54 West (16 acres) is just north of the entrance to TA-54 at Pajarito Road and is close to Zone 4. Although it is near the San Ildefonso Pueblo property line, there may be adequate set-back for sight screening.

  7. DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.4 million (subject to negotiation) for two projects to partner with industry to study the economic feasibility of producing hydrogen at existing commercial nuclear power plants. ...

  8. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  9. Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

    2012-11-26

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

  10. Exploration Case Studies on OpenEI; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, K. R.

    2015-05-11

    This poster details the goal of developing a database of geothermal case studies for future exploration efforts in new areas. The goal of this effort is to develop a template for geothermal case studies in a crowd-sourced platform to allow contributions from the entire geothermal community, and this should be broken down into queriable properties in order to be more helpful.

  11. Geoscience Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation and other relatively straight-forward laboratory manipulations. These include buffer preparations, solid sample grinding, solution concentration, filtration, and...

  12. NREL: Research Facilities - Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the lab, researchers study plant structures from the tissue scale to the molecular ... Photobiological Laboratory Researchers use this lab for enzyme engineering to block the ...

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    location of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, is one of the original ten SREL habitat reserves and was selected to complement the old-field habitatplant succession studies ...

  14. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is one-page, two-sided fact sheet presents high-level summary results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  15. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNLs Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  16. Leadership development study :success profile competencies and high-performing leaders at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Katherine M.; Mulligan, Deborah Rae; Szenasi, Gail L.; Crowder, Stephen Vernon

    2005-04-01

    Sandia is undergoing tremendous change. Sandia's executive management recognized the need for leadership development. About ten years ago the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department in partnership with executive management developed and implemented the organizational leadership Success Profile Competencies to help address some of the changes on the horizon such as workforce losses and lack of a skill set in the area of interpersonal skills. This study addresses the need for the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department to provide statistically sound data in two areas. One is to demonstrate that the organizational 360-degree success profile assessment tool has made a difference for leaders. A second area is to demonstrate the presence of high performing leaders at the Labs. The study utilized two tools to address these two areas. Study participants were made up of individuals who have solid data on Sandia's 360-degree success profile assessment tool. The second assessment tool was comprised of those leaders who participated in the Lockheed Martin Corporation Employee Preferences Survey. Statistical data supports the connection between leader indicators and the 360-degree assessment tool. The study also indicates the presence of high performing leaders at Sandia.

  17. Laboratory Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    selected as Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows November 16, 2010 Scientific disciplines range from fundamental and applied physics to geology LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, NOVEMBER 16, 2010-Five Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists from diverse fields of research have been named Laboratory Fellows. The five researchers are Brenda Dingus of the Neutron Science and Technology group; William (Bill) Louis of the Subatomic Physics group; John Sarrao, director of Los Alamos's Office of Science

  18. Laboratory Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Operations /newsroom/_assets/images/operations-icon.png Laboratory Operations Latest announcements from the Lab on its operations. Community, Events Laboratory Operations Environmental Stewardship Melissa Blueflower-Sanchez and Robert Sanchez, owners of R and M Construction, LLC, of Santa Clara Pueblo. Four regional businesses receive Native American Venture Acceleration Fund grants The grants are designed to help the recipients create jobs, increase their revenue base and help

  19. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  20. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  1. Laboratory studies of oil spill behavior in broken ice fields. Final report Nov 80-Nov 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Free, A.P.; Cox, J.C.; Schultz, L.A.

    1981-10-01

    This study examined the short-term behavior of oil spilled in or near a field of broken ice. The mechanics of oil seeping through the spaces between the ice blocks were examined, both on the level of a single straight gap and on the level of a random broken ice field, through experiments performed in ARCTEC, Incorporated's Ice Flume. The spreading of oil due to movement of the ice pack is discussed. The effects of the environment in the spill area, especially currents and winds, are taken into account throughout the study. The report gives information which permits the determination of the one-dimensional spread rate of oil spilled in a broken ice field, such as might be encountered in a natural lead or in a ship channel. The results are presented as a set of recommendations for use in oil spill response planning or for use by on-site response personnel in predicting the behavior of oil spilled in broken ice fields.

  2. Simulated Waste for Leaching and Filtration Studies--Laboratory Preparation Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Harry D.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-10-27

    This report discusses the simulant preparation procedure for producing multi-component simulants for leaching and filtration studies, including development and comparison activities in accordance with the test plan( ) prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0 (Smith 2006). A fundamental premise is that this approach would allow blending of the different components to simulate a wide variety of feeds to be treated in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For example, a given feed from the planned feed vector could be selected, and the appropriate components would then be blended to achieve a representation of that particular feed. Using the blending of component simulants allows the representation of a much broader spectrum of potential feeds to the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP).

  3. 1989 neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry intercomparison study using RADCAL (Radiation Calibration Laboratory) sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Patterson, G.R. ); Murakami, H. . Dept. of Health Physics); Liu, J.C. )

    1990-10-01

    The fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 14) was conducted during May 1-5, 1989. A total of 48 organizations (33 from the US and 15 from abroad) participated in PDIS 14. Participants submitted by mail a total of 1,302 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (40%), direct interaction TLD (22%), track (20%), film (7%), combination (7%), and bubble detectors (4%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD (84%) and film (16%). Radiation sources used in the six PDIS 14 exposures included {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm D{sub 2}O, {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm polyethylene (gamma-enhanced with {sup 137}Cs), and {sup 238}PuBe. Neutron dose equivalents ranged from 0.44--2.63 mSv and gamma doses ranged from 0. 01-1.85 mSv. One {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) exposure was performed at a 60{degree} angle of incidence (most performance tests are at perpendicular incidence). The average neutron dosimeter response for this exposure was 70% of that at normal incidence. The average gamma dosimeter response was 96% of that at normal incidence. A total of 70% of individual reported neutron dosimeter measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. If the 0.01 mSv data are omitted, approximately 90% of the individual reported gamma measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  4. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, C. M.; Brookhart, M.; Collins, C.; Khalzov, I.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wallace, J.; Clark, M.; Flanagan, K.; Li, Y.; Nonn, P. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Zweibel, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-? phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3?m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000?G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ?14 m{sup 3} of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500?V, drawing 40?A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100?kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB{sub 6} cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J??B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm?>?1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10?1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  5. Anaerobic cometabolic transformation of polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: evidence from laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Safinowski; Christian Griebler; Rainer U. Meckenstock

    2006-07-01

    The sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47 can grow on naphthalene or 2-methylnaphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. The study reported shows that the culture can furthermore cometabolically transform a variety of polycyclic and heteroaromatic compounds with naphthalene or methylnaphthalene as the auxiliary substrate. Most of the cosubstrates were converted to the corresponding carboxylic acids, frequently to several isomers. The mass spectra of specific metabolites that were extracted from supernatants of cultures containing the cosubstrates benzothiophene, benzofuran, and 1-methylnaphthalene resembled known intermediates of the anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene degradation pathways. This indicates that some of the tested compounds were first methylated and then transformed to the corresponding methylsuccinic acids by a fumarate addition to the methyl group. For some of the cosubstrates, a partial or total inhibition of growth on the auxiliary substrate was observed. This was caused by a specific combination of auxiliary substrate and cosubstrate. None of the cosubstrates tested could be utilized as the sole carbon source and electron donor by the enrichment culture N47. Field investigations at the tar-oil-contaminated aquifer (at a former gasworks in southwest Germany), where strain N47 originated, revealed the presence of metabolites similar to the ones identified in batch culture supernatants. The findings suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds can be converted by aquifer organisms and produce a variety of polar compounds that become mobile in groundwater. 51 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Quantifying Barotrauma Risk to Juvenile Fish during Hydro-turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-03-15

    We introduce a method for hydro turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine engineering design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed hydro turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism (stressor) and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, engineers and biologists can identify the more-promising designs and operating conditions to minimize hydraulic conditions hazardous to passing fish. In this paper, the BioPA method is applied to estimate barotrauma induced mortal injury rates for Chinook salmon exposed to rapid pressure changes in Kaplan-type hydro turbines. Following the description of the general method, application of the BioPA to estimate the probability of mortal injury from exposure to rapid decompression is illustrated using a Kaplan hydro turbine at the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest region of the USA. The estimated rates of mortal injury increased from 0.3% to 1.7% as discharge through the turbine increased from 334 to 564 m3/s for fish assumed to be acclimated to a depth of 5 m. The majority of pressure nadirs occurred immediately below the runner blades, with the lowest values in the gap at the blade tips and just below the leading edge of the blades. Such information can help engineers focus on problem areas when designing new turbine runners to be more fish-friendly than existing units.

  7. Final Report: Laboratory Studies of Spontaneous Reconnection and Intermittent Plasma Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egedal-Pedersen, Jan; Porkolab, Miklos

    2011-05-31

    The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and the MIT Physics Department. The NSF/DOE award No. 0613734, supported two graduate students (now Drs. W. Fox and N. Katz) and material expenses. The grant enabled these students to operate the VTF basic plasma physics experiment on magnetic reconnection. The first configuration was characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail. The second configuration was developed to be relevant to specifically to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection. In the Report we review the general motivation of this work and provide an overview of our experimental and theoretical results enabled by the support through the awards.

  8. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  9. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Tixier, J.S.

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  10. The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

    2004-07-31

    This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

  11. Laboratory Directors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Siegfried S. Hecker (1985-1997) Donald M. Kerr (1979-1985) Harold M. Agnew (1970-1979) Norris Bradbury (1945-1970) J. Robert Oppenheimer (1943-1945) Laboratory Directors Harold M. ...

  12. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    During FY-1980, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory contributions to the Waste/Rock Interactions Technology program were primarily in the areas of migration-rate studies using crushed rock, whole core, and fractured core columns; parametric studies of variables which may influence radionuclide sorption-desorption behavior; and initial studies of actinide chemistry in near-neutral solutions and Eh control. Batch experiments in both air and a controlled atmosphere (nitrogen, less than or equal to 0.2 ppM oxygen, less than or equal to 20 ppM carbon dioxide) for the sorption of several radionuclides on granite and argillite were completed. These data also provided informaton on the effects of other parameters, such as particle size and contact time. All nine elements studied had different sorption ratios for argillite when measured under the controlled atmosphere than when measured in air, except possibly for americium where any effect was smaller than the standard deviations. As expected, strontium, cesium, and barium are least affected by the presence or absence of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Columns of crushed rock and solid and cracked cores were used to study the migration of radionuclides through such materials. In general, sorption ratios measured by batch techniques are 2 to 3 times greater than those for columns; however, a wide variation in behavior was observed, depending upon the element and the mineralogy. Work has begun on a system wherein traced groundwater is circulated through a crushed rock column; this should provide a link between the usual, single-pass, crushed rock columns and the batch experiments. Materials characterization has continued, and techniques for the determination of Fe(II) in silicate rocks and groundwater have been made operational. Work on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has been started.

  13. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  15. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel, E-mail: jsavarino@lgge.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200nm band was found to be ?1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  16. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing Challenge draws more than 200 students to Los Alamos National Laboratory April 16, 2015 NOTE TO EDITORS: Media are welcome to attend the awards ceremony from 9 a.m. to noon a.m., April 21 at the Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive, Los Alamos. Student teams from around New Mexico showcase year-long research projects April 20-21 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 16, 2015-More than 200 New Mexico students and their teachers are at Los Alamos National Laboratory April 20-21 for the 25th

  17. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Robert L. ); Simmons, Mary Ann ); Simmons, Carver S. ); McKinstry, Craig A. ); Cook, Chris B. ); Thorsten, Susan L. ); Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2003-01-29

    This report describes the work conducted during the second year of a multi-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

  18. Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gone Fishing Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Gone Fishing...

  19. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish, Wildlife & Parks Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Name: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Address: 1420 East 6th Ave, PO Box 200701 Place:...

  20. Fish Habitat Regulations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Habitat Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Fish Habitat Regulations Author Alaska Department of Fish & Game Published...

  1. Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, Timothy; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    The goal of Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies is to collect monitoring data to evaluate wild and natural steelhead populations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. During 2007, intensive population data were collected in Fish Creek (Lochsa River tributary) and Rapid River (Little Salmon River tributary); extensive data were collected in other selected spawning tributaries. Weirs were operated in Fish Creek and Rapid River to estimate adult escapement and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. Snorkel surveys were conducted in Fish Creek, Rapid River, and Boulder Creek (Little Salmon River tributary) to estimate parr density. Screw traps were operated in Fish Creek, Rapid River, Secesh River, and Big Creek to estimate juvenile emigrant abundance, to tag fish for survival estimation, and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. The estimated wild adult steelhead escapement in Fish Creek was 81 fish and in Rapid River was 32 fish. We estimate that juvenile emigration was 24,127 fish from Fish Creek; 5,632 fish from Rapid River; and 43,674 fish from Big Creek. The Secesh trap was pulled for an extended period due to wildfires, so we did not estimate emigrant abundance for that location. In cooperation with Idaho Supplementation Studies, trap tenders PIT tagged 25,618 steelhead juveniles at 18 screw trap sites in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. To estimate age composition, 143 adult steelhead and 5,082 juvenile steelhead scale samples were collected. At the time of this report, 114 adult and 1,642 juvenile samples have been aged. Project personnel collected genetic samples from 122 adults and 839 juveniles. We sent 678 genetic samples to the IDFG Eagle Fish Genetics Laboratory for analysis. Water temperature was recorded at 37 locations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages.

  2. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process: Laboratory scale studies modelling and technical assessment. Final report, [October 1, 1988--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous and bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. AC22-88PCB8818 during the period October 1, 1988 to June 30, 1993. The work described in this report is primarily concerned with tests on a Laboratory Scale primarily using microautoclaves. Experiments were conducted evaluating coal, solvents, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatments, C0{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects. Other microautoclave tests are included in the companion topical reports for this contract, DE-88818-TOP-01 & 02 on Sub-Bituminous and Bituminous Bench-Scale and PDU activities. In addition to the Laboratory Scale Studies, kinetic data and modelling results from Bench-Scale and Microautoclave tests are interpreted and presented along with some economic updates and sensitivity studies.

  3. Shaken, not stirred: The recipe for a fish-friendly turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G.F.

    1997-03-01

    It is generally agreed that injuries and mortalities among turbine-passed fish can result from several mechanisms, including rapid and extreme water pressure changes, cavitation, shear, turbulence, and mechanical injuries (strike and grinding). Advances in the instrumentation available for monitoring hydraulic conditions and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques now make it possible both to estimate accurately the levels of these potential injury mechanisms in operating turbines and to predict the levels in new turbine designs. This knowledge can be used to {open_quotes}design-out{close_quotes} the most significant injury mechanisms in the next generation of turbines. However, further improvements in turbine design are limited by a poor understanding of the levels of mechanical and hydraulic stresses that can be tolerated by turbine-passed fish. The turbine designers need numbers (biological criteria) that define a safety zone for fish within which pressures, shear forces, cavitation, and chance of mechanical strike are all at acceptable levels for survival. This paper presents the results of a literature review of fish responses to the types of biological stresses associated with turbine passage, as studied separately under controlled conditions in the laboratory rather than in combination at field sites. Some of the controlled laboratory and field studies reviewed here were bioassays carried out for reasons unrelated to hydropower production. Analysis of this literature was used to develop provisional biological criteria for hydroelectric turbine designers. These biological criteria have been utilized in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Hydropower Turbine System (AHTS) Program to evaluate the results of conceptual engineering designs and the potential value of future turbine models and prototypes.

  4. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Dam Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, T.; Duncan, J.; Johnson, R.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterize the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL conducted field studies at Grand Coulee Dam in 2004 using the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish that pass through pumps at Grand Coulee Dam's Pump-Generating Plant and are transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the Pump-Generating Plant's new nine-bladed turbines was also estimated. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The lowest and highest pressures experienced by the Sensor Fish were 6.4 and 155 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.0755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of recently released hatchery kokanee would be carried through the test pump without being struck and most likely with low risk of injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish could be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without significant injury, assuming that no kokanee were injured or killed by pressure exposure during passage.

  5. Evaluation of Water Quality Conditions Near Proposed Fish Production Sites Associated with the Yakima Fisheries Project, 1991-1993 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, Dennis D.

    1994-05-01

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began studying water quality at several sites in the Yakima River Basin for the Bonneville Power Administration. These sites were being proposed as locations for fish culture facilities as part of the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP). Surface water quality parameters near the proposed fish culture facilities are currently suitable for fish production. Water quality conditions in the mainstream Yakima River and its tributaries are generally excellent in the upper part of the watershed (i.e., near Cle Elum), but they are only fair to poor for the river downstream of Union Gap (river mile 107). Water quality of the Naches River near Oak Flats is also suitable for fish production. Groundwater supplies near the proposed fish production facilities typically have elevated concentrations of metals and dissolved gases. These conditions can be mitigated using best engineering practices such as precipitation and degasification. Additionally, mixing with surface water may improve these conditions. Depending on the location and depth of the well, groundwater temperatures may be warmer than optimum for acclimating and holding juvenile and adult fish. Water quality parameters measured in the Yakima River and tributaries sometimes exceed the range of values described as acceptable for culture of salmonids and for the protection of other aquatic life. However, constituent concentrations are within ranges that exist in many northwest fish hatcheries. Additionally, site-specific tests conducted by PNL (i.e., live box exposures and egg incubation studies) indicate that fish can be successfully reared in surface and well water near the proposed facility sites. Thus, there appear to be no constraints to artificial production for the YFP.

  6. Outreach and Education in the Life Sciences A Case Study of the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, Richard E.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2010-03-15

    This project was intended to assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) -sponsored education and outreach activities on the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) in DOE national laboratories. Key activities focused on a series of pilot education and outreach workshops conducted at ten national laboratories. These workshops were designed to increase awareness of the BWC, familiarize scientists with dual-use concerns related to biological research, and promote the concept of individual responsibility and accountability

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Laboratory We have field and laboratory capabilities to measure electrostatic environment generation, storage, and charge transfer effects....

  8. The Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change projections. COSIM models were used extensively in simulations underpinning the recent climate assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that was awarded the 2007 Nobel

  9. ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY P. 0. Box 5207 Chicago 80, Ill. N U C W SHELL STRUCTURE AND 18-DECAY I. ODD A IVUCLEZ PI, G. Mayer and S . A. Moszkowski Argonne National Laboratory Chicago, I l l i n o i s m-4626 Physics & Mathematics L. W. Nordheim Duke University Durham, North Carolina ( A t present on Ieave a t the Los Alamos S c i e n t i f i c Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexfco) 1 1 . EVEN A NUCLEX L. W. Nordheim The study reported i n Part I was started independently by the Chicago and

  10. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

  11. ANALYSIS OF EPR AND FISH STUDIES OF RADIATION DOSES IN PERSONS WHO LIVED IN THE UPPER REACHES OF THE TECHA RIVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degteva, M. O.; Shagina, N. B.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Vozilova, Alexandra; Volchkova, A. Y.; Vorobiova, M. I.; Wieser, Albrecht; Fattibene, Paola; Della Monaca, S.; Ainsbury, E.; Moquet, J.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-07-24

    Waterborne radioactive releases into the Techa River from the Mayak Production Association in Russia during 1949–1956 resulted in significant doses to about 30,000 persons who lived in downstream settlements. The residents were exposed to internal and external radiation. Two methods for reconstruction of the external dose are considered in this paper, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of teeth and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) measurements of chromosome translocations in circulating lymphocytes. The main issue in the application of the EPR and FISH methods for reconstruction of the external dose for the Techa Riverside residents was strontium radioisotopes incorporated in teeth and bones that served as a source of confounding local exposures. In order to estimate and subtract doses from incorporated 89,90Sr, the EPR and FISH assays were supported by measurements of 90Sr-body burdens and estimates of 90Sr concentrations in dental tissues by the luminescence method. The resulting dose estimates derived from EPR and FISH measurements for residents of the upper Techa River were found to be consistent: the mean values vary from 510 – 550 mGy for the villages located close to the site of radioactive release to 130 – 160 mGy for the more distant villages. The upper bound of individual estimates for both methods is equal to 2.2 – 2.3 Gy. The EPR- and FISH-based dose estimates were compared with the doses calculated for the donors using the Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS). The TRDS external dose assessments were based on the data on contamination of the Techa River floodplain, simulation of ai r kerma above the contaminated soil, age-dependent life-styles and individual residence histories. For correct comparison TRDS-based doses were calculated from two sources: external exposure from the contaminated environment and internal exposure from 137Cs incorporated in donors’ soft tissues. The TRDS-based absorbed doses in tooth enamel and muscle were in agreement with with EPR- and FISH-based estimates within uncertainty bounds. Basically, the agreement between the estimates has confirmed the validity of external doses calculated with the Techa River Dosimetry System.

  12. Lab Plan | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Plan Ames Laboratory

  13. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  14. PNNL Tests Fish Passage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison

    2015-03-13

    Scientists from PNNL are testing a fish transportation system developed by Whooshh Innovations. The Whooshh system uses a flexible tube that works a bit like a vacuum, guiding fish over hydroelectric dams or other structures. Compared to methods used today, this system could save money while granting fish quicker, safer passage through dams and hatcheries.

  15. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Advanced Materials Laboratory Home/Tag:Advanced Materials Laboratory Structures of the zwitterionic coatings synthesized for this study. Permalink Gallery Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Sandia's Marine

  16. Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fish Producers Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fish Producers...

  17. Fish and megainvertebrates collected in the New York bight apex during the 12-mile dumpsite recovery study, July 1986-September 1989. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilk, S.J.; Pikanowski, R.A.; Pacheco, A.J.; McMillan, D.G.; Phelan, B.A.

    1992-10-01

    Summary tabulations for 75 species representing 47 families of fish and megainvertebrates, as well as associated environmental observations, are given for 991 bottom trawl tows made at 24 stations in the New York Bight apex from July 1986 to September 1989. The 20 most frequently occurring species were accounted for greater than 95 percent and 93 percent of the total number and weight, respectively, of all species collected.

  18. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C.

    2006-03-01

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock openings, fish would avoid the lighted regions. Four omnidirectional strobe lights were deployed on the one trash rack directly in front of one turbine penstock. Seven splitbeam transducers were deployed to monitor fish approaching three penstock openings either from in front of the trash racks or moving down the dam behind the trash racks. Four key results emerged from the 2005 study. The results provide insight into the current level of entrainment and how fish respond to strobe lights under high flow conditions. First, very few fish were detected inside the trash racks. Of the more than 3,200 targets identified by the data processing, less than 100 were detected inside the trash racks. Only 23 fish were found inside the trash racks behind the strobe lights. Of those 21 fish, 13 were detected when the lights were on. Most of the fish detected behind the trash racks were above the turbine penstock but were headed downward. No fish were detected at night when minimal flows occurred between midnight and 4:00 a.m. Second, significantly more fish (P < 0.001) were detected in front of the trash racks when the lights were on at night. On a count-per-hour basis, the difference between lights off and lights on was apparent in the early morning hours at depths between 25 m and 50 m from the transducers. The lights were approximately 34 m below the splitbeam transducers, and fish detected at night with lights on were found at a median depth of approximately 35 m, compared to a median depth of from 20.6 to 23.5 m when the lights were off. The differences in depth between lights on and off at night were also significant (P < 0.001). Additionally, the increase in fish occurred only in front of the trash rack where the strobe lights were mounted; there was no increase in the number of detections by the transducers aimed away from the lights. Third, fish clearly manifested a behavioral response to the strobe lights during the day. When the lights were on, fish detected by three of the four transducers generally were swimming north, parallel to the face of the dam. However, the distribution of swimming directions for fish detected by the transducer immediately to the north of the lights was bimodal, with some fish swimming south toward the lighted region. This behavior was similar to that seen at night when the lights were on. Fourth, kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye were detected near the strobe lights. Data were obtained from three sources: fish size from the hydroacoustic sensors and fish species from gill netting and video recording. Fish ranging in length from 30 to 600 mm (averaging 125 mm) were detected by the splitbeam transducers. There was little difference in target strength for fish detected above 25 m depth with respect to time of day or light treatment. Below 25 m and closer to the strobe lights, larger fish were present when the lights were on during the night, and smaller fish were present during the day.

  19. Dean E. Fletcher | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fletcher Faculty & Scientists SREL Home Dean E. Fletcher Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-9609 office (803) 725-3309 fax fletcher(at)srel.uga.edu Dean Fletcher has worked extensively in SRS streams over the past 20 years. Much work has focused on the life histories of southeastern fishes with emphasis on the reproductive biology of sunfish and minnow species. However, he has conducted a diverse array of projects including characterization of fish

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Power Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia National Laboratories is well-suited to understand both performance and reliability ... However, the long-term reliability of these materials must be studied before that becomes ...

  1. The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-02-28

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

  2. NWTC Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerodynamics Studies Improve Energy Capture and Lower Costs of Wind-Generated Electricity Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have expanded wind turbine aerodynamics research from blade and rotor aerodynamics to wind plant and atmospheric inflow effects. The energy capture from wind plants is dependent on all of these aerodynamic interactions, which impact the cumulative fatigue damage of turbine structural compo- nents

  3. LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory Kayla Zimmerman | (650) 926-6281 Lisa Hammon, LCLS Lab Coordinator Welcome to the LCLS Sample Preparation Laboratory. This small general use wet...

  4. Heat Transfer Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transfer Laboratory Materials in solids or fluid forms play an important role in a ... Argonne's Heat Transfer Laboratory enables researchers to: Synthesize and prepare heat ...

  5. National Laboratory Impact Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Laboratory Impact Initiative supports the relationship between the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the national laboratory enterprise.  The national laboratories...

  6. Carbon nanotubes for hydrogen storage as being studied by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skolnik, E.G.

    1997-08-01

    On June 17--18, the author met with Dr. Mike Heben of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss his research on the development of carbon nanotubes to be used for the storage of hydrogen on-board a vehicle. Dr. Heben has been working for the past several years on a project that will develop single walled nanotubes (SWNTs) composed of carbon for storage of hydrogen. Dr. Heben has spent much time trying to develop a method by which he could produce SWNTs in sufficient quantity, and then demonstrate the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen from these nanotubes at room temperature. While Dr. Heben was able to show hydrogen adsorption levels of up to 10% on a SWNT basis, generation of SWNTs from an arc-discharge was only about 0.05% of the total soot formation. Therefore, increasing SWNT concentration was a key consideration. Findings from the meeting with Dr. Heben are presented.

  7. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  8. Fish Passage: A New Tool to Investigate Fish Movement: JSATS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-04-20

    A new system is being used to determine fish mortality issues related to hydroelectric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. Called the juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system (JSATS), this tool allows researchers to better understand fish movement, behavior, and survival around dams and powerhouses.

  9. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  10. Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Radiation Budget Measurement Networks, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Air Resources Laboratory and Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division *...

  11. Support for the in situ vitrification treatability study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: FY 1988 summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oma, K.H.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of this project is to determine if in situ vitrification (ISV) is a viable, long-term confinement technology for previously buried solid transuranic and mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The RWMC is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soils and wastes into a durable glass and crystalline form. During processing, heavy metals or other inorganic constituents are retained and immobilized in the glass structure, and organic constituents are typically destroyed or removed for capture by an off-gas treatment system. The primary FY 1988 activities included engineering-scale feasibility tests on INEL soils containing a high metals loading. Results of engineering-scale testing indicate that wastes with a high metals content can be successfully processed by ISV. The process successfully vitrified soils containing localized metal concentrations as high as 42 wt % without requiring special methods to prevent electrical shorting within the melt zone. Vitrification of this localized concentration resulted in a 15.9 wt % metals content in the entire ISV test block. This ISV metals limit is related to the quantity of metal that accumulates at the bottom of the molten glass zone. Intermediate pilot-scale testing is recommended to determine metals content scale-up parameters in order to project metals content limits for large-scale ISV operation at INEL.

  12. Comparative Study of Laboratory-Scale and Prototypic Production-Scale Fuel Fabrication Processes and Product Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2014-10-01

    An objective of the High Temperature Gas Reactor fuel development and qualification program for the United States Department of Energy has been to qualify fuel fabricated in prototypic production-scale equipment. The quality and characteristics of the tristructural isotropic coatings on fuel kernels are influenced by the equipment scale and processing parameters. Some characteristics affecting product quality were suppressed while others have become more significant in the larger equipment. Changes to the composition and method of producing resinated graphite matrix material has eliminated the use of hazardous, flammable liquids and enabled it to be procured as a vendor-supplied feed stock. A new method of overcoating TRISO particles with the resinated graphite matrix eliminates the use of hazardous, flammable liquids, produces highly spherical particles with a narrow size distribution, and attains product yields in excess of 99%. Compact fabrication processes have been scaled-up and automated with relatively minor changes to compact quality to manual laboratory-scale processes. The impact on statistical variability of the processes and the products as equipment was scaled are discussed. The prototypic production-scale processes produce test fuels that meet fuel quality specifications.

  13. Laboratory, Valles Caldera sponsor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to teach students about watershed hydrology, water quality, wildlife radio telemetry, plant ecology, aquatic and terrestrial invertebrate biology, fish sampling, and Jemez...

  14. Alternatives evaluation and decommissioning study on shielded transfer tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Hinton, R.R.

    1994-08-01

    The shielded transfer tanks (STTs) are five obsolete cylindrical shipping casks which were used to transport high specific activity radioactive solutions by rail during the 1960s and early 1970s. The STTs are currently stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under a shed roof. This report is an evaluation to determine the preferred alternative for the final disposition of the five STTs. The decommissioning alternatives assessed include: (1) the no action alternative to leave the STTs in their present location with continued surveillance and maintenance; (2) solidification of contents within the tanks and holding the STTs in long term retrievable storage; (3) sale of one or more of the used STTs to private industry for use at their treatment facility with the remaining STTs processed as in Alternative 4; and (4) removal of tank contents for de-watering/retrievable storage, limited decontamination to meet acceptance criteria, smelting the STTs to recycle the metal through the DOE contaminated scrap metal program, and returning the shielding lead to the ORNL lead recovery program because the smelting contractor cannot reprocess the lead. To completely evaluate the alternatives for the disposition of the STTs, the contents of the tanks must be characterized. Shielding and handling requirements, risk considerations, and waste acceptance criteria all require that the radioactive inventory and free liquids residual in the STTs be known. Because characterization of the STT contents in the field was not input into a computer model to predict the probable inventory and amount of free liquid. The four alternatives considered were subjected to a numerical scoring procedure. Alternative 4, smelting the STTs to recycle the metal after removal/de-watering of the tank contents, had the highest score and is, therefore, recommended as the preferred alternative. However, if a buyer for one or more STT could be found, it is recommended that Alternative 3 be reconsidered.

  15. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory The Terascale Simulation Facility is a world-class supercomputing

  17. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's ... which environmen- tal attributes, such as entrainment survival for fish, are emphasized. ...

  18. Nichinghsiang Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nichinghsiang Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Nichinghsiang Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  19. Fish and Wildlife Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wildlife Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Fish and Wildlife Service Name: Fish and Wildlife Service Place: Washington, DC Year Founded: 1940 Phone Number: (303) 275-2370...

  20. Ames Laboratory Logos | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Logos The Ames Laboratory Logo comes in several formats. EPS files are vector graphics created in Adobe Illustrator and saved with a tiff preview so they will...

  1. Federal laboratories for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gover, J.; Huray, P.G.

    1998-04-01

    Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

  2. Laboratory Graduate Research Appointment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Graduate Research Program Perform your thesis research among the best and the brightest at Argonne National Laboratory. About the Program Laboratory Graduate Research (Lab Grad) appointments are available to qualified U.S. university graduate students who wish to carry out their thesis research at Argonne National Laboratory under co-sponsorship of an Argonne staff member and a faculty member. The university sets the academic standard and awards the degree. The participation of the

  3. Ames Laboratory Emergency Plan | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Emergency Plan Version Number: 13.0 Document Number: Plan 46300.001 Effective Date: 11/2014

  4. Ames Laboratory Hot Canyon | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Hot Canyon This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  5. Laboratory studies on the removal of radon-born lead from KamLAND׳s organic liquid scintillator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keefer, G.; Grant, C.; Piepke, A.; Ebihara, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kibe, Y.; Koseki, Y.; Ogawa, M.; Shirai, J.; et al

    2014-09-28

    We studied the removal of radioactivity from liquid scintillator in preparation of a low background phase of KamLAND. We describe the methods and techniques developed to measure and efficiently extract radon decay products from liquid scintillator. Lastly, we report the radio-isotope reduction factors obtained when applying various extraction methods. During this study, distillation was identified as the most efficient method for removing radon daughters from liquid scintillator.

  6. besser | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    besser Ames Laboratory Profile Matthew Besser Asst Scientist IV Division of Materials Science & Engineering 121 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5236 Email Address: besser@ameslab.gov Assistant Scientist and Materials Preparation Center Director Publications 2013 Calvo-Dahlborg, M.; Popel, P.S.; Kramer, M.J.; Besser, M.; Morris, J.R.; Dahlborg, U. Superheat-dependent microstructure of molten Al-Si alloys of different compositions studied by small angle neutron scattering. Journal of

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  8. NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet), Innovation Impact: Wind, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting NREL researchers are using advanced remote sensing instruments and high- performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior-a key to improving wind turbine design and siting within wind farms. As turbines and wind farms grow in size, they create bigger wakes and present more complex challenges to wind turbine and wind farm designers and operators. NREL researchers have confirmed through both observation and

  9. Symmetry or asymmetry -- Comfort is the question. (A study of the second floor of the west office wing of the Water Pollution Control Laboratory in Portland, Oregon.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, A.F.; Gaba, P.; Kowitanupong, C.

    1999-07-01

    This article explores the effects of an asymmetric distribution of building components, and their relation to human comfort. The studied building was the Water Pollution Control Laboratory in Portland, Oregon. This project, designed by the Miller/Hull Partnership, provides the perfect conditions to do such a study since it has very different ceiling heights within the same space, and an asymmetric distribution of the fenestration as well. Findings show that: (a) Variable ceiling heights affect the quantity of daylight received, and also affect the quality and distribution of electric light; (b) An asymmetric distribution of the fenestration creates very different conditions in both the luminous and thermal environments; and (c) The design of lighting and HVAC systems must take into consideration variations in ceiling height and the position of the fenestration into the space.

  10. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Laboratory, recovers valuable rare-earth magnetic material from manufacturing waste and creates useful magnets out of it. Ames Laboratory...

  11. mark | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Profile Mark Gordon Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 201 Spedding ... Group Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Chemical Physics TheoreticalComputational Tools ...

  12. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility Distributed Energy Research Center Engine Research Facility Heat Transfer Laboratory Tribology Laboratory Transportation Beamline at the Advanced Photon Source...

  13. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Renewable Resource Options Geothermal Biomass Solar Hydro Wind National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation ...

  14. Sustainability | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sustainability Ames Laboratory is committed to environmental sustainability in all of its operations as outlined in the Laboratory's Site Sustainability Plan. Executive orders set ...

  15. Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Blood samples are shipped at room temperature to the laboratory. White blood cells, lymphocytes, are cultured under sterile conditions in an...

  16. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  17. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  18. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  19. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  20. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  1. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  2. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  3. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through the strength and toughness of their scales, which act as natural dermal armor. Arapaima scales consist of a hard, mineralized outer shell surrounding a more ductile core. This core region is composed of aligned mineralized collagen fibrils arranged in a fine, plate-like structure. To study how these scales respond to

  4. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, Aaron; Townsend, Aaron; Palchak, David

    2015-07-29

    Balancing wind and solar in a model is relatively easy. All you need to do is assume a very large system with infinite flexibility! But what if you don't have an infinitely flexible system? What if there are thousands of generators nestled in a handful of regions that are unlikely to change their operational practices? Would you still have enough flexibility to balance hundreds of gigawatts of wind and solar at a 5 minute level? At NREL, we think we can, and our industry partners agree. This presentation was presented at the IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting by Aaron Bloom, highlighting results of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study.

  5. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  6. Surgical implantation techniques for electronic tags in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Glenn N.; Cooke, Steven J.; Brown, Richard S.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2011-01-01

    Intracoelomic implantation of transmitters into fish requires making a surgical incision, incision closure, and other surgery related techniques; however, the tools and techniques used in the surgical process vary widely. We review the available literature and focus on tools and techniques used for conducting surgery on juvenile salmonids because of the large amount of research that is conducted on them. The use of sterilized surgical instruments properly selected for a given size of fish will minimize tissue damage and infection rates, and speed the wound healing of fish implanted with transmitters. For the implantation of transmitters into small fish, the optimal surgical methods include making an incision on the ventral midline along the linea alba (for studies under 1 month), protecting the viscera (by lifting the skin with forceps while creating the incision), and using absorbable monofilament suture with a small-swaged-on swaged-on tapered or reverse-cutting needle. Standardizing the implantation techniques to be used in a study involving particular species and age classes of fish will improve survival and transmitter retention while allowing for comparisons to be made among studies and across multiple years. This review should be useful for researchers working on juvenile salmonids and other sizes and species of fish.

  7. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003: Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City-Lowden II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

    2003-11-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and at the newly constructed Garden City-Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington in the Walla Walla River Basin during the spring and summer of 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries ((NOAA Fisheries), formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City-Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed. Based on the results of our studies in 2003, we concluded: Nursery Bridge Site: (1) 68% of the initial velocity measurements on the west screen exceeded the NOAA Fisheries criteria of 0.4 ft/s for approach velocity; (2) A simple adjustment of the existing louvers was not sufficient to fix the problem; (3) The sediment and debris load in the river upstream of the screens exceeded the design criteria for the site, which had frequent breakdowns in the screen cleaning systems; and (4) The rock weirs downstream of the dam would not be expected to impede upstream movement of juvenile fish during low flow conditions. Garden City-Lowden II: (1) The flat inclined-plate screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement and migration delay; (2) Approach velocities met the NMFS criteria of less than 0.4 ft/s in June, and no change in baffle settings was needed; (3) Sweep velocities were generally lower than approach velocities and did not increase toward the downstream end of the site; and (4) The automated cleaning system at the Garden City-Lowden II site works adequately when sediment loads are low, though its effectiveness at cleaning the screens decreases as sediment and debris loads and algal growth increase.

  8. Effects of nutritional status on metabolic rate, exercise and recovery in a freshwater fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gingerich, Andrew J.; Philipp, D. P.; Suski, C. D.

    2010-11-20

    The influence of feeding on swimming performance and exercise recovery in fish is poorly understood. Examining swimming behavior and physiological status following periods of feeding and fasting is important because wild fish often face periods of starvation. In the current study, researchers force fed and fasted groups of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) of similar sizes for a period of 16 days. Following this feeding and fasting period, fish were exercised for 60 s and monitored for swimming performance and physiological recovery. Resting metabolic rates were also determined. Fasted fish lost an average of 16 g (nearly 12%) of body mass, while force fed fish maintained body mass. Force fed fish swam 28% further and required nearly 14 s longer to tire during exercise. However, only some physiological conditions differed between feeding groups. Resting muscle glycogen concentrations was twofold greater in force fed fish, at rest and throughout recovery, although it decreased in both feeding treatments following exercise. Liver mass was nearly three times greater in force fed fish, and fasted fish had an average of 65% more cortisol throughout recovery. Similar recovery rates of most physiological responses were observed despite force fed fish having a metabolic rate 75% greater than fasted fish. Results are discussed as they relate to largemouth bass starvation in wild systems and how these physiological differences might be important in an evolutionary context.

  9. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY COMMUNITY LEADERS SURVEY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY COMMUNITY LEADERS SURVEY SEPTEMBER 2013 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY-COMMUNITY LEADERS STUDY SEPTEMBER 2013 PAGE 2 RESEARCH & POLLING, INC. TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 METHODOLOGY

  10. Effects of fungal degradation on the CuO oxidation products of lignin: A controlled laboratory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedges, J.I.; Weliky, K.; Devol, A.H. ); Blanchette, R.A. )

    1988-11-01

    Duplicate samples of birch wood were degraded for 0, 4, 8 and 12 weeks by the white-rot fungus, Phlebia tremellosus, and for 12 weeks by 6 other white-rot and brown-rot fungi. P. tremellosus caused progressive weight losses and increased the H/C and O/C of the remnant wood by preferentially degrading the lignin component of the middle lamellae. Total yields of syringyl phenols were decreased 1.5 times as fast as total vanillyl phenol yields. Within both phenol families, aldehyde precursors were degraded faster than precursors of the corresponding ketones, which were obtained in constant proportion to the total phenol yield. Although two other white-rot fungi caused similar lignin compositional trends, a fourth white-rot species, Coriolus versicolor, simultaneously eroded all cell wall components and did not concentrate polysaccharides in the remnant wood. The brown-rot fungi also preferentially attacked syringyl structural units, but degraded all phenol precursors at a much slower rate than the white-rotters and did not produce excess vanillic acid. Degradation by P. tremellosus linearly increased the vanillic acid/vanillin ratio, (Ad/Al)v, of the remnant birch wood throughout the 12 week degradation study and exponentially decreased the absolute yields of total vanillyl phenols, total syringyl phenols and the syringyl/vanillyl phenol ratio, S/V. At the highest (Ad/Al)v of 0.50 total yields of syringyl and vanillyl phenols were decreased by 65% and 80%, respectively, with a resulting reduction of 40% in the original S/V. Many of the diagenetically related compositional trends that have been previously reported for lignins in natural environments can be explained by white-rot fungal degradation.

  11. Evolution of the Sensor Fish Device for Measuring Physical Conditions in Severe Hydraulic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.

    2003-02-28

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new ''fish-friendly'' turbines, and spillway designs and operations, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. The Sensor Fish was developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine System program. Field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  12. The Sample Preparation Laboratories | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cynthia Patty 1 Sam Webb 2 John Bargar 3 Arizona 4 Chemicals 5 Team Work 6 Bottles 7 Glass 8 Plan Ahead! See the tabs above for Laboratory Access and forms you'll need to complete. Equipment and Chemicals tabs detail resources already available on site. Avoid delays! Hazardous materials use may require a written Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) before you work. Check the Chemicals tab for more information. The Sample Preparation Laboratories The Sample Preparation Laboratories provide wet lab

  13. Status of Laboratory Goals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status of Laboratory Goals Status of Calendar Year 2016 objectives and targets. Item 1 Recommendation: The EMSSC recommends an Open House be held in the Ames Laboratory Storeroom and Warehouse by April 1, 2016. The Open House will provide Ames Laboratory employees the opportunity to discover what supplies are readily available through the storeroom and showcase the Equipment Pool website. This recommendation will increase awareness of the sustainable purchasing requirements by showcasing these

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  15. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

    2013-04-17

    With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

  16. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Laboratory provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs. AnalyticalChemistryLaboratoryfactsheet...

  17. Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Most laboratories offer ice machines and cold rooms. Specialty storage areas for samples include a -80 freezer, argon and nitrogen glove boxes, radiation contamination areas, inert ...

  18. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zeiss Axiovert 200 Optical Microscope Spark Cutter Fully Equipped Metallographic Laboratory Electropolisher Dimpler

  19. Accounting Resources | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounting Resources Ames Laboratory Human Resources Forms Ames Laboratory Travel Forms Ames Laboratory Forms (Select Department) ISU Intramural PO Request

  20. National Laboratory's Weapons Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Us » Strategic Programs » National Laboratory Impact Initiative Team National Laboratory Impact Initiative Team The mission of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE's) National Laboratory Impact Initiative is to significantly increase the industrial impact of the Energy Department's national laboratories on the U.S. clean energy sector. The goals of the Initiative are to: Increase and enhance laboratory-private sector relationships Increase and streamline access to

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory 14 15 Technology Transfer 2011-2012 Progress Report Technology Transfer 2011-2012 Progress Report In 2011, The National Institutes of Health awarded a five-year Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS) grant to a team of researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Tulane University. This team, lead by principal investigator Sara Del Valle, connects social media and epidemiological research in an attempt to predict people's social behavior and

  2. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project -- Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Anglea, Steven M.; Simmons, Carver S.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Lecaire, R; Francis, S

    2002-01-29

    This report describes the work conducted during the first year of a long-term study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Colville Confederated Tribes are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

  3. Federal Laboratory Consortium | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

  5. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Office presentation icon ...

  6. Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fish Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Fish Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1...

  7. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife Abbreviation: WDFW...

  8. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Name: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Address: 3406 Cherry Ave. NE Place: Salem,...

  9. Valley Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Valley Fish Farms Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Valley Fish...

  10. SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impacts on Sandia and the Nation 2 SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES 3 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation For further information, contact: Wendy R. Cieslak Senior Manager, Science, Technology, and Engineering Strategic Initiatives wrciesl@sandia.gov (505) 844-8633 or Henry R. Westrich LDRD Program Manager hrwestr@sandia.gov 505-844-9092 LDRD Impacts on Sandia and the Nation ABOUT THE COVER: Images from some of the case studies in this brochure: a near-UV light- emitting diode (LED), a cell

  11. Equipment Loans | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loans Requirements to Loan Property: Ames Laboratory may loan Government Property provided the equipment is not excess to the Laboratory's needs. In order to loan equipment, the following criteria must be met: 1) Equipment shall be used in performing research, studies, and other efforts that result in benefits to both the U.S. Government, the borrower, and provided that the DOE mission is not affected. 2) Used by another DOE organization, contractor, Government agency, or organization that has a

  12. Fume Hood Sash Stickers Increases Laboratory Safety and Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fume Hood Sash Stickers Increases Laboratory Safety and Efficiency at Minimal Cost Fume Hood Sash Stickers Increases Laboratory Safety and Efficiency at Minimal Cost Case study ...

  13. Assessment of heavy metals in seawater and fish tissues at Pulau Indah,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Selangor, Malaysia (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Assessment of heavy metals in seawater and fish tissues at Pulau Indah, Selangor, Malaysia Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessment of heavy metals in seawater and fish tissues at Pulau Indah, Selangor, Malaysia This study focuses on the levels of heavy metals in seawater and selected fish tissue at Pulau Indah, Selangor, Malaysia. Pulau Indah primarily contains Westport (Malaysia's major port), and a host of full scales

  14. Evaluation of the Whooshh Fish Transport System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last November, John Oliver highlighted during his program Last Week Tonight the Whooshh Fish Transport System (aka “salmon cannon”), a new, innovate fish transport system developed by Whooshh...

  15. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451 Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 GPS: 100 Stellarator Road Princeton, NJ 08540 www.pppl.gov 2015 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A...

  16. DOE Laboratory Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE national laboratories were created to support the various missions of the Department, including energy, national security, science and related environmental activities. The laboratories conduct innovative research and development in literally hundreds of technology areas, some available nowhere else.

  17. haberer | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    haberer Ames Laboratory Profile Charles Haberer Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3757 Email Address: haberer

  18. islowing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    islowing Ames Laboratory Profile Igor Slowing Assoc Scientist Chemical & Biological Sciences 2756 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-1959 Email Address: islowing@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Associate Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Homogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in 3D Controlled Environment Nanorefinery Education: Ph.D., Iowa State University, 2003-2008 Licenciate in Chemistry, San Carlos University, Guatemala, 1988-1995 Professional Appointments: Staff Scientist, Ames Laboratory,

  19. levin | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    levin Ames Laboratory Profile Evgenii Levin Scientist I Division of Materials Science & Engineering 107 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-6093 Email Address: levin@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Novel Materials Preparation & Processing Methodologies Professional Appointments: Scientist I & Adj. Associate Professor, Ames Laboratory U.S. DOE, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, 2010- present Associate Scientist & Lecturer, Ames Laboratory

  20. FY 2005 Laboratory Table

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Congressional Budget Request Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Preliminary Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 Laboratory Tables Laboratory Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Preliminary Preliminary The numbers

  1. Management | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Sciences & Engineering Focus: Understanding & Control of Interfacial Processes Web Site Michael Thackeray Michael Thackeray (Deputy Director) Argonne National Laboratory...

  2. Alamos National Laboratory's 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    $2 million pledged during Los Alamos National Laboratory's 2014 employee giving campaign December 17, 2013 "I Give Because..." theme focuses on unique role Lab plays in local communities LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 17, 2013-Nearly $2 million has been pledged by Los Alamos National Laboratory employees to United Way and other eligible nonprofit programs during the Laboratory's 2014 Employee Giving Campaign. Los Alamos National Security, LLC, which manages and operates the Laboratory for the

  3. biswasr | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, 1976 Professional Appointments: Senior Scientist Ames Laboratory and Microelectronics Research Center, 2013- present Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy;...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Laboratories' Strategic Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strategic Framework Vision, Mission, and Values Strategic Framework Mission Areas Laboratories Foundation Strategic Objectives and Crosscuts About Strategic Framework strategic framework Sandia continues to be engaged in the significant demands of the nation's nuclear weapons modernization program while conducting a whole range of activities in broader national security. The Laboratories' strategic framework drives strategic decisions about the totality of our work and has positioned our

  5. Idaho Fish Screening Improvements Final Status Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitzinger, Eric J.

    2008-11-12

    This project funds two Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) fish habitat biologists to develop, secure funding for, and implement on-the-ground fish habitat improvement projects in the lower Clearwater River drainage and the upper Salmon River drainage. This report summarizes project activity during the first year of funding. The Clearwater Region fish habitat biologist began work on January 28, 2008 and the Salmon Region habitat biologist began on February 11, 2008.

  6. Evolution of the sensor fish device for measuring physical conditions in sever hydraulic environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, J. P.

    2003-03-01

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new fish-friendly turbines, and spillway designs and operations, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. This report discusses the development and field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River, which have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  7. INL Laboratory Scale Atomizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.R. Clark; G.C. Knighton; R.S. Fielding; N.P. Hallinan

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory scale atomizer has been built at the Idaho National Laboratory. This has proven useful for laboratory scale tests and has been used to fabricate fuel used in the RERTR miniplate experiments. This instrument evolved over time with various improvements being made ‘on the fly’ in a trial and error process.

  8. Manufacturing Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Manufacturing Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Manufacturing Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) focuses on developing methods and technologies that will assist manufacturers of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, as well as other renewable energy technologies, to scale up their manufacturing capabilities to volumes that meet DOE and industry targets. Specifically, the manufacturing activity is currently focused on developing and validating quality control techniques to assist manufacturers of low temperature and high temperature fuel cells in the transition from low to high volume production methods for cells and stacks. Capabilities include initial proof-of-concept studies through prototype system development and in-line validation. Existing diagnostic capabilities address a wide range of materials, including polymer films, carbon and catalyst coatings, carbon fiber papers and wovens, and multi-layer assemblies of these materials, as well as ceramic-based materials in pre- or post-fired forms. Work leading to the development of non-contact, non-destructive techniques to measure critical dimensional and functional properties of fuel cell and other materials, and validation of those techniques on the continuous processing line. This work will be supported by materials provided by our partners. Looking forward, the equipment in the laboratory is set up to be modified and extended to provide processing capabilities such as coating, casting, and deposition of functional layers, as well as associated processes such as drying or curing. In addition, continuous processes are used for components of organic and thin film photovoltaics (PV) as well as battery technologies, so synergies with these important areas will be explored.

  9. Identifying the effects on fish of changes in water pressure during turbine passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Abernathy, C. Scott; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2003-09-01

    This article discusses experiments conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine how water pressure and dissolved gas levels associated with hydroelectric facilities may affect the survival of fish. The results of the experiments are discussed as well as how these results can be applied to turbine designs and plant operation.

  10. Clinical, Laboratorial, and Urodynamic Findings of Prostatic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Urinary Retention Related to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. A Prospective Single-Center Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antunes, Alberto A.; Carnevale, Francisco C. Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim M. da; Yoshinaga, Eduardo M.; Cerri, Luciana M. O.; Baroni, Ronaldo H.; Marcelino, Antonio S. Z.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to describe the clinical, laboratorial, and urodynamic findings of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in patients with urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).MethodsA prospective study of 11 patients with urinary retention due to BPH was conducted. Patients underwent physical examination, prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurement, transrectal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. International prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), and urodynamic testing were used to assess the outcome before and after 1 year.ResultsClinical success was 91 % (10/11 patients) with a mean follow-up of 22.3 months (range, 12-41 months). At the first year follow-up, the mean IPSS score was 2.8 points (p = 0.04), mean QoL was 0.4 points (p = 0.001), mean PSA decreased from 10.1 to 4.3 ng/mL (p = 0.003), maximum urinary flow (Qmax) improved from 4.2 to 10.8 mL/sec (p = 0.009), and detrusor pressure (Pdet) decreased from 85.7 to 51.5 cm H{sub 2}O (p = 0.007). Before PAE, Bladder Outlet Obstruction Index (BOOI) showed values >40 in 100 % of patients. After PAE, 30 % of patients were >40 (obstructed), 40 % were between 20 and 40 (undetermined), and 30 % were <20 (unobstructed). Patients with a BOOI <20 had higher PSA values at 1-day after PAE.ConclusionsClinical and urodynamic parameters improved significantly after PAE in patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH. Total PSA at day 1 after PAE was higher in patients with unobstructed values in pressure flow studies.

  11. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the treatability study of in situ vitrification of Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) establishes the quality assurance procedures and requirements to be implemented for the control of quality-related activities for Phase 3 of the Treatability Study (TS) of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) of Seepage Pit 1, ORNL Waste Area Grouping 7. This QAPjP supplements the Quality Assurance Plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program by providing information specific to the ISV-TS. Phase 3 of the TS involves the actual ISV melt operations and posttest monitoring of Pit 1 and vicinity. Previously, Phase 1 activities were completed, which involved determining the boundaries of Pit 1, using driven rods and pipes and mapping the distribution of radioactivity using logging tools within the pipes. Phase 2 involved sampling the contents, both liquid and solids, in and around seepage Pit 1 to determine their chemical and radionuclide composition and the spatial distribution of these attributes. A separate QAPjP was developed for each phase of the project. A readiness review of the Phase 3 activities presented QAPjP will be conducted prior to initiating field activities, and an Operational Acceptance, Test (OAT) will also be conducted with no contamination involved. After, the OAT is complete, the ISV process will be restarted, and the melt will be allowed to increase with depth and incorporate the radionuclide contamination at the bottom of Pit 1. Upon completion of melt 1, the equipment will be shut down and mobilized to an adjacent location at which melt 2 will commence.

  12. Water Efficiency Improvements At Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practices Case Study #12 „ Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. EPA completed projects in all of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) 14 Best Management Practice (BMP) categories. The projects highlighted below demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in the laboratory/medical equipment BMP category by implementing vacuum pump and steam steril-

  13. Fish Protection: Cooperative research advances fish-friendly turbine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Foust, Jason

    2012-12-01

    Renewable hydropower is a tremendous resource within the Pacific Northwest that is managed with considerable cost and consideration for the safe migration of salmon. Recent research conducted in this region has provided results that could lower the impacts of hydro power production and make the technology more fish-friendly. This research is now being applied during a period when a huge emphasis is being made to develop clean, renewable energy sources.

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 Case Case Study DDCMP: Beyond Homogeneous Decomposition with ddcMD Scaling Long-Range Forces on ...

  15. Sandia Energy - Cybersecurity Technologies Research Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cybersecurity Technologies Research Laboratory Home Cyber Permalink Gallery Sandia Builds Android-Based Network to Study Cyber Disruptions Cyber, Cybersecurity Technologies...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Electromagnetics: Main Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORIES Electromagnetics (EM) is the study of the nature and interaction of static and dynamic electric and magnetic fields. Telecommunications, navigational guidance,...

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-05

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #4 and #5: Case study overview of the grounds maintenance program for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  18. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

    2002-06-01

    This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, ... laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed ...

  20. LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE DUE TO INCLEAMENT WEATHER During the winter months, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times...

  1. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

  2. LA-UR-15-22097 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LA-UR-15-22097 Los Alamos National Laboratory DC Microgrids Scoping Study-Estimate of Technical and Economic Benefits Scott Backhaus 1 , Gregory W. Swift 1 , Spyridon Chatzivasileiadis 2 , William Tschudi 2 , Steven Glover 3 , Michael Starke 4 , Jianhui Wang 5 , Meng Yue 6 , and Donald Hammerstrom 7 1. Los Alamos National Laboratory 2. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 3. Sandia National Laboratory 4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory 5. Argonne National Laboratory 6. Brookhaven National

  3. Influence of metal(loid) bioaccumulation and maternal transfer on embryo-larval development in fish exposed to a major coal ash spill

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greeley, Jr., Mark Stephen; Adams, S. Marshall; Elmore, Logan R.; McCracken, Mary Kitty

    2016-01-03

    In December 2008, an earthen retaining wall at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Fuel Plant failed and released 4.1 million m3 of coal ash to rivers flowing into Watts Bar Reservoir in east Tennessee, United States (U.S.). As part of a comprehensive effort to evaluate the risks to aquatic resources from this spill – the largest in U.S. history – we compared bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of selenium (Se), arsenic (As), and mercury (Hg) in adult redear sunfish (Lepomis macrolophus), collected two years after the spill from both coal-ash exposed and non-exposed areas of the Emory and Clinchmore » Rivers, with the success of embryo-larval development in their offspring. Whole body and ovary concentrations of Se in female sunfish at three study sites downstream of the spill were significantly elevated (site means = 4.9–5.3 and 6.7–9.0 mg/kg d.w. whole body and ovary concentrations, respectively) compared with concentrations in fish from reference sites upstream of the spill site (2.2–3.2 mg/kg d.w. for whole bodies and 3.6–4.8 mg/kg d.w. for ovaries). However, Se concentrations in coal ash-exposed areas remain below proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) criteria for the protection of aquatic life. Site-to-site variation in fish concentrations of As and Hg were not well-correlated with ash-exposure, reflecting the multiple sources of these metal(loid)s in the affected watersheds. In 7-day laboratory tests of embryos and larvae derived from in vitro crosses of eggs and sperm from these field-collected sunfish, fertilization success, hatching success, embryo-larval survival, and incidences of developmental abnormalities did not differ significantly between ash-exposed and non-exposed fish. Furthermore, these developmental endpoints were not correlated with whole body or ovary concentrations of Se, As, or Hg in the maternal fish, or with fish size, ovary weight, or gonadal-somatic indices. Furthermore, results from this and related studies associated with the Kingston coal ash spill are consistent with proposed USEPA fish-based water quality criteria for Se, and to date continue to suggest that long-term exposures to sediment containing residual ash may not present a significant chronic risk to fish populations exposed to this major coal ash release.« less

  4. A Markov Chain Analysis of Fish Movements to Determine Entrainment Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Hedgepeth, J; Skalski, John R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    2004-10-01

    Fish can become entrained at water withdrawal locations such as fish bypasses or cooling water intakes. Accordingly, the size of a fish entrainment zone (FEZ) is often of interest to fisheries managers and facility operators. This study developed a new technique to map the FEZ, defined here as the region immediately upstream of a portal where the probability of fish movement toward the portal is greater than 90%. To map the FEZ, we applied a Markov chain analysis to fish movement data collected with an active tracking sonar. This device locks onto and follows a target, recording positions through a set of volumetric cells comprising the sampled volume. The probability of a fish moving from one cell to another was calculated from fish position data, which was used to populate a Markov transition matrix. We developed and applied the technique using data on salmon smolts migrating near the ice/trash sluiceway at The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River. The FEZ of the sluiceway entrance in 2000 as determined with this procedure was approximately 5 m across and extended 6-8 m out from the face of the dam in the surface layer 2-3 m deep. In conclusion, using a Markov chain analysis of fish track data we were able to describe and quantify the FEZ of the sluiceway at The Dalles Dam. This technique for FEZ mapping is applicable to other bioengineering efforts aimed at protecting fish populations affected by water withdrawals.

  5. Laboratory program helps small businesses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab helps small businesses Laboratory program helps small businesses The free program, run jointly by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, leverages the laboratories'...

  6. Going green earns Laboratory gold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Going green earns Laboratory gold Going green earns Laboratory gold The Laboratory's newest facility is its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

  7. Budget Office | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that the Laboratory complies with all Department Of Energy cost controls Providing decision-making support to senior Laboratory management Providing support to the Laboratory...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Locations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Locations Locations Sandia California CINT photo A national and international presence Sandia operates laboratories, testing facilities, and offices in multiple sites around the United States and participates in research collaborations around the world. Sandia's executive management offices and larger laboratory complex are located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Our second principal laboratory is located in Livermore, California. Although most of our 9,840 employees work at these two locations,

  9. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Timothy Hackett and Kathryn White are the SULI students for spring semester 2016. Ames Laboratory's fall Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) students began their program with the start of fall semester Aug. 24. The students are, left to right, Kathryn White, Shannon Goes, Kaiser Aguirre, and Adam Dziulko. Department of Energy Deputy Secretary Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall poses with SULI and CCI students who participated in a roundtable discussion during her visit to Ames Laboratory

  10. Savannah River National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River National Laboratory srnl.doe.gov SRNL is a DOE National Laboratory operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. At a glance 'Tin whiskers' suppression method Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a treatment method that slows or prevents the formation of whiskers in lead-free solder. Tin whiskers spontaneously grow from thin films of tin, often found in microelectronic devices in the form of solders and platings. Background This problem was

  11. jwang | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jwang Ames Laboratory Profile Jigang Wang Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering B15 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-2964 Email Address: jgwang@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Metamaterials Education: Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, 2005 M.S. Electrical Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, 2002 B.S. Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, P. R. China, 2000 Professional Appointments: Associate Scientist, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State

  12. Education | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education Education The MFRC has established a network of Midwest crime laboratories and university-based forensic science programs. This network has two general goals: help universities become better casework, research, and development partners for crime laboratories; and to engage crime laboratories in university efforts. These efforts can better-prepare the next generation of forensic scientists, advance the state-of-the-art in forensic science research, and influence students whose

  13. National Energy Technology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Design Standards for the NETL Logo Feburary 2016 The Logo Display of the NETL logo is critical because this symbol represents who we are - it's our signature. Consistent application of the logo is crucial to the success of our identity. As the primary identifier of the National Energy Technology Laboratory, it is essential that the logo's appearance is consistent throughout all of the Laboratory's communications. Over time, consistent and repeated use of the logo will establish a

  14. rshouk | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rshouk Ames Laboratory Profile Robert Houk Prof Chemical & Biological Sciences B27 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-9462 Email Address: rshouk@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Associate and Professor, Iowa State University Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Chemical Analysis of Nanodomains Education: Postdoctoral Associate, Iowa State University, 1981 Ph.D. Iowa State University, 1980 B.S. Slippery Rock State College, 1974 Professional Appointments: Senior Chemist and Professor of Chemistry, Iowa

  15. Mentoring | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentoring Why mentoring? As one of the largest laboratories in the nation for science and engineering research, Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the most prolific and well-renowned scientists and engineers. To maintain an environment that fosters innovative research, we are committed to ensuring the success of our major players on the frontlines of our research-our Postdoctoral Scientists. The Argonne National Laboratory has a long-standing reputation as a place that offers

  16. kabryden | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kabryden Ames Laboratory Profile Kristy Bryden Associate Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 149 Music Phone Number: 515-294-3971 Email Address: kabryden...

  17. CASL - Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The laboratory has designed and operated 52 test reactors, including EBR-1, the world's first nuclear power plant Key Contributions System safety analysis Multiscale fuel ...

  18. angiemcg | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    angiemcg Ames Laboratory Profile Angela Mcguigan Secretary II Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-8060 Email Address: angiemcg...

  19. antropov | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Exploratory Development of Theoretical Methods Education: Ph.D. Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics of Metals, Yekaterinburg,...

  20. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dr. Williams: Trip Report of ORNL Health Physics Support at the Uniroyal Chemical Company ... Laboratory (ORNL) provided health physics support for the Uniroyal Chemical Company. ...

  1. Purchasing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 44 states. Purchased Items and supplier base: Biological Materials Chemicals Computers, Monitors and Printers Furniture Laboratory Supplies Metals Office Supplies...

  2. carter | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carter Ames Laboratory Profile Steven Carter Engr IV Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-7889 Email Address: carter@ameslab.gov...

  3. cbertoni | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cbertoni Ames Laboratory Profile Colleen Bertoni Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 201 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: cbertoni...

  4. pmberge | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pmberge Ames Laboratory Profile Paul Berge Industrial Spec Division of Materials Science & Engineering 110 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5972 Email Address:...

  5. abhranil | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    abhranil Ames Laboratory Profile Abhranil Biswas Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2236 Hach Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: abiswas

  6. aboesenb | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aboesenb Ames Laboratory Profile Adam Boesenberg Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 110 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5903 Email Address: aboesenb

  7. achatman | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    achatman Ames Laboratory Profile Andrew Chatman Division of Materials Science & Engineering 37 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: achatman

  8. ackerman | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ackerman Ames Laboratory Profile David Ackerman Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2025 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-1638 Email Address: ackerman

  9. adabbott | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adabbott Ames Laboratory Profile Adam Abbott Chemical & Biological Sciences Critical Materials Institute 122 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4500 Email Address: adabbott

  10. adaoud | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaoud Ames Laboratory Profile Abdelwadood Daoud Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-8060 Email Address: adaoud

  11. adf | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adf Ames Laboratory Profile Alex Findlater Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 231 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: adf

  12. ahaupert | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ahaupert Ames Laboratory Profile Alysha Haupert Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: ahaupert

  13. aklekner | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aklekner Ames Laboratory Profile Alon Klekner Engr Tech I Facilities Services 167C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-1589 Email Address: aklekner

  14. andresg | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    andresg Ames Laboratory Profile Andres Garcia Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 307 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-6027 Email Address: andresg

  15. arbenson | The Ames Laboratory

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    arbenson Ames Laboratory Profile Alex Benson Division of Materials Science & Engineering 258 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: arbenson

  16. ashheath | The Ames Laboratory

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    ashheath Ames Laboratory Profile Ashley Heath Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: ashheath

  17. bastaw | The Ames Laboratory

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    bastaw Ames Laboratory Profile Ashraf Bastawros Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2347 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3039 Email Address: bastaw

  18. baugie | The Ames Laboratory

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    baugie Ames Laboratory Profile Brent Augustine Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 206 Wilhelm Phone Number: 309-748-0439 Email Address: baugie

  19. bbergman | The Ames Laboratory

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    bbergman Ames Laboratory Profile Brian Bergman Facil Mechanic III Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-4346 Email Address: bbergman@ameslab.gov

  20. bboote | The Ames Laboratory

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    bboote Ames Laboratory Profile Brett Boote Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 0712 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-8586 Email Address: bboote@iastate.edu

  1. bcleland | The Ames Laboratory

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    bcleland Ames Laboratory Profile Beth Cleland Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5446 Email Address: bcleland

  2. bender | The Ames Laboratory

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    bender Ames Laboratory Profile Lee Bendickson Lab Tech III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 3288 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-5682 Email Address: bender

  3. bkkuhn | The Ames Laboratory

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    bkkuhn Ames Laboratory Profile Bridget Kuhn Human Resources Office 118 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-2680 Email Address: bkkuhn@iastate.edu

  4. boehmer | The Ames Laboratory

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    boehmer Ames Laboratory Profile Anna Boehmer Postdoc Res Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering A15 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-3246 Email Address: boehmer

  5. boersma | The Ames Laboratory

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    boersma Ames Laboratory Profile Stephanie Boersma Budget Analyst V Budget Office 231 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-8785 Email Address: boersma

  6. bondarenko | The Ames Laboratory

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    bondarenko Ames Laboratory Profile Volodymyr Bondarenko Division of Materials Science & Engineering A117 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-4072 Email Address: bondarenko

  7. bspire | The Ames Laboratory

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    bspire Ames Laboratory Profile Bruce Spire Erd Machinist Sr Facilities Services 160 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5428 Email Address: bspire

  8. burghera | The Ames Laboratory

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    burghera Ames Laboratory Profile Alexander Burgher Facil Mechanic III Facilities Services 158B Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3756 Email Address: burghera

  9. byrd | The Ames Laboratory

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    byrd Ames Laboratory Profile David Byrd Asst Scientist I Division of Materials Science & Engineering 109 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5747 Email Address: byrd

  10. carraher | The Ames Laboratory

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    carraher Ames Laboratory Profile Jack Carraher Postdoc Res Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2118 BRL Phone Number: 515-294-5826 Email Address: carraher@iastate.edu

  11. cbenetti | The Ames Laboratory

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    cbenetti Ames Laboratory Profile Caleb Benetti Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering A204 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: cbenetti

  12. ccelania | The Ames Laboratory

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    ccelania Ames Laboratory Profile Christopher Celania Grad Asst-TA/RA Division of Materials Science & Engineering 325 Spedding Phone Number: 641-226-7542 Email Address: ccelania

  13. ccowan | The Ames Laboratory

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    ccowan Ames Laboratory Profile Carol Cowan Secretary III Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-2680 Email Address: ccowan

  14. chenx | The Ames Laboratory

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    chenx Ames Laboratory Profile Xiang Chen Division of Materials Science & Engineering 249 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: chenx

  15. cmarquardt | The Ames Laboratory

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    cmarquardt Ames Laboratory Profile Cynthia Marquardt Secretary II Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3756 Email Address: cmarquardt

  16. crossm | The Ames Laboratory

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    crossm Ames Laboratory Profile Jeanine Crosman Secretary III Facilities Services 158H Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3496 Email Address: crossm

  17. dabrice | The Ames Laboratory

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    dabrice Ames Laboratory Profile David Brice Division of Materials Science & Engineering 150 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: dabrice

  18. dbaldwin | The Ames Laboratory

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    dbaldwin Ames Laboratory Profile David Baldwin Director II Chemical & Biological Sciences 130 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-2069 Email Address: dbaldwin

  19. dballal | The Ames Laboratory

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    dballal Ames Laboratory Profile Deepti Ballal Division of Materials Science & Engineering 112 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-9636 Email Address: dballal

  20. dboeke | The Ames Laboratory

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    dboeke Ames Laboratory Profile David Boeke Research Tech Sr Division of Materials Science & Engineering 122 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5816 Email Address: dboeke

  1. deshong | The Ames Laboratory

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    deshong Ames Laboratory Profile Rhonda Deshong Program Asst II Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-0931 Email Address: deshong@ameslab.gov

  2. dfreppon | The Ames Laboratory

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    dfreppon Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Freppon Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 0712 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-8586 Email Address: dfreppon

  3. djbell | The Ames Laboratory

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    djbell Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Bell Grad Asst-RA Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: djbell

  4. djchadde | The Ames Laboratory

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    djchadde Ames Laboratory Profile David Chadderdon Grad Asst-RA Division of Materials Science & Engineering 2140 BRL Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: djchadde

  5. dmeyer | The Ames Laboratory

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    dmeyer Ames Laboratory Profile Dale Meyer Engr Tech II Facilities Services 158D Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3614 Email Address: dmeyer@ameslab.gov

  6. eckels | The Ames Laboratory

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    eckels Ames Laboratory Profile David Eckels Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 105 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7943 Email Address: eckels@ameslab.gov

  7. eguidez | The Ames Laboratory

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    eguidez Ames Laboratory Profile Emilie Guidez Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 201 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: eguidez@ameslab.gov

  8. finzell | The Ames Laboratory

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    finzell Ames Laboratory Profile Peter Finzell Grad Asst-RA Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-8060 Email Address: surgeftr

  9. flanders | The Ames Laboratory

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    flanders Ames Laboratory Profile Duane Flanders Sheet Metal Mech Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: flanders@ameslab.gov

  10. galvin | The Ames Laboratory

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    galvin Ames Laboratory Profile Glen Galvin Mgr Info Tech I Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 1620 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-6604 Email Address: galvin

  11. gbjorlnd | The Ames Laboratory

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    gbjorlnd Ames Laboratory Profile Grace Bjorland Division of Materials Science & Engineering B36 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: gbjorlnd

  12. gharper | The Ames Laboratory

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    gharper Ames Laboratory Profile Gregory Harper Sys Control Tech Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: gharper

  13. gsbacon | The Ames Laboratory

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    gsbacon Ames Laboratory Profile Graham Bacon Division of Materials Science & Engineering 129 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: gsbacon

  14. guan | The Ames Laboratory

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    guan Ames Laboratory Profile Yong Guan Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 3219 Coover Phone Number: 515-294-8378 Email Address: guan

  15. hanrahanm | The Ames Laboratory

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    hanrahanm Ames Laboratory Profile Michael Hanrahan Chemical & Biological Sciences 331 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: mph

  16. hauptman | The Ames Laboratory

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    hauptman Ames Laboratory Profile John Hauptman Associate Facilities Services A411 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-8572 Email Address: hauptman

  17. hcelliott | The Ames Laboratory

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    hcelliott Ames Laboratory Profile Henrietta Elliott Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5446 Email Address: hcelliott

  18. herrman | The Ames Laboratory

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    herrman Ames Laboratory Profile Terrance Herrman Engr V Facilities Services 167 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-7896 Email Address: herrman

  19. hilstromj | The Ames Laboratory

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    hilstromj Ames Laboratory Profile Jeremy Hilstrom Office Assistant-X Human Resources Office 118 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-2680 Email Address: hilst000

  20. himashir | The Ames Laboratory

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    himashir Ames Laboratory Profile Himashi Andaraarachchi Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 209B Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: himashir

  1. jac | The Ames Laboratory

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    jac Ames Laboratory Profile Justin Conrad Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 305 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-4604 Email Address: jac

  2. jbobbitt | The Ames Laboratory

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    jbobbitt Ames Laboratory Profile Jonathan Bobbitt Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 0712 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-4285 Email Address: jbobbitt

  3. jboschen | The Ames Laboratory

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    jboschen Ames Laboratory Profile Jeffery Boschen Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 124 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: jboschen

  4. jiahao | The Ames Laboratory

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    jiahao Ames Laboratory Profile Jiahao Chen Division of Materials Science & Engineering A300 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-0689 Email Address: jiahao@iastate.edu

  5. jrblaum | The Ames Laboratory

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    jrblaum Ames Laboratory Profile Jacqueline Blaum Division of Materials Science & Engineering 37 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: jrblaum

  6. kasuni | The Ames Laboratory

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    kasuni Ames Laboratory Profile Walikadage Boteju Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences Critical Materials Institute 2306 Hach Phone Number: 515-294-6342 Email Address: kasuni

  7. kbratlie | The Ames Laboratory

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    kbratlie Ames Laboratory Profile Kaitlin Bratlie Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 2220 Hoover Phone Number: 515-294-7304 Email Address: kbratlie

  8. klclark | The Ames Laboratory

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    klclark Ames Laboratory Profile Katie Clark Program Coord II Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-8753 Email Address: klclark@ameslab.gov

  9. kmbryden | The Ames Laboratory

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    kmbryden Ames Laboratory Profile Kenneth Bryden Associate Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 2274 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: kmbryden

  10. liza | The Ames Laboratory

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    liza Ames Laboratory Profile Liza Alexander Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 2242 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-6116 Email Address: liza

  11. long | The Ames Laboratory

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    long Ames Laboratory Profile Catherine Long Supv-Custodial Svc Facilities Services 158G Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: long

  12. maheedhar | The Ames Laboratory

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    maheedhar Ames Laboratory Profile Maheedhar Gunasekharan Grad Asst-RA Chemical & Biological Sciences 327 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: maheedhar

  13. ppezzini | The Ames Laboratory

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    ppezzini Ames Laboratory Profile Paolo Pezzini Postdoc Res Associate Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science Off Campus Phone Number: 515-294-3891 Email Address: ppezzini...

  14. dcheng | The Ames Laboratory

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    dcheng Ames Laboratory Profile Di Cheng Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering A311 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-5373 Email Address: dcheng@iastate.edu...

  15. bartine | The Ames Laboratory

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    bartine Ames Laboratory Profile Jeffrey Bartine Program Coord III Environmental, Safety, Health, and Assurance G40 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-4743 Email Address: bartine...

  16. Leadership | Argonne National Laboratory

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    scientific user facility in North America; and the Argonne Accelerator Institute. Harry Weerts Harry Weerts, Associate Laboratory Director, Physical Sciences and Engineering...

  17. mjkramer | The Ames Laboratory

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    Ames Laboratory Profile Matthew Kramer Director III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 125 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-0276 Email Address:...

  18. Workshops | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Workshop Summary June 8-10, 2015 NSRC Workshop on "Big, Deep, and Smart Data Analytics in Materials Imaging" Oak Ridge National Laboratory This workshop brought together ...

  19. hoenig | The Ames Laboratory

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    hoenig Ames Laboratory Profile Douglas Hoenig Mgr Facility Serv Facilities Services 158J Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-0930 Email Address: hoenig@ameslab.gov...

  20. grootvel | The Ames Laboratory

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    grootvel Ames Laboratory Profile Mark Grootveld Mgr Facility Serv Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-7895 Email Address: grootveld@ameslab.gov...

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    Board Directorate Staff Org Chart Berkeley Lab Organization Chart ESnet Protective Services ETAESDR ETAEAEI ETA Chief Operating Officer Laboratory Council RIIO...

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    Assessment of Radionuclide Monitoring in the CSRA Savannah River NERP Research ... Upcoming Seminars The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory is a research unit of the ...

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    David Jiles, Palmer Endowed Chair of the electrical and computer engineering ... When Ames Laboratory was experiencing a seemingly elevated number of power outages, Lab staff ...

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    officials expressed surprise to a lawsuit alleging noncompliance with the federal Clean Water Act filed today by citizens groups. February 7, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  5. timma | The Ames Laboratory

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    timma Ames Laboratory Profile Timothy Anderson Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences B28 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: timma...

  6. rdanders | The Ames Laboratory

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    rdanders Ames Laboratory Profile Ross Anderson Research Tech Sr Division of Materials Science & Engineering 108 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5816 Email Address:...

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    short-pulse laser, scientists from Los Alamos, the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany, and Sandia National Laboratories focus high-intensity light on an ultra-thin...

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    generations. The Laboratory, managed by Princeton University, has a more-than 60-year history of discovery and leadership in the field of fusion energy. PPPL researchers are...

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    He was the third director of Los Alamos National Laboratory, succeeding Robert Oppenheimer and Norris Bradbury. He served from 1970 to 1979. Joined Manhattan Project in 1943 During ...

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    LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 20, 2008- Los Alamos National Laboratory employees once again demonstrated concern for their communities and those in need by pledging a record...

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory

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    2009 Los Alamos, New Mexico, December 1, 2009-Los Alamos National Laboratory employees once more demonstrated concern for their communities and those in need by pledging a record...

  12. xinyufu | The Ames Laboratory

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    xinyufu Ames Laboratory Profile Xinyu Fu Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2238 Molecular Biology Bldg Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: xinyufu...

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    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You can find publications, including technical papers and reports, about geothermal technologies, research, and development at the following U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories.

  14. mmdaub | The Ames Laboratory

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    mmdaub Ames Laboratory Profile Molly Granseth Program Asst II Human Resources Office Environmental, Safety, Health, and Assurance 105 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-2864 Email Address:...

  15. Muncrief | The Ames Laboratory

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    Muncrief Ames Laboratory Profile Diane Muncrief Personnel Officer Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-5731 Email Address: muncrief...

  16. hmorris | The Ames Laboratory

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    hmorris Ames Laboratory Profile Haley Morris Office Assistant-X Human Resources Office Environmental, Safety, Health, and Assurance 105 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-2153 Email...

  17. Inquiry | The Ames Laboratory

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    Facility, a nearly 10 million building that will house an array of state-of-the art electron microscopy equipment. It's Ames Laboratory's first new research facility in...

  18. Awards | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Performance Award, 2013 (with two other researchers) U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office R&D Award, 2013 Argonne National Laboratory Distinguished...

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    event Annual Exercise an earth-shaking activity Sandia President and Laboratories Director Jill Hruby Partnerships, mission synergy key to Sandia's future Sandia California...

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    produced by current operations. LANL and regulatory agencies survey the air, soil, sediment, groundwater, and surface water around the Laboratory to make sure contaminants from...

  1. mbonilla | The Ames Laboratory

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    mbonilla Ames Laboratory Profile Claudia Bonilla escobar Postdoc Res Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 252 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-2041 Email Address: mbonilla

  2. mdotzler | The Ames Laboratory

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    mdotzler Ames Laboratory Profile Mike Dotzler Facil Mechanic III Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-4346 Email Address: mdotzler

  3. mhend | The Ames Laboratory

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    mhend Ames Laboratory Profile Matthew Henderson Sys Analyst I Chemical & Biological Sciences 327 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-1293 Email Address: mhend@ameslab.gov

  4. mhenely | The Ames Laboratory

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    mhenely Ames Laboratory Profile Michael Henely Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5446 Email Address: mhenely@iastate.edu

  5. mwiley | The Ames Laboratory

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    mwiley Ames Laboratory Profile Megan Hovey Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 2252 Hach Phone Number: 515-294-8069 Email Address: mwiley

  6. nalms | The Ames Laboratory

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    nalms Ames Laboratory Profile Nathan Alms Lab Assistant-X Division of Materials Science & Engineering 322 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: nalms

  7. ndesilva | The Ames Laboratory

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    ndesilva Ames Laboratory Profile Nuwan De silva Postdoc Res Associate Critical Materials Institute Chemical & Biological Sciences 236 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: ndesilva

  8. olsenjro | The Ames Laboratory

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    olsenjro Ames Laboratory Profile Jarrett Olsen Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: olsenjro@ameslab.gov

  9. pbenzoni | The Ames Laboratory

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    pbenzoni Ames Laboratory Profile Peter Benzoni Chemical & Biological Sciences 327 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: pbenzoni

  10. perrya | The Ames Laboratory

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    perrya Ames Laboratory Profile Perry Antonelli Grad Asst-RA Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 2240H Hoover Phone Number: 515-294-1841 Email Address: perrya

  11. qslin | The Ames Laboratory

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    qslin Ames Laboratory Profile Qisheng Lin Assoc Scientist Division of Materials Science & Engineering 353 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-3513 Email Address: qslin@ameslab.gov

  12. rberrett | The Ames Laboratory

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    rberrett Ames Laboratory Profile Ronald Berrett Sys Control Tech Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: rberrett

  13. rfry | The Ames Laboratory

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    rfry Ames Laboratory Profile Robert Fry Electronics Tech I Facilities Services 258 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4823 Email Address: rfry

  14. rmalmq | The Ames Laboratory

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    rmalmq Ames Laboratory Profile Richard Malmquist Facil Mechanic III Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1228 Email Address: rmalmq

  15. rodgers | The Ames Laboratory

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    rodgers Ames Laboratory Profile Elizabeth Rodgers Program Coord III Office of Sponsored Research Administration Director's Office 305 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-1254 Email Address: rodgers

  16. rofox | The Ames Laboratory

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    rofox Ames Laboratory Profile Rodney Fox Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 3162 Sweeney Phone Number: 515-294-9104 Email Address: rofox@iastate.edu

  17. sburkhow | The Ames Laboratory

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    sburkhow Ames Laboratory Profile Sadie Burkhow Chemical & Biological Sciences 0712 Gilman Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: sburkhow

  18. schenad | The Ames Laboratory

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    schenad Ames Laboratory Profile Shen Chen Division of Materials Science & Engineering 211 Physics Phone Number: 515-294-9361 Email Address: schenad

  19. schon | The Ames Laboratory

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    schon Ames Laboratory Profile Mallory Schon Program Coord II Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-8062 Email Address: schon

  20. seliger | The Ames Laboratory

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    seliger Ames Laboratory Profile Victoria Seliger Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: seliger

  1. sumitc | The Ames Laboratory

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    sumitc Ames Laboratory Profile Sumit Chaudhary Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 2124 Coover Phone Number: 515-294-0606 Email Address: sumitc

  2. tboell | The Ames Laboratory

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    tboell Ames Laboratory Profile Tyler Boell Division of Materials Science & Engineering 146 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: tboell

  3. tjoliveira | The Ames Laboratory

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    tjoliveira Ames Laboratory Profile Tiago De oliveira Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 505 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: tjoliveira@ameslab.gov

  4. tkales | The Ames Laboratory

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    tkales Ames Laboratory Profile Thomas Ales Division of Materials Science & Engineering 150 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: tkales@iastate.edu

  5. vaclav | The Ames Laboratory

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    vaclav Ames Laboratory Profile Michael Vaclav Engr IV Facilities Services 158E Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-7891 Email Address: vaclav

  6. valery | The Ames Laboratory

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    valery Ames Laboratory Profile Valery Borovikov Postdoc Res Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 205 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4312 Email Address: valery

  7. weverett | The Ames Laboratory

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    weverett Ames Laboratory Profile William Everett Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 121 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email Address: weverett@iastate.edu

  8. witt | The Ames Laboratory

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    witt Ames Laboratory Profile Lynnette Witt Interim Director Human Resources Human Resources Office 151 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-5740 Email Address: witt@ameslab.gov

  9. dscomito | The Ames Laboratory

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    dscomito Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Comito Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering A524 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-9800 Email Address: dscomito...

  10. vdahl | The Ames Laboratory

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    vdahl Ames Laboratory Profile Vincent Dahl Mgr Facilities Mnt Facilities Services Maintenance Shop Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: vdahl...

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory

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    funds July 21, 2009 Funding will aid environmental cleanup and compliance Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 22, 2009-Los Alamos National Laboratory today announced plans to begin...

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory

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    and affirmative procurement accomplishments. The Laboratory also received a Department of Energy "E Star" award for its Environmental Management System project, based on a...

  13. sjbajic | The Ames Laboratory

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    sjbajic Ames Laboratory Profile Stanley Bajic Assoc Scientist Chemical & Biological Sciences 5 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-8194 Email Address: sjbajic...

  14. jwgong | The Ames Laboratory

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    Ames Laboratory Profile Jianwu Gong Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering Chemical & Biological Sciences 326 Wilhelm Phone Number: 515-294-7568 Email...

  15. marit | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Honors & Awards: AAAS Fellow, 2007 Regents Award for Faculty Excellence, 2003 Inventor Incentive Award, Ames Laboratory, 2002 Iowa Regents Faculty Citation Award, 2000...

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2015 Projects save taxpayer dollars, promote environmental stewardship, sustainability LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2015-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 32...

  17. Projects | The Ames Laboratory

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    for Tool Mark Characterization Development of an AccuTOF-DART Database for Use by Forensic Laboratories Forensic Technology Center of Excellence MFRC Training Development &...

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accomplishment," Deputy Laboratory Director and this year's campaign champion Ike Richardson said of this year's pledged - 2 - amount. "The LANL team raised 1.5 million, which...

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009 Lab contributes computer modeling, antibody engineering capabilities Los Alamos, New Mexico, July 28, 2009- Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists will codirect a new...

  20. tchou | The Ames Laboratory

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    tchou Ames Laboratory Profile Tsung-han Chou Student Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering 132 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-6822 Email Address: tchou...

  1. National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

  2. dpaulc | The Ames Laboratory

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    dpaulc Ames Laboratory Profile Daniel Cole Student Associate Chemical & Biological Sciences 10 Carver Co-Lab Phone Number: 515-294-1235 Email Address: dpaulc...

  3. Factsheets | The Ames Laboratory

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    elements on the front and provides information on the back concerning Ames Laboratory's historical involvement in rare earth research, the Critical Materials Institute and the...

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6th Hazmat Challenge July 31, 2012 Competition tests skills of hazardous materials response teams LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 31, 2012 What: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)...

  5. Sustainability | Argonne National Laboratory

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    Sustainability "Much of Argonne's cutting-edge research is dedicated to discovery and ... Argonne's Sustainability and Environmental Program embodies the laboratory's commitment to ...

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory

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    sustainability award October 14, 2010 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, October 14, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory recently received an Environmental Sustainability (EStar) ...

  7. joiner | The Ames Laboratory

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    joiner Ames Laboratory Profile Stacy Joiner Program Manager I Office of Sponsored Research Administration Director's Office 332 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-5932 Email Address:...

  8. zdorkowski | The Ames Laboratory

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    zdorkowski Ames Laboratory Profile Richard Zdorkowski Program Manager I Director's Office Office of Sponsored Research Administration 128 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-5640 Email...

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory

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    Laboratory has awarded master task order agreements to three small businesses for environmental support services work worth up to 400 million within a five-year period....

  10. Employees | Argonne National Laboratory

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    due to weather or other circumstances, assistance for working remotely, clubs and sports leagues, and many other topics of interest to the laboratory community. Quick...

  11. tdball | The Ames Laboratory

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    tdball Ames Laboratory Profile Teresa Ball Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: tdball...

  12. anderegg | The Ames Laboratory

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    anderegg Ames Laboratory Profile James Anderegg Asst Scientist III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 325 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-3480 Email Address:...

  13. jacton | The Ames Laboratory

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    jacton Ames Laboratory Profile James Acton Grad Asst-RA Division of Materials Science & Engineering 0215 Hach Phone Number: 515-294-4446 Email Address: jacton...

  14. oliver | The Ames Laboratory

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    oliver Ames Laboratory Profile James Oliver Associate Simulation, Modeling, & Decision Science 2274 Howe Phone Number: 515-294-2649 Email Address: oliver@iastate.edu...

  15. vanmarel | The Ames Laboratory

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    vanmarel Ames Laboratory Profile Ross Vanmarel Facil Mechanic III Facilities Services 158 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-1746 Email Address: vanmarel...

  16. covey | The Ames Laboratory

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    covey Ames Laboratory Profile Debra Covey Director II Director's Office Office of Sponsored Research Administration 311 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-1048 Email Address: covey...

  17. A comprehensive laboratory study on the immersion freezing behavior of illite NX particles: a comparison of 17 ice nucleation measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Bingemer, Heinz; Budke, Carsten; Curtius, J.; Danielczok, Anja; Diehl, K.; Dreischmeier, Katharina; Ebert, Martin; Frank, F.; Hoffmann, Nadine; Kandler, Kondrad; Kiselev, Alexei; Koop, Thomas; Leisner, Thomas; Mohler, Ottmar; Nillius, Bjorn; Peckhaus, Andreas; Rose, Diana; Weinbruch, Stephan; Wex, Heike; Boose, Yvonne; DeMott, Paul J.; Hader, John D.; Hill, Thomas; Kanji, Zamin; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Levin, Ezra; McCluskey, Christina; Murakami, Masataka; Murray, Benjamin J.; Niedermeier, Dennis; Petters, Markus D.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Saito, Atsushi; Schill, Gregory; Tajiri, Takuya; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Welti, Andre; Whale, Thomas; Wright, Timothy; Yamashita, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Immersion freezing is the most relevant heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism 3 through which ice crystals are formed in mixed-phase clouds. In recent years, an increasing 4 number of laboratory experiments utilizing a variety of instruments have examined immersion 5 freezing activity of atmospherically relevant ice nucleating particles (INPs). However, an 6 inter-comparison of these laboratory results is a difficult task because investigators have used 7 different ice nucleation (IN) measurement methods to produce these results. A remaining 8 challenge is to explore the sensitivity and accuracy of these techniques and to understand how 9 the IN results are potentially influenced or biased by experimental parameters associated with 10 these techniques. 11 Within the framework of INUIT (Ice Nucleation research UnIT), we distributed an 12 illite rich sample (illite NX) as a representative surrogate for atmospheric mineral dust 13 particles to investigators to perform immersion freezing experiments using different IN 14 measurement methods and to obtain IN data as a function of particle concentration, 15 temperature (T), cooling rate and nucleation time. Seventeen measurement methods were 16 involved in the data inter-comparison. Experiments with seven instruments started with the 17 test sample pre-suspended in water before cooling, while ten other instruments employed 18 water vapor condensation onto dry-dispersed particles followed by immersion freezing. The 19 resulting comprehensive immersion freezing dataset was evaluated using the ice nucleation 20 active surface-site density (ns) to develop a representative ns(T) spectrum that spans a wide 21 temperature range (-37 C < T < -11 C) and covers nine orders of magnitude in ns. 22 Our inter-comparison results revealed a discrepancy between suspension and dry-23 dispersed particle measurements for this mineral dust. While the agreement was good below ~-24 26 C, the ice nucleation activity, expressed in ns, was smaller for the wet suspended samples 25 and higher for the dry-dispersed aerosol samples between about -26 and -18 C. Only 26 instruments making measurement techniques with wet suspended samples were able to 27 measure ice nucleation above -18 C. A possible explanation for the deviation between -26 28 and -18 C is discussed. In general, the seventeen immersion freezing measurement 29 techniques deviate, within the range of about 7 C in terms of temperature, by three orders of 30 magnitude with respect to ns. In addition, we show evidence that the immersion freezing 31 efficiency (i.e., ns) of illite NX particles is relatively independent on droplet size, particle 32 mass in suspension, particle size and cooling rate during freezing. A strong temperature-33 2 dependence and weak time- and size-dependence of immersion freezing efficiency of illite-34 rich clay mineral particles enabled the ns parameterization solely as a function of temperature. 35 We also characterized the ns(T) spectra, and identified a section with a steep slope between -36 20 C and -27 C, where a large fraction of active sites of our test dust may trigger immersion 37 freezing. This slope was followed by a region with a gentler slope at temperatures below -27 38 C. A multiple exponential distribution fit is expressed as ns(T) = exp(23.82 exp(-exp(0.16 39 (T + 17.49))) + 1.39) based on the specific surface area and ns(T) = exp(25.75 exp(-exp(0.13 40 (T + 17.17))) + 3.34) based on the geometric area (ns and T in m-2 and C, respectively). 41 These new fits, constrained by using an identical reference samples, will help to compare IN 42 measurement methods that are not included in the present study and, thereby, IN data from 43 future IN instruments.

  18. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  19. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville Tribal Fisheries. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions.

  20. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring in Idaho, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, A.Douglas

    1993-12-01

    This report documents the progress of Idaho Department of Fish and Game`s fish health monitoring during the past five years and will serve as a completion report for the Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project. Anadromous fish at twelve IDFG facilities were monitored for various pathogens and organosomatic analyses were performed to anadromous fish prior to their release. A fish disease database has been developed and data is presently being entered. Alternate funding has been secured to continue fish health monitoring.

  1. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  2. devo | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    devo Ames Laboratory Profile Deborah Schlagel Asst Scientist III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 111 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-3924 Email Address: schlagel@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Novel Materials Preparation & Processing Methodologies Research Interests: Synthesis of single crystals of Huesler alloys, magneto-responsive materials, superconductors, elements and alloys Single crystal characterization and property analysis

  3. riedemann | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    riedemann Ames Laboratory Profile Trevor Riedemann Asst Scientist III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 110 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-1366 Email Address: riedemann@ameslab.gov Assistant Scientist III Website(s): Novel Materials Preparation & Processing Methodologies Materials Preparation Center Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Novel Materials Preparation & Processing Methodologies Education: Masters of Science, Metallurgy, Iowa State University, 1996

  4. Re-Analysis of Hydroacoustic Fish-Passage Data from Bonneville Dam after Spill-Discharge Corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Kim, Jina; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

    2007-06-07

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to re-analyze four years of fixed-aspect hydroacoustic data after the District made adjustments to spill discharge estimates. In this report, we present new estimates of all major fish-passage metrics for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004, as well as estimates for 2005. This study supports the Portland District and its effort to maximize survival of juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes through Bonneville Dam include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines at Powerhouse 2 (B2) and a sluiceway including the B2 Corner Collector. The original reports and all associated results, discussion, and conclusions for non flow-related metrics remain valid and useful, but effectiveness measures for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004 as reported in previous reports by Ploskey et al. should be superseded with the new estimates reported here. The fish-passage metrics that changed the most were related to effectiveness. Re-analysis produced spill effectiveness estimates that ranged from 12% to 21% higher than previous estimates in spring and 16.7% to 27.5% higher in summer, but the mean spill effectiveness over all years was only slightly above 1:1 (1.17 for spring and 1.29 for summer). Conversely surface-passage effectiveness decreased in the years this metric was measured (by 10.1% in spring and 10.7% in summer of 2002 and 9.5% in spring and 10.2% in summer of 2004). The smallest changes in the re-analysis were in project fish passage efficiency (0%-1%) and spill efficiency (0.9%-3.0%).

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Systems & Assessments: About Us Defense Systems About Defense Systems & Assessments Program Areas Accomplishments Cybersecurity Programs About Defense Systems & Assessments soldier silhouetted by a sunset Defense Systems & Assessments supports guardians of peace and freedom on the battlefield and in the laboratory by applying engineering, science, and technology solutions to deter, detect, defeat, and defend threats to our national security. We analyze and exploit the

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia National Laboratories: Missions:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Weapons: About About Nuclear Weapons at Sandia Weapons Researcher World-class scientists and engineers come to Sandia to conduct breakthrough research in nuclear weapons. Sandia designs more than 6,300 parts of a modern nuclear weapon's 6,500 components. Our state-of-the-art laboratories facilitate large-scale testing and computer simulation. Sandia's work is of the highest consequence and those doing the work face awesome responsibilities. Unlike other national labs, which focus on

  7. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  8. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2013-02-01

    This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

  9. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report evaluated the feasibility of two types of technologies to observe fish and near neutrally buoyant drogues as they move through hydropower turbines.

  10. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  11. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  12. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  13. NREL Study of Fielded PV Systems Demonstrates PV Reliability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photovoltaic module quality has remained high even as module prices have declined. Scientists at the National Renew- able Energy Laboratory (NREL) have analyzed the annual performance data from almost 50,000 photo- voltaic (PV) systems that total 1.7 gigawatts of capacity installed in the United States from 2009 to 2012. The overall conclusion is that the vast majority performed as expected. Since 2009, the price of PV modules has fallen dramatically-and with this drop has come concerns about

  14. Sandia National Laboratories

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582 P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Albuquerque N e w M e x i c o Sandia Mountains Q Q ApproximatelyQ8,800QacresQQ ofQDOE-ownedQandQQ permittedQland Q Q LocatedQwithinQtheQQ KirtlandQAirQForceQQ

  15. Sandia National Laboratories beginnings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia National Laboratories beginnings focus of Los Alamos' 70th anniversary lecture March 6, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 6, 2013-Sandia National Laboratories historian Rebecca Ullrich discusses Sandia's transition from a Los Alamos division to an independent organization during a talk at 5:30 p.m., March 13 at the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos. The talk is part of the Laboratory's 70th anniversary lecture series. Sandia Labs' origins are in Los Alamos' Z Division, the engineering

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70th anniversary app for iPhone, iPads June 5, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 4, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory has launched its first app for iPhones and iPads as part of the Laboratory's yearlong celebration of 70 years serving the nation. The free application is available from the Apple Store (search for Los Alamos National Lab). The app enables users to learn more about the Laboratory's national security mission, cutting edge research, unique history, top-flight scientists and the many

  17. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony; Hollen, Robert M.; Erkkila, Tracy H.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.; Roybal, Jeffrey E.; Clark, Michael Leon

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  18. Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Johnson, Robert L.

    2005-03-31

    This report describes a study conducted by PNNL for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterized the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL used the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish who are pulled through the pumps and turbines at Grand Coulee Dam's pump generation station and transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the pump generating plant's new 9-bladed turbines was also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The highest pressure experienced by the Sensor Fish was estimated at 157 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of kokanne would be carried through the pump without being struck and most likely without injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish would be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without injury.

  19. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  20. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Dynan, William S.

    2014-11-06

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference ?-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of ?-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.