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Sample records for fish laboratory studies

  1. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

  2. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.

    2009-09-14

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including changes in pressure as they pass through turbines and dissolved gas supersaturation (resulting from the release of water from the spillway). To examine pressure changes as a source of turbine-passage injury and mortality, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists conducted specific tests using a hyperbaric chamber. Tests were designed to simulate Kaplan turbine passage conditions and to quantify the response of fish to rapid pressure changes, with and without the complication of fish being acclimated to gas-supersaturated water.

  3. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Fortner, Allison M; Riemer, Kristina P; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the effect on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by the projects. The submerged electrical generator will emit an EMF into the surrounding water, as will underwater cables used to transmit electricity from the generator to the shore, between individual units in an array (inter-turbine cables), and between the array and a submerged step-up transformer. The electric current moving through these cables will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of fish and benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011). Those experiments found little indication that the behaviors of these freshwater species were a

  4. SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory APR 2 '^ 1958 WOODS HOLE, MASS CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON By W. R. Bridges Cooperative Fishery Research Laboratory Southern Illinois as a fish poison. At concentrations of 1 p. p.m. sodium cyanide and at a variety of temperature and p

  5. THE IPOS FRAMEWORK: LINKING FISH SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ALTERED FLOWS FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, James C.

    THE IPOS FRAMEWORK: LINKING FISH SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ALTERED FLOWS FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS The current understanding of the effects of turbulence on the swimming performance of fish is primarily. These studies have produced valuable information on the swimming mechanics and behaviour of fish in turbulent

  6. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options; the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase II study are described in the present report.

  7. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  8. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume...

  9. Microscale Immune Studies Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poschet, Jens Fredrich; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Wu, Meiye; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Herr, Amy Elizabeth; Martino, Anthony A.; Perroud, Thomas D.; Branda, Catherine; Srivastava, Nimisha; Sinclair, Michael B.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Apblett, Christopher Alan; Sale, Kenneth L.; James, Conrad D.; Carles, Elizabeth L.; Lidke, Diane S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Rebeil, Roberto; Kaiser, Julie; Seaman, William (University of California, San Francisco, CA); Rempe, Susan; Brozik, Susan Marie; Jones, Howland D. T.; Gemperline, Paul (East Carolina University, Greenville, NC); Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Misra, Milind; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Carson, Bryan D.; Zhang, Zhaoduo; Plimpton, Steven James; Renzi, Ronald F.; Lane, Todd W.; Ndiaye-Dulac, Elsa; Singh, Anup K.; Haaland, David Michael; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Branda, Steven S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Joo, Jaewook; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Brennan, James S.; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Brasier, Allan (University of Texas Mecial Branch, Galveston, TX)

    2009-01-01

    The overarching goal is to develop novel technologies to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the innate immune response in host cells to pathogens such as bacteria and viruses including the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert/suppress/obfuscate the immune response to cause their harmful effects. Innate immunity is our first line of defense against a pathogenic bacteria or virus. A comprehensive 'system-level' understanding of innate immunity pathways such as toll-like receptor (TLR) pathways is the key to deciphering mechanisms of pathogenesis and can lead to improvements in early diagnosis or developing improved therapeutics. Current methods for studying signaling focus on measurements of a limited number of components in a pathway and hence, fail to provide a systems-level understanding. We have developed a systems biology approach to decipher TLR4 pathways in macrophage cell lines in response to exposure to pathogenic bacteria and their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our approach integrates biological reagents, a microfluidic cell handling and analysis platform, high-resolution imaging and computational modeling to provide spatially- and temporally-resolved measurement of TLR-network components. The Integrated microfluidic platform is capable of imaging single cells to obtain dynamic translocation data as well as high-throughput acquisition of quantitative protein expression and phosphorylation information of selected cell populations. The platform consists of multiple modules such as single-cell array, cell sorter, and phosphoflow chip to provide confocal imaging, cell sorting, flow cytomtery and phosphorylation assays. The single-cell array module contains fluidic constrictions designed to trap and hold single host cells. Up to 100 single cells can be trapped and monitored for hours, enabling detailed statistically-significant measurements. The module was used to analyze translocation behavior of transcription factor NF-kB in macrophages upon activation by E. coli and Y. pestis LPS. The chip revealed an oscillation pattern in translocation of NF-kB indicating the presence of a negative feedback loop involving IKK. Activation of NF-kB is preceded by phosphorylation of many kinases and to correlate the kinase activity with translocation, we performed flow cytometric assays in the PhosphoChip module. Phopshorylated forms of p38. ERK and RelA were measured in macrophage cells challenged with LPS and showed a dynamic response where phosphorylation increases with time reaching a maximum at {approx}30-60min. To allow further downstream analysis on selected cells, we also implemented an optical-trapping based sorting of cells. This has allowed us to sort macrophages infected with bacteria from uninfected cells with the goal of obtaining data only on the infected (the desired) population. The various microfluidic chip modules and the accessories required to operate them such as pumps, heaters, electronic control and optical detectors are being assembled in a bench-top, semi-automated device. The data generated is being utilized to refine existing TLR pathway model by adding kinetic rate constants and concentration information. The microfluidic platform allows high-resolution imaging as well as quantitative proteomic measurements with high sensitivity (study cell-signaling involved in host-pathogen interactions and other diseases such as cancer. The advances made in this project have been presented at numerous national and international conferences and are documented in many peer-reviewed publications as listed. Finer details of many of the component technologies are described in these publications. The chapters to follow in this report are also adapted from other manuscripts that are accepted for publication

  10. Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

  11. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Adams, Marshall; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

  12. Potomac River Fish Kills Study Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    /oomycete Raised clear, mucoid Fish Kills Potomac Drainage #12;4 Bacteria No consistent findings - LMBV and A lamellar fusion and inflammation Epithelial lifting, hypertrophy and Hyperplasia leading to fusion, mucous

  13. Using Advanced Imaging to Study Fish 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Browning, Zoe Swezy

    2013-05-31

    . In the first experiment, microCT was used to characterize otolith deformity in vitamin C deficient captive-raised red drum and relate the deformity to behavioral and physiological changes. I found that the normal and abnormal fish had statistically significant...

  14. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

  15. COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

  16. Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar...

  17. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  18. Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First Observation ofFirstStorageFish Sign

  19. Laboratory microfusion capability study. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy`s Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options; the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase II study are described in the present report.

  20. Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish DAILY SECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernald, Russell

    Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish Home DAILY SECTIONS News Sports Opinion Arts America! Study Spanish & Volunteer ONE FISH, TWO FISH, DUMB FISH, DEAD FISH | Print | E- mail Written scientists say fish are capable of deducing how they stack up against the competition by simply watching

  1. Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1989-10-01

    The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Contributions from the Biological Laboratory of the U. S. Fish Commission, Woods Hole; Massachusetts.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; Massachusetts. THE ORGANIC CONSTITUENTS OF THE SCALES OF .fISH. By E. H. GREEN AND R. W. TOWER. . Morner 1 has by decantation until the water remained perfectly clear. The clean scales were then twice extracted with a large

  3. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies 2012 Project Manager: Paul T. Jacobson 1 Principal Investigators: Stephen V. Amaral 2...

  4. LABORATORY SIMULATION METHODS FOR STUDYING COMPLEX COLLABORATIVE TASKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCrickard, Scott

    LABORATORY SIMULATION METHODS FOR STUDYING COMPLEX COLLABORATIVE TASKS William D. Humphries, Dennis. Carroll Penn State University State College, PA This paper describes a new laboratory model developed for studying complex CSCW phenomena. In our prior work a more ecological laboratory approach was developed

  5. Presentation: Introduction to Current & Prior Studies of the DOE Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A briefing to the Comission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories on current and prior studies of the DOE Laboratories delivered by Mark Taylor, Susannah Howieson, and...

  6. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Process Diagram Click image for larger view Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Testing Laboratory Beryllium is a metal that is primarily used as a hardening agent...

  7. Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These case studies feature examples of energy-efficient laboratories for the 21st century. The Featured Concepts Table outlines technologies covered in each case study.

  8. laboratory astrophysics studies of dib carrier (related) candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, John Paul

    PART III laboratory astrophysics studies of dib carrier (related) candidates #12;The Diffuse Astronomical Union 2014 doi:10.1017/S1743921313015949 Laboratory Electronic Spectra of Carbon Chains and Rings bands (DIBs) cannot be definitively identified without laboratory spectra. Several techniques, including

  9. Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall; Fortner, Allison M

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

  10. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    HVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory StudyHVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory StudyHVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory Study

  11. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE STUDY OF SUBPOPULATIONS OF FISHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF SUBPOPULATIONS OF FISHES Coordinated by John C . Marr Fishery Research Biologist Special Scientific Report subpopulations of fishes. John C . Marr 1 Statistical comparison of morphological data. William F . Royce 7 85 The subpopulation problem in the Pacific sardine, Sardinops caerulea . John C . Marr 108 Disease

  12. Researchers study grapevine microbiota | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100National Laboratory Researchers create enormous simulationTo survey the

  13. THE FISHES OF THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN BASIN, WITH A STUDY OF THEIR DISTRffiUTION AND -VARIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE FISHES OF THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN BASIN, WITH A STUDY OF THEIR DISTRffiUTION AND -VARIATION;105 THE FISHES OF THE SACRAMENTO-SAN JOAQUIN BASINt.WITH A STUDY OF THEIR DISTRffiUTION AND VARIATION of the various species of fishes found in the Sacramento- San Joaquin basin, but the identification

  14. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  15. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2015 Students gain new insights into their ancestry LOS ALAMOS,...

  16. The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    temporary instruments deployed in connection with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Project coverage in near fluid injection experiments of the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Project (Rose- 1 - The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies for Geothermal Monitoring

  17. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO), are studying multifunctional landscapes and how they can benefit farmers, the environment, and the bioenergy industry nationwide. Their study, “Multifunctional landscapes: Site characterization and field-scale design to incorporate biomass production into an agricultural system,” is set to be published in September 2015 in the journal, Biomass and Bioenergy.

  18. COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR I Mafine Biological Laboratory SEP 2 01957 WOODS HOLE, MASS. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE CIRCULAR 48 #12;CONTENTS Page Tuna Clipper 3 Tuna Bait Fishing 4 Two-Pole Tuna Fishing 4 Halibut Schooner 5 Halibut Long- Line 6 Steel Cable

  19. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource andfirstDeviceLabLabor ComplianceLaboratories

  20. STUDIES ON THE USE OF CARBON DIOXIDE DISSOLVED IN REFRIGERATED BRINE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDIES ON THE USE OF CARBON DIOXIDE DISSOLVED IN REFRIGERATED BRINE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE in rockfish and chum salmon of dissolving carbon dioxide in brine. Storing the fish in the refrigerated brine treated with carbon dioxide inhibited the growth of the bacteria, retarded the rate at which the fish

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Logistics of Using Fish from UBC Farm Integrated Aquaculture on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Logistics of Using Fish as the logistical aspects of processing fish. To complete these goals, our team organized interviews with key have determined are logistically feasible. Introduction Marine ecosystems are increasingly threatened

  2. FISH SPERMATOLOGY FISH SPERMATOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    FISH SPERMATOLOGY #12;FISH SPERMATOLOGY Alpha Science International Ltd. Oxford, U.K. = Editors Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia, Vodnany, Czech Republic of the publisher. ISBN 978-1-84265-369-2 Printed in India #12;Fish Spermatology is dedicated to Professor Roland

  3. Fish Bulletin. Fishing Party Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of California, Department of Fish and Game

    1990-01-01

    FISH BULLETIN: Fishing Party Vessels In the Text and Excelby the passenger carrying fishing industry (party boat). The

  4. Muon-Induced Background Study for Underground Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. -M. Mei; A. Hime

    2005-12-06

    We provide a comprehensive study of the cosmic-ray muon flux and induced activity as a function of overburden along with a convenient parameterization of the salient fluxes and differential distributions for a suite of underground laboratories ranging in depth from $\\sim$1 to 8 km.w.e.. Particular attention is given to the muon-induced fast neutron activity for the underground sites and we develop a Depth-Sensitivity-Relation to characterize the effect of such background in experiments searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  5. Laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured Climax granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Failor, R.; Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Vandergraaf, T.

    1982-06-01

    This report documents our laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured granite cores. To simulate natural conditions, our laboratory studies used naturally fractured cores and natural ground water from the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test Site. For comparison, additional tests used artificially fractured granite cores or distilled water. Relative to the flow of tritiated water, {sup 85}Sr and /sup 95m/Tc showed little or no retardation, whereas {sup 137}Cs was retarded. After the transport runs the cores retained varying amounts of the injected radionuclides along the fracture. Autoradiography revealed some correlation between sorption and the fracture fill material. Strontium and cesium retention increased when the change was made from natural ground water to distilled water. Artificial fractures retained less {sup 137}Cs than most natural fractures. Estimated fracture apertures from 18 to 60 {mu}m and hydraulic conductivities from 1.7 to 26 x 10{sup -3} m/s were calculated from the core measurements.

  6. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    This publication is one in series of case studies for "Laboratories for the 21st Century," a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This case study describes the Science and Technology Facility, a new laboratory at NREL that incorporated energy-efficient and sustainable design features including underfloor air distribution in offices, daylighting, and process cooling.

  7. Experimental studies on methane-fuel laboratory scale ram combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, Y.; Kitajima, J.; Seki, Y.; Tatara, A.

    1995-07-01

    The laboratory scale ram combustor test program has been investigating fundamental combustion characteristics of a ram combustor, which operates from Mach 2.5 to 5 for the super/hypersonic transport propulsion system. In the previous study, combustion efficiency had been found poor, less than 70 percent, due to a low inlet air temperature and a high velocity at Mach 3 condition. To improve the low combustion efficiency, a fuel zoning combustion concept was investigated by using a subscale combustor model first. Combustion efficiency more than 90 percent was achieved and the concept was found very effective. Then a laboratory scale ram combustor was fabricated and combustion tests were carried out mainly at the simulated condition of Mach 5. A vitiation technique wa used to simulate a high temperature of 1,263 K. The test results indicate that ignition, flame stability, and combustion efficiency were not significant, but the NO{sub x} emissions are a critical problem for the ram combustor at Mach 5 condition.

  8. CARCINOMA OF THE THYROID IN THE SALMONOID FISHES An investigation and experimental study conducted jointly by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARCINOMA OF THE THYROID IN THE SALMONOID FISHES An investigation and experimental study conducted or light ink Binding intrudes into the text, This has been a co-operative project between the NOAA Central. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 History of the present investigation

  9. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. C.; Biedron, S.; Burleson, Theodore A.; Milton, Stephen V.; Morin, Auralee L.; Benson, Stephen V.; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel E.; Hannon, Fay E.; Li, Rui; Tennant, Christopher D.; Zhang, Shukui; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Lewellen, John W.

    2013-08-01

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  10. Advancing the surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish: a gap analysis and research agenda based on a review of trends in intracoelomic tagging effects studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Steven J.; Woodley, Christa M.; Eppard, M. B.; Brown, Richard S.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2011-03-08

    Early approaches to surgical implantation of electronic tags in fish were often through trial and error, however, in recent years there has been an interest in using scientific research to identify techniques and procedures that improve the outcome of surgical procedures and determine the effects of tagging on individuals. Here we summarize the trends in 108 peer-reviewed electronic tagging effect studies focused on intracoleomic implantation to determine opportunities for future research. To date, almost all of the studies have been conducted in freshwater, typically in laboratory environments, and have focused on biotelemetry devices. The majority of studies have focused on salmonids, cyprinids, ictalurids and centrarchids, with a regional bias towards North America, Europe and Australia. Most studies have focused on determining whether there is a negative effect of tagging relative to control fish, with proportionally fewer that have contrasted different aspects of the surgical procedure (e.g., methods of sterilization, incision location, wound closure material) that could advance the discipline. Many of these studies included routine endpoints such as mortality, growth, healing and tag retention, with fewer addressing sublethal measures such as swimming ability, predator avoidance, physiological costs, or fitness. Continued research is needed to further elevate the practice of electronic tag implantation in fish in order to ensure that the data generated are relevant to untagged conspecifics (i.e., no long-term behavioural or physiological consequences) and the surgical procedure does not impair the health and welfare status of the tagged fish. To that end, we advocate for i) rigorous controlled manipulations based on statistical designs that have adequate power, account for inter-individual variation, and include controls and shams, ii) studies that transcend the laboratory and the field with more studies in marine waters, iii) incorporation of knowledge and techniques emerging from the medical and veterinary disciplines, iv) addressing all components of the surgical event, v) comparative studies that evaluate the same surgical techniques on multiple species and in different environments, vi) consideration of how biotic factors (e.g., sex, age, size) influence tagging outcomes, and vii) studies that cover a range of endpoints over ecologically-relevant time periods.

  11. REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and publication for Fiscal Year 1966, are listed. REPORT OF THE LABORATORY DIRECTOR Kenneth A. Henry Research menhadens. Our studies relating to the shad have been concerned principally with fish pas- sage dams

  12. Humans, Robots and Market Crashes: A Laboratory Study ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, Todd; Friedman, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Based Models and Human Subject Experiments. Handbook of Com-data from our experiments combining humans and robots, usingbetween laboratory experiment with human subjects and agent

  13. Student's Doctoral Studies Grew from Internship at DOE Laboratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Renewable Laboratory intern Chad Hotmimsky, center, looks at simulations of wave energy converters with research engineers Michael Lawson, left, and Yi-Hsiang Yu, right....

  14. Study of Bioengineered Zebra Fish Olfactory Receptor 131-2: Receptor Purification and Secondary Structure Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leck, Kwong-Joo

    How fishes are able to detect trace molecules in large bodies of water is not understood. It is plausible that they use olfactory receptors to detect water-soluble compounds. How the zebra fish Danio Rerio, an organism ...

  15. LABORATORY-NUMERICAL MODEL COMPARISONS OF CANYON FLOWS: A PARAMETER STUDY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LABORATORY-NUMERICAL MODEL COMPARISONS OF CANYON FLOWS: A PARAMETER STUDY. DON L. BOYER Cite Scientifique ­ 59655 - Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex (France) ABSTRACT An integrated set of laboratory surrounding a coastal canyon and, further, to explore the degree to which laboratory experiments can provide

  16. Can Fish Morphological Characteristics be Used to Re-design Hydroelectric Turbines?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, G. F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2011-07-19

    Safe fish passage affects not only migratory species, but also populations of resident fish by altering biomass, biodiversity, and gene flow. Consequently, it is important to estimate turbine passage survival of a wide range of susceptible fish. Although fish-friendly turbines show promise for reducing turbine passage mortality, experimental data on their beneficial effects are limited to only a few species, mainly salmon and trout. For thousands of untested species and sizes of fish, the particular causes of turbine passage mortality and the benefits of fish-friendly turbine designs remain unknown. It is not feasible to measure the turbine-passage survival of every species of fish in every hydroelectric turbine design. We are attempting to predict fish mortality based on an improved understanding of turbine-passage stresses (pressure, shear stress, turbulence, strike) and information about the morphological, behavioral, and physiological characteristics of different fish taxa that make them susceptible to the stresses. Computational fluid dynamics and blade strike models of the turbine environment are re-examined in light of laboratory and field studies of fish passage effects. Comparisons of model-predicted stresses to measured injuries and mortalities will help identify fish survival thresholds and the aspects of turbines that are most in need of re-design. The coupled model and fish morphology evaluations will enable us to make predictions of turbine-passage survival among untested fish species, for both conventional and advanced turbines, and to guide the design of hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival.

  17. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  18. DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE's Idaho National Laboratory and Arizona Public Service. GE Global Research proposes a feasibility study of hydrogen production using alkaline electrolysis powered by existing...

  19. Mitigation measures for impacts to fish habitat: Maine turnpike modernization and widening — a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Scott; Simmons, Richard

    2001-01-01

    IMPACTS TO FISH HABITAT: MAINE TURNPIKE MODERNIZATION ANDAbstract Funding Source: Maine Turnpike Authority TotalStatement A 30-mile segment of Maine Turnpike from mile 12

  20. PERSPECTIVE | FOCUS Fishing the Fermi sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    PERSPECTIVE | FOCUS Fishing the Fermi sea Paul C. Canfield is at Ames Laboratory, and Department feed villages and cities. Those skilled in the art of finding the `right place' to fish were deeply

  1. Argonne National Laboratory Scientists Study Benefits of Bioenergy Crop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823 Revision 02AugustLaboratory StandardLab

  2. Wildlife, fish and environmental studies in Ume 1 PhD student in the research education subject: Animal Community Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildlife, fish and environmental studies in Umeå 1 PhD student in the research education subject is an Equal Opportunity Employer. A person has basic eligibility for third level education if he or she has taken a second level qualification or has completed course requirements of at least 240 higher education

  3. Fish Bulletin 136. Ecological Studies of The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Part II: Fishes of The Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Jerry L; Kelley, D W

    1965-01-01

    crustacean plankters in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, p.Eco- logical studies of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Estuary.migrations of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River striped bass

  4. Laboratory studies of subaqueous debris flows by measurements of pore-fluid pressure and total stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory studies of subaqueous debris flows by measurements of pore-fluid pressure and total flows is reported where total stress as well as pore pressure transducers were mounted in the bed; hydroplaning; laboratory experiment; pore pressure measurements 1. Introduction Debris flow is an important

  5. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soloiu, Valentin

    2012-03-31

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuelsâ?? combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  6. A Laboratory Study of the Bioenergetics of Larval Walleye Pollock, Theragm chalcogramnla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Laboratory Study of the Bioenergetics of Larval Walleye Pollock, Theragm chalcogramnla Yoh the bioenergetics of late larvae, juveniles, and adults (Fukuchi 1976; Nishiyama 1981; Harris 1985; Smith and Paul

  7. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  8. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-29

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  9. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines This factsheet explains studies conducted in a...

  10. Black carbon refractive index and morphology: a Laboratory study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    cake 2.6 Heavy fuel oil 1.5 Figure 2: Global sources by fuel types [7]. A wide range of fuel types radiative properties derived from Mie theory and therefore limited to the assumption of spherical aerosol microphysical aerosol models, such as UKCA. This study derives the refractive indices black carbon (BC) aerosol

  11. 12/11/2014 WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream --federal study Manuel... https://plus.google.com/101473675488333674529/posts/Wcp1XY42QsF 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12/11/2014 WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream -- federal study Manuel... https Follow | WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream -- federal study Manuel Quiñones, E;12/11/2014 WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream -- federal study Manuel... https

  12. Internet Fish Brian A. LaMacchia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMacchia, Brian A.

    Internet Fish by Brian A. LaMacchia Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and Department of Electrical Fish,'' a novel class of resource­discovery tools designed to help users extract useful information from the Internet. Internet Fish (IFish) are semi­autonomous, persistent information brokers; users

  13. Laboratory Studies of Rheological Properties of Minerals Under Deep Mantle Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    studies of plastic properties under deep mantle conditions are challenging and the major progress on rheological properties followed by a historical review of experimental studies of plastic deformation. Then we1 Laboratory Studies of Rheological Properties of Minerals Under Deep Mantle Conditions Shun

  14. Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, Qamar Javaid

    1991-01-01

    & Technology, Pakistan. Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven W. Poston The objective of this research was to blend both, COq injection and water imbibition methods and develop a technique best suitable for enhancing oil recovery from low permeability... drive, was induced at the end of 48 hours. Studies have shown that increase in carbonated brine concentration increased total oil recovery at 70 F. With 5. 5 % carbonated brine, 62. 2 % of OOIP was recovered at 150 F as compared to 73. 7 % of OOIP...

  15. Abstract--Bycatch studies have largely ignored population level effects on fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , social disruption, and habitat damage. However, the lack of specific abundance or catchability estimates for H. erectus means that the precise impact of trawl ing on this fish remains uncertain. This paper seahorses (Hippocampus erectus) in a Gulf of Mexico shrimp trawl fishery Julia K. Baum Jessica J. Meeuwig

  16. Improved techniques for studying the temporal and spatial behavior of fish in a fixed location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a function of time and space in a fixed, three-dimensional volume. One example is the optimal design of techniques that minimize the mortality of fish approaching hydroelectric dams or the cooling intakes for positioning optimally the receiving hydrophones to minimize the location measurement errors, the development

  17. Internet Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMacchia, Brian A.

    1996-08-01

    I have invented "Internet Fish," a novel class of resource-discovery tools designed to help users extract useful information from the Internet. Internet Fish (IFish) are semi-autonomous, persistent information brokers; ...

  18. SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH POPULATIONS of the elements of study included monitoring the effects of pulp mill effluent on resident fish populations

  19. OFFSHORE FISHING IN BRISTOL BAY AND BERING SEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OFFSHORE FISHING IN BRISTOL BAY AND BERING SEA Marine Biological Laboratory DEC 19 1952 WOODS HOLE AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;OFFSHORE FISHING IN BRISTOL BAY AND BERING SEA Marine Biological Laboratory DEC 19 governing the fishery 3 Experimental offshore fishing 5 Operations in 1939 6 Summary of 1939 operations , 13

  20. Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortenin.g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortenin.g UNITED STATES 'DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortening By J. HANNEWIJK Unilever Research Laboratory Vlaardingen, The Netherlands Chapter 18 reprinted from the book, "Fish Oils ," M. E

  1. The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group MIT Media Laboratory 20 Ames Street E15 OF CONTENTS ----------------- 1. ASCII SERIAL FISH PROTOCAL 2. HOW TO MAKE FISH ANTENNA 3. CALIBRATION SOFTWARE INSTALLATION 4. HOW TO CALIBRATE A FISH 5. COMPONENT PLACEMENT 6. SCHEMATICS 7. PARTS LIST HOW

  2. Study of energy conversion and partitioning in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory plasmaa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    Study of energy conversion and partitioning in the magnetic reconnection layer of a laboratory feature of magnetic reconnection is that it energizes plasma particles by converting magnetic energy to particle energy, the exact mechanisms by which this happens are yet to be determined despite a long history

  3. A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauxois, Thierry

    A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography Thomas concerning the scattering of a low-mode internal tide by finite-amplitude Gaussian topography. Experiments using particle image velocimetry. The results support the belief that finite-amplitude topography

  4. A laboratory plasma experiment for studying magnetic dynamics of accretion discs and jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Scott

    A laboratory plasma experiment for studying magnetic dynamics of accretion discs and jets S. C. Hsu into the magnetic dynamics of accretion discs and jets. A high-speed multiple-frame CCD camera reveals images of the formation and helical instability of a collimated plasma, similar to MHD models of disc jets, and also

  5. Laboratory study of linear and nonlinear elastic pulse propagation in sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory study of linear and nonlinear elastic pulse propagation in sandstone James A. Ten propagation experiments were performed in sandstone rods, both at ambient conditions and in vacuum-long, 5-cm-diam rod of Berea sandstone with embedded detectors used in previously published experiments

  6. BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SEISMIC ENERGY of Explosive Engineers, 2-5 Feb 97, Las Vegas, NV #12;BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL and David Gross Thunder Basin Coal Company Post Office Box 406 Wright, Wyoming 82732 D. Craig Pearson

  7. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance: Best Management Practice Case Studies #4 and #5 - Water Efficient Landscape and Irrigation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practices #4 and #5 Case Study: Overview of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory grounds maintenance program and results.

  8. Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization APPENDIX I This chapter describes the fish selected the focal species based on their significance and ability to characterize the health

  9. Fish Bulletin No. 96. California Fishing Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, W L

    1953-01-01

    BULLETIN No. 96 California Fishing Ports By W. L. SCOFIELDof the more important fishing ports FOREWORD The purpose ofbrief notes on its sport fishing opportunities. Notes were

  10. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and tidal estuaries with bottom types ranging from soft mud to hard sand and rock. The Laboratory has grown research laboratories, an experimental shell- fish hatchery, administrative offices, a combined library freezer, and quick freezer. The library is limited to publications that have a direct bearing on current

  11. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Science and Technology Facility, Golden, Colorado (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Geet, O.

    2010-04-01

    As a Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) partner, NREL set aggressive goals for energy savings, daylighting, and achieving a LEED Gold rating (through the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program) for its S&TF building.

  12. Robot Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-12-30

    Broadcast transcript: Usually you expect this kind of news from Japan but this time it's South Korea where scientists have just created a robotic fish. Yes, folks, this is an electronic fish that can live underwater. At depths of up to 100 meters...

  13. Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations. Danger to fish is a major concern when...

  14. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  15. DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY Marine Biological Laboratory APR 21 1953 WOODS HOLE, Albert M. Day, Director DIRECTING THE MOVH-IENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY by Alberton L. McLain Fishery of an electrical leading device 21 Literature cited. ..,...,..,..........·· 2k ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1. Diagram

  16. Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Lecture Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ; methods used to assess hazards contaminants pose to fish and wildlife; sublethal and indirect effects" Session 2: Laboratory Toxicity Tests/ "Anatomy of an Oil Spill" Session 3: Factors Governing Test Results

  17. Greenhouse and laboratory studies on the effects of an anaerobic digester sludge on growth and nutrient uptake of sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, John Cooper

    1989-01-01

    GREENHOUSE AND LABORATORI STUDIES ON THE EFFECTS OF AN ANAEROBIC DIGESTER SLUDGE ON GROWTH AND NUTRIENT UPTAKE OF SORGHUM A Thesis By John Cooper Vincent Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Agronomy GREENHOUSE AND LABORATORy STUDIES ON THE EFFECTS OF AN ANAEROBIC DIGESTER SLUDGE ON GROWTH AND NUTRIENT UPTAKE OF SORGHUM A Thesis by John Cooper Vincent Approved...

  18. Laboratory Studies on Surface Sampling of Bacillus anthracis Contamination: Summary, Gaps, and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2011-11-28

    This report summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the (1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and (2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed and recommendations are given for future studies.

  19. Lasers, fish ears and environmental change | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lasers, fish ears and environmental change ORNL and TVA team up to study Kingston spill restoration efforts Researchers analyze fish otoliths using a laser to understand...

  20. A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Thomas; Didelle, Henri; Viboud, Samuel; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    We present the first laboratory experimental results concerning the scattering of a low-mode internal tide by a gaussian topography. Experiments performed at the Coriolis Platform in Grenoble used a recently-conceived internal wave generator as a means of producing a high-quality mode-1 wave field. The evolution of the wave field in the absence and presence of a supercritical Gaussian was studied by performing spatiotemporal modal decompositions of velocity field data obtained using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The results support predictions that large-amplitude supercritical topography produces significant reflection of the internal tide and transfer of energy from low to high modes.

  1. Descriptive Guide to Observing Fish Lesions Supported by US Environmental Protection Agency,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    between agencies and individuals. This challenge can lead to reduced quality of observational data observations, take high quality tissue samples, and make substantial contributions to field fish health studies in the field as well as in the laboratory. This guide contains common terminology, sample descriptions and data

  2. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through a Francis Turbine and Regulating Outlet at Cougar Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2009–2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2011-05-23

    Fish passage conditions through a Francis turbine and a regulating outlet (RO) at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions, identifying potential fish injury regions encountered during passage via specific routes. The RO investigation was performed in December 2009 and the turbine evaluation in January 2010, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish data were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision, strike, and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates. Comparison of the three passage routes evaluated at Cougar Dam indicates that the RO passage route through the 3.7-ft gate opening was relatively the safest route for fish passage under the operating conditions tested; turbine passage was the most deleterious. These observations were supported also by the survival and malady estimates obtained from live-fish testing. Injury rates were highest for turbine passage. Compared to mainstem Columbia River passage routes, none of the Cougar Dam passage routes as tested are safe for juvenile salmonid passage.

  3. A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-12-03

    Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

  4. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  5. Performance of a feasibility study for remediation of WAG 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubarewicz, J.; Pfeffer, J. [CH2M Hill, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garland, S.B. II [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Riddle, S.P. [USDOE Oak Ridge Field Office, TN (United States); Branscom, K.S. [Radian Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the process of preparing a feasibility study (FS) for remediation of a low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ORNL conducts research and development and is one of three DOE-owned facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6 is located in Melton Valley, approximately 2 miles southwest of the plant in Roane County, Tennessee. WAG 6 includes Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, which is still used for shallow land burial of LLW and nonradioactive materials and was the primary focus of the FS. SWSA 6 covers 68 acres, 19 of which contain wastes such as low-level radioactive liquids, solids, sludges, asbestos, and biological and associated laboratory wastes. During the first 15 years of operation, the site also received chemical wastes, but since 1986, it has been used only for LLW. Until 1986, wastes were placed in unlined trenches and auger holes, but since then, wastes have been disposed in greater confinement disposal silos, lined pipe wells and auger holes, and above-ground tumulus units. A list of the sitewide alternatives initially developed for WAG 6 remediation is presented. The alternatives combined capping, structural stabilization (dynamic compaction/grouting), waste consolidation, and groundwater collection/treatment components. In situ vitrification was also considered for areas with significant long-life source inventories.

  6. Laboratory studies on surface sampling of Bacillus anthracis contamination: summary, gaps, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2012-12-01

    This article summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the 1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and 2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed. Recommendations are given for future evaluations of data from existing studies and possible new studies.

  7. Laboratory Study Of Magnetic Reconnection With A Density Asymmetry Across The Current Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Joseph; Yamada, Massaaki; Ji, Hantao; Meyers,, Clayton E.; Jara-Almonte,; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18

    The effects of an upstream density asymmetry on magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant upstream density asymmetry of up to 10, the reconnecting magnetic field pro file is not signifi cantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to the quadrupolar structure in the symmetric configuration. The in-plane ion flow pattern and the electrostatic potential pro file are also affected by the density asymmetry. Strong bulk electron heating is observed near the low-density-side separatrix together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations.

  8. Ideal Free Distribution Theory Bioscene 27 Habitat Quality and the Distribution of Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonovics, Janis

    Ideal Free Distribution Theory Bioscene 27 Habitat Quality and the Distribution of Fish: Are Fish of the ideal free distribution theory. In this laboratory exercise, students will expose a group of fish to two: fish foraging, ideal free distribution theory, patchy resources, habitat quality Introduction The ideal

  9. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (?{sup 15}N, ?{sup 18}O, and ?{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}? = (?15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}? = (?47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from ?40 to ?74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup ?} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup ?} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying this model under the experimental temperature as well as considering the shift in width and center well reproduced the values obtained in the laboratory study. These cross sections can be used in isotopic models to reproduce the stable isotopic composition of nitrate found in Antarctic snow profiles.

  10. Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

  11. GIS Teaching Facilities: Six Case Studies on the Acquisition and Management of Laboratories (91-21)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palladino, Stephen D.; Kemp, Karen K.

    1991-01-01

    and laboratory exercises. GIS instruction requires a richis desirable for introductory GIS classes. Advanced classeshave established successful GIS facilities. A few thousands

  12. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ``past practice`` technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable.

  13. Fish Biology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

  14. Laboratory and field studies related to the radionuclide migration project. Progress report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, W.R.; Thompson, J.L.

    1984-04-01

    The FY 1983 laboratory and field studies related to the Radionuclide Migration project are described. Results are presented for radiochemical analyses of water samples collected from the RNM-1 well and the RNM-2S satellite well at the Cambric site. Data are included for tritium, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 85}Kr, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 129}I, and {sup 137}Cs. Preliminary results from water collection at the Cheshire site are reported. Laboratory studies emphasize the sorptive behavior of tuff and its dependence on mineralogy. 18 references, 7 figures, 13 tables.

  15. Laboratory studies evaluating CO2 flood impact on the geomechanics of whole core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.

    2005-06-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the injected CO2 in these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. Migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals may help lead to the utilization of this sequestration methodology. Co-injection of a mineral reactant slurry, either with the CO2 or in separate, secondary injection wells, could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by providing the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates along the periphery of the injection plume. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry co-injection strategies, by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  16. Critical and strategic materials proceedings of the laboratory study group meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    These Proceedings serve to identify the appropriate role for the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program concerning critical and strategic materials, identify and articulate high priority DOE-BES-DMS target areas so as to maximize programmatic responsiveness to national needs concerning critical and strategic materials, and identify research, expertise, and resources (including Collaborative Research Centers) that are relevant to critical and strategic materials that is either underway or in place under the DOE-BES-DMS Laboratory program. Laboratory statements of collaborative research are given.

  17. Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-08-28

    The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

  18. A Poisson Fishing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas S. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    for this problem. 4. The Basic Fishing Model. We generalizeA Poisson Fishing Model 1 Thomas S. Ferguson, 08/30/94 2as a ?shing problem. 1. The Fishing Problem. One of the ?rst

  19. A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Thomas

    We present the first laboratory experimental results concerning the scattering of a low-mode internal tide by finite-amplitude Gaussian topography. Experiments performed at the Coriolis Platform in Grenoble used a recently ...

  20. Laboratory-Scale Burning and Characterizing of Composite Solid Propellant for Studying Novel Nanoparticle Synthesis Methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Tyler Winston

    2013-04-29

    . During the past several years, the research team has refined laboratory-scale techniques for quickly and reliably assessing the mixing and performance of composite propellants with catalytic nanoparticle additives. This thesis also documents some...

  1. A laboratory study of localized boundary mixing in a rotating stratified fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Judith R. (Judith Roberta)

    2003-01-01

    Oceanic observations indicate that abyssal mixing is localized in regions of rough topography. How locally mixed fluid interacts with the ambient fluid is an open question. Laboratory experiments explore the interaction ...

  2. Scale model seismicity: a detailed study of deformation localisation from laboratory acoustic emission data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Caroline C.

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic emissions (AE) can provide information relating to the internal state of a deforming rock sample during laboratory testing and have been utilised to quantify damage progression for time-dependent failure modeling. ...

  3. Evaluation of behaviour and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Cada, Glenn F; Giza, Daniel; Jacobsen, Paul; McMahon, Brian; Pracheil, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmore »turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. Similarly, by combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.« less

  4. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmore »turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.« less

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

  6. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Fish & Wildlife Program, which implements and provides policy and planning support for actions to meet BPAs fish and wildlife mitigation responsibilities under...

  7. LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of conservation. OBJECTIVES After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Apply that you will be doing these laboratory problems before your lecturer addresses this material. The purpose

  8. Fish Camp 2015 Freshmen Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    1 Fish Camp 2015 Freshmen Information Packet #12;2 Contents Fish Camp General Information ..................................................................................................... 3 Session Dates for Fish Camp 2015.......................................................................................................................... 10 #12;3 Fish Camp General Information Fish Camp Office Mailing Address Student Activities, 131

  9. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES DECEMBER 1958 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES DECEMBER 1958 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for s veral types of canned tuna, canned salmon

  10. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES MARCH 1959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES MARCH 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch canned fish items. The retail prices as contain d h rein for s veral types of canned tuna, canned salmon

  11. Laboratory Study of Magnetic Reconnection with a Density Asymmetry across the Current Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA 2 Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA (Received 13 April 2014; published 28 August 2014) The effects of a density asymmetry and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations

  12. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taffet, M.J. ); Oberdorfer, J.A. ); McIlvride, W.A. )

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  13. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  14. www.waterboards.ca.gov/swamp CONTAMINANTS IN FISH FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP). California State Water Resources Control Board Reynolds California Department of Fish and Game Water Pollution Control Laboratory Fish Collection: Glenn, Vera Williams, and Dawit Tadesse of the State Water Resources Control Board guided the project

  15. ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " - Electro-magnetic transducer 6 Piezo-electric crystal transducer l8 "Wampus" - Underwater turbine 20ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND Marine Biological Laboratory NOV 9 -1953 WOODS, Director ATTEMPTS TO GUIDE SMALL FISH WITH UNDERWATER SOUND by Clifford J. Burner and Harvey Lo Moore

  16. The 10 $?$m infrared band of silicate dust: A laboratory study comparing the aerosol and KBr pellet techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tamanai; H. Mutschke; J. Blum; G. Meeus

    2006-09-08

    The profile of the silicate 10 $\\mu$m IR band contains important information about the evolutional stage of dust in circumstellar environments and the possible ongoing process of planetesimal formation. In order to extract this information, the observed band profiles are compared with calculated or laboratory-measured absorption cross sections of amorphous and crystalline grains with different sizes and compositions. We present in this study the first laboratory measurements of the 10 $\\mu$m band profiles of nonembedded, i.e. free-flying, particles of amorphous and crystalline Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ (with two different particle shapes), amorphous and crystalline MgSiO$_3$, and crystalline olivine. We compare the spectra with those measured on embedded grains and discuss the potential of the new experimental method for comparison with observed spectra, as well as for future studies of agglomeration and surface manipulation of the grains.

  17. The 10 $\\mu$m infrared band of silicate dust: A laboratory study comparing the aerosol and KBr pellet techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamanai, A; Blum, J; Meeus, G

    2006-01-01

    The profile of the silicate 10 $\\mu$m IR band contains important information about the evolutional stage of dust in circumstellar environments and the possible ongoing process of planetesimal formation. In order to extract this information, the observed band profiles are compared with calculated or laboratory-measured absorption cross sections of amorphous and crystalline grains with different sizes and compositions. We present in this study the first laboratory measurements of the 10 $\\mu$m band profiles of nonembedded, i.e. free-flying, particles of amorphous and crystalline Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ (with two different particle shapes), amorphous and crystalline MgSiO$_3$, and crystalline olivine. We compare the spectra with those measured on embedded grains and discuss the potential of the new experimental method for comparison with observed spectra, as well as for future studies of agglomeration and surface manipulation of the grains.

  18. Statement of work for Los Alamos National Laboratory on ferrocyanide studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.

    1990-11-01

    During management of the Hanford Single-Shell Waste Tanks (SST), the site operator precipitated cesium from the supernate as nickel cesium ferrocyanide to allow disposal of the supernate as low-level waste. This freed valuable tank storage space for receipt of additional radioactive waste generated by Hanford defense operations. Concern has arisen that the ferrocyanide could react explosively with nitrate, another waste component, and/or its radiolysis product nitrite. The current Hanford Principal Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), has requested that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluate the potential for explosive ferrocyanide reactions on a worst case basis. The worst case is believed, at this time, to be a mixture of nickel cesium ferrocyanide and a mixture of nitrate and nitrite without any dilution by inert waste constituents. PNL will perform energetic and small-scale explosion tests. The large-scale explosion tests (s) will be performed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  19. Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.

    2014-09-23

    The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 ± 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 ± 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 ± 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 ± 0.20 and averaged 1.18 ± 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

  20. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

  1. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  2. Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    to tell me about diving or fishing in Bonaire? 126. StartTHE DISSERTATION Fish, Fishing, Diving, and the ManagementPauly, D. (2011) Global fishing effort (1950-2010): Trends,

  3. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  4. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  5. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

  6. Chapter 19 Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 19 Fish This chapter describes fish resources in the project area and how the project...

  7. Fish Pond - 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    Catfish ponds can provide enjoyable outdoor recreation as well as excellent food fish. This publication explains pond preparation, stocking, feeding, water quality, off-flavor, harvesting, fish diseases, and controlling pond pests....

  8. Laboratory study related to the production and properties of pig iron nuggets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anameric, B.; Kawatra, S.K. [Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-15

    Pig iron nuggets were produced in a laboratory-scale furnace at Michigan Technological University. The process was intended to replicate Kobe Steel's ITmk3 direct ironmaking process. These nuggets were produced from pellets that were made from a mixture of iron oxide, coal, flux and a binder and heated in a furnace with a chamber temperature of 1450{sup o}C. The pellets then self-reduced to produce a solid, high-density, highly metallized (96.5% Fe) pig iron. During the nugget production process, a separate liquid slag phase formed that cleanly separated from the molten metal. The physical and chemical properties of the pig iron nuggets were similar to pig iron produced by blast furnaces, which is distinct from direct reduced iron (DRI).

  9. A laboratory exposure system to study the effects of aging on super-micron aerosol particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarpia, Joshua; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hubbard, Joshua Allen

    2014-02-01

    A laboratory system was constructed that allows the super-micron particles to be aged for long periods of time under conditions that can simulate a range of natural environments and conditions, including relative humidity, oxidizing chemicals, organics and simulated solar radiation. Two proof-of-concept experiments using a non-biological simulant for biological particles and a biological simulant demonstrate the utility of these types of aging experiments. Green Visolite®, which is often used as a tracer material for model validation experiments, does not degrade with exposure to simulated solar radiation, the actual biological material does. This would indicate that Visolite® should be a good tracer compound for mapping the extent of a biological release using fluorescence as an indicator, but that it should not be used to simulate the decay of a biological particle when exposed to sunlight. The decay in the fluorescence measured for B. thurengiensis is similar to what has been previously observed in outdoor environments.

  10. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2011-01-26

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a new Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed lowlevel, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TA-54 Area G. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to ten sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. Three passes of the analysis were required to assess different site scenarios: 1) a fully consolidated CWC with both transfer/storage and LL W disposal in one location (45 acre minimum), 2) CWC transfer/storage only (12 acre minimum), and 3) LLW disposal only (33 acre minimum). The top site choice for all three options is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. TA-54 East, Zone 4 also deserves consideration as a LLW disposal site.

  11. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU PRICES APRIL 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market Development FISHERY with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain a v e rage retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail

  12. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES NOVEMBER 1958 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for several types. Department of Labor in order to provide information on price levels in different cities. This issue contains

  13. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch Fisheries has contracted with the Bureau of Labo r Statistics to obtain average retail prices for selected

  14. CANNED FISH RETAIL .PRICES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL .PRICES, OC1rOIBrE~ UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INT...n.~""n FISH retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for several types. Department of Labor in order to provide information on price levels in different cities. This issue contains

  15. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JA.NUARY 11959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JANUARY 195 9 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch Fisheries has contracted with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain average retail prices for se lected

  16. LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab V -1 LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Electrical devices are the cornerstones of our modern world understanding of them. In the previous laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · apply the concept of circuit to any

  17. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  18. Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Orme

    2012-08-01

    Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

  19. A Laboratory Study of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection in Strongly-Driven Plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-driven system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.

  20. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly driven plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Séguin, F. H.; Town, R. P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-drivenmore »system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.« less

  1. Geothermal Heat Pump research and development studies at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, G.M.; Sullivan, W.N.

    1994-08-01

    The Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) concept was originally developed in the 1940`s. Recently, because of increasing energy costs, utility interest, and the development of simple and durable ground source heat exchangers, GHP`s have gained international attention as a proven means of energy conservation and electrical peak power demand reduction. GHP systems require installation of a buried heat exchanger to utilize the nearly constant ground temperature making them more efficient than conventional air source heat pumps. However, the high installation cost for both residential and commercial applications is a major obstacle to their market penetration. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) through its sponsors, the Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense (DOD), has embarked on a research program to find ways to reduce GHP installation costs and improve performance, thereby increasing their market penetration. The major elements of the program are: data acquisition to quantify the performance of GHP`S, research and development (R&D) of the ground source heat exchanger aimed at reducing, installation costs, and support of DOE efforts to market the GHP concept. This paper describes the current status of our program, some experimental and analytical results, and plans for future activities.

  2. The Management of Silica in Los Alamos National Laboratory Tap Water - A Study of Silica Solubility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlberg, C.; Worland, V.P.; Kozubal, M.A.; Erickson, G.F.; Jacobson, H.M.; McCarthy, K.T.

    1999-07-01

    Well water at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 60 to 100 mg/L, with 4 mg/L of magnesium, 13 mg/L calcium and lesser concentrations of other ions. On evaporation in cooling towers, when the silica concentration reaches 150 to 220 mg/L, silica deposits on heat transfer surfaces. When the high silica well water is used in the reprocessing of plutonium, silica remains in solution at the end of the process and creates a problem of removal from the effluent prior to discharge or evaporation. The work described in this Report is divided into two major parts. The first part describes the behavior of silica when the water is evaporated at various conditions of pH and in the presence of different classes of anions: inorganic and organic. In the second part of this work it was found that precipitation (floccing) of silica was a function of solution pH and mole ratio of metal to silica.

  3. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R.P. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-drivenmore »system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.« less

  4. Distribution Channels for Longline-Caught Fish in Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Distribution Channels for Longline-Caught Fish in Hawaii Dawn Kotowicz and Laurie Richmond PIFSC and JIMAR #12;Study Background · Economic and cultural importance of tuna and longline fish in Hawaii ­ From · To understand the distribution chains for Hawaii's longline caught fish (local and export) · To classify

  5. Big Fish on the Yangtze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2013-12-04

    Broadcast Transcript: This is Randi Hacker with another Postcard from Asia from the KU Center for East Asian Studies. Once upon a time, in China's New Austerity Age, that is, now, a 2,300 ton, 295-foot glow-in-the-dark puffer fish statue...

  6. Laboratory Studies of the Reactive Chemistry and Changing CCN Properties of Secondary Organic Aerosol, Including Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scot Martin

    2013-01-31

    The chemical evolution of secondary-organic-aerosol (SOA) particles and how this evolution alters their cloud-nucleating properties were studied. Simplified forms of full Koehler theory were targeted, specifically forms that contain only those aspects essential to describing the laboratory observations, because of the requirement to minimize computational burden for use in integrated climate and chemistry models. The associated data analysis and interpretation have therefore focused on model development in the framework of modified kappa-Koehler theory. Kappa is a single parameter describing effective hygroscopicity, grouping together several separate physicochemical parameters (e.g., molar volume, surface tension, and van't Hoff factor) that otherwise must be tracked and evaluated in an iterative full-Koehler equation in a large-scale model. A major finding of the project was that secondary organic materials produced by the oxidation of a range of biogenic volatile organic compounds for diverse conditions have kappa values bracketed in the range of 0.10 +/- 0.05. In these same experiments, somewhat incongruently there was significant chemical variation in the secondary organic material, especially oxidation state, as was indicated by changes in the particle mass spectra. Taken together, these findings then support the use of kappa as a simplified yet accurate general parameter to represent the CCN activation of secondary organic material in large-scale atmospheric and climate models, thereby greatly reducing the computational burden while simultaneously including the most recent mechanistic findings of laboratory studies.

  7. Passive Robotic Models of Propulsion by the Bodies and Caudal Fins of Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flammang, Brooke

    SYMPOSIUM Passive Robotic Models of Propulsion by the Bodies and Caudal Fins of Fish George V progress in understanding the dynamics of fish locomotion has been made through studies of live fishes and by analyzing locomotor kinematics, muscle activity, and fluid dynamics. Studies of live fishes are limited

  8. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2010-11-05

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a potential Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed low-level, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area (TA)-54. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to seven sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. The top site choice is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. The seven sites are as follows. TA-18/36 (62 acres) is located on Potrillo Drive that intersects Pajarito Road at the bottom of a steep grade. It has some blast zone issues on its southwest side and some important archeological sites on the southeast section. TA-60 (50 acres) is located at the end of Eniwetok Road off Diamond Drive, east of TA-3. Most of the site is within a fifty foot-deep ravine (that may have contamination in the drainage), with a small section on the mesa above. TA-63/52/46 (110 acres) lies to the north of Pajarito Road along Puye Road. It is centrally located in a brown field industrial area, with good access to generators on a controlled road. TA-46 (22 acres) is a narrow site on the south side of Pajarito Road across from TA-46 office buildings. TA-48 (14 acres) is also narrow, and is located on the north side of Pajarito Road near the west vehicle access portal (VAP). TA-51 (19 acres) is located on the south side of Pajarito Road at the top of the hill above TA-18 near the current entrance to the TA-54. TA-54 West (16 acres) is just north of the entrance to TA-54 at Pajarito Road and is close to Zone 4. Although it is near the San Ildefonso Pueblo property line, there may be adequate set-back for sight screening.

  9. Wireless Monitoring Study in the Meuse / Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory, France - 12046

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Kei; Eto, Jiro; Tanabe, Hiromi [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center - RWMC (Japan); Mayer, Stefan; Bertrand, Johan [National Radioactive Waste Management Agency - ANDRA (France); Takamura, Hisashi; Suyama, Yasuhiro [Kajima Corporation (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Two types of wireless transmission systems using ultra low frequency (8.5 kHz) were developed and used in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillites layer in the Meuse / Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (CMHM URL) in France. Short-range and mid-range transmission antennas received data transmitted from 25 m to 50 m away. From the results of two series of tests, it is clear that transmission is practical when the received voltage is larger than the received noise. However, it is also clear that wireless transmission in the CMHM URL gallery is affected by the electromagnetic noise level and steel components, and the maximum transmission distance depends on the S/N ratio. The mid-range transmission antenna achieved a transmission distance of 240 m in the surface test, where the electromagnetic noise level was small and there was no environmental attenuation. The short-range transmission antenna achieved a transmission distance of 25 m in the surface test and in the CMHM URL gallery. As the clay layer of the CMHM URL had little effect on the attenuation of the electromagnetic field, transmission over 200 m might be possible in the CMHM URL when the electromagnetic noise level is small enough and there are no significant factors enhancing attenuation. But in reality, the possible transmission distance was around 50 m. In order to show the transmitter's ability, it is preferable to keep some distance between steel components and the transmitter. The most effective way to use this transmitter is to put it in a borehole drilled from a gallery to outside of a gallery around 10 m length. In this way, it might be possible to avoid almost of all the influence of steel components. For the position of receiver, the recommendation is the same as for the transmitter. That is, place the receiver where the incoming signal from the transmitter suffers little attenuation from steel components. Therefore, the option of implementing a receiving antenna in a borehole is required. (authors)

  10. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  11. Tuesday, March 14, 2006 POSTER SESSION I: TERRESTRIAL LABORATORY ANALOG STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Mars Phoenix Scout Mission will perform DSC and EGA of soil samples. In this study, we examine two possible modes of detecting organics, namely, pyrolysis and combustion. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVII

  12. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is one-page, two-sided fact sheet presents high-level summary results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  13. Quantifying Barotrauma Risk to Juvenile Fish during Hydro-turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2014-03-15

    We introduce a method for hydro turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine engineering design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed hydro turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism (stressor) and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, engineers and biologists can identify the more-promising designs and operating conditions to minimize hydraulic conditions hazardous to passing fish. In this paper, the BioPA method is applied to estimate barotrauma induced mortal injury rates for Chinook salmon exposed to rapid pressure changes in Kaplan-type hydro turbines. Following the description of the general method, application of the BioPA to estimate the probability of mortal injury from exposure to rapid decompression is illustrated using a Kaplan hydro turbine at the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest region of the USA. The estimated rates of mortal injury increased from 0.3% to 1.7% as discharge through the turbine increased from 334 to 564 m3/s for fish assumed to be acclimated to a depth of 5 m. The majority of pressure nadirs occurred immediately below the runner blades, with the lowest values in the gap at the blade tips and just below the leading edge of the blades. Such information can help engineers focus on problem areas when designing new turbine runners to be more fish-friendly than existing units.

  14. LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST LABORATORY: DATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    LABORATORY SAFETY CHECKLIST LABORATORY: DATE: RESPONSIBLE OFFICER: INSPECTION BY: Boxes/A indicates the item does not apply to this laboratory. 1 HAZARD IDENTIFICATION /x/NA Comments 1 in the laboratory? 1.2 Are current copies available of: (a) permits for notifiable or prohibited carcinogens, (b

  15. Fishing Communities Facts Gloucester, Massachusetts has been a fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12; #12; Fishing Communities Facts Gloucester, Massachusetts has been a fishing community continuously since its founding in 1623. Boston's Fish Pier, which opened in 1914, is the oldest continuously operating fish pier in the U.S. There is a lot of support for the fishing industry by state and local

  16. Fishing Communities Facts North Carolina's commercial fishing communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12; #12; Fishing Communities Facts North Carolina's commercial fishing communities tend fisheries. The number of commercial fish processors and wholesale dealers for North Carolina, South fishing trips in the U.S. The Big Rock Blue Marlin Fishing Tournament in Morehead City, North Carolina

  17. iFISH -Conceptually What is iFISH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Jon

    iFISH - Conceptually What is iFISH? iFISH is an underlying technology that can form the basis and effective manner. It provides users with a unique exploration experience. iFISH offers a playful environment that encourages a further quick and deeper investigation. iFISH provides all of the above. It employs sliders

  18. Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

  19. Leadership development study :success profile competencies and high-performing leaders at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Katherine M.; Mulligan, Deborah Rae; Szenasi, Gail L.; Crowder, Stephen Vernon

    2005-04-01

    Sandia is undergoing tremendous change. Sandia's executive management recognized the need for leadership development. About ten years ago the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department in partnership with executive management developed and implemented the organizational leadership Success Profile Competencies to help address some of the changes on the horizon such as workforce losses and lack of a skill set in the area of interpersonal skills. This study addresses the need for the Business, Leadership, and Management Development department to provide statistically sound data in two areas. One is to demonstrate that the organizational 360-degree success profile assessment tool has made a difference for leaders. A second area is to demonstrate the presence of high performing leaders at the Labs. The study utilized two tools to address these two areas. Study participants were made up of individuals who have solid data on Sandia's 360-degree success profile assessment tool. The second assessment tool was comprised of those leaders who participated in the Lockheed Martin Corporation Employee Preferences Survey. Statistical data supports the connection between leader indicators and the 360-degree assessment tool. The study also indicates the presence of high performing leaders at Sandia.

  20. Study of driven magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma* Masaaki Yamada,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    in the evolution of solar flares5­9 and in the dynamics of the earth's magneto- sphere.10­14 It also occurs as one the confinement characteristics of high- temperature fusion plasmas. The study of solar flares has been Solar flares provide a paradigm for physical systems where magnetic energy is stored in a force- free

  1. Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies : Annual Progress Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, Timothy; Putnam, Scott

    2008-12-01

    The goal of Idaho Steelhead Monitoring and Evaluation Studies is to collect monitoring data to evaluate wild and natural steelhead populations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. During 2007, intensive population data were collected in Fish Creek (Lochsa River tributary) and Rapid River (Little Salmon River tributary); extensive data were collected in other selected spawning tributaries. Weirs were operated in Fish Creek and Rapid River to estimate adult escapement and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. Snorkel surveys were conducted in Fish Creek, Rapid River, and Boulder Creek (Little Salmon River tributary) to estimate parr density. Screw traps were operated in Fish Creek, Rapid River, Secesh River, and Big Creek to estimate juvenile emigrant abundance, to tag fish for survival estimation, and to collect samples for age determination and genetic analysis. The estimated wild adult steelhead escapement in Fish Creek was 81 fish and in Rapid River was 32 fish. We estimate that juvenile emigration was 24,127 fish from Fish Creek; 5,632 fish from Rapid River; and 43,674 fish from Big Creek. The Secesh trap was pulled for an extended period due to wildfires, so we did not estimate emigrant abundance for that location. In cooperation with Idaho Supplementation Studies, trap tenders PIT tagged 25,618 steelhead juveniles at 18 screw trap sites in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages. To estimate age composition, 143 adult steelhead and 5,082 juvenile steelhead scale samples were collected. At the time of this report, 114 adult and 1,642 juvenile samples have been aged. Project personnel collected genetic samples from 122 adults and 839 juveniles. We sent 678 genetic samples to the IDFG Eagle Fish Genetics Laboratory for analysis. Water temperature was recorded at 37 locations in the Clearwater and Salmon river drainages.

  2. Building bridges for fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building-bridges-for-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

  3. Effects of fishing and protection on Brazilian reef fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, S R; Halpern, Benjamin S; Ferreira, CEL

    2006-01-01

    292. Frédou, T. , 2004. The fishing activity on coral reefsC.M. , 2004. Effects of fishing on sex-changing CaribbeanR.F.G. , 2005. Effects of fishing pressure and trophic group

  4. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  5. This study was performed at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr. JeffreyThermalš,, 20106,5,8,30, 2015a'\ .study

  6. Laboratory studies of oil spill behavior in broken ice fields. Final report Nov 80-Nov 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Free, A.P.; Cox, J.C.; Schultz, L.A.

    1981-10-01

    This study examined the short-term behavior of oil spilled in or near a field of broken ice. The mechanics of oil seeping through the spaces between the ice blocks were examined, both on the level of a single straight gap and on the level of a random broken ice field, through experiments performed in ARCTEC, Incorporated's Ice Flume. The spreading of oil due to movement of the ice pack is discussed. The effects of the environment in the spill area, especially currents and winds, are taken into account throughout the study. The report gives information which permits the determination of the one-dimensional spread rate of oil spilled in a broken ice field, such as might be encountered in a natural lead or in a ship channel. The results are presented as a set of recommendations for use in oil spill response planning or for use by on-site response personnel in predicting the behavior of oil spilled in broken ice fields.

  7. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A.; Tixier, J.S.

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  8. Simulated Waste for Leaching and Filtration Studies--Laboratory Preparation Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Harry D.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-10-27

    This report discusses the simulant preparation procedure for producing multi-component simulants for leaching and filtration studies, including development and comparison activities in accordance with the test plan( ) prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0 (Smith 2006). A fundamental premise is that this approach would allow blending of the different components to simulate a wide variety of feeds to be treated in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For example, a given feed from the planned feed vector could be selected, and the appropriate components would then be blended to achieve a representation of that particular feed. Using the blending of component simulants allows the representation of a much broader spectrum of potential feeds to the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP).

  9. 1989 neutron and gamma personnel dosimetry intercomparison study using RADCAL (Radiation Calibration Laboratory) sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H.; Patterson, G.R. ); Murakami, H. . Dept. of Health Physics); Liu, J.C. )

    1990-10-01

    The fourteenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study (i.e., PDIS 14) was conducted during May 1-5, 1989. A total of 48 organizations (33 from the US and 15 from abroad) participated in PDIS 14. Participants submitted by mail a total of 1,302 neutron and gamma dosimeters for this mixed field study. The type of neutron dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD-albedo (40%), direct interaction TLD (22%), track (20%), film (7%), combination (7%), and bubble detectors (4%). The type of gamma dosimeter and the percentage of participants submitting that type are as follows: TLD (84%) and film (16%). Radiation sources used in the six PDIS 14 exposures included {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm D{sub 2}O, {sup 252}Cf moderated by 15-cm polyethylene (gamma-enhanced with {sup 137}Cs), and {sup 238}PuBe. Neutron dose equivalents ranged from 0.44--2.63 mSv and gamma doses ranged from 0. 01-1.85 mSv. One {sup 252}Cf(D{sub 2}O) exposure was performed at a 60{degree} angle of incidence (most performance tests are at perpendicular incidence). The average neutron dosimeter response for this exposure was 70% of that at normal incidence. The average gamma dosimeter response was 96% of that at normal incidence. A total of 70% of individual reported neutron dosimeter measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. If the 0.01 mSv data are omitted, approximately 90% of the individual reported gamma measurements were within {plus minus}50% of reference values. 33 refs., 9 figs., 27 tabs.

  10. One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Greg

    One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video Andrew Rova Simon template object recognition method for classifying fish species in un- derwater video. This method can be a component of a system that automatically identifies fish by species, im- proving upon previous works which

  11. A laboratory study of the seasonal life history and seasonal abundance of the black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham, Elwin Eugene

    1973-01-01

    . Seasonal History of Agrotis ~l allen (Hufnagel) Development of Artificial Diets for Laboratory Use Laboratory Rearing of ~rotis ~l silon. Head Capsule Measurements . Seasonal Abundance of ~A retie ~i ellen in Texas MATERIALS AND METHODS Establishment.... 40 40 CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES CITED. 50 53 VITA. 57 f Table 1 LIST OF TABLES Ingredients of the artificial diet used for rearing black cutworm larvae Page . 21 Life history of black cutworm moths maintained in the laboratory at College...

  12. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, C. M.; Brookhart, M.; Collins, C.; Khalzov, I.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wallace, J.; Clark, M.; Flanagan, K.; Li, Y.; Nonn, P. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Zweibel, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-? phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3?m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000?G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ?14 m{sup 3} of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500?V, drawing 40?A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100?kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB{sub 6} cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J?×?B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm?>?1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10?1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  13. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

    2013-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

  14. Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards Barter, Eloise

    1990-01-01

    1990). Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear ELOISE R I C H A Rmawi and Atsugewi for fishing. In 1986-87 the Pit RiverThis paper, describing the fishing equipment collected by

  15. Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards Barter, Eloise

    1990-01-01

    Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear ELOISE R I C H A R D SJohn W. Hudson acquired gear used by the Achu- mawi andACHUMAWI AND ATSUGEWI FISHING GEAR Fig. 6. Fish spear (FM

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF FIN RIGIDITY AND GUSTS ON THE FORCE PRODUCTION IN FISHES AND INSECTS : A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Löhner, Rainald

    propulsion is also important in the area of bio-fluid dynamics, for the study of propulsion in insects, birds deformation on the fluid dynamics of force production. An unstructured grid-based unsteady Navier showed that the wake capture mechanism which is responsible for a peak in thrust production just after

  17. Final Report: Laboratory Studies of Spontaneous Reconnection and Intermittent Plasma Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egedal-Pedersen, Jan; Porkolab, Miklos

    2011-05-31

    The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and the MIT Physics Department. The NSF/DOE award No. 0613734, supported two graduate students (now Drs. W. Fox and N. Katz) and material expenses. The grant enabled these students to operate the VTF basic plasma physics experiment on magnetic reconnection. The first configuration was characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail. The second configuration was developed to be relevant to specifically to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection. In the Report we review the general motivation of this work and provide an overview of our experimental and theoretical results enabled by the support through the awards.

  18. SOUTH CAROLINA COOPERATIVE FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    SOUTH CAROLINA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 2011 Annual Report The South Carolina issues in the state of South Carolina, as well as throughout the SE U.S. and internationally. #12;2011 Annual Report Page 2 South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit 2 0 1 1 A N N U

  19. The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

    2004-07-31

    This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

  20. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    During FY-1980, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory contributions to the Waste/Rock Interactions Technology program were primarily in the areas of migration-rate studies using crushed rock, whole core, and fractured core columns; parametric studies of variables which may influence radionuclide sorption-desorption behavior; and initial studies of actinide chemistry in near-neutral solutions and Eh control. Batch experiments in both air and a controlled atmosphere (nitrogen, less than or equal to 0.2 ppM oxygen, less than or equal to 20 ppM carbon dioxide) for the sorption of several radionuclides on granite and argillite were completed. These data also provided informaton on the effects of other parameters, such as particle size and contact time. All nine elements studied had different sorption ratios for argillite when measured under the controlled atmosphere than when measured in air, except possibly for americium where any effect was smaller than the standard deviations. As expected, strontium, cesium, and barium are least affected by the presence or absence of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Columns of crushed rock and solid and cracked cores were used to study the migration of radionuclides through such materials. In general, sorption ratios measured by batch techniques are 2 to 3 times greater than those for columns; however, a wide variation in behavior was observed, depending upon the element and the mineralogy. Work has begun on a system wherein traced groundwater is circulated through a crushed rock column; this should provide a link between the usual, single-pass, crushed rock columns and the batch experiments. Materials characterization has continued, and techniques for the determination of Fe(II) in silicate rocks and groundwater have been made operational. Work on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has been started.

  1. Laboratory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2008-01-17

    This chapter summarizes the laboratory activities performed by PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project in support of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Program, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. The results of these studies are contained in numerous reports (Lindenmeier et al. 2002; Serne et al. 2002a, 2002b, 2002c, 2002d, 2002e; Lindenmeier et al. 2003; Serne et al. 2004a, 2004b; Brown et al. 2005, 2006a, 2007; Serne et al. 2007) and have generated much of the data reported in Chapter 22 (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), Appendix G (Geochemistry-Contaminant Movement), and Cantrell et al. (2007, SST WMA Geochemistry Data Package – in preparation). Sediment samples and characterization results from PNNL’s Vadose Zone Characterization Project are also shared with other science and technology (S&T) research projects, such as those summarized in Chapter 12 (Associated Science Activities).

  2. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  3. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenomena in pores and fractures: Phase 2. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    Pore level laboratory experiments using microscopy permit the in situ visualization of flow and transport phenomena, that can be recorded on film or videotape. One of the principal tools for visualization is the etched glass micromodel, which is composed of a transparent two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. The spatial scale of interest in these models extends from the individual pore, up to a network of pores, perhaps with small scale heterogeneities. Micromodels are best used to help validate concepts and assumptions, and to elucidate new, previously unrecognized phenomena for further study. They are not quantitative tools, but should be used in combination with quantitative tools such as column studies or mathematical models. There are three applications: multi-phase flow, colloid transport, and bacterial transport and colonization. Specifically the authors have examined behavior of relevance to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); mathematical models of multi-phase pressure-saturation relationships; colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces, clay interference with multi-phase flow; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow and colloid movement.

  4. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel, E-mail: jsavarino@lgge.obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LGGE, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ?1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  5. Gas release during salt-well pumping: Model predictions and laboratory validation studies for soluble and insoluble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid from the tanks into the surrounding soil. Salt-well pumping, or interim stabilization, is a well-established operation for removing drainable interstitial liquid from SSTs. The overall objective of this ongoing study is to develop a quantitative understanding of the release rates and cumulative releases of flammable gases from SSTs as a result of salt-well pumping. The current study is an extension of the previous work reported by Peurrung et al. (1996). The first objective of this current study was to conduct laboratory experiments to quantify the release of soluble and insoluble gases. The second was to determine experimentally the role of characteristic waste heterogeneities on the gas release rates. The third objective was to evaluate and validate the computer model STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases) used by Peurrung et al. (1996) to predict the release of both soluble (typically ammonia) and insoluble gases (typically hydrogen) during and after salt-well pumping. The fourth and final objective of the current study was to predict the gas release behavior for a range of typical tank conditions and actual tank geometry. In these models, the authors seek to include all the pertinent salt-well pumping operational parameters and a realistic range of physical properties of the SST wastes. For predicting actual tank behavior, two-dimensional (2-D) simulations were performed with a representative 2-D tank geometry.

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  7. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  8. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Pajarito Plateau topic of inaugural lecture at Los Alamos National Laboratory January 4, 2013 Lecture series begins yearlong commemoration of 70th anniversary LOS...

  9. EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    463 EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING by Keith A. Smith Marine Biolcgica! Labcratory Ul a R AR. McKernan, Director EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING by Keith A. Smith International;#12;EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING by Keith A. Smith Base Director, Exploratory Fishing Base Bureau

  10. Laboratory and field studies on the effects of salinity on survival and distribution of the hooked mussel Brachidontes recurvus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bains, Margaret Lewis

    1967-01-01

    during 1~th test period . . ~. . . . . . 10 Daily observation? ef eaeised gill tissue ?aposed te eaters vitb saliaity values rnllg in& f res 0 to 40' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o 5 1 Deaths (by keehs) and por Cent survival ia laboratory teste on eaall... aussels (5 te li a)-SO ausaels/salinity. . . . . . . . . SS Deaths (by veehs) sad per sent survival ia laberatory tmts oa aediua nussels (15 to 50 ~) 10 aussele/salinity. . . . . . . . . SS Deaths (by veehs) and per sent survival in laboratory tests...

  11. Freezing Fish and Shellfish. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Ranzell; Reddell, Annette

    1980-01-01

    for drainage. Why Wrap or Glaze? There are two reasons for wrapping or glazing a seafood product. One is to prevent oxidation (ran cidity) and the other is to prevent dehydration (freezer burn). Although fish is nutritious because of its high... under frozen storage longer than fish products. Most of the oxidation problem can be overcome by wrapping or glazing the product to keep the air out, and lowering the temperature as much as possible. Dehydration, or loss of moisture, can create a...

  12. BPA and Fish Passage Center study effects of changing total dissolved gas standards As renewable energy expands in the Northwest, BPA and its fellow operators of the Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transmission limits), powering down thermal generation and spilling water to keep the power grid in balance redispatch, a measure where as a last resort BPA would limit generation of wind power and replace with regional parties to avoid temporary imbalances in power supply and demand that could affect endangered fish

  13. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

  14. Acoustic scattering by axisymmertic finite-length bodies with application to fish : measurement and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeder, D. Benjamin (Davis Benjamin), 1966-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates the complexities of acoustic scattering by finite bodies in general and by fish in particular through the development of an advanced acoustic scattering model and detailed laboratory acoustic ...

  15. FISHWAY RESEARCH FISHERIES-ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES CIRCULAR 98 #12;Cover: Bonneville Dam. Reports and publications on laboratory research are listed. #12;FISHWAY RESEARCH AT THE FISHERIES on the Columbia River system where a long series of major dams interrupts the migration of several species

  16. Outreach and Education in the Life Sciences A Case Study of the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, Richard E.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2010-03-15

    This project was intended to assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) -sponsored education and outreach activities on the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) in DOE national laboratories. Key activities focused on a series of pilot education and outreach workshops conducted at ten national laboratories. These workshops were designed to increase awareness of the BWC, familiarize scientists with dual-use concerns related to biological research, and promote the concept of individual responsibility and accountability

  17. Santa Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Statistics Branch. Commercial fishing licenses and permitsSanta Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile, Julythe rate or level of fishing mortality that jeopardizes the

  18. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  19. Visgraf Laboratory IMPA Visgraf Laboratory IMPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    1 Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA CNMAC 99 CNMAC 99 jonas@impa.br @impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro www.visgraf.impa.br www.visgraf.impa.br Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf Laboratory ­ IMPA Visgraf

  20. Two orders of teleost fish, the Gymnotiformes from South America and the Mormyroidei in Africa, have independently

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Philip

    Two orders of teleost fish, the Gymnotiformes from South America and the Mormyroidei in Africa flowing through sensory electroreceptor organs in the fish's skin. Electric fish can locate and identify been made in studies of electric fish and the central neurophysiology of electrosensory systems

  1. Ames Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that advance knowl- edge and provide the foundation for American innovation. From unlocking atomic energy's electric vehicles, solar panels, and wind turbines, the National Labs have pushed the boundaries Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, West Virginia Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Albany, Oregon National

  2. Reporting survival results of fish passing through low-head turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matousek, J.A.; Wells, A.W.; Hecht, J.H. [Lawler, Matusky & Skelly Engineers, Pearl River, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Findings from investigations at four Michigan hydroelectric plants indicate low to moderate mortality rates among fish passing through turbines. A fish passage study recently completed at four hydroelectric facilities on the Muskkegon and Au Sable rivers found that over 83% of the fish survive turbine entrainment. This study provides answers to questions about entrainment mortality of resident cool water fish species in the Midwest passing through turbines of various configurations.

  3. Mercury Contamination in Pelagic Fishes of the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuklyte, Ligita

    2012-10-19

    accumulates from small benthic invertebrates to large pelagic fish, and therefore high end consumers and terminal predators have elevated Hg concentrations. The main pathway of MeHg exposure in humans is by consumption of contaminated fish. In this study total...

  4. FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center If all fields are not filled out, you do NOT have permission to fish! Name: ____________________________________________ Fishing Permit is valid for ONE YEAR. In return for this privilege, I agree to: 1. ABSOLVE the Eastern

  5. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) that is managed in conjunction with the University`s Institute of Ecology. The laboratory`s overall mission is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under an M&O contract with the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. Significant accomplishments were made during the year ending July 31, 1994 in the areas of research, education and service. Reviewed in this document are research projects in the following areas: Environmental Operations Support (impacted wetlands, streams, trace organics, radioecology, database synthesis, wild life studies, zooplankton, safety and quality assurance); wood stork foraging and breeding ecology; defence waste processing facility; environmental risk assessment (endangered species, fish, ash basin studies); ecosystem alteration by chemical pollutants; wetlands systems; biodiversity on the SRS; Environmental toxicology; environmental outreach and education; Par Pond drawdown studies in wildlife and fish and metals; theoretical ecology; DOE-SR National Environmental Research Park; wildlife studies. Summaries of educational programs and publications are also give.

  6. The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

    2013-02-28

    Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods—2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

  7. EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -1- EE 448 Preface 2/26/2007 Laboratory Introduction #12;EE 448 Laboratory Preface Laboratory Introduction -2- I. INTRODUCTION The electric machinery laboratory provides students with the opportunity to examine and experiment with different types

  8. Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory 12 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 12 State Feedback Controller for Position Control of a Flexible Link 12.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to design a full of the combined system (i.e., servomotor and flexible link) introduced in the Laboratory 9 (refer to [1

  9. Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory 10 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 10 State Feedback Controller for Position Control of a DC Servo 10.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to position the gears, we will use the state space model of the DC servo introduced in the laboratory 3 (refer to [1

  10. This is an earlier view of the accepted manuscript for the article "Fish fins as non-lethal surrogates for muscle tissues in freshwater food web studies using stable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    This is an earlier view of the accepted manuscript for the article "Fish fins as non- lethal is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rcm.6265/abstract. Fish fins as non-muscle relationships for 14 European freshwater fish species Nicolas Hette-Tronquart*a , Laurent Mazeasa , Liana

  11. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  12. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Fish robotics: understanding the diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Fish robotics: understanding and hydrodynamic studies of fish locomotor function, and the implications for construction of robotic models-swimming fishes have led to the development of a variety of self-propelling robotic models. Data from

  13. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Low-Back Pain in Textile Fishing Net Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Low-Back Pain in Textile Fishing Net Manufacturing, for a population of fishing net assembly workers. LBP is a serious problem in manual work with high prevalence and affects worker absenteeism. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted among textile fish net industrial

  14. Small Boat Fishing in Hawaii: A Random Utility Model of Ramp and Ocean Destinations1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Small Boat Fishing in Hawaii: A Random Utility Model of Ramp and Ocean Destinations1 Timothy C@arec.umd.edu Abstract: This paper investigates small boat fishing on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. We develop a model allows us to study spatial aspects of small boat fishing, including the benefits and costs of attributes

  15. Understanding fish behavior during typhoon events in real-life underwater environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Understanding fish behavior during typhoon events in real-life underwater environments Concetto · Fang-Pang Lin · Daniela Giordano · Lynda Hardman · Robert B. Fisher Abstract The study of fish inevitably influenced the behavior of the fish under observation. Recent projects involving the installation

  16. Irrigation Canals as Sink Habitat for Trout and Other Fishes in a Wyoming Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of mortality for fish in the Rocky Mountain region. Our study looked at how fish were affected by the irrigation canal system in the Smiths Fork, a tributary to the Bear River in western Wyoming. There are two speckled dace Rhinichthys osculus (29% of all fish) and mountain sucker Catostomus platyrhynchus (37

  17. Business Turnover in the Texas Charter Fishing Industry, 1975-85

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    addition to a more complete understanding of the Texas charter fishing industry, this paper presentsBusiness Turnover in the Texas Charter Fishing Industry, 1975-85 ROBERT B. DinaN and JEFFREY D. VIZE Introduction In a previous study of turnover in the Texas charter boat fishing industry be tween

  18. Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Mercury level in fish caught in Indian River Lagoon higher than it should be? Harbor Branch launches new study of humans who eat fish and live around the estuary By Scott Wyland Tuesday, May 22, 2012 INDIAN RIVER COUNTY -- A 20-year-old man fishes local waters every day for his meals and scoffs

  19. LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Handling of Dead Fish at Yates Mill Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Handling of Dead Fish at Yates Mill Facility If a study fish is found dead, preserve it and return it to the lab for DRILL recording. If you are going to DCL shortly after finding the fish: 1. Put it in a plastic bag and bring it to DCL. 2. Put

  20. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

  1. Mechanism of Biomagnification in Fish under Laboratory and Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobas, Frank

    , Ontario, Canada N9B 3P4 While biomagnification of certain organic contaminants in food chains has been, [Food-chain bioaccumulation is the process where chemical concentrations in organisms (on a lipid weight of contaminants in organisms at the top of food chains to be many times greater than those in organisms

  2. Efficiency of Fish Propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maertens, A P; Yue, D K P

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the system efficiency of a self-propelled flexible body is ill-defined unless one considers the concept of quasi-propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the power needed to tow a body in rigid-straight condition over the power it needs for self-propulsion, both measured for the same speed. Through examples we show that the quasi-propulsive efficiency is the only rational non-dimensional metric of the propulsive fitness of fish and fish-like mechanisms. Using two-dimensional viscous simulations and the concept of quasi-propulsive efficiency, we discuss the efficiency two-dimensional undulating foils. We show that low efficiencies, due to adverse body-propulsor hydrodynamic interactions, cannot be accounted for by the increase in friction drag.

  3. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

  4. Carbon nanotubes for hydrogen storage as being studied by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skolnik, E.G.

    1997-08-01

    On June 17--18, the author met with Dr. Mike Heben of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to discuss his research on the development of carbon nanotubes to be used for the storage of hydrogen on-board a vehicle. Dr. Heben has been working for the past several years on a project that will develop single walled nanotubes (SWNTs) composed of carbon for storage of hydrogen. Dr. Heben has spent much time trying to develop a method by which he could produce SWNTs in sufficient quantity, and then demonstrate the adsorption and desorption of hydrogen from these nanotubes at room temperature. While Dr. Heben was able to show hydrogen adsorption levels of up to 10% on a SWNT basis, generation of SWNTs from an arc-discharge was only about 0.05% of the total soot formation. Therefore, increasing SWNT concentration was a key consideration. Findings from the meeting with Dr. Heben are presented.

  5. Laboratory Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScience (SC) Directed ResearchLaboratory

  6. Donner Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector Full reportTown2008Donald Raby Donald_ -

  7. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish 47fish-hkturbineinteractionseprijacobs...

  8. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  9. Comparative Study of Laboratory-Scale and Prototypic Production-Scale Fuel Fabrication Processes and Product Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2014-10-01

    An objective of the High Temperature Gas Reactor fuel development and qualification program for the United States Department of Energy has been to qualify fuel fabricated in prototypic production-scale equipment. The quality and characteristics of the tristructural isotropic coatings on fuel kernels are influenced by the equipment scale and processing parameters. Some characteristics affecting product quality were suppressed while others have become more significant in the larger equipment. Changes to the composition and method of producing resinated graphite matrix material has eliminated the use of hazardous, flammable liquids and enabled it to be procured as a vendor-supplied feed stock. A new method of overcoating TRISO particles with the resinated graphite matrix eliminates the use of hazardous, flammable liquids, produces highly spherical particles with a narrow size distribution, and attains product yields in excess of 99%. Compact fabrication processes have been scaled-up and automated with relatively minor changes to compact quality to manual laboratory-scale processes. The impact on statistical variability of the processes and the products as equipment was scaled are discussed. The prototypic production-scale processes produce test fuels that meet fuel quality specifications.

  10. Support for the in situ vitrification treatability study at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: FY 1988 summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oma, K.H.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of this project is to determine if in situ vitrification (ISV) is a viable, long-term confinement technology for previously buried solid transuranic and mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The RWMC is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soils and wastes into a durable glass and crystalline form. During processing, heavy metals or other inorganic constituents are retained and immobilized in the glass structure, and organic constituents are typically destroyed or removed for capture by an off-gas treatment system. The primary FY 1988 activities included engineering-scale feasibility tests on INEL soils containing a high metals loading. Results of engineering-scale testing indicate that wastes with a high metals content can be successfully processed by ISV. The process successfully vitrified soils containing localized metal concentrations as high as 42 wt % without requiring special methods to prevent electrical shorting within the melt zone. Vitrification of this localized concentration resulted in a 15.9 wt % metals content in the entire ISV test block. This ISV metals limit is related to the quantity of metal that accumulates at the bottom of the molten glass zone. Intermediate pilot-scale testing is recommended to determine metals content scale-up parameters in order to project metals content limits for large-scale ISV operation at INEL.

  11. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Crescent City Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    Stevens Act Provisions; Fishing Capacity Reduction Program;CDFG. Crescent City Fishing Community Profile Leidersdorf,W. L. 1954. California Fishing Ports. Fish Bulletin 96.

  12. Volume 209 Number 1August 2005 Published by the Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajiura, Stephen

    Laboratory Woods Hole, Massachusetts #12;The Sexually Dimorphic Cephalofoil of Bonnethead Sharks, Sphyrna sexual dimorphism is also found in the cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes). Male bonnethead sharks of cephalic sexual dimorphism among the vertebrates. Vertebrate sexual dimorphisms are often expressed

  13. BPA Fish Accords

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudget BasicDeliveringOverview:defaultFish-Accords

  14. Tribology Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / TransformingTransuranic SolicitationTribology Laboratory

  15. Fish Passage: A New Tool to Investigate Fish Movement: JSATS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-04-20

    A new system is being used to determine fish mortality issues related to hydroelectric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. Called the juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system (JSATS), this tool allows researchers to better understand fish movement, behavior, and survival around dams and powerhouses.

  16. A Comparative Study on the Shear Behaviour of an Interlayer Material Based2 on Laboratory and In-situ Shear Tests3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ph. D candidate, State Key Laboratory of Geomechanics and Geotechnical Engineering,8 Institute.com10 11 2 Professor, State Key Laboratory of Geomechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, Institute of

  17. Indian Fishing Contrivances / A Female Crusoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Anonymous

    2008-01-01

    to my attention INDIAN FISHING CONTRIVANCES The abundance of1843, and the process of fishing he describes he saw on thatBluff a number of white men fishing with precisely the same

  18. Vietnam -- Bomb Crater Fish Ponds [Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campanella, Thomas J

    1995-01-01

    E T N A M Bomb Crater Fish Ponds Thomas J. Campanella One ofthe bomb craters into ponds for growing fish, a staple of

  19. Laboratory 11 Control Systems Laboratory ECE3557 Laboratory 11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Position Control of a Flexible Joint 11.1 Objective The objective of this laboratory is to design a full in this laboratory is illustrated. For this laboratory, the servo is used in the high gear ratio configuration (refer = 2.6 · Km: one of the motor torque constants. Km = 0.00767 · Kg: gear ratio of the motor

  20. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Flexibility and High Penetrations of Wind and Solar; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, Aaron; Townsend, Aaron; Palchak, David

    2015-07-29

    Balancing wind and solar in a model is relatively easy. All you need to do is assume a very large system with infinite flexibility! But what if you don't have an infinitely flexible system? What if there are thousands of generators nestled in a handful of regions that are unlikely to change their operational practices? Would you still have enough flexibility to balance hundreds of gigawatts of wind and solar at a 5 minute level? At NREL, we think we can, and our industry partners agree. This presentation was presented at the IEEE Power and Energy Society General Meeting by Aaron Bloom, highlighting results of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study.

  1. Russell, J. 1974. Floating nplants proposed off ____. 1969. Nuclear power-anadromous Stober, Q. J., and E. O. Salo. 1973. Ecological New Jersey. Nat!. Fisherman 55(6):6B-7B. fishes. Greater Portland Commer. 53(31) studies of the proposed Kiket Island nucl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, J. 1974. Floating n·plants proposed off ____. 1969. Nuclear power-anadromous Stober, Q. J Commer. 53(31) studies of the proposed Kiket Island nuclear Snyder, G. R. 1968. Thermal plants, thermal Aug.:22-27. power site. Final Rep. Contract Snohomish pollution, and fish-The problems in the Co Sport

  2. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas General Plasma Science Developing founda/ons and advancing fundamental understanding #12;The High Energy Density developing innovative techniques to study the properties of instabilities in magnetized-high-energy-density

  3. Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    than 98% for fish less than eight inches in length. This turbine will provide a more sustainable option for producing electricity at more than 1,000 estimated environmentally...

  4. Evolution of the Sensor Fish Device for Measuring Physical Conditions in Severe Hydraulic Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.

    2003-02-28

    To assist in deriving biological specifications for design of turbine rehabilitation measures, new ''fish-friendly'' turbines, and spillway designs and operations, scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed and tested an autonomous multi-sensor device called a Sensor Fish that can acquire pressure and tri-axial linear acceleration data during passage through severe hydraulic conditions. The purpose of the Sensor Fish is to characterize physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro turbines, spill stilling basins, high-discharge outfalls, and other dam passage routes. The Sensor Fish was developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine System program. Field tests of the Sensor Fish at Rock Island, McNary, The Dalles, Bonneville, and Wanapum dams on the Columbia River and the Prosser Irrigation District on the Yakima River have shown that the device can withstand the severe environments of turbine, spill, and fish bypass passage and provide useful environmental data that can ultimately aid in the design and operation of new and existing turbines, spill, and dam fish bypass facilities.

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor Is Not Rate-limiting for the Lipoprotein-lowering Action of Fish Oil*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    of Fish Oil* Received for publication, September 26, 2000 Published, JBC Papers in Press, October 24, 2000 polyunsaturated fatty acids contained in fish oil are activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR ). The goal of this study was to assess the contribution of PPAR in mediating the effect of fish

  7. MS#040418-01 1 Abstract--The fine scale swimming behavior of fish can now be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Stephen

    MS#040418-01 1 Abstract--The fine scale swimming behavior of fish can now be studied because evaluation of the performance of these tracking algorithms for the analysis of fine scale behavior of fish was performed using a data set of 100 fish track tracks recorded simultaneously with a multibeam sonar

  8. Smoking Fish at Home--Safely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    PNW238 Smoking Fish at Home--Safely A PACIFIC NORTHWEST EXTENSION PUBLICATION WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY · OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY · UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO Three common factors in all hot fish-smok- ing-smoked fish safely. It also recom- mends refrigerated storage for all smoked fish. Note that the process

  9. NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING #12;#12;NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING A REPORT ON THE FIRST NATIONWIDE ^ ^ -. -- ECONOMIC SURVEY OF SPORT FISHING | Q U U AND HUNTING IN THE UNITED STATES, I, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE John L. Farley, Director Circular 44 For sale by the Superintendent

  10. Native Fish Society Molalla, OR 97308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Native Fish Society PO Box 568 Molalla, OR 97308 Conserving biological diversity of native fish are the state, federal and tribal fish management agencies that have limited authority over habitat conditions in the basin. That authority resides with other agencies, but the fish management agencies can certainly

  11. SURVEY OF FISHING IN 1000 PONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURVEY OF FISHING IN 1000 PONDS in 1959 HUG ^^^ri^L UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Circular 86 #12;Cover. --Fishing in a pond, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Arnle J. Suomela, Coimnissioner BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE

  12. Annual Report Exploratory Fishing and Gear Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipbuilding Corporation, Pascagoula, Miss ., for the construction of a new exploratory fishing vessel

  13. SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Milton

    SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002 RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS IN CALIFORNIA DONNA M. SCHROEDER AND MILTON S. LOVE Marine@lifesci.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT We present and review information regarding recre- ational angling and exploited marine fish

  14. HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

  15. SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIPBOARD LABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM U.S. IMPLEMENTING ORGANIZATION AUGUST 2013 #12;IODP Shipboard Laboratory Safety: Introduction 2 CONTENTS Introduction ................................................................................................................................6 TAMU EHSD: Laboratory Safety Manual

  16. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory Oxford, Maryland #12;Chart of the Tred Avon River, showing the location of the BCF Biological Laboratory and the orientation of this area modern laboratories for chem- ical, histological, microbiological, and physiological re- search

  17. LABORATORY SAFETY October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    of the program are: 1) the adherence to appropriate design criteria when designing and constructing a laboratoryLABORATORY SAFETY PROGRAM October 2012 #12;OUTLINE 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND SCOPE ...................................................................................................................................6 4.0 LABORATORY DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, DECOMMISSIONING

  18. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  19. Laboratory Policy Methods of Analysis & Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Laboratory Policy Methods of Analysis & Quality Assurance The Cereal Quality Lab (CQL) uses quality data. The laboratory participates in collaborative studies organized by AACC, Wheat Quality by the laboratory is treated confidentially and will not be revealed to third parties without prior consent

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    associate director for Environmental Programs at the Laboratory. This is the fifth master task order agreement the Laboratory has issued in the past two years to support...

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  2. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    CA. 68-76. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Gotshall, D. W.G. 1969. The Commercial Fishing Industry in Humboldt County,13030/kt1g5001fm/. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Monroe,

  3. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

  4. Life History of California Sheephead: Historical Comparisons and Fishing Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caselle, Jennifer; Hamilton, Scott L; Lowe, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Historical Comparisons and Fishing Effects Jennifer Caselle,By contrast, commercial fishing targets smaller, solid-rednew regula- tions on commercial fishing have sharply reduced

  5. Fishing and Early Jomon Foodways at Sannai Maruyama, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katayama, Mio

    2011-01-01

    7. 2. Archaeological Fishing Technology …………………………….. 7. 2.7. 3. 1. 2. Fishing ……………………………………. 7. 3. 1. 3.7. 3. 2. 2 Fishing ……………………………………….. 7. 3. 2. 3

  6. Clinical, Laboratorial, and Urodynamic Findings of Prostatic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Urinary Retention Related to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. A Prospective Single-Center Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antunes, Alberto A.; Carnevale, Francisco C. Motta Leal Filho, Joaquim M. da; Yoshinaga, Eduardo M.; Cerri, Luciana M. O.; Baroni, Ronaldo H.; Marcelino, Antonio S. Z.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to describe the clinical, laboratorial, and urodynamic findings of prostatic artery embolization (PAE) in patients with urinary retention due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).MethodsA prospective study of 11 patients with urinary retention due to BPH was conducted. Patients underwent physical examination, prostate specific antigen (PSA) measurement, transrectal ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. International prostate symptom score (IPSS), quality of life (QoL), and urodynamic testing were used to assess the outcome before and after 1 year.ResultsClinical success was 91 % (10/11 patients) with a mean follow-up of 22.3 months (range, 12-41 months). At the first year follow-up, the mean IPSS score was 2.8 points (p = 0.04), mean QoL was 0.4 points (p = 0.001), mean PSA decreased from 10.1 to 4.3 ng/mL (p = 0.003), maximum urinary flow (Qmax) improved from 4.2 to 10.8 mL/sec (p = 0.009), and detrusor pressure (Pdet) decreased from 85.7 to 51.5 cm H{sub 2}O (p = 0.007). Before PAE, Bladder Outlet Obstruction Index (BOOI) showed values >40 in 100 % of patients. After PAE, 30 % of patients were >40 (obstructed), 40 % were between 20 and 40 (undetermined), and 30 % were <20 (unobstructed). Patients with a BOOI <20 had higher PSA values at 1-day after PAE.ConclusionsClinical and urodynamic parameters improved significantly after PAE in patients with acute urinary retention due to BPH. Total PSA at day 1 after PAE was higher in patients with unobstructed values in pressure flow studies.

  7. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2013 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  8. LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS Most of the laboratory problems so far have was constant. In this set of laboratory problems, the total force acting on an object, and thus its's oscillation frequency. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to

  9. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  10. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2008 University of Colorado at Boulder, Jet Propulsion Laboratory) LASP: A Brief History In 1946-47, a handful of American universities joined Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper

  11. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    1 Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2010 University of Colorado from the Na- val Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  12. LABORATORY IV CIRCULAR MOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CIRCULAR MOTION The problems in this laboratory will help you investigate. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Determine Laboratories I, II, and III. Before coming to the lab you should be able to: · Determine an object

  13. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  14. Concentrations of radionuclides in fish collected from Bikini Atoll between 1977 and 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.A.

    1986-07-01

    This report summarizes all available data on the concentrations of radionuclides in fish from Bikini Atoll between 1977 and 1984. As found in other global studies, /sup 137/Cs is most highly accumulated in edible flesh of all species of fish, the lowest fractions are found in the bone or liver. The mean concentration of /sup 137/Cs in muscle of reef fish from the southern part of the atoll is comparable to the global fallout concentration measured in market samples of fish collected from Chicago, Illinois, in 1982. /sup 90/Sr is generally associated with non-edible parts of fish, such as bone or viscera. Twenty-five to fifty percent of the total body burden of /sup 60/Co is accumulated in the muscle tissue; the remainder is distributed among the liver, skin, and viscera. The mean concentration of /sup 60/Co in fish has been decreasing at a rate faster than radiological decay alone. Most striking is the range of /sup 207/Bi concentrations among different species of fish collected at the same time and place. Highest concentrations of /sup 207/Bi were consistently detected in the muscle (and other tissues) of goatfish and some of the pelagic lagoon fish. In other reef fish, such as mullet, surgeonfish, and parrotfish, /sup 207/Bi was usually below detection limits by gamma spectrometry. Over 70% of the whole-body activity of /sup 207/Bi in goatfish is associated with the muscle tissue, whereas less than 5% is found in the muscle of mullet and surgeonfish. Neither /sup 239 +240/Pu nor /sup 241/Am is significantly accumulated in the muscle tissue of any species of fish. Apparently, /sup 238/Pu is in a more readily available form for accumulation by fishes than /sup 239 +240/Pu. Based on a daily ingestion rate of 200 q of fish flesh, dose rates to individuals through the fish-food ingestion pathway are well below current Federal guidelines.

  15. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the treatability study of in situ vitrification of Seepage Pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) establishes the quality assurance procedures and requirements to be implemented for the control of quality-related activities for Phase 3 of the Treatability Study (TS) of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) of Seepage Pit 1, ORNL Waste Area Grouping 7. This QAPjP supplements the Quality Assurance Plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program by providing information specific to the ISV-TS. Phase 3 of the TS involves the actual ISV melt operations and posttest monitoring of Pit 1 and vicinity. Previously, Phase 1 activities were completed, which involved determining the boundaries of Pit 1, using driven rods and pipes and mapping the distribution of radioactivity using logging tools within the pipes. Phase 2 involved sampling the contents, both liquid and solids, in and around seepage Pit 1 to determine their chemical and radionuclide composition and the spatial distribution of these attributes. A separate QAPjP was developed for each phase of the project. A readiness review of the Phase 3 activities presented QAPjP will be conducted prior to initiating field activities, and an Operational Acceptance, Test (OAT) will also be conducted with no contamination involved. After, the OAT is complete, the ISV process will be restarted, and the melt will be allowed to increase with depth and incorporate the radionuclide contamination at the bottom of Pit 1. Upon completion of melt 1, the equipment will be shut down and mobilized to an adjacent location at which melt 2 will commence.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Electromagnetics: Main Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORIES Electromagnetics (EM) is the study of the nature and interaction of static and dynamic electric and magnetic fields. Telecommunications, navigational guidance,...

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Grounds Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-05

    FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #4 and #5: Case study overview of the grounds maintenance program for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  18. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    Stevens Act Provisions; Fishing Capacity Reduction Program;Industry Fee System for Fishing Capacity Reduction Loan.Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile Ralston, S. 2002.

  19. Separating environmental effects from fishing impacts on the dynamics of fish populations of the Southern California region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Chih-hao

    2006-01-01

    101 Chapter 4. Climatic and fishing effects on shifts in51 Chapter 3. Fishing elevates variability in the abundancelong-term evidence that fishing magnifies uncertainty in a

  20. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry Laboratory provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs. AnalyticalChemistryLaboratoryfactsheet...

  1. A Review on Fish Swimming and Bird/Insect Flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore Yaotsu Wu

    2010-07-29

    This expository review is devoted to fish swimming and bird/insect flight. (i) The simple waving motion of an elongated flexible ribbon plate of constant width, immersed in a fluid at rest, propagating a wave distally down the plate to swim forward is first considered to provide a fundamental concept on energy conservation. It is generalized to include variations in body width and thickness, vortex shedding from appended dorsal, ventral and caudal fins to closely simulate fish swimming for which a nonlinear theory is presented for large-amplitude propulsion. (ii) For bird flight, the pioneering studies on oscillating rigid wings are briefed, followed by presenting a nonlinear unsteady theory for flexible wing with arbitrary variations in shape and trajectory with a comparative study with experiments. (iii) For insect flight, more recent advances are reviewed under aerodynamic theory and modeling, computational methods, and experiments, on forward and hovering flights with producing leading-edge vortex to give unsteady high lift. (iv) Prospects are explored on extracting intrinsic flow energy by fish and bird to gain thrust for propulsion. (v) The mechanical and biological principles are drawn together for unified studies on the energetics in deriving metabolic power for animal locomotion, leading to a surprising discovery that the hydrodynamic viscous drag on swimming fish is largely associated with laminar boundary layers, thus drawing valid and sound evidences for a resolution to the fish-swim paradox proclaimed by Gray (1936, 1968).

  2. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site in Support of the Underground Test Area and Hydrologic Resources Management Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.L.Finnegan; J.L.Thompson

    2002-06-01

    This report details the work of Chemistry Division personnel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in FY 2001 for the U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) under its Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration divisions. Los Alamos is one of a number of agencies collaborating in an effort to describe the present and future movement of radionuclides in the underground environment of the Nevada Test Site. This fiscal year we collected and analyzed water samples from a number of expended test locations at the Nevada Test Site. We give the results of these analyses and summarize the information gained over the quarter century that we have been studying several of these sites. We find that by far most of the radioactive residues from a nuclear test are contained in the melt glass in the cavity. Those radionuclides that are mobile in water can be transported if the groundwater is moving due to hydraulic or thermal gradients. The extent to which they move is a function of their chemical speciation, with neutral or anionic materials traveling freely relative to cationic materials that tend to sorb on rock surfaces. However, radionuclides sorbed on colloids may be transported if the colloids are moving. Local conditions strongly influence the distribution and movement of radionuclides, and we continue to study sites such as Almendro, which is thermally quite hot, and Nash and Bourbon, where radionuclides had not been measured for 8 years. We collected samples from three characterization wells in Frenchman Flat to obtain baseline radiochemistry data for each well, and we analyzed eight wells containing radioactivity for {sup 237}Np, using our highly sensitive ICP/MS. We have again used our field probe that allows us to measure important groundwater properties in situ. We conclude our report by noting document reviews and publications produced in support of this program.

  3. Seismic Absorption and Modulus Measurements in Porous Rocks Under Fluid and Gas Flow-Physical and Chemical Effects: a Laboratory Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmut Spetzler

    2005-11-28

    This paper describes the culmination of a research project in which we investigated the complex modulus change in partially fluid saturated porous rocks. The investigation started with simple flow experiments over ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' surfaces, progressed to moduli measurements on partially filled single cracks, to measurements in ''clean'' and ''contaminated'' porous rocks and finally to a feasibility study in the field. For the experiments with the simple geometries we were able to measure fundamental physical properties such as contact angles of the meniscus and time dependent forces required to get the meniscus moving and to keep it moving at various velocities. From the data thus gathered we were able to interpret the complex elastic moduli data we measured in the partially saturated single cracks. While the geometry in real rocks is too complex to make precise calculations we determined that we had indeed identified the mechanisms responsible for the changes in the moduli we had measured. Thus encouraged by the laboratory studies we embarked on a field experiment in the desert of Arizona. The field site allowed for controlled irrigation. Instrumentation for fluid sampling and water penetration were already in place. The porous loosely consolidated rocks at the site were not ideal for finding the effects of the attenuation mechanism we had identified in the lab, but for logistic and cost constraint reasons we chose to field test the idea at that site. Tiltmeters and seismometers were installed and operated nearly continuously for almost 3 years. The field was irrigated with water in the fall of 2003 and with water containing a biosurfactant in the fall of 2004. We have indications that the biosurfactant irrigation has had a notable effect on the tilt data.

  4. The Smithsonian Marine Station welcomes research scientists who wish to conduct studies at the Marine Station on a space-available basis. The following is a list of fees for laboratory space and use of Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    The Smithsonian Marine Station welcomes research scientists who wish to conduct studies at the Marine Station on a space-available basis. The following is a list of fees for laboratory space and use of Station equipment. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce Fees for 2014 Tyson House lodging

  5. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  6. Sensing bending in a compliant biomimetic fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaczmarek, Adam S

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines the problem of sensing motion in a compliant biomimetic device. Specifically, it will examine the motion of a tail in a biomimetic fish. To date, the fish has been an open-loop system, the motion of ...

  7. A chrestomathy Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avise, John

    A chrestomathy on fishes Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia of Ichthyology, Ecology and Evolution- izing biological thinking (in The Origin of Species and The Descent of Man) and marine geology (in

  8. MFR PAPER 1230 Finding Fish With Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors, fishing vessels , spotter pilots, research vessels, and offshore oil platforms were used Investigation? A. It is an attempt to find out if satellites can help fishermen find fish. Our assumption

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH Jindong Liu, Ian Dukes CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom Email: {jliua, idukes, rrknig, hhu}@essex.ac.uk Keywords: Robotic fish the fish movement into several basic behaviours, namely straight cruise, cruise in turn and sharp turn

  10. A Methodology of Modelling Fish-like Swim Patterns for Robotic Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    A Methodology of Modelling Fish-like Swim Patterns for Robotic Fish Jindong Liu and Huosheng Hu@essex.ac.uk Abstract-- This paper presents a novel modelling methodology for our robotic fish, which considers the relative movement of the tail to the head in order to model variable swimming patterns for robotic fish

  11. u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish hrough Navigation Locks and Use OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Circular 352 #12;Cover Photograph.- Brailing fish from haul seine into live car. #12;UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Walter J. Hickel

  12. Publications for Alexander Fish Bulinski, K., Fish, A. (2015). Plunnecke inequalities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Publications for Alexander Fish 2015 Bulinski, K., Fish, A. (2015). Plunnecke inequalities="http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/etds.2015.51">[More Information] Bjorklund, M., Fish, A. (2015). Plünnecke inequalities print. [More Information] Bjorklund, M., Fish

  13. Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation a specific stock-effort dynamic model. The stock corresponds to two fish populations growing and moving between two fishing zones, on which they are harvested by two different fleets. The effort represents

  14. The Fish Barcode of Life (FISH-BOL) special issue ROBERT HANNER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    EDITORIAL The Fish Barcode of Life (FISH-BOL) special issue ROBERT HANNER1 , ROB DESALLE2 , ROBERT, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia The fascinating diversity of fishes coupled with their broad socio and distribution of many, if not most species of fish. Climate change is likely to exacerbate these effects

  15. To appear in Proc. 2012 ICRA Putting the Fish in the Fish Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    To appear in Proc. 2012 ICRA Putting the Fish in the Fish Tank: Immersive VR for Animal Behavior-reality framework for inves- tigating startle-response behavior in fish. Using real-time three- dimensional tracking of the looming stimuli change according to the fish's perspective and location in the tank. We demonstrate

  16. MODELING OF THE FREEZING PROCESS FOR FISH IN VERTICAL PLATE FREEZERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    MODELING OF THE FREEZING PROCESS FOR FISH IN VERTICAL PLATE FREEZERS Christoph Backi, Jan Tommy at the freezing system on board. Aims of this study: Find a model to estimate the temperature distribution in a fish block during freezing in vertical platefreezers. For a known temperature distribution the energy

  17. EFFECTS OF SWIMMING PATH CURVATURE ON THE ENERGETICS OF FISH MOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) R R f w (2) #12;along with the fish. The hydrodynamic drag can be written as (Hoerner 1965) where e studies ofrespiration and energetics in fish measure the aerobic oxygen consumption of the test animals as an indication of energy consump- tion. To obtain the correctio

  18. Does proximity to coal-fired power plants influence fish tissue mercury?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does proximity to coal-fired power plants influence fish tissue mercury? Dana K. Sackett · D. Derek+Business Media, LLC 2010 Abstract Much of the mercury contamination in aquatic biota originates from coal of contaminated fish. In this study, we quantified the relative importance of proximity to coal-fired power plants

  19. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

  20. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  1. Fish Population and Behavior Revealed by Instantaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish Population and Behavior Revealed by Instantaneous Continental Shelf­Scale Imaging Nicholas C-transect methods from slow-moving research vessels. These methods significantly undersample fish populations in time and space, leaving an incomplete and ambiguous record of abundance and behavior. We show that fish

  2. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish *preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:07 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section D. 7 Title: Resident Fish Mitigation (pg 22-23) Overview Generally, entities recommend that the existing language

  3. Fish Cognition and Consciousness Colin Allen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Fish Cognition and Consciousness Colin Allen colallen@indiana.edu phone: +1-812-855-3622 fax: +1, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA Abstract Questions about fish consciousness and cognition are receiving increasing this hugely diverse set of species. Keywords Fish, learning, cognition, consciousness Submitted to J

  4. Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have resisted, preferring freshwater fish (i.e., carp and trout) to unfamiliar marine species. Poland and especially fuel costs will continue to rise. Poland hopes to increase fish supplies for the domestic market to sell privately as the government retail price for fish is heavily subsidized and has not been increased

  5. Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes Xiaoyuan Tu Demetri Terzopoulos Department worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrody­ namically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit

  6. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos the approach, we develop a physics­based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their vir­ tual habitat are not entirely predictable

  7. COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Derek S.

    COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend Department/Number: NONC F040 F01 Credits: 0 to the art and science of fly casting, fishing and tying. Students will learn how use a fly rod to place a fly with pinpoint accuracy, tie fishing knots and construct their own leaders, and, most importantly

  8. The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa + 0 ) 2 6 - 4 9 Jacky J. Cosson I. INTRODUCTION Spermatozoa are unique among cells generated by the metazoans and are haploid unicells. Fish sperm is released with extremely harmful conditions (fresh water, sea or brackish water) in the case for many fish species (Huxley

  9. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  10. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  11. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impacts of hydropower dams on fish and wildlife. It also helps direct more than $250 million each year habitats in tributaries that have been damaged by development. A broad range of entities propose projects issues, as well as an independent panel of economists to provide guidance on questions of cost

  12. Publications Fish Disease Diagnosis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications Fish Disease Diagnosis and Basic Fishery Computer Programs The second edition of "Disease Diagnosis and Control in North American Marine Aquaculture," edited by Carl J. Sindermann edition should be a big help to aquaculturists and others involved in the detection, prevention

  13. Biomechanics Volumetric imaging of fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    Biomechanics Volumetric imaging of fish locomotion Brooke E. Flammang1,*, George V. Lauder1, Daniel stability in a complex fluid environ- ment. We used a new approach, a volumetric velocimetry imaging system into the caudal fin vortex wake. These results show that volumetric imaging of biologi- cally generated flow

  14. One Fish, Two Fish, Small Fish, Huge Fish: Utilizing Zebrafish as a Model for Studying Mitochondrial Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Meghan Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    small Tims share a common twin CX 3 C motif; and import ofcytochrome c oxidase complex, contain twin CX 9 C motifs;similar to the CX 3 C motifs of the small Tims. (103,104)

  15. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  16. Reaction Diffusion patterns in Pseudoplatystoma fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldo Ledesma-Durán; Héctor Juárez-Valencia; Iván Santamaría-Holek

    2016-01-05

    This paper studies how patterns derived from a system of reaction-diffusion equations may vary significantly depending upon boundary and initial conditions, as well as in the spatial dependence of the coefficients involved. From an extensive numerical study of the BVAM model, we demonstrate that the geometric pattern of a reaction-diffusion system is not uniquely determined by the value of the parameters in the equation. From this result, we suggest that the variability of patterns among individuals of the same species may have its roots in this sensitivity. Furthermore, this study analyzes briefly how the inclusion of the advection and the space dependency in the parameters of the model influences the forms of a specific pattern. The results of this study are compared to the skin patterns that appear in Pseudoplatystom} fishes.

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451 Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 GPS: 100 Stellarator Road Princeton, NJ 08540 www.pppl.gov 2015 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. A...

  18. Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord­ ing to Newton's laws's method to integrate. ffl Accumulate the mean­square­velocity of all the fish 2 6 4 #fish X i=1 velocity 2 i #fish 3 7 5 1=2 and plot it as a function of time. ffl Choose the time step dt in the integrator

  19. A comprehensive laboratory study on the immersion freezing behavior of illite NX particles: a comparison of 17 ice nucleation measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Bingemer, Heinz; Budke, Carsten; Curtius, J.; Danielczok, Anja; Diehl, K.; Dreischmeier, Katharina; Ebert, Martin; Frank, F.; Hoffmann, Nadine; Kandler, Kondrad; Kiselev, Alexei; Koop, Thomas; Leisner, Thomas; Mohler, Ottmar; Nillius, Bjorn; Peckhaus, Andreas; Rose, Diana; Weinbruch, Stephan; Wex, Heike; Boose, Yvonne; DeMott, Paul J.; Hader, John D.; Hill, Thomas; Kanji, Zamin; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Levin, Ezra; McCluskey, Christina; Murakami, Masataka; Murray, Benjamin J.; Niedermeier, Dennis; Petters, Markus D.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Saito, Atsushi; Schill, Gregory; Tajiri, Takuya; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Welti, Andre; Whale, Thomas; Wright, Timothy; Yamashita, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Immersion freezing is the most relevant heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism 3 through which ice crystals are formed in mixed-phase clouds. In recent years, an increasing 4 number of laboratory experiments utilizing a variety of instruments have examined immersion 5 freezing activity of atmospherically relevant ice nucleating particles (INPs). However, an 6 inter-comparison of these laboratory results is a difficult task because investigators have used 7 different ice nucleation (IN) measurement methods to produce these results. A remaining 8 challenge is to explore the sensitivity and accuracy of these techniques and to understand how 9 the IN results are potentially influenced or biased by experimental parameters associated with 10 these techniques. 11 Within the framework of INUIT (Ice Nucleation research UnIT), we distributed an 12 illite rich sample (illite NX) as a representative surrogate for atmospheric mineral dust 13 particles to investigators to perform immersion freezing experiments using different IN 14 measurement methods and to obtain IN data as a function of particle concentration, 15 temperature (T), cooling rate and nucleation time. Seventeen measurement methods were 16 involved in the data inter-comparison. Experiments with seven instruments started with the 17 test sample pre-suspended in water before cooling, while ten other instruments employed 18 water vapor condensation onto dry-dispersed particles followed by immersion freezing. The 19 resulting comprehensive immersion freezing dataset was evaluated using the ice nucleation 20 active surface-site density (ns) to develop a representative ns(T) spectrum that spans a wide 21 temperature range (-37 °C < T < -11 °C) and covers nine orders of magnitude in ns. 22 Our inter-comparison results revealed a discrepancy between suspension and dry-23 dispersed particle measurements for this mineral dust. While the agreement was good below ~-24 26 °C, the ice nucleation activity, expressed in ns, was smaller for the wet suspended samples 25 and higher for the dry-dispersed aerosol samples between about -26 and -18 °C. Only 26 instruments making measurement techniques with wet suspended samples were able to 27 measure ice nucleation above -18 °C. A possible explanation for the deviation between -26 28 and -18 °C is discussed. In general, the seventeen immersion freezing measurement 29 techniques deviate, within the range of about 7 °C in terms of temperature, by three orders of 30 magnitude with respect to ns. In addition, we show evidence that the immersion freezing 31 efficiency (i.e., ns) of illite NX particles is relatively independent on droplet size, particle 32 mass in suspension, particle size and cooling rate during freezing. A strong temperature-33 2 dependence and weak time- and size-dependence of immersion freezing efficiency of illite-34 rich clay mineral particles enabled the ns parameterization solely as a function of temperature. 35 We also characterized the ns(T) spectra, and identified a section with a steep slope between -36 20 °C and -27 °C, where a large fraction of active sites of our test dust may trigger immersion 37 freezing. This slope was followed by a region with a gentler slope at temperatures below -27 38 °C. A multiple exponential distribution fit is expressed as ns(T) = exp(23.82 × exp(-exp(0.16 × 39 (T + 17.49))) + 1.39) based on the specific surface area and ns(T) = exp(25.75 × exp(-exp(0.13 40 × (T + 17.17))) + 3.34) based on the geometric area (ns and T in m-2 and °C, respectively). 41 These new fits, constrained by using an identical reference samples, will help to compare IN 42 measurement methods that are not included in the present study and, thereby, IN data from 43 future IN instruments.

  20. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focused, interdisciplinary research effort to better understand human disease at the cellular level," said Laboratory Director Michael Anastasio. "Integrating measurements,...

  2. LABORATORY II DESCRIPTION OF MOTION IN TWO DIMENSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II DESCRIPTION OF MOTION IN TWO DIMENSIONS In this laboratory you continue the study of accelerated motion in more situations. The carts you used in Laboratory I moved in only one instructor. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to: · Determine

  3. LABORATORY II DESCRIPTION OF MOTION IN TWO DIMENSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II DESCRIPTION OF MOTION IN TWO DIMENSIONS In this laboratory you continue the study of accelerated motion in more situations. The carts you used in Laboratory I moved in only one or your instructor. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to

  4. LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab VI - 1 LABORATORY VI ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS So far this semester, you have been asked to think kinematics. OBJECTIVES: Successfully completing this laboratory should enable you to: · Use linear kinematics in a laboratory on earth, before launching the satellite. EQUIPMENT You will use an apparatus that spins

  5. Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Koren

    1 TENS Text Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory University of Wollongong TENS Text and delivering the text data to the user by electrically stimulating the fingers. Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong #12;2 The TENS Unit Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong

  6. OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OXFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTING LABORATORY The Expressive Power of Binary Submodular Functions Stanislav Zivn´y, David Cohen, Peter Jeavons Computing Laboratory, University of Oxford Rutgers, 22 January LABORATORY Problem Which submodular polynomials can be expressed by (or decomposed into) quadratic submodular

  7. Division of Laboratory Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;Division of Laboratory Sciences U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Division of Laboratory Sciences Atlanta, Georgia 30341 at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Division of Laboratory Sciences have lots

  8. LABORATORY IV OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY IV OSCILLATIONS Lab IV ­ 1 You are familiar with many objects that oscillate this laboratory, you should be able to: · Provide a qualitative explanation of the behavior of oscillating systems some of these laboratory problems before your lecturer addresses this material. It is very important

  9. A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healey, Christopher G.

    A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume: (1) head-mounted display (HMD); (2) fish tank VR (fish tank); and (3) fish tank VR augmented its structure. Fish tank and haptic participants saw the entire volume on-screen and rotated

  10. LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY NEW HIRE NOTICE: LABORATORY DELAYED OPENING OR CLOSURE DUE TO INCLEAMENT WEATHER During the winter months, the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may at times...

  11. SUMMARY of the WALLA WALLA DISTRICT VE STUDIES on the COLUMBIA RIVER FISH MITIGATION PROGRAM Data from Walla Walla District VE Team Study Reports and ENG Forms 4607-R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data from Walla Walla District VE Team Study Reports and ENG Forms 4607-R Actual Project CENWW Status of Participants in the study Days to Cost for only Net Project Actual Bid $ VE ID # Description of the Study

  12. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1953-1970: Description of individual studies, data files, codes, and summaries of significant findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grahn, D.; Fox, C.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.

    1994-05-01

    Between 1953 and 1970, studies on the long-term effects of external x-ray and {gamma} irradiation on inbred and hybrid mouse stocks were carried out at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory. The results of these studies, plus the mating, litter, and pre-experimental stock records, were routinely coded on IBM cards for statistical analysis and record maintenance. Also retained were the survival data from studies performed in the period 1943-1953 at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. The card-image data files have been corrected where necessary and refiled on hard disks for long-term storage and ease of accessibility. In this report, the individual studies and data files are described, and pertinent factors regarding caging, husbandry, radiation procedures, choice of animals, and other logistical details are summarized. Some of the findings are also presented. Descriptions of the different mouse stocks and hybrids are included in an appendix; more than three dozen stocks were involved in these studies. Two other appendices detail the data files in their original card-image format and the numerical codes used to describe the animal`s exit from an experiment and, for some studies, any associated pathologic findings. Tabular summaries of sample sizes, dose levels, and other variables are also given to assist investigators in their selection of data for analysis. The archive is open to any investigator with legitimate interests and a willingness to collaborate and acknowledge the source of the data and to recognize appropriate conditions or caveats.

  13. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  14. C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of Swimming Performance in Fishes: Predicting Evolution with Biomechanics R. Brian Langerhans1, * and David N. Reznick2 NT NINTRODUCTIONTN NINTRODUCTION Residing within the immense diversity of fishes

  15. Going green earns Laboratory gold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Going green earns Laboratory gold Going green earns Laboratory gold The Laboratory's newest facility is its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

  16. ECSI 322 Oceanography Laboratory -Manual 1 ESCI 322 -Oceanography Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, David H.

    ECSI 322 ­ Oceanography Laboratory - Manual 1 ESCI 322 - Oceanography Laboratory Laboratory Manual ­ Oceanography Laboratory - Manual 2 ESCI 322 - Introduction to Oceanography Laboratory Course Syllabus- 78-79 C+ 73-77 C 69-72C- 67-68 D+ 61-66 D 57-60 D- 0-56 F #12;ECSI 322 ­ Oceanography Laboratory

  17. Laboratory and numerical investigation of transport processes occurring above and within a saltwater wedge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Laboratory and numerical investigation of transport processes occurring above and within knowledge, so far no one has completed laboratory experiments to study contaminant transport processes occurring within a saltwater wedge. In this study, we completed laboratory experiments to understand

  18. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1977 October 1977 Eugene J Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104. #12;NOTICE The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories do not approve, recommend

  19. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1978 October 1978 Eugene J of Research and Development Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 #12;NOTICE The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories

  20. Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2B Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  1. AEROSPACE LABORATORY GENERAL INFORMATION MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    AEROSPACE LABORATORY GENERAL INFORMATION MANUAL 1. Introduction 2. Laboratory Format 3. Recommended Guidelines for Experiment Reports 4. Laboratory Notebooks 5. Report Marking Procedures 6. Course Mark compared to the systems you will find in the Undergraduate Laboratory. Typically, experimental setups

  2. Chemistry 2A Laboratory Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2A Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  3. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory AOML is an environmental research laboratory Laboratory conducts research that seeks to understand the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics;Organizational Structure The Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) fits within

  4. Chemistry 2C Laboratory Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Ting

    Chemistry 2C Laboratory Manual Standard Operating Procedures Department of Chemistry University # ____________ Laboratory Information Teaching Assistant's Name _______________________ Laboratory Section Number _______________________ Laboratory Room Number _______________________ Dispensary Room Number 1060 Sciences Lab Building Location

  5. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Dynan, William S.

    2014-11-06

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference ?-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of ?-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.

  6. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Xuan; Zhang, Xinyan; Ding, Lingling; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Dynan, William S.

    2014-11-06

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZEmore »particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference ?-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of ?-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.« less

  7. Fishing in Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Brotas

    2006-09-01

    The coordinate system $(\\bar{x},\\bar{t})$ defined by $r = 2m + K\\bar{x}- c K \\bar{t}$ and $t=\\bar{x}/cK - 1 /cK \\int_{r_a}^r (1- 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2} (1 - 2m/r)^{-1}dr$ allow us to write the Schwarzschild metric in the form: \\[ds^2=c^2 d\\bar{t}^2 + (W^2/K^2 - 2W/K) d\\bar{x}^2 + 2c (1 + W/K) d\\bar{x}d\\bar{t} - r^2 (d\\theta^2 + cos^2\\theta d\\phi^2)\\] with $W=(1 - 2m/r + K^2)^{1/2}$, in which the coefficients' pathologies are moved to $r_K = 2m/(1+K^2)$. This new coordinate system is used to study the entrance into a black hole of a rigid line (a line in which the shock waves propagate with velocity c).

  8. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at commercially important species of shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico through four research programs: (1) Shrimp on the fishing grounds by biologists provide information on migration, growth, and mortality when recaptured on Gulf of Mexico shrimp shrimp crops; develop methods for rearino shrimp com- mercially; understand

  9. Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Bureau was first known as the United States Fish Commission and functioned as an independent agency from on the first floor, an extensive library, a conference room, and adminis- trative offices. A second buildingUshed the first aquarium at Woods Hole to acquaint the general public with the aims and achievements of Federal

  10. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2013-02-01

    This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    guy" and "a very hard worker." Fanelli began his college education in his native Argentina. By 2005, he was stationed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory...

  12. morhaley | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    morhaley Ames Laboratory Profile Haley Morris Office Assistant-X Human Resources Office Environmental, Safety, Health, and Assuarance 105 TASF Phone Number: 515-294-2153 Email...

  13. mmorris | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mmorris Ames Laboratory Profile Max Morris Associate Environmental & Protective Sciences 304A Snedecor Phone Number: 515-294-2775 Email Address: mmorris...

  14. National Laboratory Geothermal Publications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You can find publications, including technical papers and reports, about geothermal technologies, research, and development at the following U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Laboratory's Environmental Programs directorate and includes work such as environmental engineering design, regulatory support, risk assessment and reporting. - 2 -...

  16. shrotriy | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shrotriy Ames Laboratory Profile Pranav Shrotriya Associate Environmental & Protective Sciences 2026 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-9719 Email Address: shrotriy...

  17. olafsson | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    olafsson Ames Laboratory Profile Sigurdur Olafsson Associate Environmental & Protective Sciences 3004 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-8908 Email Address: olafsson...

  18. matheneyl | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matheneyl Ames Laboratory Profile Lindsey Matheney Associate Environmental & Protective Sciences 1095 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-2069 Email Address: matheneyl...

  19. nastaran | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nastaran Ames Laboratory Profile Nastaran Hashemi Associate Environmental & Protective Sciences 2028 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-2877 Email Address: nastaran...

  20. bkl | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bkl Ames Laboratory Profile Barbara Lograsso Associate Environmental & Protective Sciences 2064 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-0380 Email Address: bklogras@iastate.edu...

  1. paytong | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    paytong Ames Laboratory Profile Payton Goodrich Associate Environmental & Protective Sciences 1095 Black Engineering Phone Number: 515-294-2069 Email Address: paytong...

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's weapon-physicist Greg Spriggs, leader of the Film Scanning and Reanalysis Project, the work has become a search-and-rescue mission. He...

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2015 Projects save taxpayer dollars, promote environmental stewardship, sustainability LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2015-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 32...

  4. Northwest National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    senior author and Laboratory Fellow. The feat is the bacterial equivalent of removing lungs and coaxing the disembodied tissue to breathe. Bio-cells use enzymes to oxidize...

  5. National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

  6. marit | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Honors & Awards: AAAS Fellow, 2007 Regents Award for Faculty Excellence, 2003 Inventor Incentive Award, Ames Laboratory, 2002 Iowa Regents Faculty Citation Award, 2000...

  7. Foreign Fishery Developments The Norwegian Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EEC fisheries agreement, which prevented Norwegian purse seiners from fishing North Sea brisling during the peak,200 t of meal (up 0.6 percent) and 164,600 t of oil (down 9.1 per- cent). Arctic Cod Quotas Quotas for Arctic.3 Fish oil 79,400 180.5 107,300 241.4 Cod liver oil 12,700 63.1 10,900 51.3 Canned fish 14,100 233.8 15

  8. Handling Whiting Aboard Fishing Vessels JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handling Whiting Aboard Fishing Vessels JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO Introduction The same fundamental principles for handling fresh fish in general aboard fishing vessels apply to whiting. There- fore, this article will review the factors which influence the quality of fish aboard fishing boats and will offer re

  9. Salmon fishing boats of the North American Pacific Coast in the era of oar and sail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Charles David

    1993-01-01

    for small craft identification by archaeologists working on the Pacific Coast. The information gained from studying various salmon fishing boats and their distribution reflects changing hull shape due to local sea conditions, competition amid diminishing...

  10. Development of conducting polymer based biomimetic muscles and fabrication techniques for an artificial pectoral fish fin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, S. Naomi (Sarah Naomi)

    2005-01-01

    Fish possess a greater degree of agility, maneuverability, and energy efficiency over current underwater vehicles constructed by engineers. Kinematics studies show that a high degree of three-dimensional control of multiple ...

  11. G:\\STAFF\\DOCUMENT\\2010 Documents\\2010 Files\\93-10.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    spill levels for fish passage at individual hydroelectric projects. Juvenile acoustic tag data, such as was generated by this study, needs to be considered within a management decision framework that accounts for all

  12. The Composition and Distribution of the Fish Fauna of the Navasota River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strawn, R. K.; Clark, W.J.

    1972-01-01

    . Proposed water development projects for the Navasota River include the construction of dams. If these dams are constructed, changes in the fish populations are sure to occur. This study should contribute basic information from which the effects of future...

  13. Fish and hydroelectricity; Engineering a better coexistence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zorpette, G.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on the problems that hydroelectric plants have regarding fish populations. The utilities that operate these plants are finding that accommodating migrating fish presents unique engineering challenges, not the least of which involves designing and building systems to protect fish species whose migratory behavior remains something of a mystery. Where such systems cannot be built, the status of hydroelectric dams may be in doubt, as is now the case with several dams in the United States. A further twist in some regions in the possibility that certain migratory fish will be declared threatened or endangered-a development that could wreak havoc on the hydroelectric energy supply in those regions.

  14. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  15. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report evaluated the feasibility of two types of technologies to observe fish and near neutrally buoyant drogues as they move through hydropower turbines.

  16. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  17. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Sys- tem (AHTS) Program supports the research and...

  18. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  19. APPALACHIAN LABORATORY CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY HORN POINT LABORATORY AN INSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF MARYLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    APPALACHIAN LABORATORY CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY HORN POINT LABORATORY AN INSTITUTION. of Budget and Management Please fax this form to: 410-333-7122 UMCES Agency #12;APPALACHIAN LABORATORY CHESAPEAKE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY HORN POINT LABORATORY AN INSTITUTION OF THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF MARYLAND

  20. Heavy metals in fish from the Aleutians: Interspecific and locational differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium in edible tissue of seven species of marine fish collected from several Aleutian islands (in 2004) to determine: (1) interspecific differences, (2) locational differences (among Aleutian Islands), (3) size-related differences in any metal levels within a species, and (4) potential risk to the fish or to predators on the fish, including humans. We also compared metals levels to those of three other fish species previously examined in detail, as well as examining metals in the edible tissue of octopus (Octopus dofleini). Octopus did not have the highest levels of any metal. There were significant interspecific differences in all metal levels among the fish species, although the differences were less than an order of magnitude, except for arsenic (mean of 19,500 ppb in Flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon). Significant intraisland variation occurred among the four sites on Amchitka, but there was not a consistent pattern. There were significant interisland differences for some metals and species. Mercury levels increased significantly with size for several species; lead increased significantly for only one fish species; and cadmium and selenium decreased significantly with size for halibut (Hippoglossus stenolepis). The Alaskan Department of Health and Social Services supports unrestricted consumption of most Alaskan fish species for all people, including pregnant women. Most mean metal concentrations were well below the levels known to adversely affect the fish themselves, or predators that consume them (including humans), except for mercury in three fish species (mean levels just below 0.3 ppm), and arsenic in two fish species. However, even at low mercury levels, people who consume fish almost daily will exceed guideline values from the Centers for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency. - Highlights: • Cadmium, lead, mercury and selenium levels differed among 10 fish species from the Aleutians. • Mean Arsenic was as high as 19,500 ppb (flathead sole, Hippoglossoides elassodon). • Mercury levels increased significantly with fish size for several species. • Metal levels were generally below adverse effects levels for fish and their predators. • Mercury and arsenic might pose a risk to human consumers, and require further examination.

  1. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Stewart L. Udall, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Clarence F. Pautzke, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., and Travis D. Love. Application of steaming and vacuum to shucking and cleaning scallops. U.S. Fish Brown, and H. S. Olcott. Observations on "green" tuna. Food Technology, vol. 15, no. 5 (May), p. 253 at the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Tech. nological Laboratory in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Food Technology

  2. Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    345 Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON 1,240 individuals of 28 species of waterbirds were examined in the United States for ingested lead fishing weights. A combination of radiography and visual examination of stomachs was used to search for lead weights and blood

  3. Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure Jackson Efitre & Lauren J. Chapman & Debra J. Murie Received: 22 June 2007 /Accepted: 2 crater lakes in western Uganda. We asked whether fish condition differs among lakes characterized

  4. Trace metal concentration and fish size: Variation among fish species in a Mediterranean river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Trace metal concentration and fish size: Variation among fish species in a Mediterranean river 29 April 2014 Accepted 12 May 2014 Keywords: Bioaccumulation Heavy metals Llobregat River Mediterranean Cyprinid fish a b s t r a c t Concentration of trace metals (Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb

  5. Real-time state estimation of laboratory flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stransky, Scott (Scott M.)

    2007-01-01

    In this project, we use a real time computer model to simulate a differentially heated laboratory annulus. The laboratory annulus allows us to study chaotic flows typical of the atmosphere. Our objective is to bring the ...

  6. LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

  7. When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

  8. Research in thermal biology: Burning questions for coldwater stream fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullough, Dr. Dale [University of California, Berkeley; Bartholow, Dr. John [U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife; Jager, Yetta [ORNL; al., et. [Various Institutes

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation of global warming impacts on ecological systems in addition to the myriad of land management effects on water quality, the number of literature citations dealing with the effects of water temperature on freshwater fish has escalated in the past decade. Given the many biological scales at which water temperature effects have been studied and the growing need to integrate knowledge from multiple disciplines of thermal biology to fully protect beneficial uses, we held that a survey of the most promising recent developments and an expression of some of the remaining unanswered questions with significant management implications would best be approached collectively by a diverse research community. We have identified five specific topic areas of renewed research where new techniques and critical thought could benefit coldwater stream fishes (particularly salmonids): molecular, organism, population/species, community and ecosystem, and policy issues in water quality. Our hope is that information gained through examination of recent research fronts linking knowledge at various scales will prove useful in managing water quality at a basin level to protect fish populations and whole ecosystems. Standards of the past were based largely on incipient lethal and optimum growth rate temperatures for fish species, while future standards should consider all integrated thermal impacts to the organism and ecosystem.

  9. Van Andel Research Institute, Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational model to study lung cancer Van Andel Research Institute, Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop detailed computational model to study lung cancer Scientists are...

  10. Paci c Marine Environmental Laboratory Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paci c Marine Environmental Laboratory #12;#12;Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL Laboratory #12;Contents Overview of PMEL's Strategy 1 Laboratory Structure 5 PMEL Themes 7 Climate Research 8 Contents iv #12;The Pacific Marine environMenTal laboraTory (PMEL) is one of seven federal research

  11. Proceedings of the Predator-Prey Modeling Workshop : Workshop Proceedings May 16-19, 1989, University of Washington Friday Harbor Laboratory in Friday Harbor, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fickeisen, Duane H.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1989-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of a workshop held to receive expert advice and review existing Columbia River models that include juvenile salmonid predation components and, if warranted, recommend alternate modeling approaches. The workshop was limited to models or modeling approaches that may have practical application to the specific problems of increasing survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia and Snake rivers by reducing predation losses. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) under interagency agreements with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted a multi-year study of the impact of predator populations on juvenile salmonids in the John Day Reservoir of the Columbia River. The studies were part of BPA's implementation of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program, designed to protect and enhance production of salmon as mitigation for losses caused by hydroelectric development. The FWS agreement with BPA includes provisions for refinement or development of models to understand the dynamics of predation on juvenile salmon as a basis for considering active intervention to reduce predation losses. The BPA sponsored the workshop that included a review of existing and proposed modeling approaches, identification of model development needs, and identification of data needs to support modeling efforts. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provided workshop design, facilitation, and support services including preparation of this summary. 16 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Detection of unusual fish trajectories from underwater videos 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyan, Çigdem

    2015-06-29

    Fish behaviour analysis is a fundamental research area in marine ecology as it is helpful for detecting environmental changes by observing unusual fish patterns or new fish behaviours. The traditional way of analysing ...

  13. Fishing for lobsters indirectly increases epidemics in sea urchins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lafferty, K D

    2004-01-01

    M. Harmelin-Vivien. 1998. Fishing, trophic cascades, and theSociety of America FISHING FOR LOBSTERS INDIRECTLY INCREASESpersist (Sala et al. 1998). Fishing on the predators of sea

  14. Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    1 Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning in a Simulated inhabited by realistic artificial fishes. Our algorithms emulate not only the appearance, movement model each animal holistically. An artificial fish is an autonomous agent situated in a simulated

  15. Flirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesus Revolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Julianne

    2014-01-01

    1971. Raine, Susan. " Flirty Fishing in the Children of God:PhD student Flirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesusthe movement known as “flirty fishing. ” Who Were the Jesus

  16. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Monday, 25 November 2013 12:06 Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the...

  17. "Exotic" quantum effects in the laboratory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralf Schützhold

    2010-04-15

    This Article provides a brief (non-exhaustive) review of some recent developments regarding the theoretical and possibly experimental study of "exotic" quantum effects in the laboratory with special emphasis on cosmological particle creation, Hawking radiation, and the Unruh effect.

  18. Angle-resolved environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: A new laboratory setup for photoemission studies at pressures up to 0.4 Torr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangolini, F.; Wabiszewski, G. E.; Egberts, P.; Ahlund, J.; Backlund, K.; Karlsson, P. G.; Adiga, V. P.; Streller, F.; Wannberg, B.; Carpick, R. W.

    2012-09-15

    The paper presents the development and demonstrates the capabilities of a new laboratory-based environmental X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system incorporating an electrostatic lens and able to acquire spectra up to 0.4 Torr. The incorporation of a two-dimensional detector provides imaging capabilities and allows the acquisition of angle-resolved data in parallel mode over an angular range of 14 Degree-Sign without tilting the sample. The sensitivity and energy resolution of the spectrometer have been investigated by analyzing a standard Ag foil both under high vacuum (10{sup -8} Torr) conditions and at elevated pressures of N{sub 2} (0.4 Torr). The possibility of acquiring angle-resolved data at different pressures has been demonstrated by analyzing a silicon/silicon dioxide (Si/SiO{sub 2}) sample. The collected angle-resolved spectra could be effectively used for the determination of the thickness of the native silicon oxide layer.

  19. 2010 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tables 27 Table 1A: Total Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions 29 Table 1B: Cumulative Expenditures 1978 and habitat, of the Columbia River Basin that have been affected by hydroelectric development. This program fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams in the Columbia River Basin. The Power Act requires

  20. MFR PAPER 1179 Offshore Headboat Fishing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1179 Offshore Headboat Fishing in North Carolina and South Carolina GENE R. HUNTSMAN. Bill Gulf Stream /I Mustang /I Comanche J. J. Operated in Fishing area t972 1973 OffShore X OUshore X X Ollshore X X Offshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X Inshore X X

  1. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  2. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  3. In the following questions, please tell us about your fishing activity and experience. "Shore" fishing can include fishing from a beach, bank, jetty, pier, dock, bridge, break-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In the following questions, please tell us about your fishing activity and experience. "Shore" fishing can include fishing from a beach, bank, jetty, pier, dock, bridge, break- water, causeway person to go fishing. A "charterboat" is a boat which a group of people have paid a flat fee for use

  4. Evaluation of Carrying Capacity : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 1 of 4, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    1996-05-01

    This report is one of four that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared to address Measure 7.1A in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (Council) Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) dated december 1994 (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.1A calls for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund an evaluation of salmon survival, ecology, carrying capacity, and limiting factors in freshwater, estuarine, and marine habitats. Additionally, the Measure asks for development of a study plan based on critical uncertainties and research needs identified during the evaluation. This report deals with the evaluation of carrying capacity. It describes the analysis of different views of capacity as it relates to salmon survival and abundance. The report ends with conclusions and recommendations for studying carrying capacity.

  5. Portable air monitoring laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehntholt, D.J.; Beltis, K.J.; McCullough, J.E.; Valentine, J.R. [Arthur D. Little, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Arthur D. Little, Inc. was contracted by the US Army to design, fabricate, test and deliver a series of portable air monitoring laboratories which could be used to detect trace levels of toxic chemicals on board cargo ships. The labs were designed to be completely self-sufficient, containing all supplies necessary for a 75-day mission, and to operate under rugged conditions. They were used to monitor for parts-per-billion concentrations of chemical agents in air and to provide information equivalent to high quality fixed laboratory analyses. The mission was successfully completed; independent design awards were received for the laboratories, and they were subsequently diverted to other uses.

  6. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  7. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    3/29/10. Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community ProfileFort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile Henning.Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile PSMFC.

  8. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2004-09-01

    The runoff volumes in 2003 were below average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (79%) and The Dalles Dam (82%). The year 2003 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that met the spring seasonal Biological Opinion flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam, McNary Dam and Priest Rapids Dam. However, summer seasonal flows at Lower Granite Dam and McNary Dam were considerably below the Biological Opinion objectives of 50.7 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam and 2000 Kcfs at McNary Dam. Actual summer seasonal flows were just 32.3 Kcfs and 135.5 Kcfs, respectively. In most instances spill was provided as described by the Biological Opinion program for fish passage, within the constraints of the State waivers for total dissolved gas supersaturation levels. Spill was altered during spill testing and most notably during the month of August at Ice Harbor dam. At this project spill was modified from a 24-hour program to a 12-hour nightly spill period pending the evaluation of studies being conducted in-season. Spill was not returned to full implementation of the Biological Opinion levels even after data showed that spillway passage had the highest associated fish survival. This experience demonstrated the difficulty of managing the hydrosystem for fish passage based on preliminary data and data collected in-season. Increased hatchery releases and higher wild fish production resulted in a population of yearling chinook at Lower Granite Dam being one of the highest observed in recent years. However, the increased hatchery production may have been offset to some extent by decreased survival from release to Lower Granite Dam as suggested by the lower than average survival observed for the PIT tagged trap released fish to Lower Monumental Dam. Travel times were also longer for hatchery spring chinook compared to recent past years. The short duration of high flows that occurred in the Lower Snake River was too late for yearling chinook, but likely was a benefit for steelhead. Survivals for spring fish in the Lower Granite to McNary Dam and the McNary to Bonneville Dam reach were similar to recent years. Returning numbers of adult spring and summer chinook, coho and steelhead were less than observed in 2002, but far exceeded the ten-year average return numbers. Sockeye numbers were less than both the 2002 returning adults and the ten-year average number. However, fall chinook numbers surpassed all previous counts at Bonneville Dam since 1938. In 2003, about 81 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This was slightly less than the number released last year, but about average for the past several years.

  9. Sustainable Food Laboratory Keep it Legal -Best Practices for Keeping Illegally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Food Laboratory Home About Us Projects Members Toolbox Newsletter Events Contact Keep) Farming (13) Fishing (3) Food (13) Food Lab (19) global food crisis (2) Meals (2) News (2) North America (3) Organics (2) Packaging (1) poverty alleviation (1) Public Food Service (4) Public Policy (3

  10. Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDole, Tracey Shannon

    2012-01-01

    versus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems Aversus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems bywas to investigate the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

  11. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature...

  12. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  13. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  14. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  15. Impacts of past glaciation events on contemporary fish assemblages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyron, Mark

    were characterized by Cyprinidae and Catostomidae assemblages with high abundances of tolerant fishes by Cyprinidae, Catostomidae, Centrarchidae and Percidae families with increased abundances of intolerant fishes

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

  17. International Journal of Automation and Computing 4 (2006) 325-335 Learning from Fish: Kinematics and Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    2006-01-01

    on the mechanics, kinematics, fluid dynamics, and control of fish locomotion that summarize recent work on fish on propulsive systems, and to understand basic principles of unsteady motion that are not common in current, increasingly inter- ested in the mechanics of living organisms[46] , have undertaken many biomechanical studies

  18. Idaho National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28

    INL is the leading laboratory for nuclear R&D. Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks aobut the work there and the long-term benefits it will provide.

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site OverviewThe Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) (predecessor to U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). Formerly Camp Upton, a U.S....

  20. LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS Lab VII - 1 In this lab, you will solve problems in ways that take-like behavior. These conditions may be less familiar to you than the conditions for which geometrical optics

  1. Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurement LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 10, 2012-Using a one-of-a-kind laser system at Los Alamos National Laboratory, scientists have created the largest neutron beam...

  2. Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous devices teams showcase skills at Robot Rodeo June 24-27 June 18, 2014 Bomb squads compete in timed scenarios at Los Alamos National Laboratory LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 19,...

  3. Ames Laboratory Logos | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneand Los AlamosAuthorizationAmes Laboratory

  4. Ames Laboratory Hot Canyon | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWith PropaneNaturalTest YourProgramAmes Laboratory Hot Canyon

  5. Status of Laboratory Goals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays IlluminateStateIntentchange.Status of Laboratory

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Laboratories' Foundation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming Release of the University of2013NationalNewLaboratories

  7. Laboratory Graduate Research Appointment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScience (SC) DirectedEquipmentLaboratory

  8. Simulating Blade-Strike on Fish passing through Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-06-16

    The study reported here evaluated the occurrence, frequency, and intensity of blade strike of fish on an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine by using two modeling approaches: a conventional kinematic formulation and a proposed Lagrangian particle- based scheme. The kinematic model included simplifying assumptions of fish trajectories such as distribution and velocity. The proposed method overcame the need for such simplifications by integrating the following components into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulation, (ii) generation of ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The test conditions to evaluate the blade-strike probability and fish survival rate were: (i) the turbulent environment, (ii) the fish size, and (iii) the approaching flow velocity. The proposed method offered the ability to produce potential fish trajectories and their interaction with the rotating turbine. Depending upon the scenario, the percentile of particles that registered a collision event ranged from 6% to 19% of the released sample size. Next, by using a set of experimental correlations of the exposure-response of living fish colliding with moving blades, the simulated collision data were used as input variables to estimate the survival rate of fish passing through the operating turbine. The resulting survival rates were greater than 96% in all scenarios, which is comparable to or better than known survival rates for conventional hydropower turbines. The figures of strike probability and mortality rate were amplified by the kinematic model. The proposed method offered the advantage of expanding the evaluation of other mechanisms of stress and injury on fish derived from hydrokinetic turbines and related devices.

  9. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michak, Patty

    1990-05-01

    Since 1986 Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This interagency project was developed to provide a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. Agencies involved in the project are: WDF, Washington Department of Wildlife, Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its third year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1989. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989 and will compare sampling results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on stocks. 2 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-12-01

    Efforts in the area of nuclear reactors and scientific computations are reported, including: robotics; reactor irradiation of nonend-bonded target slugs; computer link with Los Alamos National Laboratory; L-reactor thermal mitigation; aging of carbon in SRP reactor airborne activity confinement systems; and reactor risk assessment for earthquakes. Activities in chemical processes and environmental technology are reported, including: solids formation in a plutonium product stream; revised safety analysis reporting for F and H-Canyon operations; organic carbon analysis of DWPF samples; applications of Fourier transform infrared spectrometry; water chemistry analyzer for SRP reactors; and study of a biological community in Par Pond. Defense waste and laboratory operations activities include: Pu-238 waste incinerator startup; experimental canister frit blaster; saltstone disposal area design; powder metallurgy core diameter measurement; and a new maintenance shop facility. Nuclear materials planning encompasses decontamination and decommissioning of SRP facilities and a comprehensive compilation of environmental and nuclear safety issues. (LEW)

  11. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-30

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation

  12. Mark Peters | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory, where he managed the science and engineering testing program at the Yucca Mountain Project. Before joining Los Alamos National Laboratory, Dr. Peters was a...

  13. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation.

  14. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  15. Recreating Fundamental Effects in the Laboratory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralf Schützhold

    2010-04-14

    This article provides a brief (non-exhaustive) overview of some possibilities for recreating fundamental effects which are relevant for black holes (and other gravitational scenarios) in the laboratory. Via suitable condensed matter analogues and other laboratory systems, it might be possible to model the Penrose process (superradiant scattering), the Unruh effect, Hawking radiation, the Eardley instability, black-hole lasers, cosmological particle creation, the Gibbons-Hawking effect, and the Schwinger mechanism. Apart from an experimental verification of these yet unobserved phenomena, the study of these laboratory systems might shed light onto the underlying ideas and problems and should therefore be interesting from a (quantum) gravity point of view as well.

  16. Daresbury Laboratory STFC Daresbury Laboratory is renowned for its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daresbury Laboratory STFC Daresbury Laboratory is renowned for its world leading scientific computing. T he Laboratory is part of the Sci ­Tech Daresbury Campus near Warrington in Cheshire to perform cutting-edge research. Key activities Daresbury Laboratory is a hub for pioneering scientific

  17. Laboratory QualityLaboratory Quality ControlControl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laboratory QualityLaboratory Quality ControlControl Nabil A. NIMER Dept . Biotechnology & Genetic thatQA is defined as the overall program that ensures that the final results reported by the laboratory areensures that the final results reported by the laboratory are correct.correct. ""The aim of quality

  18. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory Capture Radiation Management Muon Collider 2011 Telluride, Colorado June 27­July 1, 2011 #12;Harold G. Kirk 2 The Study 2 Target System Neutrino Factory Study 2 Target Concept #12;Harold G. Kirk 3 STUDY II SOLENOID GEOMETRY SC#1 -120

  19. ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA By E. A. Tulian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA .", By E. A. Tulian Chief ofthe Section ofFish Culture, Ministry of Agriculture, Argentina Paper presented before the Fourth International Fishery #12;ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA. ~ By E. A. TULIAN, Chief of the Section of Fish

  20. FINDINGS IN BRIEF THEME: Water, aquaculture and fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINDINGS IN BRIEF THEME: Water, aquaculture and fish Photo:Jan-ErikJohansson,SLU Sustainable feed for farmed fish Farmed predatory fish (salmon, cod, etc.) need large quantities of feed, which at pre- sent consists of wildcaught marine fish spe- cies that are endangered to varying degrees. SLU researchers have

  1. MFR PAPER 1176 An Automated Unmanned Fishing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1176 An Automated Unmanned Fishing System to Harvest Coastal Pelagic Fish WILBER R. SEIDEL and THOMAS M. VANSELOUS ABSTRACT-Coastal pelagic fish resources of the Gulf of Mexico are basi- cally unutilized with the exception of menhaden, which are harvested exten- sively. The other fishes

  2. Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner UNITED 5T ATE5 DEPART MENT.A OF l'O~I,a;RCI!,L Fr RERIES, Donald L. 'McKernan, Director · Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review fishing References .................... . iii Page 1 2 2 5 6 6 8 10 12 14 #12;Shark Fishing Gear

  3. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  4. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fished. Port au Port Bay, Newfound- land; Northumberland Strait, Prince Edward Island; the Digby

  5. Fish Oil Industry in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been operating for many years experience has made these operations the more advanced industrial- ly oil, obtained generally by centrifugation of the press liquor in the processing of fish meal, amounted

  6. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  7. Interannual-to-Decadal Changes in Phytoplankton Phenology, Fish Spawning Habitat,and Larval Fish Phenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asch, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    and fishes with an offshore distribution. This spatialwere characterized by an offshore, epipelagic distribution,in the abundance of offshore species, such as ocean sunfish,

  8. Fish Passage though Hydropower Turbines: Simulating Blade Strike using the Discrete Element Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2014-12-08

    mong the hazardous hydraulic conditions affecting anadromous and resident fish during their passage though turbine flows, two are believed to cause considerable injury and mortality: collision on moving blades and decompression. Several methods are currently available to evaluate these stressors in installed turbines, i.e. using live fish or autonomous sensor devices, and in reduced-scale physical models, i.e. registering collisions from plastic beads. However, a priori estimates with computational modeling approaches applied early in the process of turbine design can facilitate the development of fish-friendly turbines. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency of blade strike and nadir pressure environment by modeling potential fish trajectories with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) applied to fish-like composite particles. In the DEM approach, particles are subjected to realistic hydraulic conditions simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and particle-structure interactions—representing fish collisions with turbine blades—are explicitly recorded and accounted for in the calculation of particle trajectories. We conducted transient CFD simulations by setting the runner in motion and allowing for better turbulence resolution, a modeling improvement over the conventional practice of simulating the system in steady state which was also done here. While both schemes yielded comparable bulk hydraulic performance, transient conditions exhibited a visual improvement in describing flow variability. We released streamtraces (steady flow solution) and DEM particles (transient solution) at the same location from where sensor fish (SF) have been released in field studies of the modeled turbine unit. The streamtrace-based results showed a better agreement with SF data than the DEM-based nadir pressures did because the former accounted for the turbulent dispersion at the intake but the latter did not. However, the DEM-based strike frequency is more representative of blade-strike probability than the steady solution is, mainly because DEM particles accounted for the full fish length, thus resolving (instead of modeling) the collision event.

  9. Laboratory Heat Recovery System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows, D. B.; Mendez, F. J.

    1981-01-01

    that they will be considerable. The system has been in successful operation since October 1979. 724 ESL-IE-81-04-123 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 Conoco R&D West The award-winning laboratory heat-recovery... stream_source_info ESL-IE-81-04-123.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 11112 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-81-04-123.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 LABORATORY HEAT...

  10. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1981 December 1981 Eugene J . Aubert and Development Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 #12;NOTICE The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories do not approve

  11. Lab VIII 1 LABORATORY VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab VIII ­ 1 LABORATORY VIII MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS In most of the laboratory problems constant. In this set of laboratory problems the force on an object, and thus its acceleration, will change this laboratory, you should be able to: · provide a qualitative explanation of the behavior of oscillating systems

  12. Lab VIII -1 LABORATORY VIII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab VIII - 1 LABORATORY VIII MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS Most of the laboratory problems so far have was constant. In this set of laboratory problems, the total force acting on an object, and thus its's oscillation frequency. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to

  13. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980 December I980 Eugene J of Research and Development Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2300 Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104 #12;NOTICE The NOAA Environmental Research Laboratories

  14. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation about the history, structure, and projects of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  15. Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels, Phase 2: Evaluations of Field Samples and Laboratory Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; LaViolette, M.

    2010-04-01

    Study to measure the flammability of gasoline/ethanol fuel vapors at low ambient temperatures and develop a mathematical model to predict temperatures at which flammable vapors were likely to form.

  16. EFFECTS OF MENHADEN FISHING UPON THE SUPPLY OF MENHADEN AND OF THE FISHES THAT PREY UPON THEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF MENHADEN FISHING UPON THE SUPPLY OF MENHADEN AND OF THE FISHES THAT PREY UPON THEM of the menhaden fishery upon predatory fishes .. __ - n - - - - - - - - - n - - _ _ - u - - u n u u _ 275 Conclusion ~ ------------------------______ 277 270 #12;EFFECTS OF MENHADEN FISHING UPON THE SUPPLY

  17. 10.1177/0270467603259787ARTICLEBULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / October 2003Roe / FISHING FOR IDENTITY Fishing for Identity: Mercury Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    / FISHING FOR IDENTITY Fishing for Identity: Mercury Contamination and Fish Consumption Among Indigenous Groups in the United States Amy Roe University of Delaware Mercury contamination of local fish stocks has disproportionately impacted by the risks of mercury contamination of their food source. Some of these groups

  18. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Seismic Risk Assessment Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Risk Assessment Project: Implementation of Proposed Methodology at INL and Associated Risk Studies Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Implementation...

  19. Fume Hood Sash Stickers Increases Laboratory Safety and Efficiency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safety and Efficiency at Minimal Cost Case study describes two University of California campuses that increased laboratory exhaust efficiency and safety by using fume hood...

  20. Visgraf Laboratory -IMPAVisgraf Laboratory -IMPAVisgraf Laboratory -IMPA CNMAC 99CNMAC 99CNMAC 99 Frontiers ofFrontiers of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    1 Visgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPA CNMAC 99CNMAC 99CNMAC@impa.br@impa.br Visgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPA Rio de JaneiroRio de Janeiro www.visgraf.impa.brwww.visgraf.impa.br Visgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPAVisgraf Laboratory - IMPA CNMAC 99CNMAC 99CNMAC 99

  1. EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety, principal investigators, lab supervisors, and lab personnel assess their areas of responsibility to determine safety procedures and use this information to mitigate situations that may pose a problem in case

  2. LABORATORY VII ROTATIONAL DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    OF A COMPLEX SYSTEM While examining the engine of your friend's snow blower you notice that the starter cord wraps around a cylindrical ring. This ring is fastened to the top of a heavy, solid disk, "a flywheel of the system. To test this idea you decide to build a laboratory model described below to determine the moment

  3. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.;

    2013-05-28

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  4. PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    PHYSICAL GEOLOGY LABORATORY MANUAL Geology 001 Eleventh Edition by Professors Charles Merguerian and J Bret Bennington Department of Geology Hofstra University © 2010 #12;ii Table of Contents Lab and Find Out More about Geology at Hofstra Email: Geology professors can be contacted via Email: Full

  5. PENNSYLVANIA APPALACHIAN LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    , coordinates, and catalyzes environmental research and graduate education within the University System. UMCES), in which UMCES has a leading role. UMCES also delivers its services through environmental science education LABORATORY INSTITUTE OF MARINE AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY MARYLAND SEA GRANT ANNAPOLIS CHESAPEAKE

  6. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  7. National Laboratory Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories host multidisciplinary transportation research centers. A wide-range of cutting-edge transportation research occurs at these facilities, funded by both DOE and cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs) with industry

  8. Laboratory Density Functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Giraud

    2007-07-26

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  9. FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heiser, Gernot

    FUTURE LOGISTICS LIVING LABORATORY Delivering Innovation The Future Logistics Living Lab that will provide logistics solutions for the future. The Living Lab is a demonstration, exhibition and work space by a group of logistics companies, research organisations, universities, and IT providers that includes NICTA

  10. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Predator and Bottom-Feeding Fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti Reservoirs in North-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Gonzales, P.R. Fresquez

    2006-03-01

    Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, we began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2005, six species of fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs were collected and the edible portion (fillets) was analyzed for 209 possible PCB congeners. Fish from the reservoirs were last sampled in 2001. Mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Abiquiu Reservoir ({mu} = 2.4 ng/g) were statistically similar ({alpha} = 0.01; P (T{le}t) [range = 0.23-0.71]) to mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Cochiti Reservoir ({mu} = 2.7 ng/g), implying that LANL is not the source of PCBs in fish in Cochiti Reservoir. The levels of PCBs in fish from Cochiti Reservoir generally appear to be declining, at least since 2001, which is when PCB levels might have peaked resulting from storm water runoff after the Cerro Grande Fire. Although a PCB ''fingerprinting'' method can be used to relate PCB ''signatures'' in one area to signatures in another area, this method of implicating the source of PCBs cannot be effectively used for biota because they alter the PCB signature through metabolic processes. Regardless of the source of the PCBs, certain species of fish (catfish and carpsuckers) at both Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs continue to harbor levels of PCBs that could be harmful to human health if they are consistently eaten over a long period of time. Bottom-feeding fish (carpsucker and catfish) from Cochiti Reservoir contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-fillet-wet) than predator fish (walleye, northern pike, bass) ({mu} = 1.67 ng/g) and the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) charts. Similarly, bottom-feeding fish from Abiquiu Reservoir also contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-wet) than predator fish (walleye, bass) ({mu} = 0.68 ng/g-wet) and only the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in the EPA charts.

  11. Geophysical Prospecting, 2009, 57, 209224 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2478.2008.00771.x Laboratory-scale study of field of view and the seismic interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    -scale study of field of view and the seismic interpretation of fracture specific stiffness Angel Acosta-Colon1, on the interpretation of fracture properties from seismic wave propagation was investigated using an acous- tic lens of the field of view affected the interpretation of the fracture specific stiffness. Many small

  12. Study of Driven Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma Masaaki Yamada, Hantao Ji, Scott Hsu, Troy Carter, Russell Kulsrud, Norton Bretz,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the evolution of solar ares5{9 and in the dynamics of the Earths magnetosphere10{14. It also occurs as one the con#12;nement characteris- tics of high-temperature fusion plasmas. The study of solar ares has beenYohkoh satellite8. Solar ares provide a paradigmfor physical systems where magnetic energy is stored in a force

  13. Study of Driven Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma Masaaki Yamada, Hantao Ji, Scott Hsu, Troy Carter, Russell Kulsrud, Norton Bretz,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    process in the evolution of solar flares 5--9 and in the dynamics of the Earths magnetosphere 10. The study of solar flares has been intensified due to the availability of soft X­ray pictures of the sun recently taken by the Yohkoh satellite 8 . Solar flares provide a paradigm for physical systems where

  14. Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2008-07-29

    Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

  15. Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

  16. A fish is too vAluAble to cAtch only once!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    A fish is too vAluAble to cAtch only once! Florida is the "Fishing Capital of the World," largely saltwater fish when we catch them to help maintain fish populations, and more and more anglers fishing experiences. For more information on catch-and-release fishing, proper fish handling techniques

  17. Local fish consumption and serum PCB concentrations among Mohawk men at Akwesasne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, E.F.; Deres, D.A.; Hwang, S.A.; Bush, B.; Yang, B. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States)] [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States); Tarbell, A.; Jacobs, A. [Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (United States). Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment] [Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne (United States). Akwesasne Task Force on the Environment

    1999-02-01

    A study was conducted to assess local fish consumption patterns and their relationship to concentrations of total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the serum of Mohawk men residing near three hazardous waste sites. From 1992 to 1995, 139 men were interviewed and donated a 20-ml venous blood sample. The results indicated that the men ate a mean of 21.2 local fish meals during the past year, compared with annual means of 27.7 meals 1--2 years before and 88.6 meals more than 2 years before. This change is probably a consequence of advisories issued against the consumption of local fish, since 97% of the mean were aware of the advisories and two-third had changed their behavior as a result. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum PCB levels increased with age and local fish consumption. The data suggest that local fish consumption has contributed to body burdens in this population and that the advisories have been effective in modifying local fish consumption habits.

  18. Infrastructure Required for Tag/Mark Application, Detection, and Recovery Tag/Mark & release Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency Adipose fin clip Marking trailers N processing Otolith Insulated box, thermal chilling system, lab processing, smolt traps N/A Fish traps, fish *Fish mortality data may be collected at any stage of the fish life cycle from harvest, recovered

  19. RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hydroelectric projects have created a number of problems for resident fish. In the natural state, the Columbia, keeping gravel spawning beds clean. But hydroelectric projects slowed and decreased the flow, allowing is a species critically affected by hydroelectric development. Biologically an anadromous fish, the white

  20. IN SITU EXPERIMENTS WITH COASTAL PELAGIC FISHES TO ESTABLISH DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ELECTRICAL FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN SITU EXPERIMENTS WITH COASTAL PELAGIC FISHES TO ESTABLISH DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ELECTRICAL FISH of a scale electrical harvesting system were conducted off Panama City, Fla. with both captured and wild- tional Marine Fisheries Service has been engaged in the design and development of an electrical