Sample records for fish downstream migration

  1. DOWNSTREAM MOVEMENT OF LAMPREYS AND FISHES IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    387 DOWNSTREAM MOVEMENT OF LAMPREYS AND FISHES IN THE CARP LAKE RIVER, MICHIGAN SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC, Commissioner Bureau of Conrunercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernaui, Director DOWNSTREAM MOVEMENT OF LAMPREYS in the traps. #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Downstream movement of lampreys 1 Length and weight of migrant

  2. Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower Turbines Background One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S. is the provision of adequate fish passage at projects. Mortality of downstream migrating fish, particularly as a result of passing through hydropower

  3. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  4. Infrastructure Required for Tag/Mark Application, Detection, and Recovery Tag/Mark & release Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency Adipose fin clip Marking trailers N processing Otolith Insulated box, thermal chilling system, lab processing, smolt traps N/A Fish traps, fish *Fish mortality data may be collected at any stage of the fish life cycle from harvest, recovered

  5. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  6. Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation a specific stock-effort dynamic model. The stock corresponds to two fish populations growing and moving between two fishing zones, on which they are harvested by two different fleets. The effort represents

  7. Patterns of mercury and methylmercury bioaccumulation in fish species downstream of a long-term mercury-contaminated site in the lower Ebro River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Patterns of mercury and methylmercury bioaccumulation in fish species downstream of a long that the highest biological impact attributable to mercury pollution occurred downstream of the discharge site mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at the discharge site and downstream points. Multiple

  8. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  9. Hydroacoustic Assessment of Downstream Migrating Salmonids at Lower Monumental Dam in Spring, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Ward R. (BioSonics, Inc., Seattle, WA)

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of the spillway in passing migrants, with the spillway operating per the criteria identified in the COE's 1985 Juvenile Fish Passage Plan. Specific study objectives were to estimate: (1) the effectiveness of the spillway for Passing migrants; (2) die1 variability in passage rates of migrants through the powerhouse and the spillway; (3) the daily and cumulative run timing of migrant passage; (4) the proportions of migrants that passed through each turbine intake and spill bay (i.e., the horizontal distributions across the powerhouse and the spillway); and (5) the vertical distributions of migrants approaching the powerhouse and spillway.

  10. The Roles of Akt1 and Akt2 Downstream of Src Family Kinases in the Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiueh, Venice Calinisan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arf6 activation to the downstream  activation of Rac1.  invasion­associated factor downstream of Akt signaling.  Roles of Akt1 and Akt2 Downstream of Src Family Kinases in 

  11. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems Michael S. Zisman*Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target andthe Neutrino Factory systems downstream of the target and

  12. Juvenile Salmonid SurvivalJuvenile Salmonid Survival Downstream of theDownstream of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juvenile Salmonid SurvivalJuvenile Salmonid Survival Downstream of theDownstream of the Federal as fish move downstream Reach Release-BO N 1BO N 1-K alam aK alam a-O ak PtO ak Pt-3-Tree 3-Tree decreases downstreamrate decreases downstream Reach Release-BO N 1 BO N 1-O ak Pt O ak Pt-3-Tree 3-Tree

  13. A Foraging Cost of Migration for a Partially Migratory Cyprinid Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­70% of their energy reserves during their spawning migration [12], and both sustained flight and also stop, Lund University, Lund, Sweden, 2 National Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University

  14. Catalog of Waters Important for the Spawning, Rearing or Migration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spawning, Rearing or Migration of Anadromous Fishes Organization Alaska Department of Fish and Game Published Divisions of Sport Fish and Habitat, 2012 Report Number 12-05 DOI...

  15. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  16. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the Neutrino Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target and capture area. These include the bunching and phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and decay ring systems. We also briefly discuss the R&D program under way to develop these systems, and indicate areas where help from CERN would be invaluable.

  17. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

  18. Observations of the Behavior and Distribution of Fish in Relation to the Columbia River Navigation Channel and Channel Maintenance Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, R. L.; Mueller, Robert P.; Weiland, Mark A.; Johnson, P. N.

    2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a compilation of 7 studies conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers between 1995 and 1998 which used hydroacoustic methods to study the behavior of migrating salmon in response to navigation channel maintenance activities in the lower Columbia River near river mile 45. Differences between daytime and nighttime behavior and fish densities were noted. Comparisons were made of fish distribution across the river (in the channel, channel margin or near shore) and fish depth upstream and downstream of dikes, dredges, and pile driving areas.

  19. DOWNSTREAM MOVEMENT OF SALMON IDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM MOVEMENT OF SALMON IDS AT BONNEVILLE DAM Marine Biological Laboratory APR 1 7 1958 WOODS Washington, D. C January 1958 #12;ABSTRACT At Bonneville Deun most downstream-migrant salmonlds were ca TABLES 1. Hourly catches of downstream-migrant seLLmonids in 1952. Each hour represents the suomation

  20. RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995 Section 10 RESIDENT FISH Resident fish are freshwater fish that live and migrate within the rivers, streams and lakes of the Columbia River Basin, but do not travel to the ocean. Resident fish exist throughout the basin

  1. Defining migration Measuring migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Youqin

    Census: 5-year period Tend to underestimate migration. WHY? Registration: Scandinavian countries, China-off Non-monetary costs and benefits Public goods Critique? 0 )1(1 T t t t ij t i t j ij r CUU PV: 3. Family Migration Theory Net family gain Costs and benefits "Tied migrants" (Mincer, 1978

  2. Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

  3. Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutant, Charles C [ORNL; Mann, Roger [RMecon, Davis, California; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

  4. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

  5. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

  6. Downstream Competition, Foreclosure, and Vertical Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Downstream Competition, Foreclosure, and Vertical Integration Gilles Chemla ¤ July 8, 2002 and Management Strategy 12, 2 (2003) 261-289." #12;Downstream Competition, Forclosure, and Vertical Integration Abstract This paper analyzes the impact of competition among downstream ¯rms on an upstream ¯rm's payo

  7. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2004-2005 project year, there were 590 adult summer steelhead, 31 summer steelhead kelts (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 70 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 80 adult and 1 jack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 13, 2004, and June 16, 2005. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by ODFW in order to enumerate fish passage. Of the total, 143 adult summer steelhead and 15 summer steelhead kelts were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the video efforts between February 4 and May 23, 2005. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year.

  8. UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INFLUENCE ON STBLI UNSTEADINESS Upstream and Downstream Influence on the Unsteadiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INFLUENCE ON STBLI UNSTEADINESS 1 Upstream and Downstream Influence between the incoming flow and the shock motions, as well as the downstream flow and the shock unsteadiness correlate with downstream shock motion. Pirozzoli & Grasso [14] analyzed DNS data of a reflected shock

  9. FISH SPERMATOLOGY FISH SPERMATOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    FISH SPERMATOLOGY #12;FISH SPERMATOLOGY Alpha Science International Ltd. Oxford, U.K. = Editors Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia, Vodnany, Czech Republic of the publisher. ISBN 978-1-84265-369-2 Printed in India #12;Fish Spermatology is dedicated to Professor Roland

  10. The study of downstream targets and other characteristics of NTT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fung, Michelle W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAN DIEGO The Study of Downstream Targets and OtherOF THE THESIS The Study of Downstream Targets and Othera number of putative downstream targets of NTT, including

  11. Survival of Seaward-Migrating PIT and Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Chinook Salmon in the Snake and Columbia Rivers: An Evaluation of Length-Specific Tagging Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Oldenburg, Eric W.; Seaburg, Adam; Cook, Katrina V.; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, M. B.; Deters, Katherine A.

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies examining the survival of juvenile salmon as they emigrate to the ocean provide important information regarding the management of regulated river systems. Acoustic telemetry is a widely used tool for evaluating the behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids in the Columbia River basin. Thus, it is important to understand how the surgical tagging process and the presence of a transmitter affect survival so any biases can be accounted for or eliminated. This study evaluated the effects of fish length and tag type on the survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon during their seaward migrations through the Snake and Columbia rivers during 2006, 2007, and 2008. Fish were collected at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River (river kilometer 695) and implanted with either only a passive integrated transponder (PIT) tag (PIT fish) or both a PIT tag and an acoustic transmitter (AT fish). Survival was estimated from release at Lower Granite Dam to multiple downstream locations (dams) using the Cormack–Jolly–Seber single release model, and analysis of variance was used to test for differences among length-classes and between tag types. No length-specific tag effect was detected between PIT and AT fish (i.e., length affected the survival of PIT fish in a manner similar to which it affected the survival of AT fish). Survival among the smallest length class (i.e., 80–89 mm) of both PIT and AT subyearling Chinook salmon was markedly low (i.e., 4%). Fish length was positively correlated with the survival of both PIT and AT fish. Significant differences in survival were detected between tag types; the survival of PIT fish was generally greater than that of AT fish. However, confounding variables warrant caution in making strong inferences regarding this factor. Further, results suggest that tag effects may be due to the process of surgically implanting the transmitter rather than the presence of the transmitter.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: drastically simplify downstream...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drastically simplify downstream sugarlignin recovery process One-Pot-to-Prep Biomass for Biofuels On September 10, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News...

  13. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990's, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and initiating trap and haul efforts. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2002-2003 project year, there were 545 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 29 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 1 adult and 1 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway adult trap between January 1 and June 23, 2003. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported 21 adult spring chinook from Ringold Springs Hatchery and 281 from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. Of these, 290 were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  14. Supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos Manzano, Fidel

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies current supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream industry, using ExxonMobil as a case study. Based on the analysis of the literature and the interaction with industry experts, this work describes ...

  15. The iPhone Goes Downstream: Mandatory Universal Distribution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper 1125 The iPhone Goes Downstream: mandatory universalauthor(s). The iPhone Goes Downstream: Mandatory UniversaliPhones using a single downstream vendor prompted calls for

  16. Assessment of Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) Downstream of Domestic Wastewater Effluents in the Bayous of Harris County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Crystal

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    in toxicology studies with responses ranging from changes in gonad gene expression downstream of a WWTP {Garcia-Reyero, 2008 #126} to feminization of males expose to EE2 {Kidd, 2007 #53}. Studies with mosquitofish have found a reduction of the male sex organ... #158}. Physical, morphological, and histological biomarkers such as lesions and abnormalities of gonads and other body parts are also useful in studying toxicological effects of chemicals on fish. Angus {, 2005 #31} found that male western...

  17. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m2) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

  18. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  19. The Use of Traits-Based Assessment to Estimate Effects of Hydropower Projects on Fish Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Use of Traits-Based Assessment to Estimate Effects of Hydropower Projects on Fish Populations Background Safe downstream passage of fish at conventional hydropower projects affects not only migratory fish species for testing, assess impacts of new hydropower development, and develop mitigation measures

  20. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. The migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage criteria and passage and trapping facility design and operation. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. During the 2003-2004 project year, there were 379 adult summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 36 adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus); 108 adult and 3 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) enumerated at the Nursery Bridge Dam fishway video counting window between December 21, 2003, and June 30, 2004. Summer steelhead and spring chinook were observed moving upstream while bull trout were observed moving both upstream and downstream of the facility. In addition, the old ladder trap was operated by the WWBNPME project in order to radio tag spring chinook adults. A total of 2 adult summer steelhead, 4 bull trout, and 23 adult spring chinook were enumerated at the west ladder at Nursery Bridge Dam during the trapping operations between May 6 and May 23, 2004. Operation of the Little Walla Walla River juvenile trap for trap and haul purposes was not necessary this year. The project transported adult spring chinook from Threemile Dam to the South Fork Walla Walla Brood Holding Facility. A total of 239 spring chinook were outplanted in August for natural spawning in the basin.

  1. COOPERATIVE GAME THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE GAME THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP By Ezio Marchi Paula Andrea THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP MARCHI, Ezio Instituto de Matemática Aplicada San; and second, an economic element, where we reconsider the upstream-downstream relationship under a cooperative

  2. The Nonlinear Downstream Development of Baroclinic Instability Joseph Pedlosky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    The Nonlinear Downstream Development of Baroclinic Instability Joseph Pedlosky Woods Hole The downstream development in both space and time of baroclinic instability is studied in a nonlinear channel as a conceptual model for the development of fluctuations in currents like the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio downstream

  3. The iPhone Goes Downstream: Mandatory Universal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    The iPhone Goes Downstream: Mandatory Universal Distribution Larry S. Karp Jeffrey M. Perloff February 2010 Abstract Apple's decision to market iPhones using a single downstream vendor has prompted vendors. We show that an upstream monopoly might want to use one or more downstream vendors, and society

  4. The iPhone Goes Downstream: Mandatory Universal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    The iPhone Goes Downstream: Mandatory Universal Distribution Larry S. Karp Jeffrey M. Perloff December 2011 Abstract Apple's original decision to market iPhones using a single downstream vendor prompted calls for mandatory universal distribution (MUD), whereby all downstream vendors would sell the i

  5. Integrating Future Communication Technologies for the Downstream Component of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Integrating Future Communication Technologies for the Downstream Component of Public Warning an alert system in case of coastal tsunami due to underwater landslides. Its downstream component combines of the alerting global system. This paper presents the RATCOM architecture, focusing mainly on its downstream

  6. Fish Biologist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as a fish biologist within the Fish and Wildlife Policy and Planning organization. Your primarily focus will be on assessing the impacts...

  7. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Ballinger, Dean; Kamps, Jeffrey W. (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Gladstone, OR)

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The seaward migration of juvenile salmonids was monitored by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) at John Day Dam, located at river mile 216, and at Bonneville Dam, located at river mile 145 on the Columbia River. The PSMFC Smolt Monitoring Project is part of a larger Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP) coordinated by the Fish Passage Center (FPC) for the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. This program is carried out under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program and is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The purpose of the SMP is to monitor the timing and magnitude of the juvenile salmonid out-migration in the Columbia Basin and make flow and spill recommendations designed to facilitate fish passage. Data are also used for travel time and survival estimates and to build a time series data set for future reference. The purpose of the PSMFC portion of the program is to provide the FPC with species and project specific real time data from John Day and Bonneville dams.

  8. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Juveniles, 2007-2008 Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achord, Stephen; Sandford, Benjamin P.; Hockersmith, Eric E. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior and survival of wild juvenile spring/summer Chinook salmon in the Snake River Basin. Data reported is from detections of PIT tagged fish during late summer 2007 through mid-2008. Fish were tagged in summer 2007 by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in Idaho and by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) in Oregon. Our analyses include migration behavior and estimated survival of fish at instream PIT-tag monitors and arrival timing and estimated survival to Lower Granite Dam. Principal results from tagging and interrogation during 2007-2008 are listed below: (1) In July and August 2007, we PIT tagged and released 7,390 wild Chinook salmon parr in 12 Idaho streams or sample areas. (2) Overall observed mortality from collection, handling, tagging, and after a 24-hour holding period was 1.4%. (3) Of the 2,524 Chinook salmon parr PIT tagged and released in Valley Creek in summer 2007, 218 (8.6%) were detected at two instream PIT-tag monitoring systems in lower Valley Creek from late summer 2007 to the following spring 2008. Of these, 71.6% were detected in late summer/fall, 11.9% in winter, and 16.5% in spring. Estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam was 15.5% for the late summer/fall group, 48.0% for the winter group, and 58.5% for the spring group. Based on detections at downstream dams, the overall efficiency of VC1 (upper) or VC2 (lower) Valley Creek monitors for detecting these fish was 21.1%. Using this VC1 or VC2 efficiency, an estimated 40.8% of all summer-tagged parr survived to move out of Valley Creek, and their estimated survival from that point to Lower Granite Dam was 26.5%. Overall estimated parr-to-smolt survival for all summer-tagged parr from this stream at the dam was 12.1%. Development and improvement of instream PIT-tag monitoring systems continued throughout 2007 and 2008. (4) Testing of PIT-tag antennas in lower Big Creek during 2007-2008 showed these antennas (and anchoring method) are not adequate to withstand high spring flows in this drainage. Future plans involve removing these antennas before high spring flows. (5) At Little Goose Dam in 2008, length and/or weight were taken on 505 recaptured fish from 12 Idaho stream populations. Fish had grown an average of 40.1 mm in length and 10.6 g in weight over an average of 288 d. Their mean condition factor declined from 1.25 at release (parr) to 1.05 at recapture (smolt). (6) Mean release lengths for detected fish were significantly larger than for fish not detected the following spring and summer (P < 0.0001). (7) Fish that migrated through Lower Granite Dam in April and May were significantly larger at release than fish that migrated after May (P < 0.0001) (only 12 fish migrated after May). (8) In 2008, peak detections at Lower Granite Dam of parr tagged during summer 2007 (from the 12 stream populations in Idaho and 4 streams in Oregon) occurred during moderate flows of 87.5 kcfs on 7 May and high flows of 197.3 kcfs on 20 May. The 10th, 50th, and 90th percentile passage occurred on 30 April, 11 May, and 23 May, respectively. (9) In 2007-2008, estimated parr-to-smolt survival to Lower Granite Dam for Idaho and Oregon streams (combined) averaged 19.4% (range 6.2-38.4% depending on stream of origin). In Idaho streams the estimated parr-to-smolt survival averaged 21.0%. This survival was the second highest since 1993 for Idaho streams. Relative parr densities were lower in 2007 (2.4 parr/100 m{sup 2}) than in all previous years since 2000. In 2008, we observed low-to-moderate flows prior to mid-May and relatively cold weather conditions throughout the spring migration season. These conditions moved half of the fish through Lower Granite Dam prior to mid-May; then high flows moved 50 to 90% of the fish through the dam in only 12 days. Clearly, complex interrelationships of several factors drive the annual migrational timing of the stocks.

  9. The Impact of the Central Asian Mountains on Downstream Storminess and Monsoon Onset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hyo Seok

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the upstream BCC on downstream storminess 2.5. Stationarylevel cyclonic motions downstream of the Tibetan Plateau.Chang, E. K. N. , 1993: Downstream development of baroclinic

  10. Time-Dependent Traffic Flow Features at a Freeway Bottleneck Downstream of a Merge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert Lawrence

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    74 Upstream and downstream N-curves, Queen Elizabethconditions upstream and downstream of a freeway bottleneckfreely between those two downstream stations. Conversely,

  11. Reduction in downstream test utilization following introduction of coronary computed tomography in a cardiology practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Thomson, Louise E.; Friedman, John D.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PAPER Reduction in downstream test utilization followingtesting, reduction of downstream SPECT MPI and TME as wellechocardiography Á Downstream utilization Á Cardiology

  12. Molecular Mechanism of Beta-Arrestin-dependent ERK activation Downstream of Protease-activated Receptor-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Jungah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanisms of two distinct downstream pathways of PAR-2 viaof the cofilin pathway downstream of protease-activatedand membrane protrusions downstream of protease-activated

  13. Novel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and Targets Controlled by Transcription Factors CREM in the Testis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proteins in spermatids: Downstream targets and implicationsNovel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and TargetsNovel Insights into the Downstream Pathways and Targets

  14. Rethinking Downstream Regulation: California's Opportunity to Engage Households in Reducing Greenhouse Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. , et al. , Rethinking downstream regulation: California’sD. , et al. , Rethinking downstream regulation: California’slocate/enpol Rethinking downstream regulation: California’s

  15. Beta-arrestin inhibits CAMKKbeta-dependent AMPK activation downstream of protease-activated-receptor-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ping; Jiang, Yong; Wang, Yinsheng; Shyy, John Y; DeFea, Kathryn A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dependent AMPK activation downstream of protease-activated-of the cofilin pathway downstream of protease- activateddependent AMPK activation downstream of protease- activated-

  16. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisk, William

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow StraightenersSensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straightenersprobes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver

  17. Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish DAILY SECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernald, Russell

    Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish Home DAILY SECTIONS News Sports Opinion Arts America! Study Spanish & Volunteer ONE FISH, TWO FISH, DUMB FISH, DEAD FISH | Print | E- mail Written scientists say fish are capable of deducing how they stack up against the competition by simply watching

  18. Fish Protection: Cooperative research advances fish-friendly turbine design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Foust, Jason

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable hydropower is a tremendous resource within the Pacific Northwest that is managed with considerable cost and consideration for the safe migration of salmon. Recent research conducted in this region has provided results that could lower the impacts of hydro power production and make the technology more fish-friendly. This research is now being applied during a period when a huge emphasis is being made to develop clean, renewable energy sources.

  19. Robot Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast transcript: Usually you expect this kind of news from Japan but this time it's South Korea where scientists have just created a robotic fish. Yes, folks, this is an electronic fish that can live underwater. At depths of up to 100 meters...

  20. Migration of the European sea bass Cefas have been collaborating with IFREMER scientists and the Breton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migration of the European sea bass Cefas have been collaborating with IFREMER scientists bass, Dicentrarchus labrax. Although a popular and important catch for both commercial and recreational fishermen, relatively little is known about the behaviour of this highly migratory fish

  1. September 2009 Migrating to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    September 2009 Migrating to Evaluator's Guide Windows Server 2008 R2 File Services #12;Evaluator's Guide: Migrating to Windows Server 2008 R2 File Services 5 Migrating to Windows Server 2008 R2 File Services IT Professionals hear a lot about the new, enticing features of Windows Server 2008 such as Active

  2. Making migration safer Policy Message

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    : India, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Pakistan #12;.......................... Remittance economies in Asia Migration

  3. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  4. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion measures resulted in very poor in-river migration conditions in 2001. Up to 99% of Snake River yearling chinook and steelhead were transported from the Snake River collection projects. Approximately 96% of Snake River juvenile sub-yearling fall chinook were transported. Of Mid-Columbia origin yearling chinook, 35% were transported, of steelhead 30% were transported and of sub yearling chinook, 59% were transported. Based upon data collected on the run-at-large, the juvenile survival to Lower Granite Dam of wild and hatchery yearling chinook and wild and hatchery steelhead were the lowest observed in the last four years. In 2001, as the result of the lowest observed flows in recent years, travel times through the hydro system for spring chinook yearlings and steelhead was approximately twice as long as has been observed historically. Juvenile survival estimates through each index reach of the hydro system for steelhead and chinook juveniles was the lowest observed since the use of PIT tag technology began for estimating survival.

  5. Downstream hydraulic geometry relations: 2. Calibration and testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Vijay P.; Yang, Chih Ted; Deng, Zhi-Qiang

    2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Downstream hydraulic geometry relations: 2. Calibration and testing Vijay P. Singh Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA Chih Ted Yang 1 Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado...; KEYWORDS: dynamic equilibrium, hydraulic geometry, maximum entropy, minimum energy dissipation, regime equations, stream power Citation: Singh, V. P., C. T. Yang, and Z.-Q. Deng, Downstream hydraulic geometry relations: 2. Calibration and testing, Water...

  6. Trace contaminant determination in fish scale by laser ablation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, I.; Coutant, C.C.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser ablation on rings of fish scale has been used to analyze the historical accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) in striped bass in the Watts Bar Reservoir. Rings on a fish scale grow in a pattern that forms a record of the fish`s chemical intake. In conjunction with the migration patterns of fish monitored by ecologists, relative PCB concentrations in the seasonal rings of fish scale can be used to study the PCB distribution in the reservoir. In this study, a tightly-focused laser beam from a XeCl excimer laser was used to ablate and ionize a small portion of a fish scale placed in a vacuum chamber. The ions were identified and quantified by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Studies of this type can provide valuable information for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) off-site clean-up efforts as well as identifying the impacts of other sources to local aquatic populations.

  7. Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish THE HUGETHREE-GORGES DAM (TGD) OFTHE Yangtze River is going and animals, as discussed by J. Wu et al. in their Policy Forum "Three-Gorges Dam-- experiment in habitat). The construction of the Gezhou Dam (38 km downstream from the TGD) in 1981 led to sharp declines in the popula

  8. aquatic biota downstream: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for optimizing bioaccumulation parameters (BAF and BSAF) in aquatic species, such as fish, whose exposure history. Keywords: Bioaccumulation factor Exposure range BSAF Sediments...

  9. The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Justin Toby

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for Interpreting Downstream Effects of Dams onF. and N. Shin, 2001. The downstream effects of dams on theG.P. and M.G. Wolman, 1984. Downstream Effects of Dams on

  10. Galectin-3 is a downstream regulator of matrix metalloproteinase-9 function during endochondral bone formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega, Nathalie; Behonick, Danielle J; Colnot, Céline; Cooper, Douglas N W; Werb, Zena

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    June 2005 Galectin-3 Is a Downstream Regulator of Matrixof MMP-9 that acts downstream to regulate hypertrophicsuggest that galectin-3 is a downstream regu- lator of MMP-9

  11. Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production Response1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantitative Network Signal Combinations Downstream of TCR Activation Can Predict IL-2 Production of intense ongoing study, but understanding how the consequent downstream signaling networks integrate hypothesized that a quantitative combination of key downstream network signals across multiple pathways must

  12. Downstream genes of Pax6 revealed by comprehensive transcriptome profiling in the developing rat hindbrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C: A screen for downstream effectors of Neurogenin2 in theNumayama-Tsuruta et al. : Downstream genes of Pax6 revealedARTICLE Open Access Downstream genes of Pax6 revealed by

  13. Managing the commons upstream and downstream: the need to adapt institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Managing the commons upstream and downstream: the need to adapt institutions Traditional rules Common-pool resources (forest, water, pasture), managed in a complex upstream­ downstream constellation flexible boundaries around resources, which allow users upstream and downstream to be coordinated

  14. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kamps, Jeffrey W.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M. (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR)

    2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2004 river flows were near or below the historical average for each month of the fish passage season (Mar-Oct) at John Day and Bonneville. These flow levels provided average migration conditions for juvenile salmonids, comparable to 2003. The number of fish handled at John Day increased from 166,209 in 2003 to 412,797 in 2004. This dramatic increase is due entirely to an increased sample rate to get fish for researchers, from an average of 8.5% last year to 18.5% this year. In the spring, 83% of fish sampled were for research, and in the fall, 92% were for research. Unusually small subyearling Chinook, on average 10 millimeters shorter than last year, made meeting the 110 mm fork length or 13 gram requirement difficult. Consequently, we had to sample even more fish to get the number required by researchers. Passage timing at John Day was similar to previous years, with the 10% and 90% dates within a week of last year for all species. Descaling was lower than last year for all species except sockeye and below the historical average for all species. At 5.4%, sockeye descaling was 2% higher than any other species. Mortality, while up from last year for all species and higher than the historical average for all species except sockeye, continued to be low, below 1% for all species. The number of fish sampled at Bonneville was five and one half times the number sampled last year, from 80,687 to 444,580. Like John Day, this increase resulted from research fish collections. Passage timing at Bonneville was early for spring migrants, with record early 10%, 50%, and 90% dates for yearling Chinook, unclipped steelhead, and coho. Clipped steelhead also passed Bonneville earlier than normal, with record early 50% and 90% dates and only missing the 10% date by two days. Sockeye were the exception this year with the 10% date only a couple of days different than the 50% date for three previous years and the latest 90% date of any year, except of 2001. The middle 80% of the yearling Chinook and unclipped steelhead runs took longer to pass Bonneville than any previous year, at 44 and 45 days, respectively. For subyearling Chinook, the middle 80% of the fish passed during the last three weeks of June and the first week of July, taking 35 days to pass the project, the same as last year. Descaling for all species was slightly higher than the average of the last five years. Compared to last year, descaling varied by species, increasing for yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye and lower for subyearling Chinook and steelhead. Since sampling began in the juvenile monitoring facility, descaling has been quite consistent, staying below 3.6% for yearling and subyearling Chinook, unclipped steelhead and coho, and above 4.7% for clipped steelhead and sockeye. Mortality was slightly higher than last year and the historical average for yearling and subyearling Chinook and steelhead. Coho and sockeye mortality was lower than last year and the historical average. Mortality for all species was below 1%. Powerhouse 2 operational priority and research results showing higher survival of fish passing through the PH1 turbines rather than through the bypass system resulted in a complete disuse of the PH1 bypass system. Consequently, we removed the historic PH1 data from this report and refer readers to any prior report for information regarding first powerhouse fish sampling.

  15. Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    1 Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs Shen Chen, Ahmad R. Dhaini maximum energy conservation in green Ethernet passive optical networks (EPONs). While overlapping allocation scheme for energy conservation in green EPONs. Simulation results verify the proposed model

  16. Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

  17. Polypyrimidine Track-binding Protein Binding Downstream of Caspase-2 Alternative Exon 9 Represses Its Inclusion*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jane Y.

    Polypyrimidine Track-binding Protein Binding Downstream of Caspase-2 Alternative Exon 9 Represses (In100) located in the intron downstream of alternative exon 9. The upstream portion of this element downstream from the decoy 3 acceptor site. This downstream domain harbors several polypyrimidine track

  18. Innovative Applications of O.R. Master surgery scheduling with consideration of multiple downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Innovative Applications of O.R. Master surgery scheduling with consideration of multiple downstream on operating theater and operating staff, we enlarge the scope to downstream resources, such as the intensive for the downstream resources. We then discuss measures to define downstream costs resulting from the MSS and propose

  19. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kamps, Jeffrey W.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M. (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Portland, OR)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2003 spring flows were within 7 kcfs of last year's flows, but the summer flows were significantly lower, averaging 194 kcfs compared to 278 kcfs last year. Late summer and fall flows were within 20 kcfs of last year's flows. These flow levels provided good migration conditions for juvenile salmonids, comparable to last year, except in June and July. Monthly average river flows were lower than the historical averages. The number of fish handled at John Day decreased from 257,741 last year to 166,209 this year. Part of this decline is due to reduced research effort which lowers the total number of fish needed. Descaling, compared to last year, varied by species, increasing for yearling chinook and clipped and unclipped steelhead, decreasing for coho and sockeye, and remaining about the same for subyearling chinook. Descaling was well below the average for the airlift years for all species except unclipped steelhead. This may be a function of unclipped hatchery steelhead being counted as unclipped steelhead, a category traditionally reserved for wild steelhead. Mortality continues to be low, at or below last year's levels for yearling chinook, subyearling chinook, clipped steelhead and sockeye; slightly higher than last year for unclipped steelhead and coho. With the exception of sockeye, mortality rates at the new facility are well below the average for the years of sampling with the airlift system. The spring migrants generally started migrating later and finished earlier, for a shorter overall duration. Sub-yearling chinook did just the opposite, starting earlier and ending later for a longer middle 80% duration. This was the fourth year of index level sampling at the Hamilton Island Juvenile Monitoring Facility at Bonneville. The number of fish handled declined from 85,552 last year to 80,303 this year. Descaling for all species was similar to the previous two years (within 2%) but in all cases lower than the historical average. Mortality was lower than last year for all species, and below 1% for all species except sockeye (1.9%). Passage timing and duration was similar to last year for all species. A total of 5,542 fish were handled in the first powerhouse for condition monitoring and gas bubble exams. Fish condition was good, with descaling and mortality below last year's levels for all species. Powerhouse 2 operational priority reduced operation of PH1 again this year especially in midsummer as river flow declined. This prompted a 31 July end to a season that was scheduled to go through August. After 23 June exams for gas bubble trauma symptoms were conducted in the Juvenile Monitoring Facility. A total of 3,473 fish were examined and only one fish with bubbles was observed.

  20. Fish Tales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLerran, L.

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk is about fishing and the friendships that have resulted in its pursuit. It is also about theoretical physics, and the relationship of imagination and fantasy to the establishment of ideas about nature. Fishermen, like theoretical physicists, are well known for their inventive imaginations. Perhaps neither are as clever as sailors, who conceived of the mermaid. If one doubts the power of this fantasy, one should remember the ghosts of the many sailors who drowned pursuing these young nymphs. An extraordinary painting by J. Waterhouse is shown as Fig. 1. The enchantment of a mermaid must reflect an extraordinary excess of imagination on the part of the sailor, perhaps together with an impractical turn of mind. A consummated relationship with a mermaid is after all, by its very nature a fantasy incapable of realization. To a theoretical physicist, she is symbolic of many ideas we develop. There are many truths known to fisherman in which one might also find parallels to the goals of scientists: (1) A fish is the only animal that keeps growing after its death; (2) Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught; (3) ''...of all the liars among mankind, the fisherman is the most trustworthy.'' (William Sherwood Fox, in Silken Lines and Silver Hooks); and (4) Men and fish are alike. They both get into trouble when they open their mouths. These quotes may be interpreted as reflecting skepticism regarding the honesty of fisherman, and probably do not reflect adequate admiration for a creative imagination. Is it fair to criticize a person for believing a falsehood that he or she sincerely believes to be true? The fisherman simultaneously invents the lie, and believes in it himself. The parallel with theoretical physics is perhaps only approximate, although we physicists may invent stories that we come to believe, on some rare occasions our ideas actually correspond to a more or less true descriptions of nature. These minor philosophical differences are not really the central issue, however. It is more to the point that both fishermen and scientists enjoy creating a good story, and we also enjoy a story well told. The correct mixture of truth, lie, fantasy and excitement is a witches brew.

  1. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Fish and Wildlife Administrator for BPAs Fish and Wildlife Division. The Fish and Wildlife Administrator is responsible for overseeing projects, and...

  2. OGJ group weathered tough times upstream and downstream in 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, J.B.; Price, R.B.

    1992-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    With an upstream sector hit by low oil and gas prices and downstream operations squeezed by weak petroleum demand, 1991, was a tough year for the group of 22 major integrated U.S. companies Oil and Gas Journal tracks. This paper reports that the brief respite caused by the oil price spike in second half 1990 ended abruptly early in first half 1991, and it turned into a year of buckling down for most companies. They shed non-core assets, implemented strategic restructuring moves, and reduced staff. Although low prices slowed overall drilling activity for the group, oil and gas production increased slightly, and most companies reported reserves gains. Recession in the U.S. and Europe depressed demand for the group's fined products enough to pinch downstream earnings even as buoyant Asia-Pacific demand helped jack up world product sales.

  3. Results from modeling and simulation of chemical downstream etch systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Vosen, S.R.; Shon, J.W.; Larson, R.S.; Fox, C.A.; Buchenauer

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes modeling work performed at Sandia in support of Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) benchmark and tool development programs under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with SEMATECH. The Chemical Downstream Etch (CDE) Modeling Project supports SEMATECH Joint Development Projects (JDPs) with Matrix Integrated Systems, Applied Materials, and Astex Corporation in the development of new CDE reactors for wafer cleaning and stripping processes. These dry-etch reactors replace wet-etch steps in microelectronics fabrication, enabling compatibility with other process steps and reducing the use of hazardous chemicals. Models were developed at Sandia to simulate the gas flow, chemistry and transport in CDE reactors. These models address the essential components of the CDE system: a microwave source, a transport tube, a showerhead/gas inlet, and a downstream etch chamber. The models have been used in tandem to determine the evolution of reactive species throughout the system, and to make recommendations for process and tool optimization. A significant part of this task has been in the assembly of a reasonable set of chemical rate constants and species data necessary for successful use of the models. Often the kinetic parameters were uncertain or unknown. For this reason, a significant effort was placed on model validation to obtain industry confidence in the model predictions. Data for model validation were obtained from the Sandia Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (MBMS) experiments, from the literature, from the CDE Benchmark Project (also part of the Sandia/SEMATECH CRADA), and from the JDP partners. The validated models were used to evaluate process behavior as a function of microwave-source operating parameters, transport-tube geometry, system pressure, and downstream chamber geometry. In addition, quantitative correlations were developed between CDE tool performance and operation set points.

  4. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M.; Ballinger, Dean (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, The Dalles, OR)

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005 was an average to below average flow year at John Day and Bonneville Dams. A large increase in flow in May improved migration conditions for that peak passage month. Spill was provided April through August and averaged about 30% and 48% of river flow at John Day and Bonneville Dams, respectively. Water temperature graphs were added this year that show slightly lower than average water temperature at John Day and slightly higher than average temperatures at Bonneville. The number of fish handled at John Day decreased from 412,797 in 2004 to 195,293 this year. Of the 195,293 fish, 120,586 (61.7%) were collected for researchers. Last year, 356,237 (86.3%) of the fish sampled were for researchers. This dramatic decline is the result of (1) fewer research fish needed (2) a smaller, lighter tag which allowed for tagging of smaller fish, and (3) a larger average size for subyearling chinook. These factors combined to reduce the average sample rate to 10.8%, about half of last year's rate of 18.5%. Passage timing at John Day was similar to previous years, but the pattern was distinguished by larger than average passage peaks for spring migrants, especially sockeye. The large spike in mid May for sockeye created a very short middle 80% passage duration of just 16 days. Other spring migrants also benefited from the large increase in flow in May. Descaling was lower than last year for all species except subyearling chinook and below the historical average for all species. Conversely, the incidence of about 90% of the other condition factors increased. Mortality, while up from last year for all species and higher than the historical average for all species except sockeye, continued to be low, less than 1% for all species. On 6 April a slide gate was left closed at John Day and 718 fish were killed. A gate position indicator light was installed to prevent reoccurrences. Also added this year was a PIT tag detector on the adult return-to-river flume. For the first time this year, we successfully held Pacific lamprey ammocetes. The number of fish sampled at Bonneville Dam was also down this year to 260,742, from 444,580 last year. Reasons for the decline are the same as stated above for John Day. Passage timing at Bonneville Dam was quite similar to previous years with one notable exception, sockeye. Sockeye passage was dominated by two large spikes in late May that greatly condensed the passage pattern, with the middle 80% passing Bonneville in just 18 days. Unlike John Day, passage for the rest of the species was well disbursed from late April through early June. Fish condition was good, with reductions in descaling rates for all species except unclipped steelhead and sockeye. Sockeye mortality matched last year's rate but was considerably lower for all other species. Rare species sampled at Bonneville this year included a bull trout and a eulachon.

  5. Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Migration Year Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 1 #12;Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 NIDS NCCR North-South #12;Book Nepal Migration Year Book 2011 Publishers Nepal Institute of Development Studies (NIDS) G.P.O. Box: 7647, Kathmandu, Nepal Email: nids@mail.com.np Web: www.nids.org.np National Centre of Competence in Research

  6. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  7. Large-Scale Algal Cultivation, Harvesting and Downstream Processing Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ATP3 (Algae Testbed Public-Private Partnership) is hosting the Large-Scale Algal Cultivation, Harvesting and Downstream Processing Workshop on November 2–6, 2015, at the Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation in Mesa, Arizona. Topics will include practical applications of growing and managing microalgal cultures at production scale (such as methods for handling cultures, screening strains for desirable characteristics, identifying and mitigating contaminants, scaling up cultures for outdoor growth, harvesting and processing technologies, and the analysis of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates). Related training will include hands-on laboratory and field opportunities.

  8. Characterization and application of vortex flow adsorption for simplification of biochemical product downstream processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Junfen, 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One strategy to reduce costs in manufacturing a biochemical product is simplification of downstream processing. Biochemical product recovery often starts from fermentation broth or cell culture. In conventional downstream ...

  9. Using benthic infauna abundance and genetic markers in oysters as indicators of hypoxia downstream from a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Using benthic infauna abundance and genetic markers in oysters as indicators of hypoxia downstream on communities downstream from these systems has not been well assessed. This study sought to examine differences between regions downstream from a permeable reactive barrier and a control site at Waquoit Bay in three

  10. Ecosystem response to a salmon disturbance regime: Implications for downstream nutrient fluxes in aquatic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Ecosystem response to a salmon disturbance regime: Implications for downstream nutrient fluxes the post-spawn period, downstream biofilm abundance exceeded pre-spawn values, indicating a near short spatial scales acts to retard the flushing of MDNs to downstream rearing lakes. The magnitude

  11. On downstream hydraulic geometry and optimal energy expenditure: case study of the Ashley and Taieri Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramírez, Jorge A.

    On downstream hydraulic geometry and optimal energy expenditure: case study of the Ashley Abstract The downstream distribution of channel geometry and of the rate of energy expenditure per unit the network. We look at energy expenditure from two perspectives. (1) In the context of downstream hydraulic

  12. Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Scott C. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Rotor Scott C. Morris , David B. Stephens The region downstream of a ducted rotor has been experimentally investigated in terms of its wake the description of the flow field and wall pressure in the region downstream of the rotor. Measurements involving

  13. Feasibility Studies on a Downstream Injection System for Mu2e Calorimeter Calibration Guangyong Koha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    Feasibility Studies on a Downstream Injection System for Mu2e Calorimeter Calibration Electrons A calibration-electron injection system sited downstream of the calorimeters within the Mu2e detector solenoid directed along the beam axis), progressing downstream over the extent of the stopping target array.1

  14. Partial Crosstalk Precompensation in Downstream Raphael Cendrillon a,, George Ginis b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partial Crosstalk Precompensation in Downstream VDSL Raphael Cendrillon a,, George Ginis b , Marc than 52 Mbps in the downstream, to the mass consumer market. This is achieved by transmitting and is the primary limitation on performance in VDSL. In downstream transmission several crosstalk precompensation

  15. Downstream coarsening in headwater channels Chris J. Brummer and David R. Montgomery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Downstream coarsening in headwater channels Chris J. Brummer and David R. Montgomery Department drainage basins in western Washington document systematic downstream coarsening of median bed surface grain size (D50) and a subsequent shift to downstream fining at a drainage area of about 10 km2 . Analyses

  16. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 5 (1996) 173180. Printed in the UK Downstream physics of the helicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Francis F.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 5 (1996) 173­180. Printed in the UK Downstream physics of the helicon and that a dense, cool (Te downstream region. The density n and electron densities, it plays little role in the downstream evolution of the plasma. These results indicate

  17. Identification of novel Hoxa1 downstream targets regulating hindbrain, neural crest and inner ear development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    Identification of novel Hoxa1 downstream targets regulating hindbrain, neural crest and inner ear and heart in humans and mice; however, almost nothing is known about the molecular downstream targets regulated by Hox genes (Hueber and Lohmann, 2008). In this study, we set out to identify the downstream

  18. A Gene Necessary for Normal Male Courtship, yellow, Acts Downstream of fruitless in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Jonathan

    A Gene Necessary for Normal Male Courtship, yellow, Acts Downstream of fruitless in the Drosophila- ship behavior, genes acting downstream of fru have not yet been identified. Here we demonstrate that the yellow (y) gene is genetically downstream of fru in the 3rd -instar larval brain. Yellow protein

  19. STEREO observations of upstream and downstream waves at low Mach number shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    STEREO observations of upstream and downstream waves at low Mach number shocks C. T. Russell,1 L. K; published 13 February 2009. [1] Early theories of upstream and downstream wave formation at laminar (low, propagating upstream along the shock normal. Downstream waves were attributed to nearly perpendicular shocks

  20. Downstream Hydraulic Geometry of Alluvial Channels Jong-Seok Lee, A.M.ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Downstream Hydraulic Geometry of Alluvial Channels Jong-Seok Lee, A.M.ASCE1 ; and Pierre Y. Julien. A larger database for the downstream hydraulic geometry of alluvial channels is examined through with meandering to braided planform geometry. The five parameters describing downstream hydraulic geometry are

  1. Downstream variations in the width of bedrock channels David R. Montgomery and Karen B. Gran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    Downstream variations in the width of bedrock channels David R. Montgomery and Karen B. Gran the Mokelumne River show that bedrock channel width decreases substantially downstream at the contact between show systematic channel widening after flood flows and debris flow impacts. We conclude that downstream

  2. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall downstream from the dam and in an upstream control reach using aerial photos (1994­2008) and in the field

  3. SCOUR DOWNSTREAM OF GRADE-CONTROL By Noel E. Bormann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    SCOUR DOWNSTREAM OF GRADE-CONTROL STRUCTURES By Noel E. Bormann1 and Pierre Y. Julien,2 Members, ASCE ABSTRACT: A theoretical investigation of local scour downstream of grade-control structures based, however, causes sig- nificant downstream local scour, which may undermine these structures. Structural

  4. DOWNSTREAM VDSL CHANNEL TRACKING USING LIMITED FEEDBACK FOR CROSSTALK PRECOMPENSATED SCHEMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    DOWNSTREAM VDSL CHANNEL TRACKING USING LIMITED FEEDBACK FOR CROSSTALK PRECOMPENSATED SCHEMES J, crosstalk becomes the main impairment in VDSL systems. For downstream communication, crosstalk precompensa or downstream bit rate needs to be used to help the estimation. In this paper, we design a new algorithm to try

  5. Physically based model of downstream fining in bedrock streams with lateral input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Eric

    Click Here for Full Article Physically based model of downstream fining in bedrock streams not show a clear, monotonic pattern of size reduction in the downstream direction. Both abrasion and selective sorting may play important roles in generating downstream fining. The objective of this study

  6. DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS of downstream channels and lead to accumulation of fine sediments and habitat degradation. To investigate, we-sediment measures, and an intensive sampling scheme, this study found that channels downstream of diversions

  7. Flowfield and wall pressure characteristics downstream of a boundary layer suction device.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    Flowfield and wall pressure characteristics downstream of a boundary layer suction device. Meagan A-dimensional slit can significantly reduce the fluctuating wall pressure immediately downstream of the suction slit momentum regions of the flow with the wall at the downstream edge of the suction slit. The third region

  8. Active species downstream of an ArO surface-wave microwave discharge for biomedicine,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Vasco

    Active species downstream of an Ar­O 2 surface-wave microwave discharge for biomedicine, surface.1088/0963-0252/20/3/035006 Active species downstream of an Ar­O2 surface-wave microwave discharge for biomedicine, surface treatment in a 0.5 cm diameter tube at pressures between 1 and 12 mbar. The early afterglow that occurs downstream

  9. MHD turbulence in Saturn's magnetosheath downstream of a quasi parallel bow shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    1 MHD turbulence in Saturn's magnetosheath downstream of a quasi parallel bow shock M. B. Bavassano of the MHD turbulence downstream of a quasi parallel shock is investigated using plasma and magnetic eld data. The characteristics of the waves observed in that region are compared with those of the waves present: (i) downstream

  10. Nearshore fish assemblages associated with introduced predatory fishes in lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricciardi, Anthony

    investigated the relationship between the presence of introduced largebodied predatory fishes (largemouth bass: impact; invasive species; native fishes; pike; largemouth bass; rock bass; smallmouth bass; walleyeNearshore fish assemblages associated with introduced predatory fishes in lakes JUSTIN TRUMPICKASa

  11. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M.; Ballinger, Dean (Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission, Gladstone, OR)

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000 was the third season in the Smolt Monitoring Facility (SMF) at John Day Dam. Despite the continued presence of the NMFS The Dalles Dam spillway survival study, and a higher target number of study fish, sample numbers were down form 1999. Additionally, the average sample rate this year (25%) was nearly twice the average rate in 1999, (13%). Spill, expressed as a percent of river flow, was up slightly this year, about 3% in the spring and 8% through the summer and fall, which accounts for some of the decline in sample numbers. The largest declines in sample numbers were for yearling and subyearling chinook and wild sockeye. Descaling and mortality rates were very low for all species, the highest descaling was 11.2% for hatchery sockeye. River flow was lower than last year, debris was light, dissolved gas levels were generally below the Oregon and Washington water quality standards, and overall, migration conditions were good. Passage duration was generally similar to last year but timing varied considerably, depending on species. PIT tag detections were down to 41,848 from 138,705 the previous year. Increased spill passage is the likely explanation for the large decline. The Separation by Code component of the system was utilized by three different studies. At Bonneville Dam, index level sampling was transferred from the first powerhouse to the second powerhouse and occurred at the new Hamilton Island Juvenile Monitoring Facility. An estimated 2.7 million fish passed through the bypass system, 54,051 of which were sampled in the new facility. The location and method differ so much from previous years that comparisons are pointless. River conditions were similar to those described for John Day Dam; lower than in 1999, moderate debris, manageable gas levels, and normal temperatures. Passage timing and duration was very similar to last year for the chinook and steelhead but the coho migration started later and ended earlier, and sockeye were just the opposite. Descaling rates were up for all species and mortality was up for yearling and subyearling chinook and coho. PIT tag detection declined from 130,998 last year to 86,842 this year.

  12. HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HANDLING FRESH FISH REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 2 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH 428 Washington 25, D, C. December 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART TWO HANDLING FRESH FISH By Charles in a series of five on "Refrigeration of Fish." Titles of the other four leaflets are: - 38 - 84 Part 1

  13. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  14. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achond, Stephen; Hockersmith, Eric E.; Sandford, Benjamin P. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA)

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the 2002 results from an ongoing project to monitor the migration behavior of wild spring/summer chinook salmon smolts in the Snake River Basin. The report also discusses trends in the cumulative data collected for this project from Oregon and Idaho streams since 1989. The project was initiated after detection data from passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) had shown distinct differences in migration patterns between wild and hatchery fish for three consecutive years. National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) investigators first observed these differences in 1989. The data originated from tagging and interrogation operations begun in 1988 to evaluate smolt transportation for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1991, the Bonneville Power Administration began a cooperative effort with NMFS to expand tagging and interrogation of wild fish. Project goals were to characterize the outmigration timing of these fish, to determine whether consistent migration patterns would emerge, and to investigate the influence of environmental factors on the timing and distribution of these migrations. In 1992, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) began an independent program of PIT tagging wild chinook salmon parr in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha River Basins in northeast Oregon. Since then, ODFW has reported all tagging, detection, and timing information on fish from these streams. However, with ODFW concurrence, NMFS will continue to report arrival timing of these fish at Lower Granite Dam.

  15. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  16. COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinkers 44 Fish Hooks 45 to 46 Tuna Jigs 47 Fishing Spoons 47 Swivels 48 Floats and Buoys 48 List and Diesel power. Shipbuilding techniques and fishing exper- iences are reflected in the modern fishing navigation and fish-finding de- vices. A recent development in fishing gear is the power block used

  17. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All Brands ExceptCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch

  18. Monitoring the Migrations of Wild Snake River Spring and Summer Chinook Salmon Smolts, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achord, Stephen; Marsh, Douglas M.; Kamikawa, Daniel J. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Division, Seattle, WA)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We PIT tagged wild spring and summer chinook salmon parr in the Snake River Basin in 1991, and subsequently monitored these fish during their smolt migration through Lower Granite, Little Goose, and McNary Dams during spring and summer 1992. This report details our findings.

  19. Functional dissection of homeodomain transcription factors HoxA9 and Meis1 in myeloid leukemia : their epigenetic regulation and their downstream targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inhibitors for the downstream mediator proteins such as FLT3regulation and their downstream targets A dissertationthe leukemia-associated downstream target genes underlines

  20. Quantification of the upstream-to-downstream influence in the Muskingum method and implications for speedup in parallel computations of river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Cedric H; Yang, Zong-Liang; Famiglietti, James S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the upstream-to-downstream influence in the Muskingumsolved in an upstream-to-downstream manner which imposesof the upstream-to-downstream influence in the Muskingum

  1. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the effect on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by the projects. The submerged electrical generator will emit an EMF into the surrounding water, as will underwater cables used to transmit electricity from the generator to the shore, between individual units in an array (inter-turbine cables), and between the array and a submerged step-up transformer. The electric current moving through these cables will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of fish and benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011). Those experiments found little indication that the behaviors of these freshwater species were a

  2. San Francisco Estuary Striped Bass Migration History Determined by Electron-microprobe Analysis of Otolith Sr/Ca Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostrach, D J; Phillis, C C; Weber, P K; Ingram, B L; Zinkl, J G

    2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat use has been shown to be an important factor in the bioaccumulation of contaminants in striped bass. This study examines migration in striped bass as part of a larger study investigating bioaccumulation and maternal transfer of xenobiotics to progeny in the San Francisco Estuary system. Habitat use, residence time and spawning migration over the life of females (n = 23) was studied. Female striped bass were collected between Knights Landing and Colusa on the Sacramento River during the spawning runs of 1999 and 2001. Otoliths were removed, processed and aged via otolith microstructure. Subsequently, otoliths were analyzed for strontium/calcium (Sr/Ca) ratio using an electron-microprobe to measure salinity exposure and to distinguish freshwater, estuary, and marine habitat use. Salinity exposure during the last year before capture was examined more closely for comparison of habitat use by the maternal parent to contaminant burden transferred to progeny. Results were selectively confirmed by ion microprobe analyses for habitat use. The Sr/Ca data demonstrate a wide range of migratory patterns. Age of initial ocean entry differs among individuals before returning to freshwater, presumably to spawn. Some fish reside in freshwater year-round, while others return to more saline habitats and make periodic migrations to freshwater. Frequency of habitat shifts and residence times differs among fish, as well as over the lifetime of individual fish. While at least one fish spent its final year in freshwater, the majority of spawning fish spent their final year in elevated salinity. However, not all fish migrated to freshwater to spawn in the previous year. Results from this investigation concerning migration history in striped bass can be combined with contaminant and histological developmental analyses to better understand the bioaccumulation of contaminants and the subsequent effects they and habitat use have on fish populations in the San Francisco Estuary system.

  3. iFISH -Conceptually What is iFISH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Jon

    iFISH - Conceptually What is iFISH? iFISH is an underlying technology that can form the basis and effective manner. It provides users with a unique exploration experience. iFISH offers a playful environment that encourages a further quick and deeper investigation. iFISH provides all of the above. It employs sliders

  4. Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

  5. Influence of Headwater Streams on Downstream Reaches in Forested Lee H. MacDonald and Drew Coe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Influence of Headwater Streams on Downstream Reaches in Forested Areas Lee H. MacDonald and Drew of the streamflow in downstream areas. Headwater streams also provide other important constituents to downstream, and fine particulate organic matter are more likely to be delivered to downstream reaches than coarse

  6. Downstream patterns of bed material grain size in a large, lowland alluvial river subject to low sediment supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Downstream patterns of bed material grain size in a large, lowland alluvial river subject to low. The data also show that tributaries have a minor impact on main stem downstream fining due to basin shape of downstream fining. Citation: Singer, M. B. (2008), Downstream patterns of bed material grain size in a large

  7. Understanding barotrauma in fish passing hydro structures: a global strategy for sustainable development of water resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Boys, Craig A.; Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Silva, Luiz G.; Brauner, Colin J.; Mallen-Cooper, Martin; Phonekhampeng, Oudom; Thorncraft, Garry; Singhanouvong, Douangkham

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater fishes are one of the most imperiled groups of vertebrates and species declines have been linked to a number of anthropogenic influences. This is alarming as the diversity and stability of populations are at risk. In addition, freshwater fish serve as important protein sources, particularly in developing countries. One of the focal activities thought to influence freshwater fish population declines is water resource development, which is anticipated to increase over the next several decades. For fish encountering hydro structures, such as passing through hydroturbines, there may be a rapid decrease in pressure which can lead to injuries commonly referred to as barotraumas. The authors summarize the research to date that has examined the effects of rapid pressure changes on fish and outline the most important factors to consider (i.e., swim bladder morphology, depth of acclimation, migration pattern and life stage) when examining the susceptibility of barotraumas for fish of interest.

  8. Building bridges for fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building-bridges-for-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

  9. One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Greg

    One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video Andrew Rova Simon template object recognition method for classifying fish species in un- derwater video. This method can be a component of a system that automatically identifies fish by species, im- proving upon previous works which

  10. Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Mayrai Gindy, University of Rhode.3 Hazard Classification of the Federal Emergency Management Agency .............. 11 2.4 General Dam Design

  11. Brf1 posttranscriptionally regulates pluripotency and differentiation responses downstream of Erk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elowitz, Michael

    Brf1 posttranscriptionally regulates pluripotency and differentiation responses downstream of Erk, operates downstream of FGF/Erk MAP kinase signaling to regulate pluripotency and cell fate decision making in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). FGF/Erk MAP kinase signaling up-regulates Brf1, which disrupts

  12. Water Research 39 (2005) 33763384 Eutrophication downstream from small reservoirs in mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espigares, Tíscar

    Water Research 39 (2005) 3376­3384 Eutrophication downstream from small reservoirs in mountain experience eutrophication as a consequence of deep releases from dams. Field studies were conducted in four sources, causing eutrophication downstream. Nutrients would ultimately come from land/forest runoff

  13. Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South sluice gate operations affect the 45-km reach of the Hwang River between the Hapcheon Reregulation Dam

  14. Fish Passage Center 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele [Fish Passage Center of the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Authority

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The January-July runoff volume above the Dalles Dam in 2007 was 89% of the average runoff volume for the 1971-2000 historical record. The April-July runoff volume at Lower Granite Dam was 68% of the 1971-2000 historical record. Over the 79 year historical record from 1929 through 2007, the 2007 January-July runoff volume at the Dalles was the 50th lowest year out of the 79th year record. The January through July runoff volume at Lower Granite was the 65th lowest runoff year out of 79 on record. This year can be characterized by steadily decreasing snowpack which was below average in the Columbia Basin by the end of April. The combination of runoff volume, decreasing snowpack and reservoir operations resulted in spring migration flows at McNary Dam averaging 239 Kcfs, slightly above the Biological Opinion flow objective of 237 Kcfs. However the spring period migration flows in the Snake River averaged 61 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam, substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 85 Kcfs. Summer migration period Biological Opinion flow objectives averaged 163 Kcfs at McNary Dam, substantially below the summer flow objective of 200 Kcfs. Summer migration period flows in the Snake River at Lower Granite Dam averaged 29 Kcfs, also substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 50 Kcfs. Overall spring migrants in the Columbia River experienced better migration flows than spring migrants in the Snake River reach. Summer migration flow objectives were not achieved in either the Columbia or Snake rivers. The 2007 FCRPS Operations Agreement represents an expanded and improved spill program that goes beyond the measures contained in the 2004 Biological Opinion. During the spring period, spill now occurs for twenty-four hours per day at all projects, except for John Day Dam where the daily program remains at 12 hours. A summer spill program provides spill at all the fish transportation collector projects (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams), whereas prior to 2005 spill was terminated at these projects after the spring period. In addition, the 2007 operations agreement provided regardless of flow conditions. For the first time spill for fish passage was provided in the low flow conditions that prevailed in the Snake River throughout the spring and summer migration periods. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) monitoring continued throughout the spill period. A higher incidence of rank 1, GBT signs were observed in late arriving steelhead smolts arriving after the 95% passage date had occurred. During this time dissolved gas levels were generally below the 110% water quality standard in the forebay where fish were sampled. This occurrence was due to prolonged exposure and extended travel times due to low migration flows. The 2007 migration conditions differed from any year in the historic record. The migration conditions combined low river flows in the Snake River with spill throughout the spring and summer season. The juvenile migration characteristics observed in 2007 were unique compared to past years in that high levels of 24 hour spill for fish passage were provided in low flow conditions, and with a delayed start to the smolt transportation program a smaller proportion of the total run being transported. This resulted in relatively high spring juvenile survival despite the lower flows. The seasonal spring average flow in the Snake River was 61 Kcfs much lower than the spring time average of 120 Kcfs that occurred in 2006. However juvenile steelhead survival through the Lower Granite to McNary reach in 2007 was nearly 70% which was similar to the juvenile steelhead survival seen in 2006 under higher migration flows. The low flows in the May-July period of 2007 were similar to the 2001 low flow year, yet survival for fall chinook juveniles in this period in 2007 was much higher. In 2001 the reach survival estimate for juvenile fall Chinook from Lower Granite to McNary Dam ranged from 0.25-0.34, while survival in the same reach ranged between 0.54-0.60 in 2007. In addition travel time estimat

  15. FISH U REGISTRATION Name: ___________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    registration and deposit (Make checks payable to SIUC) to: FISH U (Attn: Candie Glover) Fisheries & Illinois. Carbondale, IL 62901 Fish U Fisheries & Illinois Aquaculture Attn: Candie Glover Life Science II, Rm 173. Contact Candie Glover if you are interested in coordinating efforts for carpooling and/or lodging. #12;

  16. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RETAIL PRICES CONTENTS Page Tuna, Canned White Meat Tuna. (Albacore), Solid Pack, In Oil All BrandsCANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU PRICES APRIL 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market Development FISHERY

  17. Information Management Software Services SAP Migrations Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , customers worldwide have maximized their SAP systems by providing a streamlined migration path to DB2Assessment Prepare SAP migration project plan templates before the project starts to allow extra time to define the order in which your SAP landscape(s) and systems are migrated. Once the migration assessment phase

  18. Assessment of the risk of pile driving to juvenile fish James J. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    page 1 Assessment of the risk of pile driving to juvenile fish James J. Anderson Fisheries Research-12, 1990, Seattle, WA. The problem In this talk I will report on an effort to reassess the risk of pile industry concerns that provisions restricting pile driving during the spring migration are resulting

  19. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  20. The influence of return bends on the downstream pressure drop and condensation heat transfer in tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traviss, Donald P.

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of return bends on the downstream pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of condensing refrigerant R-12 was studied experimentally. Flow patterns in glass return bends of 1/2 to 1 in. radius and 0.315 ...

  1. Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Colin B.

    "One fish, Two fish, Red fish, Blue fish" Mathematically Modeling a Fresh Fish Detector Ibrahim using a device designed to determine the freshness of fish. Through an electric current applied fresh fish from those which are not. Key words. Mathematical modelling, differential equations, noise re

  2. Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation" (McEwen, 1994: 359). Lawler (1992) recognised that little was known about the downstream change. It is suggested that downstream change in discharge is best represented as a power function in terms of channel

  3. Convective Snowbands Downstream of the Rocky Mountains in an Environment with Conditional, Dry Symmetric, and Inertial Instabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumacher, Russ

    Convective Snowbands Downstream of the Rocky Mountains in an Environment with Conditional, Dry quickly equatorward. The bands occurred downstream of complex terrain on the anticyclonic-shear side banners downstream of mountains, and in association with frontogenetical ascent along two baroclinic zones

  4. Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Helene (2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition downstream. The present study focuses on the predictability of a Mediterranean tropical-like storm (Medicane) on 26 September 2006 downstream of the ET of Hurricane Helene from 22 to 25 September. While

  5. 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 710, 2008/Reno, NV Upstream and downstream influence on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    and downstream influence on the unsteadiness of STBLI using DNS data in two configurations M. Pino Martin , S 08544 Statistical analysis of the upstream and downstream flow influence on shock unsteadiness in shock that the unsteadiness of the shock is dominated by the downstream flow. The same analysis applied to the reflected shock

  6. Interaction between a flexible filament and a downstream rigid body Fang-Bao Tian,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Haoxiang

    Interaction between a flexible filament and a downstream rigid body Fang-Bao Tian,1,2 Haoxiang Luo- action between rigid objects. In the situation that one rigid object is located in the downstream wake bodies in tandem arrangement, the downstream one suffers a drag increase and flaps with a larger

  7. Organometallic vapor-phase homoepitaxy of gallium arsenide assisted by a downstream hydrogen afterglow plasma in the growth region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, George J.

    Organometallic vapor-phase homoepitaxy of gallium arsenide assisted by a downstream hydrogen 1991; accepted for publication 3 April 1992) hz situ generated arsenic hydrides are reacted downstream with trimethylgallium (TMGa), both in the presence of and in the absence of a downstream hydrogen afterglow plasma. The

  8. Osteopontin is a downstream effector of the PI3-kinase pathway in melanomas that is inversely correlated with functional PTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringnér, Markus

    Osteopontin is a downstream effector of the PI3-kinase pathway in melanomas that is inversely downstream of PI3K in melanoma and provides insight into how PTEN loss contributes to melanoma development upregulation, we sought to identify downstream components of this pathway that are upregulated when PTEN

  9. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism. Abstract: Transition state searches have been...

  10. adam2 promotes migration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    migrative schedule Amir, Amihood 369 How to Migrate Agents Lambda Matthew Hohlfeld y Bennet Yee z Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: How to Migrate...

  11. amplicon promotes migration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    migrative schedule Amir, Amihood 374 How to Migrate Agents Lambda Matthew Hohlfeld y Bennet Yee z Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: How to Migrate...

  12. Planet migration in self-gravitating disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meru, Farzana; Baruteau, Clement

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and migration of the planet at the same time so that theG. W. 1978, Moon and Planets, 18, 5 Fukagawa, M. , Hayashi,Planet migration in self-gravitating protoplanetary discs

  13. LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRELIMINARY MODELING RESULTS O.BOUR*, E,UniversitéLaval, Sainte-Foy, Canada SUMMARY: Lateral landfill gas migration occurs in the surroundings of a MSW landfill complementary physical measures were used to build a conceptual model of lateral landfill gas migration

  14. Employment Protection and Migration$ Remi Bazillier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Employment Protection and Migration$ R´emi Bazillier LEO-CNRS (UMR 7322), Universit´e d particularly employment protection (EPL), are an important determinant of migration. Us- ing a bilateral migration database, we empirically show that the employment protection differential has a negative impact

  15. Effects in fish during dredging of Lake Jaernsjoen, River Emaan, Sweden

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foerlin, L. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoophysiology; Norrgren, L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the investigation was to study biochemical, physiological and morphological effects in fish during dredging of sediment in a heavily PCB contaminated lake (Lake Jaernsjoen, River Emaan), and to provide a biological control program employing fish for the lake after dredging and restoration. Dredging of the PCB contaminated sediments in Lake Jaernsjoen took place in 1993 and 1994 (see Helgee and Troedsson, this conference). Three different caging studies were performed with one study each year of 1992, 1993 and 1994. Cages with fish were placed at different sites including sites both upstream and downstream the lake and sites at the lake. The fish were caged for four weeks. In 1992 a parallel study was performed of feral perch from the contaminated area. Caging of rainbow trout in Lake Jaernsjoen during dredging resulted in liver enlargement, induction of liver detoxification enzymes (for example EROD activity) and liver morphological changes such as degeneration and vacualization. Induction of EROD activity was also observed in the caged fish in 1992 study (before start of dredging). However no effect was seen on EROD activity in feral perch. The effects caused by dredging in the caged fish were more pronounced in 1994 study than in 1993 study. In the 1994 study effects were also observed in fish caged at sites downstream the lake. In 1993 the dredging area was closed off by a silt curtain whereas in 1994 no silt curtain was used. Therefore, the results seem to indicate that the more pronounced effect picture in the 1994 study seems to be caused by a higher release of suspended material during dredging without a protecting silt curtain (1994).

  16. THE FISH LIVER OIL INDUSTRY FISH ERY LEAFLET 233

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of livers with respect to oil content and vitamin A potency · · Relationship of oil content and vitamin A by molecular dietillation · Concentration of vitamin A by saponification · Vitamin-oil specifications, pricesQY THE FISH LIVER OIL INDUSTRY FISH ERY LEAFLET 233 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE United States

  17. Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marriage Rates in Rural China . . . . . . . . . . .Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . . . . . .and Rural-Urban Migration in Hinterland China . . . . . 1.

  18. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

  19. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

  20. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  1. Fish passage and protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of reprints on fish passage and protection topics from: American Fisheries Society; American Society of Civil Engineers; Harza Engineering Company; Hydro Review Magazine; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Independent Energy Magazine; National Hydropower Association; Northwest Hydroelectric Association; United States Army Corps of Engineers; United States Committee on large dams; and the United States Department of the Interior.

  2. FISH U REGISTRATION Name: ___________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Aquatic Sciences Attn: Candie Glover, Outreach Coordinator Life Science II, Rm 173 ­ Mail Code 6511 Center for Fisheries, Aquaculture & Aquatic Sciences Attn: Candie Glover, Outreach Coordinator Life MUST have a current Fishing License. Contact Candie Glover if you are interested in coordinating

  3. An analysis of the induced flow downstream between oscillating wings in a wind tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Barry Erwin

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ANALYSIS OF THE INDUCED FLOW DOWNSTREAM BETWEEN OSCILLATING WINGS IN A WIND TIMBAL A Thesis by BARRY ERWIN MORGAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1970 Major Subject; Aerospace Engineering AN ANALYSIS OF THE INDUCED FLOW DOWNSTREAM BETWEEN OSCILLATING WINGS IN A WIND TUNNEL A Thesis by BARRY ERWIN MORGAN Approved as to style and content by: rman of Committee) (Hea of Depart ent...

  4. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

  6. Like all other vertebrates, fish need time to recover after exhaustive activity. Furthermore, a rapid rate of recovery may

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Like all other vertebrates, fish need time to recover after exhaustive activity. Furthermore. For example, a rapid rate of recovery is needed to keep migratory passage timely when adult salmon use of anaerobic swimming because the entire upstream migration is completed using stored energy reserves

  7. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiaole Shirley

    pathogene- sis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional expression leads to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). TAL1 is expressed by the leukemic cellsNEOPLASIA Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic

  8. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT Prepared for the Northwest Power Planning Council October 1997 97-15 #12;Published October 1997 by the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 503-222-5161 Toll Free

  9. Effect of downstream feedback on the achievable performance of feedback control loops for serial processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    ]. For control design purposes, the common approach is to use linear models obtained around a certain operationEffect of downstream feedback on the achievable performance of feedback control loops for serial-- This paper deals with feedback control of serial processes, that is, processes formed by the series

  10. Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

  11. Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers William L. Graf including more than 75,000 dams. One hundred thirty-seven of the very large dams, each storing 1.2 km3 (106 effects of these very large dams emerge from an analysis of the stream gage records of 72 river reaches

  12. A mass-balance framework for quantifying downstream changes in fluvial architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola, Chris

    A mass-balance framework for quantifying downstream changes in fluvial architecture NIKKI STRONG models that emphasize the three-dimensionality of alluvial architecture. New data are pre- sented from control on architecture, rather than subsidence per se. A simple coordinate transformation is proposed

  13. Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream using Itezhi-Tezhi Reservoir (Zambia) as a model system aims at defining optimized turbine withdrawal. The water depth of turbine withdrawals was varied in a set of simulations to optimize outflow water quality

  14. A Scalable Approach for Reliable Downstream Data Delivery in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivakumar, Raghupathy

    based simulations, we evaluate the proposed framework. Categories and Subject Descriptors C.2 the spe- cific application the sensor network is used for. Consider a security application where imageA Scalable Approach for Reliable Downstream Data Delivery in Wireless Sensor Networks Seung

  15. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Portland, OR)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage characteristics for management purposes and also travel time and survival analyses. These analyses showed consistent significant relationships between flow and spill percent versus survival for Steelhead in each reach analyzed. These results point to the importance of maintain high flows and spill for steelhead survival through the hydrosystem. A significant relation between either travel time or spill percent and survival for yearling Chinook was found. Given the high correlation between the variables it is not surprising that only one is retained in these models. Again the findings show the importance of flows and spill in spring Chinook survival through the hydrosystem. Survival trends in the Lower Snake River have been steadily declining for in-river migrants over the past several years with two notable exceptions. The lowest survivals were measured in 2001 when low flows and very little or no spill was provided led to poor migration conditions. Also survival increased in 2003 when Biological Opinion spill was provided despite moderate to low flows. Reach survivals in 2004 in the Snake River were the second lowest following 2001. Sub-yearling survival in the mid-Columbia in 2004 between Rock Island and McNary Dam were very low compared to other recent years. The general run-at-large migration timing of sub-yearling fall Chinook in the Snake River has changed with the increasing releases of hatchery supplementation production in the Snake River.

  16. Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

  17. Total and Inorganic Arsenic in Mid-Atlantic Marine Fish and Shellfish and Implications for Fish Advisories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Richard; Crecelius, Eric A.

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to 33.3 metric tons of arsenic trioxide were spilled off the Middle Atlantic coast of the United States in January of 1992 during a shipping accident. Historical fish tissue data for samples collected in the Delaware Inland Bays before and after the spill reveal a prominent spike in total arsenic in summer flounder following the spill and a gradual decline ever since. In 2002, a small study was conducted to determine whether summer flounder migrating into the Delaware Inland Bays from the Continental Shelf in the spring contain higher body burdens of arsenic than summer flounder migrating out of the Inland Bays in the fall. Total arsenic was significantly higher in the incoming fish. Considering that summer flounder overwinter at the spill site, that arsenic trioxide is a dense powder of limited solubility that would tend to incorporate into the sediments, and that summer flounder are demersal fish, we conclude that summer flounder accumulate arsenic offshore and that the likely source of their extra body burden is the spilled arsenic. Speciation of arsenic in the summer flounder, as well as in Atlantic croaker, striped bass, and hard clam reveal low concentrations (0.5 ? 20 ug/kg ww) of toxic inorganic arsenic. DMA was more than an order of magnitude greater in hard clam meats than in the other species tested, a finding attributed to arsenic uptake by phytoplankton and subsequent dietary uptake by the clam. Risk assessment using the inorganic arsenic concentrations was used to conclude that a fish advisory is not warranted.

  18. A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

  19. Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals Aluminum oxide in common soil minerals captures uranium Using computational chemistry models, scientists at Pacific Northwest National...

  20. Migration and Development Research Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , poverty, inequality and growth....................................................... 3 2.3. Socio the effects of migration and remittances on development indicators such as poverty, health, inequality, income

  1. Essays on migration and monetary policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borger, Scott Charles

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6] Hanson, G.H. (2006): “Illegal Migration from Mexico toSpilimbergo. (1999): “Illegal Immigration, Border Enforce-Effects of Enforcement on Illegal Markets: Evidence from

  2. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  3. Evolution of Migrating Planets Undergoing Gas Accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennaro D'Angelo; Stephen H. Lubow

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the orbital and mass evolution of planets that undergo run-away gas accretion by means of 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations. The disk torque distribution per unit disk mass as a function of radius provides an important diagnostic for the nature of the disk-planet interactions. We first consider torque distributions for nonmigrating planets of fixed mass and show that there is general agreement with the expectations of resonance theory. We then present results of simulations for mass-gaining, migrating planets. For planets with an initial mass of 5 Earth masses, which are embedded in disks with standard parameters and which undergo run-away gas accretion to one Jupiter mass (Mjup), the torque distributions per unit disk mass are largely unaffected by migration and accretion for a given planet mass. The migration rates for these planets are in agreement with the predictions of the standard theory for planet migration (Type I and Type II migration). The planet mass growth occurs through gas capture within the planet's Bondi radius at lower planet masses, the Hill radius at intermediate planet masses, and through reduced accretion at higher planet masses due to gap formation. During run-away mass growth, a planet migrates inwards by only about 20% in radius before achieving a mass of ~1 Mjup. For the above models, we find no evidence of fast migration driven by coorbital torques, known as Type III migration. We do find evidence of Type III migration for a fixed mass planet of Saturn's mass that is immersed in a cold and massive disk. In this case the planet migration is assumed to begin before gap formation completes. The migration is understood through a model in which the torque is due to an asymmetry in density between trapped gas on the leading side of the planet and ambient gas on the trailing side of the planet.

  4. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

  5. Electromagnetic field generation in the downstream of electrostatic shocks due to electron trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockem, A; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new magnetic field generation mechanism in electrostatic shocks is found, which can produce fields with magnetic energy density as high as 0.01 of the kinetic energy density of the flows on time scales $ \\tilde \\, 10^4 \\, {\\omega}_{pe}^{-1}$. Electron trapping during the shock formation process creates a strong temperature anisotropy in the distribution function, giving rise to the pure Weibel instability. The generated magnetic field is well-confined to the downstream region of the electrostatic shock. The shock formation process is not modified and the features of the shock front responsible for ion acceleration, which are currently probed in laser-plasma laboratory experiments, are maintained. However, such a strong magnetic field determines the particle trajectories downstream and has the potential to modify the signatures of the collisionless shock.

  6. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim [Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

  7. The Roles of Akt1 and Akt2 Downstream of Src Family Kinases in the Migration and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiueh, Venice Calinisan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Johnson, M.D.  (2007).   MDA­MB­435 cells are derived breast cancer cell line, MDA?MB? 231 cells.   SFKs were inhibition of  SFKs in MDA?MB?231 cells led to decreased 

  8. Migrating Songbirds Recalibrate Their Magnetic Compass Daily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Troy G.

    Migrating Songbirds Recalibrate Their Magnetic Compass Daily from Twilight Cues William W. Cochran, the same individuals migrated northward again. We suggest that birds orient with a magnetic compass­3) after a voyage of up to 25,000 km (4, 5). Migratory songbirds can orient on the basis of compass

  9. Helium Migration in Iron Christ's College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Helium Migration in Iron Y. Zhang Christ's College Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy the achievement at all. ii #12;Abstract A theoretical model of helium migration in body centred cubic (BCC)structure irons has been developed using the concept of the effective helium diffusion coeffi- cient

  10. Curvature Capillary Migration of Microspheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nima Sharifi-Mood; Iris B. Liu; Kathleen J. Stebe

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the question: How does capillarity propel microspheres along curvature gradients? For a particle on a fluid interface, there are two conditions that can apply at the three phase contact line: Either the contact line adopts an equilibrium contact angle, or it can be pinned by kinetic trapping, e.g. at chemical heterogeneities, asperities or other pinning sites on the particle surface. We formulate the curvature capillary energy for both scenarios for particles smaller than the capillary length and far from any pinning boundaries. The scale and range of the distortion made by the particle are set by the particle radius; we use singular perturbation methods to find the distortions and to rigorously evaluate the associated capillary energies. For particles with equilibrium contact angles, contrary to the literature, we find that the capillary energy is negligible, with the first contribution bounded to fourth order in the product of the particle radius and the deviatoric curvature. For pinned contact lines, we find curvature capillary energies that are finite, with a functional form investigated previously by us for disks and microcylinders on curved interfaces. In experiments, we show microsphere migrate along deterministic trajectories toward regions of maximum deviatoric curvature with curvature capillary energies ranging from $6 \\times10^3 - 5 \\times 10^4~k_BT$. These data agree with the curvature capillary energy for the case of pinned contact lines. The underlying physics of this migration is a coupling of the interface deviatoric curvature with the quadrupolar mode of nanometric disturbances in the interface owing to the particle's contact line undulations. This work is an example of the major implications of nanometric roughness and contact line pinning for colloidal dynamics.

  11. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Predator and Bottom-Feeding Fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti Reservoirs in North-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Gonzales, P.R. Fresquez

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, we began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2005, six species of fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs were collected and the edible portion (fillets) was analyzed for 209 possible PCB congeners. Fish from the reservoirs were last sampled in 2001. Mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Abiquiu Reservoir ({mu} = 2.4 ng/g) were statistically similar ({alpha} = 0.01; P (T{le}t) [range = 0.23-0.71]) to mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Cochiti Reservoir ({mu} = 2.7 ng/g), implying that LANL is not the source of PCBs in fish in Cochiti Reservoir. The levels of PCBs in fish from Cochiti Reservoir generally appear to be declining, at least since 2001, which is when PCB levels might have peaked resulting from storm water runoff after the Cerro Grande Fire. Although a PCB ''fingerprinting'' method can be used to relate PCB ''signatures'' in one area to signatures in another area, this method of implicating the source of PCBs cannot be effectively used for biota because they alter the PCB signature through metabolic processes. Regardless of the source of the PCBs, certain species of fish (catfish and carpsuckers) at both Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs continue to harbor levels of PCBs that could be harmful to human health if they are consistently eaten over a long period of time. Bottom-feeding fish (carpsucker and catfish) from Cochiti Reservoir contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-fillet-wet) than predator fish (walleye, northern pike, bass) ({mu} = 1.67 ng/g) and the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) charts. Similarly, bottom-feeding fish from Abiquiu Reservoir also contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-wet) than predator fish (walleye, bass) ({mu} = 0.68 ng/g-wet) and only the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in the EPA charts.

  12. Convergent Evolution in Livebearing Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troendle, Nicholas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    CONVERGENT EVOLUTION IN LIVEBEARING FISHES A Thesis by NICHOLAS JOSEPH TROENDLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2012 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences Convergent Evolution in Livebearing Fishes Copyright 2012 Nicholas Joseph Troendle CONVERGENT EVOLUTION IN LIVEBEARING...

  13. 1 E Fish out recruitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E Fish out Harvest Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon Hatchery 1A Juvenile/Smolt production Habitat 1G Rearing distribution 2K Estuarine life histories among returning adults 3E Productivity survival 1B Adult hydrosystem survival 1C Project survival (juvenile) 1D Fish guidance efficiency 1E

  14. 1 E Fish out recruitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 E Fish out Harvest Hydro 5A Age one recruitment for sturgeon Hatchery 1A Juvenile/Smolt production Habitat 1G Rearing distribution 2K Estuarine life histories among returning adults 3E Productivity (juvenile) 1D Fish guidance efficiency 1E Forebay delay 2A, 3F Dam passage delay 2B Dam passage fallback

  15. Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish Innovative Mercury Treatment Benefits Stream, Fish October 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge scientists Kelly Roy, left, and Trent Jett...

  16. Santa Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2002). Socio-economic profile of the California wetfishCommercial Fishing Community Profile, July 2008 Mangelsdorf,Commercial Fishing Community Profile, July 2008 Santa Cruz

  17. A Survey of Process Migration Mechanisms Jonathan M. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jonathan M.

    A Survey of Process Migration Mechanisms Jonathan M. Smith Computer Science Department Columbia Migration Mechanisms Jonathan M. Smith Computer Science Department Columbia University New York, NY 10027

  18. NETL Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible Oil and Natural Gas Development NETL Gas Migration Study to Advance Understanding of Responsible Oil and Natural Gas...

  19. 10/5/08 9:56 AMRed Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish --Shekhar 2008 (1001): 2 --ScienceNOW Page 1 of 2http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2008/1001/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton, Karen L.

    10/5/08 9:56 AMRed Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish -- Shekhar 2008 (1001): 2 -- Science. Blue male cichlids (top) live close to the surface of Lake Victoria, whereas red males dwell in deeper water. CREDIT: OLE SEEHAUSEN Red Fish, Blue Fish, One Fish Becomes Two Fish By Chandra Shekhar Science

  20. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

  1. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Gao, Fei; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition state searches have been employed to investigate the migration mechanisms of W clusters on W nanoparticles, and to determine the corresponding migration energies for the possible migration paths of these clusters. The tungsten clusters containing up to four adatoms are found to prefer 2D-compact structures with relatively low binding energies. The effect of interface and vertex regions on the migration behavior of the clusters is significantly strong, as compared to that of nanoparticle size. The migration mechanisms are quite different when the clusters are located at the center of the nanoparticle and near the interface or vertex areas. Near the interfaces and vertex areas, the substrate atoms tend to participate in the migration processes of the clusters, and can join the adatoms to form a larger cluster or lead to the dissociation of a cluster via the exchange mechanism, which results in the adatom crossing the facets. The lowest energy paths are used to be determined the energy barriers for W cluster migrations (from 1- to 4-atoms) on the facets, edges and vertex regions. The calculated energy barriers for the trimers suggest that the concerted migration is more probable than the successive jumping of a single adatom in the clusters. In addition, it of interest to note that the dimer shearing is a dominant migration mechanism for the tetramer, but needs to overcome a relatively higher migration energy than other clusters.

  2. Transverse Entanglement Migration in Hilbert Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. W. Chan; J. P. Torres; J. H. Eberly

    2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that, although the amount of mutual entanglement of photons propagating in free space is fixed, the type of correlations between the photons that determine the entanglement can dramatically change during propagation. We show that this amounts to a migration of entanglement in Hilbert space, rather than real space. For the case of spontaneous parametric down conversion, the migration of entanglement in transverse coordinates takes place from modulus to phase of the bi-photon state and back again. We propose an experiment to observe this migration in Hilbert space and to determine the full entanglement.

  3. comparison with allowing them to pro-ceed downstream on their own voli-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is already available for optimism. Theoretically, by reducing losses of young fish, the system has. Copies of this paper, in limited numbers, are available from 0825, Technical Information Division, the primary water uses are: 1) electrical power production, 2) irrigation, 3) flood control, 4) navigation, 5

  4. Numerical and experimental study on the effects of elbows upon the flow downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tung, Karine

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /m' p ?, = 13579. 04 Kg/m CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The presence of one or two elbows in a piping system is known to have an effect on the axial velocity profile and the amount of swirl present downstream of the elbows. As most flowmeters... (using a three-hole Pitot probe) where natural gas with a density of 20. 7 kg/m' and viscosity of 1. 1E ' kg/m s was flowing at a bulk average velocity of 19. 9 m/s through the 20. 3 cm diameter piping systems described above. The effect of these pipe...

  5. Through A Fish's Eye: The Status of Fish Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . More than 3,000 species of fish inhabit America's streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, marshes, swamps important factors such as small dams and abandoned mines could not be incorporate

  6. Chemical Tools for Studying Directed Cell Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Brenda N.

    Cell migration is required for many physiological processes, including wound repair and embryogenesis, and relies on precisely orchestrated events that are regulated in a spatially and temporally controlled manner. Most ...

  7. NAWIPS Migration to AWIPS II Status Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Migrating to new architecture · Leveraged Raytheon implementations where possible · Take advantage/Integration · Software to be base-lined via Raytheon task ­ Drops will be more frequent - available for Center

  8. PMI Toolbox User's Guide Photon Migration Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, David

    PMI Toolbox User's Guide 2/25/2002 1 Photon Migration Imaging Toolbox 2001 http Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA. http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html #12;PMI

  9. Immigration Control in the Age of Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Tak Kei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to 2003 and 2007 to 2008), Malta (2007), and Norway (2009).022). MIGRATION From 2000 to 2009, Malta received a total ofby 1,446 percent. In 2000, Malta received 450 immigrants. In

  10. A chrestomathy Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avise, John

    A chrestomathy on fishes Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia of Ichthyology, Ecology and Evolution,200,000 words of science, of which roughly 45,000 (nearly 1%) refer directly or indirectly to fishes. These have now been compiled, annotated, cross-refer- enced and elaborated on by Daniel Pauly in Darwin's Fishes

  11. Consumer Expenditure Patterns for Fish and Shellfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on/ish and shellfish. March )WJ2. 44(.7) Table 1. - Price, per capita consumption, and share of fish Service. 1981). Per capita Consumer price Per capita total Consumer price index Fish/shellfish fish/shellfish index for red meat/poultry/ for tofal red meat/ expenditure consumption fish/sheIIIish seafood

  12. Native Fish Society Molalla, OR 97308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Native Fish Society PO Box 568 Molalla, OR 97308 Conserving biological diversity of native fish are the state, federal and tribal fish management agencies that have limited authority over habitat conditions in the basin. That authority resides with other agencies, but the fish management agencies can certainly

  13. Tackling Global Inequality in Labor Migration: Diaspora Mechanism and Migration Development Bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gevorkyan, Aleksandr V.; Gevorkyan, Arkady V.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tackling Global Inequality in Labor Migration: DiasporaCruz Conference on “Mapping Global Inequalities - BeyondIncome Inequality” * November 17, 2007 New York, NY

  14. HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

  15. Directional Sensing Orients Cell Migration and Polarization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devreotes, Peter

    and interactions between the cells of our nervous system during development (9). Later in life, cell movements downstream pathways. In Dictyostelium, chemotaxis plays a critical role in all stages of its life cycle of the cell cortex (10, 46, 49, 55). In neutrophils and highly developed Dictyostelium cells, the efficiency

  16. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  17. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hughes, James S.; Bouchard, Kyle E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Nagy, William T.

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2005. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of two studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2005, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, and (2) smolt approach and fate at B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C from the B1 forebay. Some of the large appendices are only presented on the compact disk (CD) that accompanies the final report. Examples include six large comma-separated-variable (.CSV) files of hourly fish passage, hourly variances, and Project operations for spring and summer from Appendix E, and large Audio Video Interleave (AVI) files with DIDSON-movie clips of the area upstream of B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C (Appendix H). Those video clips show smolts approaching the outlet, predators feeding on smolts, and vortices that sometimes entrained approaching smolts into turbines. The CD also includes Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Files (PDF) of the entire report and appendices.

  18. In vivo filtering of in vitro MyoD target data: An approach for identification of biologically relevant novel downstream targets of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    relevant novel downstream targets of transcription factors. Po Zhao1 , Jinwook Seo2 , Zuyi Wang3 , Yue Wang of downstream targets of MyoD, where a published set of candidate targets from a well-controlled in vitro a downstream target promoter motif, called the "E-box", that share the consensus sequence of CANNTG. Most basic

  19. Cumulative watershed effects (CWEs) result from the overlapping effects of management activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from forest management in the amount of sediment transport along a downstream gradient, and the interbasin variability in annual issues are particularly important in terms of the downstream delivery of sediment and the reliability

  20. Stationary Solutions of the NavierStokes Equations in a HalfPlane DownStream of an Object: Universality of the Wake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stationary Solutions of the Navier­Stokes Equations in a Half­Plane Down­Stream of an Object in the down--stream direction, the leading order deviation from the constant flow is universal, i--Stokes equations can be interpreted as a dynamical system, the down--stream direction playing the role of time

  1. Efficient Initiation of HIV-1 Reverse Transcription in Vitro REQUIREMENT FOR RNA SEQUENCES DOWNSTREAM OF THE PRIMER BINDING SITE ABROGATED BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    DOWNSTREAM OF THE PRIMER BINDING SITE ABROGATED BY NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN-DEPENDENT PRIMER of viral RNA. Here, we have investigated whether sequences downstream of the PBS play a role in promoting bases downstream of the PBS when tRNA3 Lys or an 18-nt RNA complementary to the PBS (R18), but not an 18

  2. BIODIVERSITY Freshwater fish introductions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olden, Julian D.

    BIODIVERSITY RESEARCH Freshwater fish introductions in mediterranean-climate regions and fragmenta- tion, hydrological alteration, climate change, overexploitation, pollution and the global mediterranean-climate regions: California (USA), central Chile, south-western Australia, the Iberian peninsula

  3. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenta, Giovanni [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)] [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States); Markidis, Stefano [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Divin, Andrey [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S?10{sup ?3}W/m{sup 2}.

  4. Cosmic ray diffusive acceleration at shock waves with finite upstream and downstream escape boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ostrowski; R. Schlickeiser

    1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we discuss the modifications introduced into the first-order Fermi shock acceleration process due to a finite extent of diffusive regions near the shock or due to boundary conditions leading to an increased particle escape upstream and/or downstream the shock. In the considered simple example of the planar shock wave we idealize the escape phenomenon by imposing a particle escape boundary at some distance from the shock. Presence of such a boundary (or boundaries) leads to coupled steepening of the accelerated particle spectrum and decreasing of the acceleration time scale. It allows for a semi-quantitative evaluation and, in some specific cases, also for modelling of the observed steep particle spectra as a result of the first-order Fermi shock acceleration. We also note that the particles close to the upper energy cut-off are younger than the estimate based on the respective acceleration time scale. In Appendix A we present a new time-dependent solution for infinite diffusive regions near the shock allowing for different constant diffusion coefficients upstream and downstream the shock.

  5. Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at Ultrarelativistic Shock Waves: Effects of Downstream Short-Wave Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacek Niemiec; Michal Ostrowski; Martin Pohl

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper is the last of a series studying the first-order Fermi acceleration processes at relativistic shock waves with the method of Monte Carlo simulations applied to shocks propagating in realistically modeled turbulent magnetic fields. The model of the background magnetic field structure of Niemiec & Ostrowski (2004, 2006) has been augmented here by a large-amplitude short-wave downstream component, imitating that generated by plasma instabilities at the shock front. Following Niemiec & Ostrowski (2006), we have considered ultrarelativistic shocks with the mean magnetic field oriented both oblique and parallel to the shock normal. For both cases simulations have been performed for different choices of magnetic field perturbations, represented by various wave power spectra within a wide wavevector range. The results show that the introduction of the short-wave component downstream of the shock is not sufficient to produce power-law particle spectra with the "universal" spectral index 4.2. On the contrary, concave spectra with cutoffs are preferentially formed, the curvature and cutoff energy being dependent on the properties of turbulence. Our results suggest that the electromagnetic emission observed from astrophysical sites with relativistic jets, e.g. AGN and GRBs, is likely generated by particles accelerated in processes other than the widely invoked first-order Fermi mechanism.

  6. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N. [Center for Plasma-Materials Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Yu, He [Center for Plasma-Materials Interactions, Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n{sub e} peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n{sub e} increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n{sub e} and T{sub e} data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V{sub p}) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T{sub e} and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  7. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

  8. Fishes Of Las Gemelas Seamounts And Isla Del Coco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starr, Richard M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groupers Threadfin Bass Wrasses Total Fish Biomass (kg/100mJawfishes Jellynose fish Leather bass Longfinned bullseyeGoosefishes Jellynose fish Leather bass Longfinned bullseye

  9. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  10. Anadromous and estuarine fishes migrate in the spring months to oli-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gradients in the salt- front region of the Patuxent River subestuary, Chesapeake Bay, were hypothesized ichthyoplankton assem- blages were distinguished: 1) river- ine--characterized predominantly by anadromous species

  11. Response of PCB contamination in stream fish to abatement actions at an industrial site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, G.R.; Peterson, M.J.; McCarthy, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Milne, G. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, used large quantities of PCBs in equipment associated with the great electric power requirements of isotopic enrichment of uranium. Historic losses of PCBs in the 1950s and 1960s have left a legacy of contamination at the site. A biological monitoring program implemented in 1987 found PCBs in PGDP effluents and in fish downstream from facility discharges. As a consequence, a fish consumption advisory was posted on Little Bayou Creek by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1987, and regulatory discharge limits for PCBs at PGDP were reduced. Monitoring at multiple locations in receiving streams indicated that PGDP discharges were more important than in stream sediment contamination as sources of PCBs to fish. Environmental management and compliance staff at PGDP led an effort to reduce PCB discharges and monitor the effects of those actions. The active discharge of uncontaminated process water to historically PCB-contaminated drainage systems was found to mobilize PCBs into KPDES (Clean Water Act) regulated effluents. Efforts to locate PCB sources within the plant, coupled with improvements in management practices and remedial actions, appear to have been successful in reducing PCB discharges from these sources. Actions included emplacing passive monitors in the plant drainage system to identify this as a chronic source, and consolidating and re-routing effluents to minimize flow through PCB-contaminated channels. As a consequence, PCB contamination in fish in small streams receiving plant discharges decreased 75% over from 1992--1995.

  12. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and North76. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Gotshall, D. W. 1966.Eureka Fishing Community Profile Monroe, G. M. , S. J.

  13. Protease-Activated Receptor-2 in the Intestinal Epithelium & Differential Effects of Beta Arrestins on the Internalization, Desensitization & ERK 1/2 Activation Downstream of Protease-Activated Receptor-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Chang Shun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the cofilin pathway downstream of protease- activatedand E R K 1/2 activation downstream of protease activatedand E R K 1/2 activation downstream of Protease Activated

  14. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harbor Fishing Community Profile Ralston, S. 2002. WestTrinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile Endnotes http://information. Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

  15. Evaluation of Steelhead Kelt Passage into the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse Corner Collector Prior to the Juvenile Migration Seasons, 2007 and 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Kim, Jina; Nagy, William T.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of a steelhead kelt passage study conducted by the PNNL for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Bonneville Dam in early spring 2007 and 2008. At the Second Powerhouse, a surface flow outlet called the corner collector (B2CC) may be an effective non-turbine passage route for steelhead kelt moving downstream in early spring before the main juvenile emigration season. The goal of this project was to inform management decisions regarding B2CC operations by estimating the number of kelt using the B2CC for downstream passage at Bonneville Dam prior to the juvenile spring migration season. We performed a hydroacoustic study from March 2 to April 10, 2007 and from March 13 to April 15, 2008.

  16. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

  17. OUT OF EGYPT: Globalisation, marginalisation and illegal Muslim migration to the EU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talani, Leila Simona

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    marginalisation and illegal Muslim migration to the EU: Drbased in Cairo working on illegal migration from the Middleunderstand the problem of illegal migration in the context

  18. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  19. MFR PAPER 1230 Finding Fish With Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors, fishing vessels , spotter pilots, research vessels, and offshore oil platforms were used Investigation? A. It is an attempt to find out if satellites can help fishermen find fish. Our assumption

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH Jindong Liu, Ian Dukes CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom Email: {jliua, idukes, rrknig, hhu}@essex.ac.uk Keywords: Robotic fish the fish movement into several basic behaviours, namely straight cruise, cruise in turn and sharp turn

  1. First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewandowski, Roger

    First International Symposium on Fishing Vessel Energy Efficiency E-Fishing, Vigo, Spain, May 2010 HydroPêche: a way to improve energy efficiency of fishing devices Grégory Germain 1 , Philippe Druault 2 should provide a substantial gain on the fuel consumed of actual fishing devices while maintaining

  2. Rural migration in the western states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freiwald, J.G.; Poster, B.R.; Olinger, C.; Aragon, P.C.; Buslee, P.L.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid rural growth rate since 1970 in 14 western states (Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming) was stimulated by recreation, resource development, manufacturing, commuting, institutional employment, and retirement. The eight Rocky Mountain States had significantly greater rural growth than the six Great Plains States. Other factors correlated with in-migration are population growth during the 1960's, presence of an interstate highway, adjacency to a metropolitan area, high per capita income, high population density, and absence of rural farm population. The presence of a central city with a population of over 20,000 or of a military base does not appear to be significantly related to net in-migration. An overview of regional growth patterns and of the factors related to rural in-migration is included, followed by an examination of these factors for each of the counties that experienced high in-migration in the 14 states.

  3. Anchored Mobilities: Mobile Technology and Transnational Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dourish,Paul

    Anchored Mobilities: Mobile Technology and Transnational Migration Amanda Williams Donald Bren Irvine, CA 92697-3440, USA jpd@ics.uci.edu ABSTRACT Mobile technologies are deployed into diverse social mobility. We present an ethnography of transnational Thai retirees and their uses of mobile technology

  4. Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

  5. Capillary migration of microdisks on curved interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu Yao; Nima Sharifi-Mood; Iris B. Liu; Kathleen J. Stebe

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The capillary energy landscape for particles on curved fluid interfaces is strongly influenced by the particle wetting conditions. Contact line pinning has now been widely reported for colloidal particles, but its implications in capillary interactions have not been addressed. Here, we present experiment and analysis for disks with pinned contact lines on curved fluid interfaces. In experiment, we study microdisk migration on a host interface with zero mean curvature; the microdisks have contact lines pinned at their sharp edges and are sufficiently small that gravitational effects are negligible. The disks migrate away from planar regions toward regions of steep curvature with capillary energies inferred from the dissipation along particle trajectories which are linear in the deviatoric curvature. We derive the curvature capillary energy for an interface with arbitrary curvature, and discuss each contribution to the expression. By adsorbing to a curved interface, a particle eliminates a patch of fluid interface and perturbs the surrounding interface shape. Analysis predicts that perfectly smooth, circular disks do not migrate, and that nanometric deviations from a planar circular, contact line, like those around a weakly roughened planar disk, will drive migration with linear dependence on deviatoric curvature, in agreement with experiment.

  6. Study of Golden Eagles Migration in the Calgary Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Tianqing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eagles Migration in the Calgary Canada A thesis submitted inMigration in the Calgary Canada by Tianqing Liao Master ofMountains of Calgary, Canada. The project began in March

  7. Channel Meander Migration in Large-Scale Physical Model Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Po Hung

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of large-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to study channel meander migration. Factors affecting the migration of banklines, including the ratio of curvature to channel width, bend angle, and the Froude ...

  8. Deadlock-free fine-grained thread migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Myong Hyon

    Several recent studies have proposed fine-grained, hardware-level thread migration in multicores as a solution to power, reliability, and memory coherence problems. The need for fast thread migration has been well documented, ...

  9. The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa + 0 ) 2 6 - 4 9 Jacky J. Cosson I. INTRODUCTION Spermatozoa are unique among cells generated by the metazoans and are haploid unicells. Fish sperm is released with extremely harmful conditions (fresh water, sea or brackish water) in the case for many fish species (Huxley

  10. COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Derek S.

    COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend Department/Number: NONC F040 F01 Credits: 0 to the art and science of fly casting, fishing and tying. Students will learn how use a fly rod to place a fly with pinpoint accuracy, tie fishing knots and construct their own leaders, and, most importantly

  11. Fish Oil Industry in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the international market. Refined anchovy oil is an excellent product for many applIcations or it can be transformedFish Oil Industry in South America UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Fish Oil Industry in South America By -J. R. SANCHEZ TORRES Chief

  12. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos the approach, we develop a physics­based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their vir­ tual habitat are not entirely predictable

  13. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

  14. Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes Xiaoyuan Tu Demetri Terzopoulos Department worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrody­ namically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit

  15. Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Sterling K.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooc Z TA245.7 8873 N0.1380 r--- u ----!i -- B-1380 Fish Grubs in Freshwater Ponds and Lakes Sterling K. Johnson* Fish grubs are the immature forms of parasitic worms that invade the flesh of fishes. Grubs appear as round or bead...

  16. Circular 57 Streptococcal Infections of Fish1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    , and striped bass (Inglis et al. 1993). Strep has also been isolated from a variety of ornamental fishCircular 57 Streptococcal Infections of Fish1 Roy P.E. Yanong and Ruth Francis-Floyd2 1 of the common disease-causing bacteria of fish are Gram-negative (appear pink with a Gram stain

  17. Mercury concentrations in Maine sport fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, C.P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)] [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Haines, T.A. [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)] [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assess mercury contamination of fish in Maine, fish were collected from 120 randomly selected lakes. The collection goal for each lake was five fish of the single most common sport fish species within the size range commonly harvested by anglers. Skinless, boneless fillets of fish from each lake were composited, homogenized, and analyzed for total mercury. The two most abundant species, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, were also analyzed individually. The composite fish analyses indicate high concentrations of mercury, particularly in large and long-lived nonsalmonid species. Chain pickerel Esox niger, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and white perch Morone americana had the highest average mercury concentrations, and brook trout and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the lowest. The mean species composite mercury concentration was positively correlated with a factor incorporating the average size and age of the fish. Lakes containing fish with high mercury concentrations were not clustered near known industrial or population centers but were commonest in the area within 150 km of the seacoast, reflecting the geographical distribution of species that contained higher mercury concentrations. Stocked and wild brook trout were not different in length or weight, but wild fish were older and had higher mercury concentrations. Fish populations maintained by frequent introductions of hatchery-produced fish and subject to high angler exploitation rates may consist of younger fish with lower exposure to environmental mercury and thus contain lower concentrations than wild populations.

  18. Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Walleye · Smallmouth bass · Northern pike · Others 5 Native and Non-native Fish Predators #12;· At dams#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Council's Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Program Summary of Predation Event Center #12;Council's 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Piscivorous Predator Control · Implement

  19. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  20. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  1. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish *preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:07 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section D. 7 Title: Resident Fish Mitigation (pg 22-23) Overview Generally, entities recommend that the existing language

  2. Structural Dynamics of Various Causes of Migration in Jaipur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayant Singh; Hansraj Yadav; Florentin Smarandache

    2008-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Various social causes for migration in Jaipur are studied and statistical hypotheses are made in this paper.

  3. Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord­ ing to Newton's laws's method to integrate. ffl Accumulate the mean­square­velocity of all the fish 2 6 4 #fish X i=1 velocity 2 i #fish 3 7 5 1=2 and plot it as a function of time. ffl Choose the time step dt in the integrator

  4. A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healey, Christopher G.

    A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume: (1) head-mounted display (HMD); (2) fish tank VR (fish tank); and (3) fish tank VR augmented its structure. Fish tank and haptic participants saw the entire volume on-screen and rotated

  5. A novel molecular index for secondary oil migration distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    migration distances from source rocks to reservoirs can greatly help in the search for new petroleum and correlates solely with migration distance from source rock to reservoir. Case studies serve to demonstrate alteration of buried organic matter in source rocks, followed by oil expulsion (primary migration) out

  6. Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow E.S. van Baaren Master's Thesis for the salt migration in the groundwater underneath the polders near the coast. The problem description of this thesis is to investigate the possibilities of modelling salt migrations in density dependent groundwater

  7. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

  8. Double layer in an expanding plasma: Simultaneous upstream and downstream measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byhring, H. S.; Fredriksen, A. [Institute of Science and Technology, University of Tromsoe, NO-9037 Tromsoe (Norway); Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion energy measurements were taken simultaneously using one retarding field energy analyzer placed at the open end of the plasma source, and one in the plasma diffusion region of an expanding low pressure argon plasma. An electric double layer was found, which is well separated from the region of high magnetic field and which is downstream of the maximum in the magnetic field gradient. An axially movable analyzer was used to determine the position of the double layer. It appears to be more closely connected to the rapid change in diameter from the source to the diffusion chamber, but still has a radial dimension close to that of the source diameter. These results suggest that the double layer forms, not as much as a result of a magnetic nozzle, but rather as a reaction to a dramatic change in boundary conditions. Still, a magnetic field of at least a few tens of Gauss in the double layer region is necessary for its spontaneous formation.

  9. Contaminant monitoring of biota downstream of a radioactive liquid waste treatment facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.D.; Biggs, J.R.; Fresquez, P.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Environment, Safety, and Health Div.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Small mammals, plants, and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfall {number_sign}051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation/ingestion or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. The pelt was separated from the carcass of each animal and both were analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for americium ({sup 241}Am), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu), and total uranium (U). With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring.

  10. Channel bed slope effect on the height of gravity waves produced by a sudden downstream discharge stoppage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porté-Agel, Fernando

    of Hydraulic Engineering. Submitted November 3, 2008; accepted October 14, 2009; posted ahead of print November Engineers #12;Introduction In relatively small hydraulic power plant structures (run-off river without pond to the turbine at the downstream end. Changes in the operation of the turbine produce changes in discharge

  11. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1 Kelly Kibler, Desiree Tullos, and Mathias Kondolf 2 ABSTRACT: Dam removal is a promising river restoration technique, particularly for the vast number of rivers impounded by small dams

  12. C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of Swimming Performance in Fishes: Predicting Evolution with Biomechanics R. Brian Langerhans1, * and David N. Reznick2 NT NINTRODUCTIONTN NINTRODUCTION Residing within the immense diversity of fishes

  13. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  14. Barriers for steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) smolt migration through the lower flood channel of Alameda Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes-Yoshida, Kristina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fish, the East Bay Regional Park District found large predatory largemouth bass (fish, especially in pools with large invasive fishes such as pikeminnow and bass (

  15. Characterizing the Fish Passage Environment at The Dalles Dam Spillway: 2001-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Serkowski, John A.; Cook, Chris B.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Perkins, William A.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spill environment at The Dalles Dam in 2001-2004 was characterized using a field-deployed autonomous sensor (the so-called Sensor Fish), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, and Lagrangian particle tracking. The sensor fish has a self-contained capability to digitally the record pressure and triaxial accelerations it was exposed to following its release into the spillway. After recovery downstream of the tailrace, the data stored in the memory of the sensor are downloaded and stored for analysis. The spillway, stilling basin, and tailrace hydrodynamics were simulated using an unsteady, free-surface, three-dimensional CFD code that solved the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. The results from the CFD simulations were then used in a Lagrangian particle tracking model that included the effects of mass, drag, and buoyancy in the particle equation of motion. A random walk method was used to simulate the effects of small-scale turbulence on the particle motion. Several operational and structural conditions were evaluated using the Sensor Fish, CFD, and particle tracking. Quantifying events such as strike and stilling basin retention time characterized exposure conditions in the spill environment.

  16. Downstream asymptotics in exterior domains: from stationary wakes to time periodic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. van Baalen

    2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations in a half-space with boundary data on the line $(x,y)=(x_0,y)$ assumed to be time-periodic (or stationary) with a fixed asymptotic velocity ${\\bf u}_{\\infty}=(1,0)$ at infinity. We show that there exist (locally) unique solutions for all data satisfying a compatibility condition in a certain class of fuctions. Furthermore, we prove that asymptotically the vorticity decompose itself in a dominant stationary part on the parabolic scale $y\\sim\\sqrt{x}$ and corrections of order $x^{-{3/2}+\\epsilon}$, while the velocity field decompose itself in a dominant stationary part in form of an explicit multiscale expansion on the scales $y\\sim\\sqrt{x}$ and $y\\sim x$ and corrections decaying at least like $x^{-{9/8}+\\epsilon}$. The asymptotic fields are made of linear combinations of universal functions with coefficients depending mildly on the boundary data. The asymptotic expansion for the component parallel to ${\\bf u}_{\\infty}$ contains `non-trivial' terms in the parabolic scale with amplitude $\\ln(x)x^{-1}$ and $x^{-1}$. To first order, our results also imply that time-periodic wakes behave like stationary ones as $x\\to\\infty$. The class of functions used is `natural' in the sense that `Physically Reasonable' (in the sense of Finn & Smith) stationary solutions of the N.-S. equations around an obstacle are covered if the half-space is choosen sufficiently far downstream. The coefficients appearing in the asymptotics may then be linearly related to the net force acting on the obstacle. To our knowledge, it is the first time that estimates uncovering the $\\ln(x)x^{-1}$ correction are proved in this setting.

  17. Directly Imaging Tidally Powered Migrating Jupiters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Subo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that ongoing direct imaging experiments may detect a new class of long-period, highly luminous, tidally powered extrasolar gas giants. Even though they are hosted by Gyr-"old" main-sequence stars, they can be as "hot" as young Jupiters at ~100 Myr, the prime targets of direct imaging surveys. These planets, with years-long orbits, are presently migrating to "feed" the "hot Jupiters" in steady state. Their existence is expected from a class of "high-e" migration mechanisms, in which gas giants are excited to highly eccentric orbits and then shrink their semi-major axis by factor of ~ 10-100 due to tidal dissipation at successive close periastron passages. The dissipated orbital energy is converted to heat, and if it is deposited deep enough into the planet atmosphere, the planet likely radiates steadily at luminosity ~2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of our Jupiter during a typical Gyr migration time scale. Their large orbital separations and expected high planet-to-star flux ratios in IR make ...

  18. Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

  19. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

  20. Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

  1. Further Tests of Changes in Fish Escape Behavior Resulting from Sublethal Stresses Associated with Hydroelectric Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, M.G.

    2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. The most commonly used laboratory technique for assessing susceptibility to predation is the predator preference test. In this report, we evaluate the field application of a new technique that may be valuable for assessing indirect mortality, based on changes in a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. Initial studies demonstrated that turbulence created in a small laboratory tank can alter escape behavior. As a next step, we converted our laboratory design to a more portable unit, transported it to Alden Research Laboratory in Holden, Massachusetts, and used it to test fish that passed uninjured through a pilot-scale turbine runner. Rainbow trout were either passed through the turbine or exposed to handling stresses, and their behavior was subsequently evaluated. Groups of five fish were given a startle stimulus (a visual and pressure wave cue) and filmed with a high-speed (500 frames per s) video camera. The reactions of each group of fish to the startle stimulus were filmed at nominally 1-, 5-, and 15-min post-exposure. We compared the behaviors of 70 fish passed through the turbine and another 70 under control conditions (either transferred from the holding tank or injected into the Alden loop downstream of turbine). The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a startle response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of the maximum C-shape, time to completion of the C-shape, completeness of the C-shape, direction of turn, and degree of turn. The data were evaluated for statistical significance and patterns of response were identified. The most immediate measure of potential changes in fish behavior was whether test and control fish exhibited a startle response. Unlike earlier studies, there was no significant difference among the treatment group and the controls for startle response. The majority of rainbow trout in all groups responded to the startle stimulus. There were however, significant differences in some of the particular aspects of the subsequent escape behavior. The time to first reaction, the duration of the reaction, and the times associated with maximum C-shape formation were all significantly different between the tank controls and the two groups of fish injected into the Alden turbine loop. There were no significant differences in behavioral responses between the trout passed through the turbine runner and those injected downstream of the runner. Other behavioral parameters, such as C-shape completeness ratio, were not significantly affected. The effect of the Alden turbine loop on some aspects of the escape behavior suggest that the process of movement through the system is important, but that the role of the added stress, if any, of passage through the turbine runner is minimal. It may be important that statistically significant differences in timing of phases of the startle response were detected, even though the majority of stressed fish still exhibited the startle response. This is in contrast to earlier studies, where timing of phases of the startle responses were only affected when the overall startle response was impaired. This pattern

  2. Foreign Fishery Developments The Norwegian Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EEC fisheries agreement, which prevented Norwegian purse seiners from fishing North Sea brisling during the peak,200 t of meal (up 0.6 percent) and 164,600 t of oil (down 9.1 per- cent). Arctic Cod Quotas Quotas for Arctic.3 Fish oil 79,400 180.5 107,300 241.4 Cod liver oil 12,700 63.1 10,900 51.3 Canned fish 14,100 233.8 15

  3. The electron distribution function downstream of the solar-wind termination shock: Where are the hot electrons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahr, Hans J; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the majority of the literature on plasma shock waves until now, electrons have played the role of "ghost particles," since they contribute to mass- and momentum flows only negligibly and have been treated as taking care of the electric plasma neutrality. In some more recent papers, however, electrons play a new important role in the shock dynamics and thermodynamics, especially at the solar-wind termination shock. They react on the shock electric field in a very specific way, leading to suprathermal non-equilibrium distributions of the downstream electrons that can be represented by a kappa distribution function. In this article, we discuss why these anticipated hot electron population has not been seen by the plasma detectors of the Voyager spacecraft downstream of the solar-wind termination shock. We show that hot non-equilibrium electrons induce a strong negative electric charge-up of any spacecraft cruising through this downstream plasma environment. This charge reduces electron fluxes at the spacecraf...

  4. Pile driving and bioacoustic impacts on fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Deborah C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the nexus to use steel piles as the preferred structuralbegan driving the steel piles, we realized that underwaterdeath to fish near the pile. Pressure waves are generated

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: avoid altering fish behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fish behavior Current Energy Converter Array Optimization Framework On March 13, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable...

  6. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document was printed on recycled paper. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines M. A. Weiland T. J. Carlson October 2003 Prepared for: Pacific...

  7. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  8. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  9. Spooner creek restoration and fish ladder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tom

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPOONER CREEK RESTORATION AND FISH LADDER Tom Moore (Phone:847-3132 Abstract Spooner Creek is a dendritic second orderflows into Cattaraugus Creek, a tributary of Lake Erie.

  10. FISHING INDUSTRY OF THE GULF OF ADEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisor t o the Br itish Secret ary of State ,the best fishing gr ounds s eem t o ? e of f t he har b r

  11. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  12. Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet and Heart Attacks MAURICE E. STANSBY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet and Heart Attacks MAURICE E. STANSBY Introduction Research has shown- unsaturates but also often equivalent amounts of saturates. Vegetable oils, on the other hand, contain principally polyunsaturates. Nevertheless, fish oils reduce serum cholesterol levels to a greater extent than

  13. Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    345 Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON 1,240 individuals of 28 species of waterbirds were examined in the United States for ingested lead fishing weights. A combination of radiography and visual examination of stomachs was used to search for lead weights and blood

  14. When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

  15. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher plume propagation estimates in a high-permeability conduit like a vertical fracture.

  16. Groundwater migration of radionuclides at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malensek, A.J.; Wehmann, A.A.; Elwyn, A.J.; Moss, K.J.; Kesich, P.M.

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The simple Single Resident Well (SRW) Model has been used to calculate groundwater movement since Fermilab`s inception. A new Concentration Model is proposed which is more realistic and takes advantage of computer modeling that has been developed for the siting of landfills. Site geologic and hydrologic data were given to a consultant who made the migration calculations from an initial concentration that was based upon the existing knowledge of the radioactivity leached out of the soil. The various components of the new Model are discussed, and numerical examples are given and compared with DOE/EPA limits.

  17. Abstract In migrating birds, the success of migration is determined by stopover duration, the most important

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    warblers Sylvia borin at 17 stopover sites in Europe and Africa during autumn. Average stopover duration regulate stopover duration. Keywords Stopover length · Migration strategy · Passerine birds · Capture and the wintering grounds into phases of flights and stop- overs. At good stopover sites, energy reserves are replen

  18. The Built Environment and Migration: A Case Study of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Rosa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Community Networks in Mexico-U.S. Migration. THe JournalTraditional Architecture of Mexico. London, UK: Thames anddevelopment: assessing Mexico's economic and social policy

  19. Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    1 Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning in a Simulated inhabited by realistic artificial fishes. Our algorithms emulate not only the appearance, movement model each animal holistically. An artificial fish is an autonomous agent situated in a simulated

  20. Fish Bulletin No. 45. The Sharks and Rays of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walford, Lionel A

    1931-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of each dorsal fin, the fish is a Horned Shark (Heterodontusdorsal fins are without spines, the fish is a Sleeper Shark (dorsal fin is above the root of the pectoral fins, the fish is a Mackerel Shark (

  1. Are mangroves a limiting resource for two coral reef fishes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, B S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reef fish. Proc 6th Int Coral Reef Symp 1:149–155 Wilsona limiting resource for two coral reef fishes? Benjamin S.of adult populations of 2 coral reef fish species (the

  2. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  3. Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget »TraveleBooks FindFirstFirst-time

  4. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  5. Integrated Program Review Fish and Wildlife Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Program Review (IPR) Fish and Wildlife Program Costs May 20, 2010 Presented to Northwest Total Annual Average Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions1/ 226 5 24 41 8 310 137 750 1/ FY 2012 White Sturgeon. These actions may include such things as dredging, restoration of channel complexity

  6. Kalispel Resident Fish Project Annual Report, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jason; Andersen, Todd

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2003, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented.

  7. DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY Marine Biological Laboratory APR 21 1953 WOODS HOLE, Albert M. Day, Director DIRECTING THE MOVH-IENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY by Alberton L. McLain Fishery of an electrical leading device 21 Literature cited. ..,...,..,..........·· 2k ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1. Diagram

  8. Fish Physiology, Toxicology, and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    was "Eutrophication: The toxic effects of ammonia, nitrite and the detrimental effects of hypoxia on fish." These proceedings include 22 papers presented over a 3-day period and discuss eutrophication, ammonia and nitrite toxicity and the effects of hypoxia on fish with the aim of understanding the effects of eutrophication

  9. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd; Olson, Jason

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued monitoring enhancement projects (implemented from 1996 to 1998) for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Additional baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted, in 2002, in tributaries to the Pend Oreille River. Further habitat and fish population enhancement projects were also implemented in 2002.

  10. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  11. FISH POPULATION STUDIES LEWIS AND CLARK LAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    their full contribution to the progress, prosperity, and security of the United States, now and in the future, and shore seine catches in the months of June, July, and August by South Dakota Department of Game, Fish Dakota Depart - ment of Game, Fish and Parks, and continued each year through 1961 as part of the Dingell

  12. BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BITTERROOT RIVER SUBBASIN INVENTORY FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION AUGUST 2009 A report prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council #12;#12;Bitterroot Subbasin Inventory for Fish (Inventory Volume), and Part III (Management Plan Volume), its appendices, and electronically linked

  13. Making a Big Splash with Louisiana Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Jacqueline

    .S.A. All Rights Reserved. #12;#12;Table of Contents Preface Table of Contents Overview of the LSU MNS Fish Chapter IV. The Gulf of Mexico Section IV.A. The Louisiana Pancake Batfish Section IV.B. Tripod Fish and the SERPENT Project Section IV.C. The 2010 Oil Spill Chapter V. The Mississippi River Section V.A Background

  14. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CORROSION RESISTANCE OF FISH TAGGING PINS [Marine Biological Laboratoryj WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL A, Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suoraela, Commissioner CORROSION RESISTANCE were tagged with nickel and Type 304 stainless steel pins to compare the corrosion resistance

  15. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  16. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  17. african cichlid fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Somatostatin Regulates Aggressive Behavior in an African Cichlid Fish Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: be- havioral states. In the African cichlid fish...

  18. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines This report evaluated the feasibility of two types of...

  19. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  20. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

  1. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  2. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  3. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  4. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center, Shepherdstown, West Virginia U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center,...

  5. Lasers, fish ears and environmental change | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lasers, fish ears and environmental change ORNL and TVA team up to study Kingston spill restoration efforts Researchers analyze fish otoliths using a laser to understand...

  6. Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDole, Tracey Shannon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    versus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems Aversus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems bywas to investigate the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

  7. australian freshwater fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in fish is a regulated, cellular process. The ambient water is an additional magnesium source for fish, implicating the gills as a secondary route for magnesium uptake. Certainly,...

  8. atherinopsid freshwater fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in fish is a regulated, cellular process. The ambient water is an additional magnesium source for fish, implicating the gills as a secondary route for magnesium uptake. Certainly,...

  9. australian freshwater fish: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in fish is a regulated, cellular process. The ambient water is an additional magnesium source for fish, implicating the gills as a secondary route for magnesium uptake. Certainly,...

  10. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  11. Oxbow Fish Hatchery Snake River Sockeye Salmon Smolt Program, 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, Duane D. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This contract proposal is in response to the Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion Implementation Plan/Update Proposed Action (UPA) associated with increasing the number of Snake River sockeye smolts by 150,000. To accomplish this proposal the cooperation and efforts of three government entities has been planned (e.g., Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)). Improvements at the IDFG Eagle Fish Hatchery and NMFS Burley Creek Hatchery will focus on increasing sockeye salmon captive broodstock and egg production. Improvements at the ODFW Oxbow Fish Hatchery will be made to accommodate the incubation, hatching and rearing of 150,000 sockeye salmon smolts for release into Idaho's Sawtooth Valley, Upper Salmon River near IDFG's Sawtooth Fish Hatchery and/or Redfish Lake Creek 1.4 km downstream of Redfish Lake. Modifications to Oxbow Fish Hatchery (ODFW) will include retro-fit existing pond drains so pond cleaning effluent water can be routed to the pollution abatement pond, and modifications to the abatement pond. Also included in this project as an added phase, was the rerouting of the hatchery building effluent water to meet state DEQ guidelines for the use of formalin to treat salmonid eggs. Some additional funding for the described Oxbow Hatchery modifications will come from Mitchell Act Funding. All personnel costs associated with this project will come from Mitchell Act funding. Due to heavy work load issues, being under staffed, and two emergency projects in the spring and summer of 2006, ODFW engineers were not able to complete all plans and get them out for bid in 2006. As a result of these circumstances retro-fitting pond drains and modifications to the abatement pond was carried over into fiscal year 2007-2008. A no cost time extension to the contract was approved by BPA. The format for this report will follow the standard format for Statement of Work Report (SOW), which includes sub-categories Work Element (WE), and within the WE the Milestone Titles.

  12. Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River During Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Richmond, Marshall C.; Bleich, Matthew D.; Titzler, P. Scott; Fu, Tao

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10°C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir’s epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four lower Snake reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water’s surface, and during periods of low river discharge, often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The depth of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may also be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004 plus a brief one-week period in 2005 of Lower Monumental, Little Goose, and Lower Granite Reservoirs. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are sufficiently capable of matching diurnal and long term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the 3-D model Flow3-D. This model was used to better understand mixing processing and entrainment. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake discharge. Simulation results were also linked with the particle tracking model FINS to better understand alterations of integrated metrics due to alternative operation schemes. These findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir and may have a significant impact on the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

  13. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Crescent City Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and NorthCity Fishing Community Profile Leidersdorf, C. 1975.City Fishing Community Profile Woodbury, D. 1999. Reduction

  14. Towards a Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    Towards a Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services Asil A. Almonaies Manar H {asil,alalfi,cordy,dean}@cs.queensu.ca Abstract Migrating traditional legacy web applications to web services is an important step in the modernization of web-based business systems to more complex inter

  15. Department of Economic and Social Affairs International Migration Report 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Youqin

    Department of Economic and Social Affairs International Migration Report 2002 United Nations #12;ST/ESA/SER.A/220 Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division International Migration Report 2002 rights reserved #12;iii PREFACE The Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs

  16. MOVARTO: Server Migration across Networks using Route Triangulation and DNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Ravi

    MOVARTO: Server Migration across Networks using Route Triangulation and DNS Problem: How do I move a server across the Internet? Server migration across wide area networks is a fundamental issue faced applications are hosted on servers at remote data centers and accessed via the Internet. These applications

  17. A Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    A Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services Asil A. Almonaies, Manar H. Alalfi-automatically migrat- ing monolithic legacy web applications to service oriented architecture (SOA) by separating potentially reusable features as web services. Software design re- covery and source transformation techniques

  18. CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    1 CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP? SAMP is the Southern African people in Canada and in Africa? SAMP recently launched a new migration project, The Diaspora Project come to Canada and do they ever think of going back? What kind of education individuals have obtained

  19. NEUTROPHILS INFLUENCE MELANOMA ADHESION AND MIGRATION UNDER FLOW CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Cheng

    NEUTROPHILS INFLUENCE MELANOMA ADHESION AND MIGRATION UNDER FLOW CONDITIONS Margaret J. SLATTERY State University, University Park, PA, USA We have studied human melanoma cell (C8161) adhesion to be very low on these melanoma cells. As a result, C8161 trans- endothelial migration under a flow

  20. R326 Dispatch Nuclear migration: Cortical anchors for cytoplasmic dynein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dynein, and provide a critical link in understanding the basis of nuclear migration in yeast. The nuclearR326 Dispatch Nuclear migration: Cortical anchors for cytoplasmic dynein Kerry Bloom Nuclear body that rolls around at random inside the sack of a eukaryotic cell. Controlled nuclear movements

  1. Migrating a Domain-Specific Modeling Infrastructure to MDA Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Deursen, Arie

    Migrating a Domain-Specific Modeling Infrastructure to MDA Technology Duncan Doyle1,2, Hans Geers2 be migrated to models conform the MDA, in order to benefit from the range of MDA standards. We describe of the lessons learned. 1 Introduction The MDA promise of model-driven development is becoming a reality

  2. Migration, rural development, poverty and food security: a comparative perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Migration, rural development, poverty and food security: a comparative perspective Thomas Lacroix rural underdevelopment, poverty and food insecurity in rural areas? The case studies provide mixed poverty, even for non-migrant households. In the countries benefiting from temporary migration schemes

  3. Giant Planet Migration in Viscous Power-Law Discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Edgar

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Many extra-solar planets discovered over the past decade are gas giants in tight orbits around their host stars. Due to the difficulties of forming these `hot Jupiters' in situ, they are generally assumed to have migrated to their present orbits through interactions with their nascent discs. In this paper, we present a systematic study of giant planet migration in power law discs. We find that the planetary migration rate is proportional to the disc surface density. This is inconsistent with the assumption that the migration rate is simply the viscous drift speed of the disc. However, this result can be obtained by balancing the angular momentum of the planet with the viscous torque in the disc. We have verified that this result is not affected by adjusting the resolution of the grid, the smoothing length used, or the time at which the planet is released to migrate.

  4. Atomic Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H-SiC. Atomic Computer Simulations of Defect Migration in 3C and 4H-SiC. Abstract: Knowledge of the migration of intrinsic point...

  5. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michak, Patty

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1986 Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This interagency project was developed to provide a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. Agencies involved in the project are: WDF, Washington Department of Wildlife, Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its third year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1989. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989 and will compare sampling results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on stocks. 2 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  7. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulkner, James R.; Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D. [Northwest Fisheries Science Center

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the sixteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags. We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,565 hatchery steelhead O. mykiss, 15,991 wild steelhead, and 9,714 wild yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. These included 122,061 yearling Chinook salmon tagged at Lower Granite Dam for evaluation of latent mortality related to passage through Snake River dams. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2008 were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead, (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions, and (3) evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2008 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2008 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. For yearling Chinook salmon, overall percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses in the Snake River were 80% hatchery-reared and 20% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 65% hatchery-reared and 35% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.939 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.935 for steelhead.

  8. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  9. The Spectroscopic-Assisted Investigation into Energy Migration through Disordered Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colby, Kathryn Anne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaics and Energy Migration through Disordered Systems………………………………………………………………………Photovoltaics and Energy Migration through Disordered Systemsphotovoltaics. The study of energy flow through disordered systems

  10. Evaluation of Fish Passage Conditions for Juvenile Salmonids Using Sensor Fish at Detroit Dam, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish passage conditions through two spillways at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River in Oregon were evaluated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District, using Sensor Fish devices. The objective of the study was to describe and compare passage exposure conditions through Spillbay 3 and Spillbay 6 at 1.5- and 3.5-ft gate openings, identifying potential fish injury regions of the routes. The study was performed in July 2009, concurrent with HI-Z balloon-tag studies by Normandeau Associates, Inc. Sensor Fish and live fish were deployed at elevations approximately 3 ft above structure at depths determined using a computational fluid dynamics model. Data collected were analyzed to estimate 1) exposure conditions, particularly exposure to severe collision and shear events by passage route sub-regions; 2) differences in passage conditions between passage routes; and 3) relationships to live-fish injury and mortality data estimates.

  11. FRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 3 FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE. REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART THREE FACTORS TO BE CONSIDERED IN THE FREEZING AND COLD STORAGE OF FISHERY PRODUCTS Taking Place During Cold Storage of Fish Section 3 - Protective Coverings for Frozen Fish · · Pages 1

  12. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  13. APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPENDIX C AEERPS FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM December 21, 1994 Appendix C ASSURING AN ADEQUATE Council characterizes the fish and wildlife provisions of the Northwest Power Act as "[a Basin Fish And Wildlife program must consist of measures to "protect, mitigate, and enhance fish

  14. Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Planning and Fish and Wildlife Program Development RELATIONSHIP OF THE POWER PLAN TO THE FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM: SUFFICIENT RESOURCES TO MEET ELECTRICITY DEMANDS AND THE REQUIREMENTS FOR FISH and to accommodate system operations to benefit fish and wildlife. The central purpose of this chapter of the power

  15. The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group MIT Media Laboratory 20 Ames Street E15 OF CONTENTS ----------------- 1. ASCII SERIAL FISH PROTOCAL 2. HOW TO MAKE FISH ANTENNA 3. CALIBRATION SOFTWARE INSTALLATION 4. HOW TO CALIBRATE A FISH 5. COMPONENT PLACEMENT 6. SCHEMATICS 7. PARTS LIST HOW

  16. Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

  17. Cape Fear River Basin Action Plan for Migratory Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    those built to produce hydroelectric power and store drinking water, which block fish from returning

  18. ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA By E. A. Tulian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA .", By E. A. Tulian Chief ofthe Section ofFish Culture, Ministry of Agriculture, Argentina Paper presented before the Fourth International Fishery #12;ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA. ~ By E. A. TULIAN, Chief of the Section of Fish

  19. INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Production Advisory Committee PNFHPC: Pacific Northwest Fish Health Protection Committee PP&L: Paafic Power

  20. Type I planet migration in nearly laminar disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lubow, S H [STSI; Lin, D [UCSC

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the migration of low-mass planets ({<=}30 M{sub {circle_plus}}) in nearly laminar disks (viscosity parameter {alpha} < 10{sup -3}) over timescales of several thousand orbit periods. We consider disk masses of 1, 2, and 5 times the minimum mass solar nebula, disk thickness parameters of H/r = 0.035 and 0.05, and a variety of {alpha} values and planet masses. Disk self-gravity is fully included. Previous analytic work has suggested that Type I planet migration can be halted in disks of sufficiently low turbulent viscosity, for {alpha} {approx} 10{sup -4}. The halting is due to a feedback effect of breaking density waves that results in a slight mass redistribution and consequently an increased outward torque contribution. The simulations confirm the existence of a critical mass (M{sub {alpha}} {approx} 10M{sub {circle_plus}}) beyond which migration halts in nearly laminar disks. For {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -3}, density feedback effects are washed out and Type I migration persists. The critical masses are in good agreement with the analytic model of Rafikov. In addition, for {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -4} steep density gradients produce a vortex instability, resulting in a small time-varying eccentricity in the planet's orbit and a slight outward migration. Migration in nearly laminar disks may be sufficiently slow to reconcile the timescales of migration theory with those of giant planet formation in the core accretion model.

  1. Orbital Evolution and Migration of Giant Planets: Modeling Extrasolar Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Trilling; W. Benz; T. Guillot; J. I. Lunine; W. B. Hubbard; A. Burrows

    1998-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Giant planets in circumstellar disks can migrate inward from their initial (formation) positions. Radial migration is caused by inward torques between the planet and the disk; by outward torques between the planet and the spinning star; and by outward torques due to Roche lobe overflow and consequent mass loss from the planet. We present self-consistent numerical considerations of the problem of migrating giant planets. Summing torques on planets for various physical parameters, we find that Jupiter-mass planets can stably arrive and survive at small heliocentric distances, thus reproducing observed properties of some of the recently discovered extra-solar planets. Inward migration timescales can be approximately equal to or less than disk lifetimes and star spindown timescales. Therefore, the range of fates of massive planets is broad, and generally comprises three classes: (I) planets which migrate inward too rapidly and lose all their mass; (II) planets which migrate inward, lose some but not all of their mass, and survive in very small orbits; and (III) planets which do not lose any mass. Some planets in Class III do not migrate very far from their formation locations. Our results show that there is a wide range of possible fates for Jupiter-mass planets for both final heliocentric distance and final mass.

  2. Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . There is also a shortage of pro- cessing equipment such as ice factories and cold storage facilities.Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry Polish fishennen caught about 700

  3. Fish and Wildlife | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  4. FISHERY LEAFLET 260 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE INTERIOR #12;#12;United States Department of the Interior, J. A. ICn;ig, Secretary Fish and Wildlife LEGISLATION Compiled by MILTOK J. LIHDNEE Aquatic Biologist, Office of Foreign Activities and Chief, United

  5. Laser technique detects pollutants in fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a laser and a mass spectrometer, trace pollutants can be detected in fish scales and the time and place of exposure can be determined. The technique has been demonstrated using striped bass from the Clinch and Tennessee rivers.

  6. Kootenai River Native Fish Conservation Aquaculture Master

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /incomplete incubation · predation · larval food limitation/starvation · over-wintering energy deficiency Result: Aging Idaho Dept of Fish and Game #12;Burbot conservation strategy · conservation aquaculture · habitat) · Continue small scale extensive rearing experiments in local ponds · Monitor experimental releases

  7. Control of charge migration in molecules by ultrashort laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolay V. Golubev; Alexander I. Kuleff

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to electronic many-body effects, the ionization of a molecule can trigger ultrafast electron dynamics appearing as a migration of the created hole charge throughout the system. Here we propose a scheme for control of the charge migration dynamics with a single ultrashort laser pulse. We demonstrate by fully ab initio calculations on a molecule containing a chromophore and an amine moieties that simple pulses can be used for stopping the charge-migration oscillations and localizing the charge on the desired site of the system. We argue that this control may be used to predetermine the follow-up nuclear rearrangement and thus the molecular reactivity.

  8. Control of charge migration in molecules by ultrashort laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golubev, Nikolay V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to electronic many-body effects, the ionization of a molecule can trigger ultrafast electron dynamics appearing as a migration of the created hole charge throughout the system. Here we propose a scheme for control of the charge migration dynamics with a single ultrashort laser pulse. We demonstrate by fully ab initio calculations on a molecule containing a chromophore and an amine moieties that simple pulses can be used for stopping the charge-migration oscillations and localizing the charge on the desired site of the system. We argue that this control may be used to predetermine the follow-up nuclear rearrangement and thus the molecular reactivity.

  9. Exotic Earths: Forming Habitable Worlds with Giant Planet Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Close-in giant planets (e.g. ``Hot Jupiters'') are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth mass planets also form interior to the migrating Jovian planet, analogous to recently-discovered ``Hot Earths''. Very water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the Habitable Zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets.

  10. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouwes, Nick (EcoLogical Research, Providence, UT); Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise ID); Schaller, Howard (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office, Vancouver, WA)

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species.Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts. experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. ''D'', or differential delayed mortality, is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. A ''D'' equal to one indicates that there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage, while a ''D'' less than one indicates that transported smolts die at a greater rate after release, than smolts that have migrated through the hydrosystem. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatcheries; (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program; (5) evaluate growth patterns of transported and in-river migrating smolts, and of upriver and downriver stocks. Primary CSS focus in this report for the 1997-1999 migration years included hatchery chinook tasks for objectives 1, 4 and 5.

  11. Mechanisms of contaminant migration from grouted waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnuson, S.O. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yu, A.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-level radioactive decontaminated salt solution is generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from the In-Tank Precipitation process. The solution is mixed with cement, slag, and fly ash, to form a grout, termed ``Saltstone``, that will be disposed in concrete vaults at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) [1]. Of the contaminants in the Saltstone, the greatest concern to SRS is the potential release of nitrate to the groundwater because of the high initial nitrate concentration (0.25 g/cm{sup 3}) in the Saltstone and the low Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 44 mg/L. The SDF is designed to allow a slow, controlled release over thousands of years. This paper addresses a modeling study of nitrate migration from intact non-degraded concrete vaults in the unsaturated zone for the Radiological Performance Assessment (PA) of the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility [3]. The PA addresses the performance requirements mandated by DOE Order 5820.2A [4].

  12. Germany: Managing Migration in the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Philip L.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1997 Ardaugh, John. 1987. Germany and the Germans. London:in 19th and 20th Century Germany. Berg Publishers. Bade,Past, Migration Future: Germany and the US. Providence. Berg

  13. Interprovincial Migration and the Stringency of Energy Policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaohu

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Interprovincial migration flows involve substantial relocation of people and productive activity, with implications for regional energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. In China, these flows are not explicitly considered ...

  14. Quantitative studies of EGFR autocrine induced cell signaling and migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joslin, Elizabeth Jane

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor autocrine and/or paracrine signaling plays an important role in normal epithelial cell proliferation, survival, adhesion and migration. Aberrant expression of the EGF receptor and its ...

  15. Inter-provincial Permanent and Temporary Migration in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mingjie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the role of migration in China's regional development and9: 485-502. Zhu, Yu. 2007. "China's floating population andThe settlement intention of China’s floating population in

  16. Wandering Neuronal Migration in the Postnatal Vertebrate Forebrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Benjamin B.

    Most non-mammalian vertebrate species add new neurons to existing brain circuits throughout life, a process thought to be essential for tissue maintenance, repair, and learning. How these new neurons migrate through the ...

  17. LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Smith, Alan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MIGRATION· PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS Alan Jaymay vary even though replacement fi~~d the pa~ameter value PIe N - P ;, RT I r:. fILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS. I.lan ~1ar

  18. Effects of interstitial flow on tumor cell migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polacheck, William J. (William Joseph)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interstitial flow is the convective transport of fluid through tissue extracellular matrix. This creeping fluid flow has been shown to affect the morphology and migration of cells such as fibroblasts, cancer cells, endothelial ...

  19. Implementing Incremental Code Migration with XML Wolfgang Emmerich, Cecilia Mascolo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    Implementing Incremental Code Migration with XML Wolfgang Emmerich, Cecilia Mascolo and Anthony Finkelstein Dept. of Computer Science University College London Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK fW.Emmerich

  20. WORKING PAPER N 2009 -41 Migration and capital accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , remittances, capital accumulation, rural poverty PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES LABORATOIRE D. Key Words: Migration; Remittances; Capital Accumulation; Rural Poverty. Paris School of Economics (PSE) and Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL Europe), 48 Boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris, France. chiodi

  1. Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensz, Christopher

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    differences in environments along both paths Data ? Remote sensing: ? CCMP ocean winds ? AVHRR temperature ? AVHRR sea ice ? NPP layer 4 product ? Models: ? Linear exploration ? Circular-linear regression ? Non-linear regression m g C /m 2... d ay °C m /s Models ? Implemented in R ? Models: ? Linear exploration Southern Migration, 9 birds, n=929 Northern Migration, 9 birds, n=629 Future Directions 1: Finish non-linear model 2: Generalize procedure and include...

  2. Preliminary investigation of the nature of hydrocarbon migration and entrapment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Jianyong

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    production while another half sealed among them. The Ship Shoal 274 reservoirs have exhibited a complex history of migration and entrapment. An early stage of oil and gas charge was followed and disturbed by late stage gas migration, mainly 8 through growth... structures. The charge time for commercial hydrocarbon accumulation is much longer in oil-water systems than in oil-gas-water systems. Faults are classified into charging faults and ?back doors? ? faults other than charging faults in stacked fault...

  3. The effects of habitat composition, quality, and breaks on home ranges of exploited nearshore reef fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Christopher G.; Caselle, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bass Sheephead Kelp bass Ocean whitefish Of the fish thatsand bass and trying to recapture previously tagged fish forgamefish. Kelp bass data are only from fish tracked along

  4. Asthma patients with specific genotypes identified for fish oil treatment trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    genotypes identified for fish oil treatment trial Thecommon chronic disease. Fish oils containing omega-3 fattyinflammatory diseases. Fish oil inhibits the production of

  5. Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Lauren J.

    Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation by differences in fishing pressure and catchment deforestation; and we related relative condition factor to gradients of environmental variation across lakes. Lakes charac- terized by severe catchment deforestation

  6. "Cut Me Some Slack": Latency-Aware Live Migration for Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    by leveraging `migration slack', or resources that can be used for migration without excessively impacting query"Cut Me Some Slack": Latency-Aware Live Migration for Databases Sean Barker Yun Chi Hyun Jin Moon and exploit migration slack in real time. Using our prototype, we demonstrate that Slacker effectively

  7. Estimates of potential radionuclide migration at the Bullion site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brikowski, T.H.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bullion site in Area 20 of the Nevada Test Site has been selected for an intensive study of the hydrologic consequences of underground testing, including subsequent radionuclide migration. The bulk of the chimney and cavity lie in zeolitized tuffs of low hydraulic conductivity, while the base of the cavity may extend downward into more conductive rhyolite flows. A mathematical analog to the Bullion setting is used here to estimate expected radionuclide migration rates and concentrations. Because of a lack of hydrologic data at the site, two contrasting scenarios are considered. The first is downward-transport, in which downward hydraulic gradients flush chimney contents into the conductive underlying units, enhancing migration. The other is upward-transport, in which upward gradients tend to drive chimney contents into the low-conductivity zeolitized tuffs, discouraging migration. In the downward-transport scenario, radionuclide travel times and concentrations are predicted to be similar to those encountered at Cheshire, requiring approximately 10 years to reach a proposed well 300 m downgradient. The upward transport scenario yields predicted travel times on the order of 2,000 years to the downgradient well. The most likely scenario is a combination of these results, with vertical movement playing a limited role. Radionuclides injected directly into the rhyolites should migrate laterally very quickly, with travel times as in the downward-transport scenario. Those in the zeolitized tuff-walled portion of the chimney should migrate extremely slowly, as in the upward-transport scenario.

  8. Cloud Migration: A Case Study of Migrating an Enterprise IT System to IaaS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khajeh-Hosseini, Ali; Sommerville, Ian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study illustrates the potential benefits and risks associated with the migration of an IT system in the oil & gas industry from an in-house data center to Amazon EC2 from a broad variety of stakeholder perspectives across the enterprise, thus transcending the typical, yet narrow, financial and technical analysis offered by providers. Our results show that the system infrastructure in the case study would have cost 37% less over 5 years on EC2, and using cloud computing could have potentially eliminated 21% of the support calls for this system. These findings seem significant enough to call for a migration of the system to the cloud but our stakeholder impact analysis revealed that there are significant risks associated with this. Whilst the benefits of using the cloud are attractive, we argue that it is important that enterprise decision-makers consider the overall organizational implications of the changes brought about with cloud computing to avoid implementing local optimizations at the cost ...

  9. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David (Colville Confederated Tribes, Nespelem, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn naturally in existing and future available habitat (i.e. natural supplementation), while meeting other program objectives. In addition to the hatchery specific goals detailed above, hatchery personnel will actively participate in the Northwest Power Planning Council program, participate in the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Resident Fish Committee, and other associated committees and Ad Hoc groups that may be formed to address resident fish issues in the blocked area above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams.

  10. Migrational Characteristics, Biological Observations, and Relative Survival of Juvenile Salmonids Entering the Columbia River Estuary, 1966-1983, 1985 Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawley, Earl M.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural runs of salmonids in the Columbia River basin have decreased as a result of hydroelectric-dam development, poor land- and forest-management, and over-fishing. This has necessitated increased salmon culture to assure adequate numbers of returning adults. Hatchery procedures and facilities are continually being modified to improve both the efficiency of production and the quality of juveniles produced. Initial efforts to evaluate changes in hatchery procedures were dependent upon adult contributions to the fishery and returns to the hatchery. Procedures were developed for sampling juvenile salmon and steelhead entering the Columbia River estuary and ocean plume. The sampling of hatchery fish at the terminus of their freshwater migration assisted in evaluating hatchery production techniques and identifying migrational or behavioral characteristics that influence survival to and through the estuary. The sampling program attempted to estimate survival of different stocks and define various aspects of migratory behavior in a large river, with flows during the spring freshet from 4 to 17 thousand cubic meters per second (m/sup 3//second).

  11. EFRIGERATION OF FISH -PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 4 PRE PARA TION, FRE EZI NG, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH, SHELLFISH Washington 25, D. C. 1956 REFRI GERATION OF FISH: PART FOUR PREPARATION, FREEZING, AND COLD STORAGE OF FISH

  12. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

  13. The pendulum dilemma of fish orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HongSheng Zhao

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The shape of a galaxy is constrained both by mechanisms of formation (dissipational vs. dissipationless) and by the available orbit families (the shape and amount of regular and stochastic orbits). It is shown that, despite the often very flattened shapes of banana and fish orbits, these boxlet orbits generally do not fit a triaxial galaxy in detail because, similar to loop orbits, they spend too little time at the major axis of the model density distribution. This constraint from the shape of fish orbits is relaxed at (large) radii where the density profile of a galaxy is steep.

  14. archer fishes toxotes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrodynamics of jumping in archer fish, Toxotes microlepis MIT - DSpace Summary: The maneuvering of fish is not only of...

  15. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Shepherdstown, West Virginia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  16. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the Amazon Basin, has a remarkable ability to resist predation by piranhas through...

  17. Hydrodynamics of jumping in archer fish, Toxotes microlepis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Anna Margaret

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The maneuvering of fish is not only of interest to those wishing to better understand how fish function, but also is a great inspiration for designing underwater vehicles. This thesis provides the first characterization ...

  18. Fishery Notes Great Lakes 1976 Commercial Fish Catch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., will become operational to pro- vide navigation service in the Gulf of Mexico . Exi ting LORAN-C chains-value fish is processed into fish meal , oil , and pet food . The whitefish was the leading income

  19. Seagrass habitat utilization by fishes in Christmas Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crotwell, Patricia Lynn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fishes in Christmas Bay, TX were collected during April 1994 through March 1995 to: 1) assess temporal variability in their density, biomass, and diversity; 2) define the relationship between variability in fish population parameters...

  20. Seagrass habitat utilization by fishes in Christmas Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crotwell, Patricia Lynn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fishes in Christmas Bay, TX were collected during April 1994 through March 1995 to: 1) assess temporal variability in their density, biomass, and diversity; 2) define the relationship between variability in fish population parameters...

  1. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  2. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

  3. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Program, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR); Duke, Bill B. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from August 19, 2003 to July 8, 2004. A total of 3,388 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,482 adult, 638 jack, and 2,150 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 8,319 adult and 667 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,965 adult and 270 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 34 summer steelhead and 31 adult and 9 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 3,166 summer steelhead; 1,076 adult, 554 jack and 2,026 subjack fall chinook; 8,213 adult and 647 jack coho; and 2,152 adult and 174 jack spring chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 121 summer steelhead; 388 adult and 19 jack fall chinook; and 561 adult and 29 jack spring chinook were collected for brood. In addition, 239 spring chinook were collected for the outplanting efforts in the Walla Walla Basin. There were also 25 pair hatchery steelhead adults collected for the progeny maker study. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 184 days between January 12 and July 6, 2004. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 173 days and were trapped 10 days. An estimated 44 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland to the Umatilla River boat ramp (RM 0.5). Approximately 84% of the juveniles transported were salmonids. No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on February 10, 2004 for outmigration sampling and continued until July 7, 2004 when sampling was discontinued. The juvenile bypass ran at the 5 cfs level until the initiation of Phase I on August 15, 2004. The juvenile trap was operated by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) under the Evaluation of Umatilla Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration Project.

  4. A METHOD OF SIMULTANEOUSLY TAGGING LARGE OCEANIC FISH AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -range sportfishing boats, which fre- quently capture large tuna but lack gear to han- dle live fish on deck

  5. Supervisor: Odd M. Faltinsen The influence of fish on the mooring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    1 Zhao He Supervisor: Odd M. Faltinsen The influence of fish on the mooring loads of a floating fish farm CeSOS Highlights #12;2 · Dead fish experiment · Simulations related to the dead fish experiment · Real fish experiment · Simulations related to the real fish experiment · Conclusions Experiments

  6. SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory APR 2 '^ 1958 WOODS HOLE, MASS CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON By W. R. Bridges Cooperative Fishery Research Laboratory Southern Illinois as a fish poison. At concentrations of 1 p. p.m. sodium cyanide and at a variety of temperature and p

  7. Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA182 Megalocytivirus Infections in Fish, with Emphasis on Ornamental Species1 Roy P. E. Yanong (genus) of fish viruses in the family Iridoviridae (the iridoviruses). Megalocytiviruses cause systemic fishes in both cultured and wild stocks. In some disease outbreaks, 100% losses have oc- curred in under

  8. Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR802 Managing Florida Ponds for Fishing 1 Charles E. Cichra2 1. This document is CIR802, one-out and impounded waters, limerock pits, and sand or gravel pits, commonly called borrow pits. Fishing pressure in fishing as a source of recreation and food. Competition for public fishery resources, coupled

  9. Fish Nutrition1 Ruth Francis-Floyd, DVM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    VM114 Fish Nutrition1 Ruth Francis-Floyd, DVM2 1. This document is VM114, one of a series Introduction For many years water quality has been the most important limitation to fish production. Advances. Most successfully reared ornamental fish are omnivores, and these are the species that have adapted

  10. Pentastomid Infections in Fish1 Roy P. E. Yanong2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    FA90 Pentastomid Infections in Fish1 Roy P. E. Yanong2 1. This document is Fact Sheet FA-90, one of worm-like parasites that infect many different species of fish. Infections have been found in several families of fish including the Cichlidae (tilapia), Cyprinidae (danios), Cyprinodontidae (flagfish

  11. upcfish.nw 29 September 2003 1 Fish and Sharks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    upcfish.nw 29 September 2003 1 Fish and Sharks Hiromi Suenaga and Phil Merkey Introduction correlation with actual predator-prey problems in the real world. In our model we have the fish swimming to explore was the interaction between two different primary data structures. The collection of fish

  12. A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Miniature Biomimetic Robotic Fish and Its Realtime Path Planning Chao Zhou, Zhiqiang Cao, Shuo a novel miniature biomimetic robotic fish based on single link with compact structure, high maneuverability and multiple sensors. The robotic fish mimics the motion of Thunniform mode, and the methods

  13. PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    PUBLICATION 600-080 Fish Health and Disease Striped bass (Morone saxitilis) and hybrid striped bass these fish are commonly raised in high densities under intensive aquaculture situations (e.g., cages, ponds of the viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens, but the fish become increasingly susceptible

  14. Enhancing Fish Tank VR Jurriaan D. Mulder, Robert van Liere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liere, Robert van

    Enhancing Fish Tank VR Jurriaan D. Mulder, Robert van Liere Center for Mathematics and Computer Science CWI Amsterdam, the Netherlands mullie¡ robertl¢ @cwi.nl Abstract Fish tank VR systems provide that resides at a fixed location. Therefore, fish tank VR systems provide only a limited virtual workspace

  15. DETECTING ABNORMAL FISH TRAJECTORIES USING CLUSTERED AND LABELED DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    DETECTING ABNORMAL FISH TRAJECTORIES USING CLUSTERED AND LABELED DATA Cigdem Beyan, Robert B We propose an approach for the analysis of fish trajectories in unconstrained underwater videos. Trajectories are classified into two classes: normal trajectories which contain the usual behavior of fish

  16. Simulator Building and Parameter Optimization of an Autonomous Robotic Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    Simulator Building and Parameter Optimization of an Autonomous Robotic Fish Jindong Liu, Huosheng@essex.ac.uk Abstract-- This paper presents a short review on the research of robotic fish. A simulation environment for robotic fish is built and the experiment shows that it is a convenient way to make research on the robotic

  17. Fish Foraging on an Artificial Reef in Puget Sound, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish Foraging on an Artificial Reef in Puget Sound, Washington GREGORY J. HUECKEL and R. LEE with an artificial reef in Puget Sound to increase our knowledge of the changes in the structure of the fish com with an artificial reef in Puget Sound, Wash. Stomachs ofthesefish species, dissectedfrom 609 fish speared on, around

  18. Summer Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience in Coastal Fish Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    ·Tagging and tracking striped bass using acoustic technology ·Fish habitat surveys ·Stomach pumpingSummer Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experience in Coastal Fish Ecology We seek 1 and estuarine fish ecology in northeastern Massachusetts What you get: ·Field research experience ·3 credit

  19. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , smallmouth bass; crappie; bluegill, redear sunfish; channel cat:fish #12;State Name ARKANSAS - Cont. Lonoke'-'I' 'J UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Washington 25, D. C. Leaflet FL-41 Revised May 1959 LIST OF STATE FISH HATCHERIES

  20. Annual Fish Population Surveys of Lewis and Clark Lake, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    nearly the same as 1998, but preferred-length fish were more abundant in the sample. Smallmouth bass/ " 202. -F SOUTH DAKOTA c ) Annual Fish Population Surveys of Lewis and Clark Lake, 1999 Department of Game, Fish and Parks Wildlife Division Joe Foss Building Pierre, South Dakota 57501-3182 o o

  1. Contaminant Concentrations in Fish SacramentoSan Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Fish and Game) arranged for age determination of largemouth bass. Henry Lee (U.S. EPA) reviewed a draftContaminant Concentrations in Fish from the Sacramento­San Joaquin Delta and Lower San Joaquin ......................................................................................... 45 Contaminant Concentrations in Fish from the Sacramento­San Joaquin Delta and Lower San Joaquin

  2. Phytoplankton blooms and fish recruitment rate: Effects of spatial distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biktashev, Vadim N.

    Phytoplankton blooms and fish recruitment rate: Effects of spatial distribution V. N. Biktashev a consider the spatio-temporal dynamics of a spatially-structured generalisa- tion of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-fish. In particular, we study the dependence of the fish recruitment on carrying capacities of the plankton subsystem

  3. Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish Habib Ammari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish Habib Ammari Thomas Boulier Josselin in weakly electric fishes. We first investigate the forward complex conductivity problem and derive the approx- imate boundary conditions on the skin of the fish. Then we provide a dipole approximation

  4. "Bone Softening," a Practical Way to Utilize Small Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Even in Japan, where per-capita fish consumption is about 5 times that of the United States, small tons in 1986) is used primarily for fish meal rather than for direct human consumption. Looking for ways to increase direct consumption of sar dines and other small fishes, Japanese researchers

  5. The Fish Passage Center Annual Report of Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Fish Passage Center Annual Report of Accomplishments 2012 Salmon River Smolt Monitoring Program Trap Submitted To The Fish Passage Center Oversight Board December 30, 2012 #12;G:\\STAFF\\DOCUMENT\\2012 Documents\\2012 Files\\156-12.doc Profile The Fish Passage Center (Center) was first established in 1984

  6. Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, and in the Gulf of Mexico, but prices for high-potency shark-liver oil made fishing for soupfinShark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner UNITED 5T ATE5 DEPART MENT.A OF l'O~I,a;RCI!,L Fr RERIES, Donald L. 'McKernan, Director · Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review

  7. Prediction of biomass in Norwegian fish farms Anders Llanda,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldrin, Magne

    involves systematic fluctuations in biomass and quantity of slaughtered fish. When the new fish have beenPrediction of biomass in Norwegian fish farms Anders Lølanda, , Magne Aldrina , Gunnhildur H). The model provided good predictions of future biomass of Norwegian farmed salmon and can also be used

  8. Helical Turbine and Fish Safety By Alexander Gorlov, August, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    1 Helical Turbine and Fish Safety By Alexander Gorlov, August, 2010 Abstract The objective of this paper is to describe research using the Helical Turbine for hydropower with particular focus on fish). Correspondingly, the following two conclusions are formulated. Probability of fish kill by kinetic turbines

  9. MFR PAPER 1278 Flavors in Fish From Petroleum Pickup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1278 Flavors in Fish From Petroleum Pickup MAURICE E. STANSBY ABSTRACT - All flavors noted in fish resembling petroleum oil are not derived from oil in water. Origins of various flavors to understand the differentiation between baseline flavor of fish in the absence of petroleum from flavors di

  10. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3/29/10. Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community ProfileHarbor Fishing Community Profile Henning. 1966. FeasibilityVaccaro. 2007. Community Profiles for West Coast and North

  11. The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and the river network downstream 339 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(3), 339357 (2003) © EGU The role of a dambo in the hydrology of a catchment and Southern Africa. Owing to their importance in local agriculture and as a water resource, the hydrology

  12. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

  13. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Eureka Ice and Cold Storage in 2008, and increasinglyclosure of Eureka Ice and Cold Storage in 2008 is a reminderFrancisco Eureka Ice and Cold Storage opens Tom Lazio Fish

  14. Fish Bulletin 160. Observations On Fishes Associated With Kelp Beds in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feder, Howard M; Turner, Charles H; Limbaugh, Conrad

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. Limbaugh, Conrad. 1955. Fish life in the kelp beds andthe effects of kelp harvesting. Univ. Calif. , Inst. Mar.Hubbs, [ed. ]. Utilization of kelp-bed resources in southern

  15. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  16. TECHNICAL NOTE FISH PROTEINS AS BINDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products . Recently in th meat and poultry industry, there has been interest in binding tog th r pieces and storage at temperatures above freezing . The following describes some of the re- search on the use of fish various flavoring agents such as ocean quahogs, ,Iaine shrimp, and crab meat. All these were highly

  17. Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    #12;Climate Change and Variability Lake Ice, Fishes and Water Levels John J. Magnuson Center to everything else." #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible Place Magnuson 2006 #12;Ice-on Day 2007 Peter W. Schmitz Photo Local Lake Mendota #12;Ice Breakup 2010 Lake Mendota March 20 #12;March 21 Ice Breakup 2010

  18. Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japan's Squid Fishing Industry WILLIAM G. COURT .. Introduction Dried-squid (surume) has been an item of commerce, ceremony, and diet in Japan for hundreds of years, and squid is caught of the fishery. In 1952 squid landings reached 646,730 tons and, at 15 percent of the total, became Japan's most

  19. Fish production: integrating growth, mortality, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 Fish production: integrating growth, mortality, and population density K. Limburg lecture notes, Fisheries Science Outline: 1. Biological production ­ a critical ecological parameter 2. How to compute production from a simple biomass model 3. Production:biomass ratios 4. Growth: mortality ratios Reading

  20. Augmented Fish Monitoring, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michak, Patty

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1986 Washington department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project. This project provides a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its second year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1988. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1988 to December 31, 1988 and will compare sampling results from 1987 and 1988. The analysis will be divided in two sections: adult analysis and juvenile analysis. The adult analysis will include results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on index stocks. Additionally, highlights from monthly monitoring exams will identify any significant and unusual findings from the routine exams completed in 1988. 6 refs., 8 figs., 14 tabs.

  1. Nearshore Fish Atlas of Alaska INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Management Act of 1996 requires the identification of essential fish habitat (EFH) for species included, and the Arctic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Catch data in this atlas were compiled from a suite of studies in the same year or in different years. A geographic position is obtained in the middle of each seine site

  2. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  3. 199403300 response.doc FISH PASSAGE CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -house since 1985. These data are printed out in hard copy and filed everyday as well as stored electronically-4752 Phone: (503) 230-4099 Fax: (503) 230-7559 http://www.fpc.org e-mail us at fpcstaff@fpc.org MEMORANDUM TO that they are documented for future use of data. The Fish Passage Center (FPC) maintains written documentation

  4. Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCaire, Richard

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a substantial impact to the economy. During the past several years the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement project has been collecting data pertaining to fish entraining out of the lake through Grand Coulee Dam. During 1996 and 1997 the lake was deeply drawn down to accommodate the limited available water during a drought year and for the highly unusual draw-down of Lake Roosevelt during the critical Northwest power shortage. The goal of the project is to enhance the resident rainbow trout fishery in Lake Roosevelt lost as a result of the unusual operation of Grand Coulee dam during the drought/power shortage.

  5. Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Reintroduction of Native FishReintroduction of Native Fish Species to Coal CreekSpecies to Coal Control and Reclamation ActSurface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977of 1977 Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000)Coal Creek Watershed Foundation (2000) BackgroundBackground Fish populations in Coal Creek

  6. FISHES OF THE GULF OF MAINE 401 with long seanes or basse nets, which stop in the fish; and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHES OF THE GULF OF MAINE 401 with long seanes or basse nets, which stop in the fish; and the w' While 700 were taken at Provincetown in a day i~ October 1859. Fishing for bass from the rocks with hook in their homes or use them for their grounds. He also describes 3 how "shoales of basse have driven up shoales

  7. Introduced Fish Species: "What do Introduced Fish Species: "What do the locals think?"the locals think?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    bass grass carp Currently 56 species of introduced fish in Tennessee waters 12 exotic to US12 exotic release Bait bucket Game fish introductions Procambarus acutus Two local examples brook troutstriped bass #12;10/19/2009 4 striped bass (Morone saxatilis) Anadromous fish native to Atlantic and Gulf coasts

  8. Fish mercury distribution in Massachusetts, USA lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Hutcheson, M.S.; West, C.R.; Pancorbo, O.; Hulme, K.; Cooperman, A.; DeCesare, G.; Isaac, R.; Screpetis, A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment, water, and three species of fish from 24 of Massachusetts' (relatively) least-impacted water bodies were sampled to determine the patterns of variation in edible tissue mercury concentrations and the relationships of these patterns to characteristics of the water, sediment, and water bodies (lake, wetland, and watershed areas). Sampling was apportioned among three different ecological subregions and among lakes of differing trophic status. The authors sought to partition the variance to discover if these broadly defined concepts are suitable predictors of mercury levels in fish. Average muscle mercury concentrations were 0.15 mg/kg wet weight in the bottom-feeding brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus); 0.31 mg/kg in the omnivorous yellow perch (Perca flavescens); and 0.39 mg/kg in the predaceous largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Statistically significant differences in fish mercury concentrations between ecological subregions in Massachusetts, USA, existed only in yellow perch. The productivity level of the lakes (as deduced from Carlson's Trophic Status Index) was not a strong predictor of tissue mercury concentrations in any species. pH was a highly (inversely) correlated environmental variable with yellow perch and brown bullhead tissue mercury. Largemouth bass tissue mercury concentrations were most highly correlated with the weight of the fish (+), lake size (+), and source area sizes (+). Properties of individual lakes appear more important for determining fish tissue mercury concentrations than do small-scale ecoregional differences. Species that show major mercury variation with size or trophic level may not be good choices for use in evaluating the importance of environmental variables.

  9. Hydraulic Characteristics of the Lower Snake River during Periods of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Migration, 2002-2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, C.; Dibrani, B.; Richmond, M.; Bleich, M.; Titzler, P..; Fu, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a four-year study to assess hydraulic conditions in the lower Snake River. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Cold water released from the Dworshak Reservoir hypolimnion during mid- to late-summer months cools the Clearwater River far below equilibrium temperature. The volume of released cold water augments the Clearwater River, and the combined total discharge is on the order of the Snake River discharge when the two rivers meet at their confluence near the upstream edge of Lower Granite Reservoir. With typical temperature differences between the Clearwater and Snake rivers of 10 C or more during July and August, the density difference between the two rivers during summer flow augmentation periods is sufficient to stratify Lower Granite Reservoir as well as the other three reservoirs downstream. Because cooling of the river is desirable for migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during this same time period, the amount of mixing and cold water entrained into Lower Granite Reservoir's epilimnion at the Clearwater/Snake River confluence is of key biological importance. Data collected during this project indicates the three reservoirs downstream of Lower Granite also stratify as direct result of flow augmentation from Dworshak Reservoir. These four reservoirs are also heavily influenced by wind forcing at the water's surface and during periods of low river discharge often behave like a two-layer lake. During these periods of stratification, lower river discharge, and wind forcing, the water in the upper layer of the reservoir is held in place or moves slightly upstream. This upper layer is also exposed to surface heating and may warm up to temperatures close to equilibrium temperature. The thickness (depth) of this upper warm layer and its direction of travel may be of key biological importance to juvenile fall Chinook salmon. This report describes field data collection, modeling, and analysis of hydrodynamic and temperature conditions in the Lower Granite Reservoir during the summer flow augmentation periods of 2002, 2003, and 2004. Although temperature, and hence density, differences during flow augmentation periods between the Clearwater and Snake rivers were approximately equal (7-12 C) for all four years, the discharge ratio varied which resulted in significant differences in entrainment of cooler Clearwater River water into the Lower Granite Reservoir epilimnion. However, as a direct result of system management, Lower Granite Dam tailrace temperatures were maintained near 20 C during all years. Primary differences in the other three lower Snake River reservoirs were therefore a result of meteorological conditions and dam operations, which produced variations in wind setup and surface heating. Circulation patterns in all four lower Snake River reservoirs were numerically simulated for periods of 2002, 2003, 2004, and 2005 using CE-QUAL-W2. Simulation results show that these models are capable of matching diurnal and long-term temperature and velocity changes in the reservoirs. In addition, the confluence zone of the Clearwater and Snake rivers was modeled using the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic model Flow3D. Once calibrated and validated, the reservoir models were used to investigate downstream impacts of alternative reservoir operation schemes, such as increasing or decreasing the ratio of Clearwater to Snake river discharge. Simulation results were linked with the particle tracking model FINS to develop reservoir-integrated metrics that varied due to these alternative operation schemes. Findings indicate that significant alterations in water temperature throughout the lower Snake River are possible by altering hypolimnetic discharges from Dworshak Reservoir, which may also impact the behavior of migrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon during periods of flow augmentation.

  10. Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Robert (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead (Oncoryhnchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1--August 31, 1996. This was the twelfth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish collected by species, (2) number of fin clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) total number of fish showing signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT), (4) percent of descaled fish, and (5) daily average river flow, powerhouse {number_sign}1 flow, powerhouse {number_sign}2 flow and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the water budget, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows during the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids.

  11. Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail 1. In Outlook 2007 on the File menu, click Import and Export. 1a. For Outlook 2010 on the File menu, click Open, then Import 2. Click Export to a file, and then click Next. #12;3. Click Comma Separated Values (Windows), and then click Next

  12. Traces of Human Migrations in Helicobacter pylori Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, Thierry

    Traces of Human Migrations in Helicobacter pylori Populations Daniel Falush,1 Thierry Wirth,1 Bodo Reichard,1 Elena Katzowitsch,8 Xiaoyan Wang,1 Mark Achtman,1 * Sebastian Suerbaum8 Helicobacter pylori tuberculosis (2), Haemophilus influenzae (3), and Helicobac- ter pylori (4­8). H. pylori, a Gram

  13. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    /water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

  14. Migration and animal husbandry: Competing or complementary livelihood strategies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Kyrgyzstan Nadia Schoch, Bernd Steimann and Susan Thieme Abstract Animal husbandry and labour migration; their interlinkages have rarely been examined. Based on a case study in rural Kyrgyzstan, the aim of this paper; Kyrgyzstan. 1. Introduction Processes of agrarian transformations within and across countries have changed

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Granite magma migration and emplacement along thrusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galland, Olivier

    ORIGINAL PAPER Granite magma migration and emplacement along thrusts Eric C. Ferre´ · Olivier in the emplacement of granite plutons in contractional settings. We address both cases where contractional tectonics. This phenomenon occurs for both low-viscosity magma (basalts to andesite) and high-viscosity magma (dry granite

  16. Leveraging Load Migration and Basestaion Consolidation for Green Communications in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Jian "Neil"

    as a useful technology for improving resource utilization and power efficiency. For example, in a virtualized power-efficient BSs in its neighborhood such that idle BSs can be turned off or put into sleep to save power. In this paper, we propose to leverage load migration and BS consolidation for green

  17. Migration Health MIDSA Report -December 2009 Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    -Sectoral Approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5.5 PHC Reform and Provision of Health Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 5.10 Burden on Health Care System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 5.11 Condom#12;Migration Health MIDSA Report - December 2009 Table of Contents 1 Foreword 1 2 Acronyms 3 3

  18. Tier II Canada Research Chair Migration and Ethnic Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    Tier II Canada Research Chair in Migration and Ethnic Relations Faculty of Social Science Western University The Faculty of Social Science at Western University invites applications for a Tier II Canada for Tier II Canada Research Chairs, the candidate will hold a PhD (obtained within the last ten years

  19. Performance and Energy Modeling for Live Migration of Virtual Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Cheng-Zhong

    Performance and Energy Modeling for Live Migration of Virtual Machines Haikun Liu , Cheng-Zhong Xu , Hai Jin , Jiayu Gong , Xiaofei Liao School of Computer Science and Technology Huazhong University of Science and Technology Wuhan, 430074, China {hjin, xfliao}@hust.edu.cn Department of Electrical

  20. Intramolecular hydride migration from formyl to carbonyl and nitrene ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, L.; Brookhart, M.; Templeton, J.L. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction of [Tp{prime}W(CO){sub 2}(NPh)][PF{sub 6}] [Tp{prime} = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate] with lithium borohydride at -40 {degrees}C generates Tp{prime}W(CO)(Nph)(CHO) (1), which undergoes hydride migration from carbon to nitrogen (at -70 {degrees}C, k{sub obs} = 7.2 x 10{sup -6} s{sup -1}, {Delta}G{sup {double_dagger}} = 16.5 kcal/mol, t{sub {1/2}} = 27 h) to form Tp{prime}W(CO){sub 2}(NHPh). Crossover experiments indicate that the hydride migration is intramolecular. The metal formyl intermediate is fluxional; hydride migration interconverts the formyl and carbonyl ligands. The rate constant for this degenerate migration is 40 s{sup -1} at -41 {degrees}C with {Delta}G{sup {double_dagger}} = 11.7 kcal/mol. The analogous acyl complex Tp{prime}W(CO)(Nph)[C(O)Ph] (3) has been synthesized from the reaction of [Tp{prime}W(CO){sub 2}-(NPh)][PF{sub 6}] with PhMgBr. 9 refs.

  1. Greening the Cloud Using Renewable-Energy-Aware Service Migration*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 Greening the Cloud Using Renewable-Energy-Aware Service Migration* Uttam Mandal, M. Farhan Habib this energy consumption, and hence, carbon footprint and green house gas emission of cloud computing, is contributing to increased energy consumption, and hence, carbon footprint and green house gas emission

  2. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. II. MIGRATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia); O'Brien, David P. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: j.bond@unsw.edu.au [Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, Universite de Bordeaux, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  3. Computation Migration based on Mobile IP and Intelligent Agent Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Runtong

    Page 1 Computation Migration based on Mobile IP and Intelligent Agent Techniques Runtong Zhang, Dongmei Zhang, Zhigang Kan and Jian Ma Advanced Internet Technology, Nokia (China) R&D Center No. 11, He is to investigate the use of mobile agents in the platform of mobile IPv6, to provide adapted services to mobile

  4. NAWIPS/GEMPAK Migration to AWIPS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;2 TOPICS · Background · Raytheon Code issues · Schedule · Major Tasks for NCEP · GEMPAK 6.0 · Suggested decoders/encoders, D2D, GFE, Hydro Apps, etc. #12;5 Background · N-AWIPS migration will leverage Raytheon;6 Raytheon Code Issues · Both NCEP and Unidata are waiting for the NWS and Raytheon to reach agreement

  5. 27 Migration,Poverty,Security andSocialNetworks:ACentral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    417 27 Migration,Poverty,Security andSocialNetworks:ACentral AmericanPerspective Abelardo Morales introduction to understanding the migra- tion­poverty relationship from a different perspective, i of inequality and as a resource for poverty alleviation strategies, from a Central American perspective

  6. Reply to Engelder: Potential for fluid migration from the Marcellus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    LETTER Reply to Engelder: Potential for fluid migration from the Marcellus Formation remains) and brines by imbibition and capillary binding seals the Marcellus Formation and precludes the flow of fluids between the Marcellus Formation and shallow aquifers in northeastern Pennsylvania (2). First, considerable

  7. THEORETICAL EFFECT OF BENTONITE MIGRATION ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THEORETICAL EFFECT OF BENTONITE MIGRATION ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS TRANSPORT THROUGH GEOSYNTHETIC CLAY LINERS Jason H. FitzSimmons1 and Timothy D. Stark2 ABSTRACT: Since the introduction of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) to waste containment facilities, one of the major concerns

  8. Stefan Salzmann Migration for education: Studying abroad and return to the home country.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    migration for education and therewith of overall migration issues regarding post-soviet Kyrgyzstan-structured interviews with post graduates between one and to five years after they had returned to Kyrgyzstan. While

  9. Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanchani, Jitesh

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Detailed petrographic analysis was undertaken to study the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. The important components...

  10. Short-term Migration, Rural Workfare Programs and Urban Labor Markets: Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    , a simple calibration exercise reveals that small changes in short-term migration can have large impacts of migration in developing countries (Banerjee and Duo, 2007; Badiani and Sar, 2009; Morten, 2012). In 2007

  11. Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow possible migration of Marcellus brine through naturally occurring pathways. The occurrences of saline water, because of natural hydraulic connections to deeper formations. formation water isotopes Marcellus Shale

  12. Development and application of chemical tools for investigating dynamic processes in cell migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Brenda Nicole

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell migration is a dynamic process essential for many fundamental physiological functions, including wound repair and the immune response. Migration relies on precisely orchestrated events that are regulated in a spatially ...

  13. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O'Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of seven streams and four lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2000. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in southern Pend Oreille County, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2001. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  14. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of Blocked Area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the Blocked Area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. Common collection and analytical methodologies were developed in 1999. In 1999, 2000, and 2001 the project began addressing some of the identified data gaps throughout the Blocked Area. Data collection of established projects and a variety of newly developed sampling projects are ongoing. Projects developed and undertaken by JSAP fisheries managers include investigations of the Pend Orielle River and its tributaries, the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation. Migration patterns of adfluvial and reservoir fish in Box Canyon Reservoir and its tributaries, a baseline assessment of Boundary Reservoir and its tributaries, ecological assessment of mountain lakes in Pend Oreille County, and assessments of streams and lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation were completed by 2001. Assessments of the Little Spokane River and its tributaries, tributaries to the Pend Oreille River, small lakes in Pend Oreille County, WA, and water bodies within and near the Spokane Indian Reservation were conducted in 2002. This work was done in accordance with the scope of work approved by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  15. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1997.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, Christopher; Lockwoood, Jr., Neil

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998.

  16. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, Todd

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued assessing habitat and population enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in recommendations from the 1996, 1997, and 1998 annual reports, were monitored during field season 1999, 2000, and 2001. Post assessments were used to evaluate habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations where enhancement projects were implemented.

  17. Anatomy and evolution of chirocentrid fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardack, David

    1965-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this shale with the Austin Chalk on the Bosque River near Waco, Texas. Numer- ous specimens assigned to Xiphactinus, lchthyodectes, and Gillicus are found in the Smoky Hill Chalk Mem- ber of the Niobrara Formation. Few, if any, specimens of these fishes have... been obtained from the underlying Fort Hays Limestone Member. Exact localities for most fossil vertebrates from the Niobrara Formation are unknown. Xiphactinus specimens are recorded from the Austin Chalk near Britton, Celina, and Sa- voy, Texas...

  18. Feasibility study: a proposed recreational fishing enterprise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, James D

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chosen to locate immediately adjacent to or inside the city limits of major metropolitan centers in the region. Indeed, Cichra and Carpenter, 1989, point out there are now over 1500 commercial fee fishing operations in business in the southern U. S.... Figure 8 shows both paid and non-paid advertising and promotional activities (non-purchased does not necessarily infer no-cost), which will be balanced across most major commercial media on a seasonally adjusted basis. This approach will emphasize...

  19. Determinants and Income Effects of Commuting and Migration An empirical analysis for Germany after Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Determinants and Income Effects of Commuting and Migration An empirical analysis for Germany after differentials between East and West Germany led to massive commuting and migration flows. In this paper we: Human capital and income, Germany, commuting, migration, GSOEP JEL No.: J31, J61, O15 Address: Institute

  20. Migrate Roles and Features to Windows Server 2012 R2 or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    #12;Migrate Roles and Features to Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012 Summary: This E-Book includes guidance to help you migrate server roles and features to Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows Server 2012. Also included is an installation and operations guide for Windows Server Migration Tools, a set

  1. Physical Machine State Migration Jui-Hao Chiang, Maohua Lu, Tzi-cker Chiueh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiueh, Tzi-cker

    machine to another. This physical machine state migration (PMSM) capability greatly decreases the amount.g., the hypervisor in the case of VM migration. The PMSM prototype described in this paper is adapted from Linux's hibernation facility. The current PMSM prototype can migrate a physical machine running the MySQL DBMS server

  2. Report of Flood, Oil Sheen, and fish Kill Incidents on East Fork Poplar Creek at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality and plant opemtion irriiormation provided by the Y-12 Plant strongly suggest that a dechlorinating agent, applied to the raw water released below the North-South Pipes was responsible for the toxicity resulting in the fish kill of July 24. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in upper EFPC indicai e that low oxygen levels (3-5 ppm) occurred for a period of up to 30 min. This slug of low DO water traveling down EFPC to the lake could easily explain the massive fish kill and the resulting observations. Dissolved oxygen levels of 5.2 ppm or lower are documented as causing problems for warmwater fish species (Heath 1995). The presence of other stressors, including a range of petrochemicals, tends to lower resistance to low oxygen conditions. Given the sequence of events in upper EFPC in the few days prior to July 24, where extremely high flows were followed by inputs of a wide range of low concentrations of oils, the sensitivity to low DO conditions might be heightened. The possible toxic impact of ::he oils and other contaminants reaching EFPC as a result of the heavy rainfidl on July 22 doesn't appear significant enough to be the sole cause of the kill on July 24. Even during the height of the kill, a large school of fish remained immediately downstream of the North-South Pipes. If the toxicity of waters flowing through this outlet were the primary cause of the kill, then it would be expected that this school of fish would not have been present immediately below the pipes. Any impact of waters entering from other sources, such as pumping of basements WOUIC1 have produced a staggered pattern of mortality, with fishing dying in different localities at different times and rates. Further, it would be expected that the morta.lhy observed would have continued over several days at least, as more resistant individuals succumbed slowly to the toxic exposure. This would have provided freshly dead or dying fish for the surveys of July 25 and 28. In previous fish kills in this stream section, the impact on the fish community has been judged to be short-term only, with no significant long-term ecological effects. In fact, the numerous fish kills over the past 7 years do not appear to have dampened the growth of the stream fish populations. The magnit~de of these kills was far less than that of the July 24 kill; maximum mortality of 10-20o/0 of th{~ total population above Lake Reality. Because the current kill has tiected a much larger proportion of the resident population, the impacts are expected to extend for a longer period in this situation, perhaps up to a year. Decreased population levels should be evident through the fhll 1997 and spring 1998 samples. Depending on the success rate of reproduction during the summer cf 1998, the recovery of fish populations should be observed in the fdl 1998 population sample. However, complete recovery may take several reproductive seasons to reach the densities seen in 1997. The cyprinid species occurring in upper EFPC have tremendous reproductive capacities and should be able to repopulate this area with little or no long-term ecological impact. Even the redbreast sunfish should, at the worst, only endure a narrowing of its available gene pool, with little if any long-term impacts.

  3. Introduction to Fish Health Management 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR921 Introduction to Fish Health Management 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd2 1. This document is CIR921, one Is Fish Health Management? Fish health management is a term used in aquaculture to describe management practices which are designed to prevent fish disease. Once fish get sick it can be difficult to salvage them

  4. Comparative Survival Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Spring/Summer Chinook; Migration Years 1997-2000 Mark/Recapture Activities and Bootstrap Analysis, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren Thomas J.; Franzoni, Henry; Basham, Larry R. (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Comparative Survival Study (CSS) was initiated in 1996 as a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to estimate survival rates over different life stages for spring and summer chinook (hereafter, chinook) produced in major hatcheries in the Snake River basin and from selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. Much of the information evaluated in the CSS is derived from fish tagged with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags. A comparison of survival rates of chinook marked in two different regions (which differ in the number of dams chinook have to migrate through) provides insight into the effects of the Snake/Columbia hydroelectric system (hydrosystem). The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) for Snake River chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Additional comparisons can be made within in-river experiences as well comparison between the different collector projects from which smolts are transported. CSS also compares these survival rates for wild Snake River spring and summer chinook. These comparisons generate information regarding the relative effects of the current management actions used to recover this listed species. Scientists and managers have recently emphasized the importance of delayed hydrosystem mortality to long-term management decisions. Delayed hydrosystem mortality may be related to the smolts experience in the Federal Columbia River Power System, and could occur for both smolts that migrate in-river and smolts that are transported. The CSS PIT tag information on in-river survival rates and smolt-to-adult survival rates (SARs) of transported and in-river fish are relevant to estimation of ''D'', which partially describes delayed hydrosystem mortality. The parameter D is the differential survival rate of transported fish relative to fish that migrate in-river, as measured from below Bonneville Dam to adults returning to Lower Granite Dam. When D = 1, there is no difference in survival rate after hydrosystem passage. When D < 1, then transported smolts die at a greater rate after release below Bonneville Dam than smolts that have migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. While the relative survival rates of transported and in-river migrants are important, the SARs must be also be sufficient to allow the salmon to persist and recover (Mundy et al. 1994). Decreased SARs could result from delayed hydrosystem mortality for either transported or in-river migrants, or both. Major objectives of the CSS include: (1) development of a long-term index of transport SAR to in-river SAR for Snake River hatchery and wild spring and summer chinook smolts measured at Lower Granite Dam; (2) develop a long-term index of survival rates from release of smolts at Snake River hatcheries to return of adults to the hatcheries; (3) compute and compare the overall SARs for selected upriver and downriver spring and summer chinook hatchery and wild stocks; and (4) begin a time series of SARs for use in hypothesis testing and in the regional long-term monitoring and evaluation program. Primary CSS focus in this report is for wild and hatchery spring/summer chinook that outmigrated in 1997 to 2000 and returned in 2003. Another goal of CSS was to help resolve uncertainty concerning marking, handling and bypass effects associated with control fish used in National Marine Fisheries Service's (NMFS) transportation research and evaluation. Significant concern had been raised that the designated control groups, which were collected, marked and released at dams, did not experience the same conditions as the in-river migrants which were not collected and bypassed under existing management, and that the estimated ratios of SARs of transported fish to SARs of control fish may be biased (Mundy et al. 1994). Instead of marking at the dams, as traditionally done for NMFS transportation evaluations, CSS began marking sufficient numbers of fish at the hatcheries and defining in-river groups from the detection histories at the dams (e.g., total

  5. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  6. anadromous fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 INTEGRATED HATCHERY OPERATIONS TEAM OPERATION PLANS FOR ANADROMOUS FISH Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants Websites Summary: INTEGRATED HATCHERY...

  7. adrar mountains fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gravures de la rgion vont ensuite Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 2 Determinants of fish assemblage structure in Mount Itoupe mountain streams (French Guiana) Biology and...

  8. antarctic notothenioid fishes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Transcriptomic and genomic evolution under constant cold in Antarctic notothenioid fish Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: in protein biosynthesis, protein...

  9. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river...

  10. Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalLiteratureReviewAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid510804...

  11. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Consistency Determination Webpage Abstract This website explains the...

  12. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting March 29, 2013 Kristen Johnson Sustainability...

  13. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  14. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleModeling-ComputerSimulationsAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid387627...

  15. California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: California Department of Fish and Wildlife Environmental Review and Permitting Webpage Abstract This website provides...

  16. Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleStaticTemperatureSurveyAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid511143...

  17. A fish model of renal regeneration and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renate Reimschuessel

    The fish kidney provides a unique model for investigating renal injury, repair, and development. Like mammalian kidneys, fish kidneys have the remarkable ability to repair injured nephrons, designated renal regeneration. This response is marked by a recovery from acute renal failure by replacing the injured cells with new epithelial cells, restoring tubule integrity. In addition, fish have the ability to respond to renal injury by de novo nephron neogenesis. This response occurs in multiple fish species including goldfish, zebrafish, catfish, trout, tilapia, and the aglomerular toadfish. New nephrons develop in the weeks after the initial injury. This nephrogenic response can be induced in adult fish, providing a more abundant source of developing renal tissue compared with fetal mammalian kidneys. Investigating the roles played by different parts of the nephron during development and repair can be facilitated using fish models with differing renal anatomy, such as aglomerular fish. The fish nephron neogenesis model may also help to identify novel genes involved in nephrogenesis, information that could eventually be used to develop alternative renal replacement therapies. Key Words: development; fish; kidney; model; nephron; regeneration; repair

  18. Acquisition protects fish habitat in Yakima County Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities. The property would be owned and managed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. September 2008 Land to get management plan Once this property has been...

  19. GRANDE RONDE RIVER BASIN FISH HABITAT IMPROVEMENT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Kathy Anderson U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration #12;CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . · · . . · . . . . . . i INTRODUCTION

  20. A Migrated Aortic Stent Graft Causing Erosive Spondylopathy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gestrich, Christopher, E-mail: christopher.gestrich@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Probst, Chris, E-mail: chris.probst@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)] [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai, E-mail: kai.wilhelm@ek-bonn.de [Johanniterkrankenhaus Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany)] [Johanniterkrankenhaus Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Schiller, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.schiller@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)] [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn, Department of Cardiac Surgery (Germany)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report about a patient presenting with back pain 4 months after an uneventful endovascular implantation of an aortic stent graft. Computed tomography scan revealed a migration of the stent with consecutive endoleakage, kink formation, and movement of the stent toward the spine, which caused destruction of the aortic wall as well as vertebral necrosis. Explantation of the stent and replacement of the native aorta relieved the patient of his symptoms.