National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fish downstream migration

  1. Issue Backgrounder : Downstream Fish Migration : Improving the Odds of Survival.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-05-01

    Background information is given on the problems caused to anadromous fish migrations, especially salmon and steelhead trout, by the development of hydroelectric power dams on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Programs arising out of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and conservation Act of 1980 to remedy these problems and restore fish and wildlife populations are described. (ACR)

  2. Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downstream Fish Passage through Hydropower Turbines Background One of the most widespread environmental constraints to the development of hydropower in the U.S. is the provision of adequate fish passage at projects. Mortality of downstream migrating fish, particularly as a result of passing through hydropower

  3. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S.

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  4. Infrastructure Required for Tag/Mark Application, Detection, and Recovery Tag/Mark & release Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juvenile fish migration Adult fish migration Mortality*Ocean residency Adipose fin clip Marking trailers N processing Otolith Insulated box, thermal chilling system, lab processing, smolt traps N/A Fish traps, fish *Fish mortality data may be collected at any stage of the fish life cycle from harvest, recovered

  5. Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation a specific stock-effort dynamic model. The stock corresponds to two fish populations growing and moving between two fishing zones, on which they are harvested by two different fleets. The effort represents

  6. JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-16 September 13, 1995 blank page #12;SECTION 5 JUVENILE SALMON MIGRATION September 13, 1995 5-16 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM temperature MIGRATION SECTION 5 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 5-17 September 13, 1995 program. If there are conflicting

  7. Mercury in Fish Collected Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico: 1991--2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2004-10-15

    Small amounts of mercury (Hg) may exist in some canyon drainage systems within Los Alamos National Laboratory lands as a result of past discharges of untreated effluents. This paper reports on the concentrations of Hg in muscle (fillets) of various types of fish species collected downstream of LANL's influence from 1991 through 2004. The mean Hg concentration in fish from Cochiti reservoir (0.22 {micro}g/g wet weight), which is located downstream of LANL, was similar to fish collected from a reservoir upstream of LANL (Abiquiu) (0.26 {micro}g/g wet weight). Mercury concentrations in fish collected from both reservoirs exhibited significantly (Abiquiu = p < 0.05 and Cochiti = p < 0.10) decreasing trends over time. Predator fish like the northern pike (Esox lucius) contained significantly higher concentrations of Hg (0.39 {micro}g/g wet weight) than bottom-feeding fish like the white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) (0.10 {micro}g/g wet weight).

  8. 12/11/2014 WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream --federal study Manuel... https://plus.google.com/101473675488333674529/posts/Wcp1XY42QsF 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12/11/2014 WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream -- federal study Manuel... https Follow | WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream -- federal study Manuel Quiñones, E;12/11/2014 WATER POLLUTION: Mines can harm fish far downstream -- federal study Manuel... https

  9. FISH AND SHRIMP MIGRATIONS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ANALYZED USING STABLE C,N, ANDS ISOTOPE RATIOS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH AND SHRIMP MIGRATIONS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ANALYZED USING STABLE C,N, ANDS ISOTOPE RATIOS1 BRIAN FRY' ABSTRACT Natural stable isotope tags were used in the northern GulfofMexico to interpret migrations offive commer- cial fish and shrimp species: Leiostomus xanthurus, Micropogonias undu

  10. Parallel passageways: An assessment of salmon migration in the San Gregorio watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Chris

    2008-01-01

    with both the upstream and downstream channel bed surfaces.with areas immediately upstream and downstream. 5.adequate water depth upstream and downstream to support fish

  11. Sluiceway Operations for Adult Steelhead Downstream Passage at The Dalles Dam, Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Tackley, Sean C.

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated adult steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss; fallbacks and kelts) downstream passage at The Dalles Dam in the Columbia River, USA, during the late fall, winter, and early spring months between 2008 and 2011. The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of operating the dam’s ice-and-trash sluiceway during non-spill months to provide a relatively safe, non-turbine, surface outlet for overwintering steelhead fallbacks and downstream migrating steelhead kelts. We applied the fixed-location hydroacoustic technique to estimate fish passage rates at the sluiceway and turbines of the dam. The spillway was closed during our sampling periods, which generally occurred in late fall, winter, and early spring. The sluiceway was highly used by adult steelhead (91–99% of total fish sampled passing the dam) during all sampling periods. Turbine passage was low when the sluiceway was not operated. This implies that lack of a sluiceway route did not result in increased turbine passage. However, when the sluiceway was open, adult steelhead used it to pass through the dam. The sluiceway may be operated during late fall, winter, and early spring to provide an optimal, non-turbine route for adult steelhead (fallbacks and kelts) downstream passage at The Dalles Dam.

  12. Catalog of Waters Important for the Spawning, Rearing or Migration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spawning, Rearing or Migration of Anadromous Fishes Organization Alaska Department of Fish and Game Published Divisions of Sport Fish and Habitat, 2012 Report Number 12-05 DOI...

  13. Downstream extent of the N Reactor plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Ecker, R.M.; Vail, L.W.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    The downstream extent of the N Reactor thermal plume was studied to assess the potential for fisheries impacts downstream of N Reactor. The N Reactor plume, as defined by the 0.5/sup 0/F isotherm, will extend less than 10 miles downstream at river flows greater than or equal to annual average flows (120,000 cfs). Incremental temperature increases at the Oregon-Washington border are expected to be less than 0.5/sup 0/F during all Columbia River flows greater than the minimum regulated flows (36,000 cfs). The major physical factor affecting Columbia River temperatures in the Hanford Reach is solar radiation. Because the estimated temperature increase resulting from N Reactor operations is less than 0.3/sup 0/F under all flow scenarios, it is unlikely that Columbia River fish populations will be adversely impacted.

  14. Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2009-12-23

    We describe the Neutrino Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target and capture area. These include the bunching and phase rotation, cooling, acceleration, and decay ring systems. We also briefly discuss the R&D program under way to develop these systems, and indicate areas where help from CERN would be invaluable.

  15. Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First Observation ofFirstStorageFish Sign

  16. Characterization of Fish Passage Conditions through the Fish Weir and Turbine Unit 1 at Foster Dam, Oregon, Using Sensor Fish, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Joanne P.

    2013-02-01

    This report documents investigations of downstream fish passage research involving a spillway fish weir and turbine passage conditions at Foster Dam in May 2012.

  17. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design: Analysis of Barriers to Upstream Fish Migration, Volume IV of IV, Investigation of the Physical and Biological Conditions Affecting Fish Passage Success at Culverts and Waterfalls, 1982-1984 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01

    A synopsis of the project components was prepared to provide an overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists or engineers. This short report can be used also by technical persons who are interested in the scope of the project, and as a summary of the three main reports. The contents includes an historical perspective on fishway design which provides the basis for this project. The major project accomplishments and significant additions to the body of knowledge about the analysis and design of fishways are discussed. In the next section the research project organization, objectives and components are presented to familiarize the reader with the scope of this project. The summary report concludes with recommendations for assisting in the enhancement and restoration of fisheries resources from the perspective of fish passage problems and their solution. Promising research topics are included.

  18. Database of radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water, fish, waterfowl, gamebirds, and shellfish downstream of Hanford`s single-pass production reactors, 1960--1970. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiede, M.E.; Duncan, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from radionuclide emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project is conducted by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The time periods of greatest interest to the HEDR study vary depending on the type of environmental media concerned. Concentrations of radionuclides in Columbia River media from 1960--1970 provide the best historical data for validation of the Columbia River pathway computer models. This report provides the historical radionuclide measurements in Columbia River water (1960--1970), fish (1960--1967), waterfowl (1960--1970), gamebirds (1967--1970), and shellfish (1960--1970). Because of the large size of the databases (845 pages), this report is being published on diskette. A diskette of this report is available from the Technical Steering Panel (c/o K. CharLee, Office of Nuclear Waste Management, Department of Ecology, Technical Support and Publication Information Section, P.O. Box 47651, Olympia, Washington 98504-7651).

  19. Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel

    2009-04-03

    A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

  20. Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutant, Charles C; Mann, Roger; Sale, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

  1. The Application of Traits-Based Assessment Approaches to Estimate the Effects of Hydroelectric Turbine Passage on Fish Populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    One of the most important environmental issues facing the hydropower industry is the adverse impact of hydroelectric projects on downstream fish passage. Fish that migrate long distances as part of their life cycle include not only important diadromous species (such as salmon, shads, and eels) but also strictly freshwater species. The hydropower reservoirs that downstream-moving fish encounter differ greatly from free-flowing rivers. Many of the environmental changes that occur in a reservoir (altered water temperature and transparency, decreased flow velocities, increased predation) can reduce survival. Upon reaching the dam, downstream-migrating fish may suffer increased mortality as they pass through the turbines, spillways and other bypasses, or turbulent tailraces. Downstream from the dam, insufficient environmental flow releases may slow downstream fish passage rates or decrease survival. There is a need to refine our understanding of the relative importance of causative factors that contribute to turbine passage mortality (e.g., strike, pressure changes, turbulence) so that turbine design efforts can focus on mitigating the most damaging components. Further, present knowledge of the effectiveness of turbine improvements is based on studies of only a few species (mainly salmon and American shad). These data may not be representative of turbine passage effects for the hundreds of other fish species that are susceptible to downstream passage at hydroelectric projects. For example, there are over 900 species of fish in the United States. In Brazil there are an estimated 3,000 freshwater fish species, of which 30% are believed to be migratory (Viana et al. 2011). Worldwide, there are some 14,000 freshwater fish species (Magurran 2009), of which significant numbers are susceptible to hydropower impacts. By comparison, in a compilation of fish entrainment and turbine survival studies from over 100 hydroelectric projects in the United States, Winchell et al. (2000) found useful turbine passage survival data for only 30 species. Tests of advanced hydropower turbines have been limited to seven species - Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow trout, alewife, eel, smallmouth bass, and white sturgeon. We are investigating possible approaches for extending experimental results from the few tested fish species to predict turbine passage survival of other, untested species (Cada and Richmond 2011). In this report, we define the causes of injury and mortality to fish tested in laboratory and field studies, based on fish body shape and size, internal and external morphology, and physiology. We have begun to group the large numbers of unstudied species into a small number of categories, e.g., based on phylogenetic relationships or ecological similarities (guilds), so that subsequent studies of a few representative species (potentially including species-specific Biological Index Testing) would yield useful information about the overall fish community. This initial effort focused on modifying approaches that are used in the environmental toxicology field to estimate the toxicity of substances to untested species. Such techniques as the development of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) and Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models rely on a considerable amount of data to establish the species-toxicity relationships that can be extended to other organisms. There are far fewer studies of turbine passage stresses from which to derive the turbine passage equivalent of LC{sub 50} values. Whereas the SSD and ICE approaches are useful analogues to predicting turbine passage injury and mortality, too few data are available to support their application without some form of modification or simplification. In this report we explore the potential application of a newer, related technique, the Traits-Based Assessment (TBA), to the prediction of downstream passage mortality at hydropower projects.

  2. UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INFLUENCE ON STBLI UNSTEADINESS Upstream and Downstream Influence on the Unsteadiness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    UPSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM INFLUENCE ON STBLI UNSTEADINESS 1 Upstream and Downstream Influence the upstream flow and downstream flow with the shock motions. In Section 6, we characterize the separa between the incoming flow and the shock motions, as well as the downstream flow and the shock unsteadiness

  3. Evaluation of the potential for fish passage through the N Reactor and the Hanford generating project discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dauble, D.D.; Vail, L.W.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1987-09-01

    The potential for juvenile downstream-migrating salmonids to encounter both the Hanford Generating Project (HGP) and N Reactor discharges was evaluated. Three general scenarios were assessed for fish exposure: (1) HGP plume centerline passage followed by N Reator plum centerline passage, (2) HGP plume centerline passage including intersection with the N Reactor plume, and (3) noncenterline plume passage through the edge of first the HGP and then the N Reactor plume. It is highly unlikely that a fish would pass through both plume centerlines because of the location of the two discharges and because of river-mixing characteristics near the discharges. For the set of conditions that we evaluated, exposure to elevated temperatures would be of insufficient duration to result in mortalities to fish that might encounter both the HGP and N Reactor plumes.

  4. Supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos Manzano, Fidel

    2005-01-01

    This thesis studies current supply chain practices in the petroleum downstream industry, using ExxonMobil as a case study. Based on the analysis of the literature and the interaction with industry experts, this work describes ...

  5. FISH SPERMATOLOGY FISH SPERMATOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    FISH SPERMATOLOGY #12;FISH SPERMATOLOGY Alpha Science International Ltd. Oxford, U.K. = Editors Research Institute of Fish Culture and Hydrobiology, University of South Bohemia, Vodnany, Czech Republic of the publisher. ISBN 978-1-84265-369-2 Printed in India #12;Fish Spermatology is dedicated to Professor Roland

  6. Fish Bulletin. Fishing Party Vessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of California, Department of Fish and Game

    1990-01-01

    FISH BULLETIN: Fishing Party Vessels In the Text and Excelby the passenger carrying fishing industry (party boat). The

  7. The export of carbon mediated by mesopelagic fishes in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, Peter Charles

    2011-01-01

    population migration and feeding at depth by VM fishes thatMigration, DVM). A portion of the DSL remains at depthdepth than it decreases blow 400 m, and because the effort of vertical migration

  8. Today's Objectives Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Today's Objectives · Migration ­Definitions ­Models ­Demographics ­Summaries ­Case Studies Population Geography Class 3.1 #12;Human Migration Population Change = Fertility + Mortality + Migration #12;MIGRATION · More complex than birth and death · No limits (unlike fertility and mortality) · Migration has

  9. Philippines' downstream sector poised for growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    This paper reports that the Philippines' downstream sector is poised for sharp growth. Despite a slip in refined products demand in recent years, Philippines products demand will rebound sharply by 2000, East-West Center (EWC), Honolulu, predicts. Philippines planned refinery expansions are expected to meet that added demand, EWC Director Fereidun Fesharaki says. Like the rest of the Asia-Pacific region, product specifications are changing, but major refiners in the area expect to meet the changes without major case outlays. At the same time, Fesharaki says, push toward deregulation will further bolster the outlook for the Philippines downstream sector.

  10. Downstream-based Scheduling for Energy Conservation in Green EPONs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    downstream and upstream ONU transmissions can maximize the ONU sleep time, it jeopardizes the quality is based on the upstream time slot. In this paper, we study the downstream traffic performance in green sleep time, setting identical upstream/downstream transmission cycle times based on a maximum downstream

  11. Fast and Easy Sample Dialysis When downstream quality matters,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Fast and Easy Sample Dialysis When downstream quality matters, make sure your upstream tools downstream applications · D-Tube Dialyzers give you a gentle way to concentrate intractable or sensitive

  12. COOPERATIVE GAME THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE GAME THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP By Ezio Marchi Paula Andrea THEORY SOLUTION IN AN UPSTREAM-DOWNSTREAM RELATIONSHIP MARCHI, Ezio Instituto de Matemática Aplicada San; and second, an economic element, where we reconsider the upstream-downstream relationship under a cooperative

  13. Morphodynamics of small-scale superimposed sand waves over migrating dune bed forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Morphodynamics of small-scale superimposed sand waves over migrating dune bed forms Jeremy G migrating dunes are examined using data drawn from laboratory experiments. We refer to the superimposed classified as ripples, dunes, or bars. Within the experiments, the sheets formed downstream

  14. Energetic costs of migration through the Fraser River Canyon, British Columbia, in adult pink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    the primary factors affecting migration activity and energetics. Fish increased their activity levels whenEnergetic costs of migration through the Fraser River Canyon, British Columbia, in adult pink spp.) depend on energy reserves to complete their upriver spawning migration. Little is known about

  15. Written Statement of Peggy Montana, Shell Downstream Quadrennial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    April 11. 2014 Good Morning. I am Peggy Montana, Executive Vice President, Pipelines and Special Projects, for Shell Downstream Inc. My previous role was EVP Supply...

  16. COMPLIANCE STUDIES: WHAT ABOUT THE FISH?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Wagner, Katie A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Eppard, M. B.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-08-21

    ABSTRACT It is understood that operational and structural conditions at hydroelectric facilities along with environmental conditions of the migration corridors affect the passage conditions for fish. Hydropower fish survival assessments at the individual- and population-level have progressed over the past decade with development of turbine simulation software and improvements in telemetry systems, in particular, micro-transmitters, cabled and autonomous receivers, and advanced statistical designs that provide precise estimates of passage routes and dam-passage survival. However, these approaches often ignore fish condition as a variable in passage and survival analyses. To account for fish condition effects on survival results, compliance statistical models often require increased numbers of tagged fish. For example, prior to and during migration, fish encounter numerous stressors (e.g., disease, predation, contact with structures, decompression events), all of which can cause physical and physiological stress, altering the probability of survival after passage through a dam or a series of dams. In addition, the effects of surgical transmitter implantation process or the transmitter itself may cause physiological stress, alter behavior, and/or decrease survival. Careful physiological evaluations can augment survival model assumptions, resultant data, and predictive scenarios. To exemplify this, surgeons concurrently noted fish condition and surgical implantation during a multi-dam compliance study in 2011. The analyses indicted that surgeon observations on fish condition and surgical outcomes were related to 24 h holding mortalities and fish that never detected after release. Short reach and long reach survival were related to surgical outcomes and fish condition, respectively.

  17. Internet Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMacchia, Brian A.

    1996-08-01

    I have invented "Internet Fish," a novel class of resource-discovery tools designed to help users extract useful information from the Internet. Internet Fish (IFish) are semi-autonomous, persistent information brokers; ...

  18. Fish and hydroelectricity; Engineering a better coexistence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zorpette, G.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on the problems that hydroelectric plants have regarding fish populations. The utilities that operate these plants are finding that accommodating migrating fish presents unique engineering challenges, not the least of which involves designing and building systems to protect fish species whose migratory behavior remains something of a mystery. Where such systems cannot be built, the status of hydroelectric dams may be in doubt, as is now the case with several dams in the United States. A further twist in some regions in the possibility that certain migratory fish will be declared threatened or endangered-a development that could wreak havoc on the hydroelectric energy supply in those regions.

  19. Seismic velocity estimation from time migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    2007-01-01

    v List of Tables Comparison of time migration and depthof seismic imaging: time migration and depth migration. TimeComparison of time migration and depth migration Adequate

  20. LONG-TERM FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF INNER BENDS IN A LARGE RIVER M. PYRON,a* J. S. BEUGLY,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyron, Mark

    to an upstream­downstream pattern was present in 1977 and 2008, but not in 1997. A hydrologic analysis based and identified a longitudinal gradient in dominant substrate categories with gravel upstream and sand downstream in lower stability of fish assemblages. Downstream locations in larger rivers are suggested to have lower

  1. September 2009 Migrating to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    September 2009 Migrating to Evaluator's Guide Windows Server 2008 R2 File Services #12;Evaluator's Guide: Migrating to Windows Server 2008 R2 File Services 5 Migrating to Windows Server 2008 R2 File Services IT Professionals hear a lot about the new, enticing features of Windows Server 2008 such as Active

  2. Bird migration monitoring across

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Bird migration monitoring across Europe using weather radar M. de Graaf, H. Leijnse, A. Dokter, J Conference on Radar in Meteorology and Hydrology #12;Bird migration monitoring across Europe using weather-29 June Toulouse Bird Migration Monitoring across Europe ­ M. de Graaf et al.2 #12;Introduction Flysafe 2

  3. DENIL-TYPE FISH LADDER ON PACIFIC SALMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of upstream migrating fish at hydroelectric and irrigation developments is becoming increasingly importanto pass" for the Herting power dam on the Atran fliver, near Falkenburg, Sweden. As a result

  4. Optimal Bounds for Online Page Migration with Generalized Migration Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmid, Stefan

    Optimal Bounds for Online Page Migration with Generalized Migration Costs Johannes Schneider1 to a generalized version of the classic page migration problem where migration costs are not necessarily given by the migration distance only, but may depend on prior migrations, or on the available bandwidth along

  5. Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish DAILY SECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernald, Russell

    Home Science One fish, two fish, dumb fish, dead fish Home DAILY SECTIONS News Sports Opinion Arts America! Study Spanish & Volunteer ONE FISH, TWO FISH, DUMB FISH, DEAD FISH | Print | E- mail Written scientists say fish are capable of deducing how they stack up against the competition by simply watching

  6. cPIES sites Q: Downstream of SFZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    from PF core [km] North (downstream) South (upstream) 5958.55857.557 0 50 100 150 Latitude of max() N cPIES sites Q: Downstream of SFZ Neutraldensity[kg/m 3 ] Distance from PF core [km] -100-50050100 27.2 27.4 27.6 27.8 28 28.2 Q: Upstream of SFZ Distance from PF core [km] -100

  7. Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focal Fish Species Focal Fish Species Characterization APPENDIX I This chapter describes the fish selected the focal species based on their significance and ability to characterize the health

  8. Fish Bulletin No. 96. California Fishing Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, W L

    1953-01-01

    BULLETIN No. 96 California Fishing Ports By W. L. SCOFIELDof the more important fishing ports FOREWORD The purpose ofbrief notes on its sport fishing opportunities. Notes were

  9. Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-08-28

    The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

  10. Robot Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-12-30

    Broadcast transcript: Usually you expect this kind of news from Japan but this time it's South Korea where scientists have just created a robotic fish. Yes, folks, this is an electronic fish that can live underwater. At depths of up to 100 meters...

  11. Planet formation and migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John C B Papaloizou; Caroline Terquem

    2005-11-28

    We review the observations of extrasolar planets, ongoing developments in theories of planet formation, orbital migration, and the evolution of multiplanet systems.

  12. An ODE Model of the Motion of Pelagic Fish Bjorn Birnir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Björn

    An ODE Model of the Motion of Pelagic Fish Bj¨orn Birnir Center for Complex and Nonlinear Science], describing the motion of a school of fish. Classes of linear and sta- tionary solutions of the ODEs are found are found. Applications of the model to the migration of the capelin, a pelagic fish that undertakes

  13. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's (FWC) encourages anglers from throughout to determine whether the fish was previously caught. Tarpon can be identified using DNA fingerprinting, or "fin survival rates, health, migration, and movement of individual fish within the fishery. By evaluating

  14. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-01-01

    GAS PLUME MIGRATION t = 64.0 [day] Depth [m] Depth [m] t =GAS PLUME MIGRATION t = 160.0 [day] Depth [m] Depth [m] t =

  15. UCL Migration Research Unit 2013 Migration Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    UCL Migration Research Unit ANNUAL REPORT 2013 Migration Research Unit UCL DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY in the Migration Research Unit. Two key members of the research unit are on the move. JoAnn McGregor moves highly successful MSc in Global Migration and her involvement in the degree will be missed as well as her

  16. A Service Migration Case Study: Migrating the Condor Schedd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    A Service Migration Case Study: Migrating the Condor Schedd Joe Meehean and Miron Livny Computer, 2005 Abstract Service migration has become an important topic due the rising interest in both service with migrating a service: packaging the service binaries and data in a fashion that allows it to be restarted

  17. Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish THE HUGETHREE-GORGES DAM (TGD) OFTHE Yangtze River is going and animals, as discussed by J. Wu et al. in their Policy Forum "Three-Gorges Dam-- experiment in habitat). The construction of the Gezhou Dam (38 km downstream from the TGD) in 1981 led to sharp declines in the popula

  18. Towards a Theoretical Ethnography of Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FitzGerald, David

    2006-01-01

    of international migration: the American experience. NewC. B. (2000). Theorizing migration in anthropology. In C. B.J. F. Hollifield (Eds. ), Migration theory: talking across

  19. Reverse Migration: The Impact of Returning Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albright, Alison; Naybor, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    The Case of Taiwan. Migration Policy Institute. SeptemberSilent River: Women and Migration. Retrieved September 2009of the problems reverse migration will create for women and

  20. Immigration Control in the Age of Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Tak Kei

    2011-01-01

    Policies for an Age of Migration. Washington D.C. : Carnegieed. ). 2011. Global Migration Governance. New York: OxfordCitizenship. ” International Migration Review 38 (2): 389-

  1. Nationality and Migration in Modern Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FitzGerald, David

    2005-01-01

    The quantification of migration between Mexico and theUnited States’, in Migration Between Mexico and the Unitedof Ethnic and Migration Studies Mexico’s overwhelming net

  2. Mexico-United States Migration: Health Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuniga, Elena; Wallace, Steven P.; Berumen, Salvador; Castaneda, Xotichl; al., et

    2005-01-01

    Americans. Mexico-United States Migration • Health issuesMexico-United States Migration Health Issues © ConsejoMéxico D. F. Mexico-United States Migration Health Issues

  3. Nationality and Migration in Modern Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzgerald, D

    2005-01-01

    The quantification of migration between Mexico and theUnited States’, in Migration Between Mexico and the UnitedCA: Sage, Migration News (2003) ‘Mexico: Migrants, Babies,

  4. Essays on migration and monetary policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borger, Scott Charles

    2009-01-01

    2006): “Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States,”push factors for migration from Mexico with limited pullthe dynamics of migration from Mexico to the United States

  5. Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinson, Rick D.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M.; Ballinger, Dean

    2006-04-01

    2005 was an average to below average flow year at John Day and Bonneville Dams. A large increase in flow in May improved migration conditions for that peak passage month. Spill was provided April through August and averaged about 30% and 48% of river flow at John Day and Bonneville Dams, respectively. Water temperature graphs were added this year that show slightly lower than average water temperature at John Day and slightly higher than average temperatures at Bonneville. The number of fish handled at John Day decreased from 412,797 in 2004 to 195,293 this year. Of the 195,293 fish, 120,586 (61.7%) were collected for researchers. Last year, 356,237 (86.3%) of the fish sampled were for researchers. This dramatic decline is the result of (1) fewer research fish needed (2) a smaller, lighter tag which allowed for tagging of smaller fish, and (3) a larger average size for subyearling chinook. These factors combined to reduce the average sample rate to 10.8%, about half of last year's rate of 18.5%. Passage timing at John Day was similar to previous years, but the pattern was distinguished by larger than average passage peaks for spring migrants, especially sockeye. The large spike in mid May for sockeye created a very short middle 80% passage duration of just 16 days. Other spring migrants also benefited from the large increase in flow in May. Descaling was lower than last year for all species except subyearling chinook and below the historical average for all species. Conversely, the incidence of about 90% of the other condition factors increased. Mortality, while up from last year for all species and higher than the historical average for all species except sockeye, continued to be low, less than 1% for all species. On 6 April a slide gate was left closed at John Day and 718 fish were killed. A gate position indicator light was installed to prevent reoccurrences. Also added this year was a PIT tag detector on the adult return-to-river flume. For the first time this year, we successfully held Pacific lamprey ammocetes. The number of fish sampled at Bonneville Dam was also down this year to 260,742, from 444,580 last year. Reasons for the decline are the same as stated above for John Day. Passage timing at Bonneville Dam was quite similar to previous years with one notable exception, sockeye. Sockeye passage was dominated by two large spikes in late May that greatly condensed the passage pattern, with the middle 80% passing Bonneville in just 18 days. Unlike John Day, passage for the rest of the species was well disbursed from late April through early June. Fish condition was good, with reductions in descaling rates for all species except unclipped steelhead and sockeye. Sockeye mortality matched last year's rate but was considerably lower for all other species. Rare species sampled at Bonneville this year included a bull trout and a eulachon.

  6. Planet Formation with Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Chambers

    2006-10-30

    In the core-accretion model, gas-giant planets form solid cores which then accrete gaseous envelopes. Tidal interactions with disk gas cause a core to undergo inward type-I migration in 10^4 to 10^5 years. Cores must form faster than this to survive. Giant planets clear a gap in the disk and undergo inward type-II migration in migration times exceed typical disk lifetimes if viscous accretion occurs mainly in the surface layers of disks. Low turbulent viscosities near the midplane may allow planetesimals to form by coagulation of dust grains. The radius r of such planetesimals is unknown. If rmigration timescale and cores will survive. Migration is substantial in most cases, leading to a wide range of planetary orbits, consistent with the observed variety of extrasolar systems. When r is of order 100m and midplane alpha is of order 3 times 10^-5, giant planets similar to those in the Solar System can form.

  7. Characterization and application of vortex flow adsorption for simplification of biochemical product downstream processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Junfen, 1972-

    2003-01-01

    One strategy to reduce costs in manufacturing a biochemical product is simplification of downstream processing. Biochemical product recovery often starts from fermentation broth or cell culture. In conventional downstream ...

  8. Instruction-Level Execution Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devadas, Srinivas

    2010-04-17

    We introduce the Execution Migration Machine (EM²), a novel data-centric multicore memory system architecture based on computation migration. Unlike traditional distributed memory multicores, which rely on complex cache ...

  9. DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOWNSTREAM PASSAGE FOR SALMON AT HYDROELECTRIC PROJECTS IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN: DEVELOPMENT ..........................................................................25 Division Barriers Upstream of the Powerhouse

  10. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ober, Curtis C. (Las Lunas, NM); Romero, Louis A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ghiglia, Dennis C. (Longmont, CO)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  11. On downstream hydraulic geometry and optimal energy expenditure: case study of the Ashley and Taieri Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramírez, Jorge A.

    On downstream hydraulic geometry and optimal energy expenditure: case study of the Ashley the network. We look at energy expenditure from two perspectives. (1) In the context of downstream hydraulic Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Downstream hydraulic geometry; River networks; Energy

  12. STEREO observations of upstream and downstream waves at low Mach number shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    STEREO observations of upstream and downstream waves at low Mach number shocks C. T. Russell,1 L. K; published 13 February 2009. [1] Early theories of upstream and downstream wave formation at laminar (low, propagating upstream along the shock normal. Downstream waves were attributed to nearly perpendicular shocks

  13. Partial Crosstalk Precompensation in Downstream Raphael Cendrillon a,, George Ginis b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the upstream signal of one modem couples into the downstream signal of another or vice versa. FEXT occurs whenPartial Crosstalk Precompensation in Downstream VDSL Raphael Cendrillon a,, George Ginis b , Marc than 52 Mbps in the downstream, to the mass consumer market. This is achieved by transmitting

  14. Downstream Hydraulic Geometry of Alluvial Channels Jong-Seok Lee, A.M.ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Downstream Hydraulic Geometry of Alluvial Channels Jong-Seok Lee, A.M.ASCE1 ; and Pierre Y. Julien. A larger database for the downstream hydraulic geometry of alluvial channels is examined through with meandering to braided planform geometry. The five parameters describing downstream hydraulic geometry are

  15. Fish Biology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochem, Frank J.

    Lab 10: Fish Biology Introduction The effective management of fish populations requires knowledge of the growth rate of the fish. This requires determination of the age of fish to develop a relationship between the size and age of fish. For an inventory, this information provides insights to evaluate the potential

  16. Modeling and Simulations of the Spawning Migration of Pelagic Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    harengus) (Vil- and oceanic currents. Internal variables,by 56. The temperature and oceanic currents are stored in ademonstrates that oceanic temperature and currents allow us

  17. A Poisson Fishing Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas S. Ferguson

    2011-01-01

    for this problem. 4. The Basic Fishing Model. We generalizeA Poisson Fishing Model 1 Thomas S. Ferguson, 08/30/94 2as a ?shing problem. 1. The Fishing Problem. One of the ?rst

  18. Fish and Wildlife Administrator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Fish & Wildlife Program, which implements and provides policy and planning support for actions to meet BPAs fish and wildlife mitigation responsibilities under...

  19. The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

    2004-07-31

    This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

  20. Fish Camp 2015 Freshmen Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    1 Fish Camp 2015 Freshmen Information Packet #12;2 Contents Fish Camp General Information ..................................................................................................... 3 Session Dates for Fish Camp 2015.......................................................................................................................... 10 #12;3 Fish Camp General Information Fish Camp Office Mailing Address Student Activities, 131

  1. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  2. Migration as a Matter of Time: Reasons for Migration and its Meaning for Children and Youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto, Lilia

    2006-01-01

    Mexican Experiences of Migration. Berkeley: University ofof Globalization: Women, Migration, and Domestic Work. Palo2005. Children of Global Migration: Transnational Families

  3. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES DECEMBER 1958 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES DECEMBER 1958 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for s veral types of canned tuna, canned salmon

  4. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES MARCH 1959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES MARCH 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch canned fish items. The retail prices as contain d h rein for s veral types of canned tuna, canned salmon

  5. The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Justin Toby

    2010-01-01

    from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small damsfrom hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small damsdam to halt downstream progression of the hydraulic mining

  6. Influence of Headwater Streams on Downstream Reaches in Forested Lee H. MacDonald and Drew Coe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    it difficult to rigorously link upstream inputs and anthropogenic activities to the condition of downstreamInfluence of Headwater Streams on Downstream Reaches in Forested Areas Lee H. MacDonald and Drew of the streamflow in downstream areas. Headwater streams also provide other important constituents to downstream

  7. Migration and Global Environmental Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Challenges and Opportunities FINAL PROJECT REPORT and adaptation, and also developmental and humanitarian agendas. Migration and Global Environmental Change Future Environmental Change (2011) Final Project Report The Government Office for Science, London #12;3 A range

  8. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty inversion, seismic anisotropy. 1. Introduction A general formulation of prestack depth migration based numerical methods (Claerbout, 1971) is considered in this paper. A common­shot prestack depth migration

  9. Essays on migration and monetary policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borger, Scott Charles

    2009-01-01

    and T. Vishwanath. (1996): “Migration with Endogenous MovingFigure 1.11: Distribution of Migration Trips in the MMPof Increased US Wage on Migration …………………… Figure 2.8:

  10. Global Migration and Regionalization, 1840-1940

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, Adam

    2007-01-01

    Thousands Sources: See McKeown, "Global Migration," 188-9.Figure 4: Indian Migration, 1842-1937 Burma, Ceylon, Malayaof India, 100; McKeown, "Global Migrations," 186-9.

  11. Mitigation measures for fish habitat improvement in Alpine rivers affected by hydropower operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitigation measures for fish habitat improvement in Alpine rivers affected by hydropower operations In mountainous areas, high-head-storage hydropower plants produce peak load energy. The resulting unsteady water habitat improvement. This method was applied to an Alpine river downstream of a complex storage hydropower

  12. Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    to tell me about diving or fishing in Bonaire? 126. StartTHE DISSERTATION Fish, Fishing, Diving, and the ManagementPauly, D. (2011) Global fishing effort (1950-2010): Trends,

  13. Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Scott C. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    Interior Duct Wall Pressure Downstream of a Low-Speed Rotor Scott C. Morris , David B. Stephens The region downstream of a ducted rotor has been experimentally investigated in terms of its wake characteristics and the duct wall pressure fluctuations. The motivation for the measurements was to document

  14. Pickup Ions Upstream and Downstream of Shocks G. Gloeckler*,, L. A. Fisk and L. J. Lanzerotti**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickup Ions Upstream and Downstream of Shocks G. Gloeckler*,, L. A. Fisk and L. J. Lanzerotti from upstream to downstream is relatively small in the case of Jupiter's bow shock. The presence of pre, the reverse shock of a Corotating Interaction Region, and the Jovian bow shock. Upstream ion velocity

  15. Waves upstream and downstream of interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Waves upstream and downstream of interplanetary shocks driven by coronal mass ejections P. Kajdic,1) waves and higher-frequency (HF, 1 Hz) whistler precursors upstream of these shocks. Downstream of them as in the upstream case. We find that IP shocks with relatively small Mms can excite waves in large regions in front

  16. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA ABSTRACT Dam removal is often implemented to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall

  17. Brf1 posttranscriptionally regulates pluripotency and differentiation responses downstream of Erk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elowitz, Michael

    Brf1 posttranscriptionally regulates pluripotency and differentiation responses downstream of Erk, operates downstream of FGF/Erk MAP kinase signaling to regulate pluripotency and cell fate decision making in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). FGF/Erk MAP kinase signaling up-regulates Brf1, which disrupts

  18. Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South sluice gate operations affect the 45-km reach of the Hwang River between the Hapcheon Reregulation Dam

  19. TRIBUTE TO STANLEY DODSON Does the morphology of beaver ponds alter downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Angus

    ratio of beaver dam height (which determines hydraulic head) to pond surface area and related to pond depended on pond morphology, increasing downstream of small ponds with high dams, but only during the low-limiting nutrients downstream. Both periphyton biomass and BOM decreased down- stream of small ponds with high dams

  20. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program Annual Report #12; 2005Annual Report Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program www.coopunits.org #12;2 #12;2 Front cover photos

  1. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  2. Chapter 19 Fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Words in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 19 Fish This chapter describes fish resources in the project area and how the project...

  3. Fish Pond - 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    Catfish ponds can provide enjoyable outdoor recreation as well as excellent food fish. This publication explains pond preparation, stocking, feeding, water quality, off-flavor, harvesting, fish diseases, and controlling pond pests....

  4. Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P.; Duke, Bill; Loffink, Ken

    2008-12-30

    In the late 1990s, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, along with many other agencies, began implementing fisheries restoration activities in the Walla Walla Basin. An integral part of these efforts is to alleviate the inadequate fish migration conditions in the basin. Migration concerns are being addressed by removing diversion structures, constructing fish passage facilities, implementing minimum instream flow requirements, and providing trap and haul efforts when needed. The objective of the Walla Walla River Fish Passage Operations Project is to increase the survival of migrating adult and juvenile salmonids in the Walla Walla River basin. The project is responsible for coordinating operation and maintenance of ladders, screen sites, bypasses, trap facilities, and transportation equipment. In addition, the project provides technical input on passage and trapping facility design, operation, and criteria. Operation of the various passage facilities and passage criteria guidelines are outlined in an annual operations plan that the project develops. Beginning in March of 2007, two work elements from the Walla Walla Fish Passage Operations Project were transferred to other projects. The work element Enumeration of Adult Migration at Nursery Bridge Dam is now conducted under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project and the work element Provide Transportation Assistance is conducted under the Umatilla Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance Project. Details of these activities can be found in those project's respective annual reports.

  5. John Day Fish Passage and Screening; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartlerode, Ray; Dabashinsky, Annette; Allen, Steve

    2003-01-28

    This project is necessary to insure that replacement of fish screening devices and fishways meet current NMFS design criteria for the protection of all salmonid life stages. The mission of the fish passage program in Northeast Oregon is to protect and enhance fish populations by assisting private landowners, public landowners, irrigation districts and others by maintaining fish screening devices and fishways. These facilities reduce or eliminate fish loss associated with irrigation withdrawals, and as a result insure fish populations are maintained for enjoyment by present and future generations. Assistance is provided through state and federal programs. This can range from basic technical advice to detailed construction, fabrication and maintenance of screening and passage facilities. John Day screens personnel identified 50 sites for fish screen replacement, and one fish passage project. These sites are located in critical spawning, rearing and migration areas for spring chinook, summer steelhead and bull trout. All projects were designed and implemented to meet current NMFS criteria. It is necessary to have a large number of sites identified due to changes in weather, landowner cooperation and access issues that come up as we try and implement our goal of 21 completed projects.

  6. Planetary Migration to Large Radii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. Martin; S. H. Lubow; J. E. Pringle; M C. Wyatt

    2007-04-25

    There is evidence for the existence of massive planets at orbital radii of several hundred AU from their parent stars where the timescale for planet formation by core accretion is longer than the disc lifetime. These planets could have formed close to their star and then migrated outwards. We consider how the transfer of angular momentum by viscous disc interactions from a massive inner planet could cause significant outward migration of a smaller outer planet. We find that it is in principle possible for planets to migrate to large radii. We note, however, a number of effects which may render the process somewhat problematic.

  7. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU PRICES APRIL 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch of Market Development FISHERY with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain a v e rage retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail

  8. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES NOVEMBER 1958 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for several types. Department of Labor in order to provide information on price levels in different cities. This issue contains

  9. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE ll959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDUFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JUNE 1959 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch Fisheries has contracted with the Bureau of Labo r Statistics to obtain average retail prices for selected

  10. CANNED FISH RETAIL .PRICES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL .PRICES, OC1rOIBrE~ UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INT...n.~""n FISH retail prices for selected canned fish items. The retail prices as contained herein for several types. Department of Labor in order to provide information on price levels in different cities. This issue contains

  11. CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JA.NUARY 11959 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE, Commissioner CANNED FISH RETAIL PRICES JANUARY 195 9 Prepared in the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Branch Fisheries has contracted with the Bureau of Labor Statistics to obtain average retail prices for se lected

  12. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Fortner, Allison M; Riemer, Kristina P; Schweizer, Peter E

    2012-04-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the effect on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by the projects. The submerged electrical generator will emit an EMF into the surrounding water, as will underwater cables used to transmit electricity from the generator to the shore, between individual units in an array (inter-turbine cables), and between the array and a submerged step-up transformer. The electric current moving through these cables will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of fish and benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011). Those experiments found little indication that the behaviors of these freshwater species were a

  13. Information Management Software Services SAP Migrations Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , customers worldwide have maximized their SAP systems by providing a streamlined migration path to DB2Assessment Prepare SAP migration project plan templates before the project starts to allow extra time to define the order in which your SAP landscape(s) and systems are migrated. Once the migration assessment phase

  14. ANNUAL REPORT 2012 UCL Migration Research Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    in research on migration in different contexts including Zimbabwe, Cameroon, Mexico, South Africa, CanadaANNUAL REPORT 2012 UCL Migration Research Unit Migration Research Unit UCL DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY #12;Co-Directors' Report The UCL Migration Research Unit (MRU) was first established by John Salt

  15. The Charged Heavy Ion COunter (CHICO) is comprised of two equivalent halves referred to as the upstream and downstream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, Douglas

    to as the upstream and downstream detectors (as seen from the particle beam's point of view). Each half consists to wrap around the beampipe upstream of CHICO, and ten downstream to complete the entire system

  16. The influence of return bends on the downstream pressure drop and condensation heat transfer in tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traviss, Donald P.

    1971-01-01

    The influence of return bends on the downstream pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of condensing refrigerant R-12 was studied experimentally. Flow patterns in glass return bends of 1/2 to 1 in. radius and 0.315 ...

  17. Fishing Communities Facts Gloucester, Massachusetts has been a fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12; #12; Fishing Communities Facts Gloucester, Massachusetts has been a fishing community continuously since its founding in 1623. Boston's Fish Pier, which opened in 1914, is the oldest continuously operating fish pier in the U.S. There is a lot of support for the fishing industry by state and local

  18. Fishing Communities Facts North Carolina's commercial fishing communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12; #12; Fishing Communities Facts North Carolina's commercial fishing communities tend fisheries. The number of commercial fish processors and wholesale dealers for North Carolina, South fishing trips in the U.S. The Big Rock Blue Marlin Fishing Tournament in Morehead City, North Carolina

  19. iFISH -Conceptually What is iFISH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Jon

    iFISH - Conceptually What is iFISH? iFISH is an underlying technology that can form the basis and effective manner. It provides users with a unique exploration experience. iFISH offers a playful environment that encourages a further quick and deeper investigation. iFISH provides all of the above. It employs sliders

  20. Microsoft Word - Fish Impact Assessment 070512.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K Fish Habitat and Fish Population Impacts ASSESSMENT OF RELATIVE FISH HABITAT AND FISH POPULATION IMPACTS OF I-5 CORRIDOR REINFORCEMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES AND OPTIONS Report to:...

  1. Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Helene (2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    northeastward by an upstream trough during ET and contributed to the building of a downstream ridge. A troughPredictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition downstream. The present study focuses on the predictability of a Mediterranean tropical-like storm (Medicane

  2. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine B. Gunawan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    plane from upstream to downstream of the turbine at x/D = -10, -5, -3, -2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model B, Minneapolis, MN 55414. ABSTRACT Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines

  3. Building bridges for fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building-bridges-for-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

  4. Effects of fishing and protection on Brazilian reef fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floeter, S R; Halpern, Benjamin S; Ferreira, CEL

    2006-01-01

    292. Frédou, T. , 2004. The fishing activity on coral reefsC.M. , 2004. Effects of fishing on sex-changing CaribbeanR.F.G. , 2005. Effects of fishing pressure and trophic group

  5. Monitoring Fish Contaminant Responses to Abatement Actions: Factors that Affect Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring of contaminant accumulation in fish has been conducted in East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee since 1985. Bioaccumulation trends are examined over a twenty year period coinciding with major pollution abatement actions by a Department of Energy facility at the stream s headwaters. Although EFPC is enriched in many contaminants relative to other local streams, only polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury (Hg) were found to accumulate in the edible portions of fish to levels of human health concern. Mercury concentrations in redbreast sunfish were found to vary with season of collection, sex and size of individual fish. Over the course of the monitoring, waterborne Hg concentrations were reduced[80%; however, this did not translate into a comparable decrease in Hg bioaccumulation at most sites. Mercury bioaccumulation in fish did respond to decreased inputs in the industrialized headwater reach, but paradoxically increased in the lowermost reach of EFPC. As a result, the downstream pattern of Hg concentration in fish changed from one resembling dilution of a headwater point source in the 1980s to a uniform distribution in the 2000s. The reason for this remains unknown, but is hypothesized to involve changes in the chemical form and reactivity of waterborne Hg associated with the removal of residual chlorine and the addition of suspended particulates to the streamflow. PCB concentrations in fish varied greatly from year-to-year, but always exhibited a pronounced downstream decrease, and appeared to respond to management practices that limited episodic inputs from legacy sources within the facility.

  6. Fish Passage Center 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2008-11-25

    The January-July runoff volume above the Dalles Dam in 2007 was 89% of the average runoff volume for the 1971-2000 historical record. The April-July runoff volume at Lower Granite Dam was 68% of the 1971-2000 historical record. Over the 79 year historical record from 1929 through 2007, the 2007 January-July runoff volume at the Dalles was the 50th lowest year out of the 79th year record. The January through July runoff volume at Lower Granite was the 65th lowest runoff year out of 79 on record. This year can be characterized by steadily decreasing snowpack which was below average in the Columbia Basin by the end of April. The combination of runoff volume, decreasing snowpack and reservoir operations resulted in spring migration flows at McNary Dam averaging 239 Kcfs, slightly above the Biological Opinion flow objective of 237 Kcfs. However the spring period migration flows in the Snake River averaged 61 Kcfs at Lower Granite Dam, substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 85 Kcfs. Summer migration period Biological Opinion flow objectives averaged 163 Kcfs at McNary Dam, substantially below the summer flow objective of 200 Kcfs. Summer migration period flows in the Snake River at Lower Granite Dam averaged 29 Kcfs, also substantially below the Biological Opinion flow objective of 50 Kcfs. Overall spring migrants in the Columbia River experienced better migration flows than spring migrants in the Snake River reach. Summer migration flow objectives were not achieved in either the Columbia or Snake rivers. The 2007 FCRPS Operations Agreement represents an expanded and improved spill program that goes beyond the measures contained in the 2004 Biological Opinion. During the spring period, spill now occurs for twenty-four hours per day at all projects, except for John Day Dam where the daily program remains at 12 hours. A summer spill program provides spill at all the fish transportation collector projects (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary dams), whereas prior to 2005 spill was terminated at these projects after the spring period. In addition, the 2007 operations agreement provided regardless of flow conditions. For the first time spill for fish passage was provided in the low flow conditions that prevailed in the Snake River throughout the spring and summer migration periods. Gas bubble trauma (GBT) monitoring continued throughout the spill period. A higher incidence of rank 1, GBT signs were observed in late arriving steelhead smolts arriving after the 95% passage date had occurred. During this time dissolved gas levels were generally below the 110% water quality standard in the forebay where fish were sampled. This occurrence was due to prolonged exposure and extended travel times due to low migration flows. The 2007 migration conditions differed from any year in the historic record. The migration conditions combined low river flows in the Snake River with spill throughout the spring and summer season. The juvenile migration characteristics observed in 2007 were unique compared to past years in that high levels of 24 hour spill for fish passage were provided in low flow conditions, and with a delayed start to the smolt transportation program a smaller proportion of the total run being transported. This resulted in relatively high spring juvenile survival despite the lower flows. The seasonal spring average flow in the Snake River was 61 Kcfs much lower than the spring time average of 120 Kcfs that occurred in 2006. However juvenile steelhead survival through the Lower Granite to McNary reach in 2007 was nearly 70% which was similar to the juvenile steelhead survival seen in 2006 under higher migration flows. The low flows in the May-July period of 2007 were similar to the 2001 low flow year, yet survival for fall chinook juveniles in this period in 2007 was much higher. In 2001 the reach survival estimate for juvenile fall Chinook from Lower Granite to McNary Dam ranged from 0.25-0.34, while survival in the same reach ranged between 0.54-0.60 in 2007. In addition travel time estimat

  7. One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Greg

    One Fish, Two Fish, Butterfish, Trumpeter: Recognizing Fish in Underwater Video Andrew Rova Simon template object recognition method for classifying fish species in un- derwater video. This method can be a component of a system that automatically identifies fish by species, im- proving upon previous works which

  8. Inter-provincial Permanent and Temporary Migration in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    not only the primary drive behind migration, but also thenot only the primary motivation for migration, but also themigrants their primary reason of migration. The 1990 census

  9. Cost Model for Digital Curation: Cost of Digital Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kejser, Ulla Bøgvad; Nielsen, Anders Bo; Thirifays, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Curation: Cost of Digital Migration Ulla Bøgvad Kejser, Thefocus especially on costing digital migration activities. Inof the OAIS Model digital migration includes both transfer (

  10. Rural-urban Migration in China: Evidence from Anhui Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    migrants in China. In Migration and Social Protection inStretton. 1984. Circular migration in South East Asia : someExploring contemporary migration. Routledge. Buckley, C.

  11. Demographic Variation in Housing Cost Adjustments With US Family Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Suzanne Davies; Clark, William A.V.; Ruiz, Tricia

    2007-01-01

    Mobility and destination in migration decisions: the rolesBailey AJ, Cooke TJ. 1998. Family migration and employment:the importance of migration history and gender.

  12. Managing Migration and Integration: Europe and the US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Managing Migration and Integration:  Europe and the US More restrictive migration policies and EU enlargement in response to low­skilled migration effect was largest in 

  13. Migration and the City: Urban Effects of the Morisco Expulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valencia, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Migration and the City: Urban Effects of the MoriscoJames Monroe Spring 2011 Migration and the City: Urbanby Adriana Valencia Abstract Migration and the City: Urban

  14. Migration and Income Diversification Evidence from Burkina Faso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wouterse, Fleur; Taylor, J. Edward

    2006-01-01

    Adepoju, A. (1977). Migration and Development in TropicalInternational Labor Migration Patterns in West Africa.history of a circular migration system in West Africa.

  15. Migration and Health: Latinos in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Steven P.; Castaneda, Xotichl

    2008-01-01

    Migration and Health Latinos in the United Statesand Interna- tional Migration Studies Guillermo Paredes,C.P. 06600 México, D.F. Migration and Health: Latinos in the

  16. Mexican Internal and International Migration: Empirical Evidence from Related Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Scheven, Elsa Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    and Undocumented Migration from Mexico. ” In Immigrationand S. Martin 1998 Migration Between Mexico and the UnitedRural-origin Internal Migration in Mexico. ” Social Science

  17. "Them" or "Us"?: Assessing Responsibility for Undocumented Migration from Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krissman, Fred

    2001-01-01

    continued undocumented migration from Mexico. Our governmentThe Binational Study: migration between Mexico and the US.of international migration from western Mexico. Berkeley:

  18. The Built Environment and Migration: A Case Study of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    of Undocumented Migration: Mexico and the United States (pp.misconception that migration from Mexico to the US. , is avillage in central Mexico, migration to the United States

  19. Reframing Mexican Migration as a Multi-Ethnic Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jonathan A

    2006-01-01

    y wo rds indigenous; migration; Mexico; collective identityCulture of Migration in Southern Mexico. Austin: Universitylong-standing patterns of migration to Mexico’s cities. For

  20. Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards Barter, Eloise

    1990-01-01

    1990). Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear ELOISE R I C H A Rmawi and Atsugewi for fishing. In 1986-87 the Pit RiverThis paper, describing the fishing equipment collected by

  1. Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards Barter, Eloise

    1990-01-01

    Achumawi and Atsugewi Fishing Gear ELOISE R I C H A R D SJohn W. Hudson acquired gear used by the Achu- mawi andACHUMAWI AND ATSUGEWI FISHING GEAR Fig. 6. Fish spear (FM

  2. SOUTH CAROLINA COOPERATIVE FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jodice, Patrick

    SOUTH CAROLINA COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNIT 2011 Annual Report The South Carolina issues in the state of South Carolina, as well as throughout the SE U.S. and internationally. #12;2011 Annual Report Page 2 South Carolina Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit 2 0 1 1 A N N U

  3. Planetary migration in protoplanetary disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo

    2003-04-06

    In the current paper, we further develop the model for the migration of planets introduced in Del Popolo et al. (2001) and extended to time-dependent accretion discs in Del Popolo and Eksi (2002). We use a method developed by Stepinski and Valageas (1996, 1997), that is able to simultaneously follow the evolution of gas and solid particles for up to $10^7 {\\rm yr}$. The disc model is coupled to the migration model introduced in Del Popolo et al. (2001) in order to obtain the migration rate of the planet in the planetesimal disc. We find that in the case of discs having total mass of $10^{-3}-0.1 M_{\\odot}$, and $0.1<\\alpha<0.0001$, planets can migrate inward a large distance while if $M<10^{-3} M_{\\odot}$ the planets remain almost in their initial position for $0.1<\\alpha<0.01$ and only in the case $\\alpha<0.001$ the planets move to a minimum value of orbital radius of $\\simeq 2 {\\rm AU}$. The model gives a good description of the observed distribution of planets in the period range 0-20 days.

  4. Migration and Distributive Politics in an Indigenous Community: Oportunidades, Educational Surveillance and Migration Patterns in La Gloria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil-Garia, Oscar F.

    2013-01-01

    Central American migration to Mexico, the United States, andindicate increased migration from Mexico’s rural southernshape the culture of migration in Mexico’s southern region.

  5. Migration of Protoplanets in Radiative Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm Kley; Aurelien Crida

    2008-06-18

    In isothermal disks the migration of protoplanets is directed inward. For small planetary masses the standard type-I migration rates are so fast that this may result in an unrealistic loss of planets into the stars. We investigate the planet-disk interaction in non-isothermal disks and analyze the magnitude and direction of migration for an extended range of planet masses. We have performed detailed two-dimensional numerical simulations of embedded planets including heating/cooling effects as well as radiative diffusion for realistic opacities. In radiative disks, small planets with M_planet < 50 M_Earth do migrate outward with a rate comparable to absolute magnitude of standard type-I migration. For larger masses the migration is inward and approaches the isothermal, type-II migration rate. Our findings are particularly important for the first growth phase of planets and ease the problem of too rapid inward type-I migration.

  6. Directoryless shared memory coherence using execution migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lis, Mieszko

    We introduce the concept of deadlock-free migration-based coherent shared memory to the NUCA family of architectures. Migration-based architectures move threads among cores to guarantee sequential semantics in large ...

  7. Brownian Motion in Planetary Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth A. Murray-Clay; Eugene I. Chiang

    2006-07-10

    A residual planetesimal disk of mass 10-100 Earth masses remained in the outer solar system following the birth of the giant planets, as implied by the existence of the Oort cloud, coagulation requirements for Pluto, and inefficiencies in planet formation. Upon gravitationally scattering planetesimal debris, planets migrate. Orbital migration can lead to resonance capture, as evidenced here in the Kuiper and asteroid belts, and abroad in extra-solar systems. Finite sizes of planetesimals render migration stochastic ("noisy"). At fixed disk mass, larger (fewer) planetesimals generate more noise. Extreme noise defeats resonance capture. We employ order-of-magnitude physics to construct an analytic theory for how a planet's orbital semi-major axis fluctuates in response to random planetesimal scatterings. To retain a body in resonance, the planet's semi-major axis must not random walk a distance greater than the resonant libration width. We translate this criterion into an analytic formula for the retention efficiency of the resonance as a function of system parameters, including planetesimal size. We verify our results with tailored numerical simulations. Application of our theory reveals that capture of Resonant Kuiper belt objects by a migrating Neptune remains effective if the bulk of the primordial disk was locked in bodies having sizes 1000 km was less than a few percent. Coagulation simulations produce a size distribution of primordial planetesimals that easily satisfies these constraints. We conclude that stochasticity did not interfere with, nor modify in any substantive way, Neptune's ability to capture and retain Resonant Kuiper belt objects during its migration.

  8. Methanosaeta fibers in anaerobic migrating blanket reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    An anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) was seeded with flocculent biomass from a digester and fedMethanosaeta fibers in anaerobic migrating blanket reactors L.T. Angenent,* D. Zheng,* S. Sung in these fibers. Keywords Anaerobic migrating blanket reactor; AMBR; fibers; oligonucleotide hybridization probes

  9. Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration Alexander Druzhinin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Decoupled elastic prestack depth migration $ Alexander Druzhinin* British Geological Survey of the formula for common-shot or common-receiver amplitude-preserving elastic prestack depth migration (Pre to enhance strongly polarized wave modes prior to prestack depth migration (PreSDM) (e.g. Dillon et al., 1988

  10. Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Resolution of prestack depth migration Ludek Klimes Department of Geophysics, Faculty of a general 3­D common­shot elastic prestack depth migration in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium is studied. Geophys. AS CR, Prague 457 #12;L. Klimes 1. INTRODUCTION A general formulation of prestack depth migration

  11. Collecting Cyclic Distributed Garbage by Controlled Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskov, Barbara

    Collecting Cyclic Distributed Garbage by Controlled Migration Umesh Maheshwari Barbara Liskov M distributed across nodes. A common proposal is to migrate all objects on a garbage cycle to a single node due to unnecessary migration of objects. We present solutions to these problems: our scheme avoids

  12. Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    Cloud Enterprise Storage and Data Migration 20097733 Bobby Nielsen, 20003686 Frederik Kierbye}@cs.au.dk 20130324 Abstract This document presents a research in Enterprise Cloud Storage and Data Migration. The hypothesis is that, it is easy to migrate data between cloud platforms, including changing api

  13. Memory Space Representation Heterogeneous Network Process Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xian-He

    Memory Space Representation for Heterogeneous Network Process Migration Kasidit Chanchio Xian@bit.csc.lsu.edu http://www.csc.lsu.edu/~scs/ Abstract A major difficulty of heterogeneous process migration is how and effective for heterogeneous network process migration. 1. Introduction As network computing becomes

  14. CRITERION DELINEATING THE MODE OF HEADCUT MIGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    CRITERION DELINEATING THE MODE OF HEADCUT MIGRATION By O. R. Stein,l Associate Member, ASCE, and P- tating headcutsthat tend to flatten as they migrate; and (2) stepped headcutsthat tend to retain nearly detachmentpotentialimmediatelyupstreamanddownstreamofthe headcutisused to delineate these modes of migration. The delineatingparameter is the ratio

  15. A hybrid formulation of map migration and wave-equation-based migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    CWP-549 March 2006 A hybrid formulation of map migration and wave-equation-based migration using through a one-to- one mapping from the data to the image, known as map migration. Using building blocks in a map-migration-based procedure to image seismic data. Fo- cussing on sparsely representing the imaging

  16. Recent hydrocarbon developments in Latin America: Key issues in the downstream oil sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.; Pezeshki, S.

    1995-03-01

    This report discusses the following: (1) An overview of major issues in the downstream oil sector, including oil demand and product export availability, the changing product consumption pattern, and refineries being due for major investment; (2) Recent upstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela; (3) Recent downstream developments in the oil and gas sector in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, Cuba, and Venezuela; (4) Pipelines in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico; and (5) Regional energy balance. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. The Great Migration and the Demographics of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKnight, Christy

    2015-01-01

    The Great Migration and the Demographics of America Bynarratives of the Great Migration stop short of explaining

  18. EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    463 EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING by Keith A. Smith Marine Biolcgica! Labcratory Ul a R AR. McKernan, Director EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING by Keith A. Smith International;#12;EXPLORATORY FISHING FOR MAINE HERRING by Keith A. Smith Base Director, Exploratory Fishing Base Bureau

  19. COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMERCIAL FISHING VESSELS AND GEAR I Mafine Biological Laboratory SEP 2 01957 WOODS HOLE, MASS. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE CIRCULAR 48 #12;CONTENTS Page Tuna Clipper 3 Tuna Bait Fishing 4 Two-Pole Tuna Fishing 4 Halibut Schooner 5 Halibut Long- Line 6 Steel Cable

  20. Freezing Fish and Shellfish. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Ranzell; Reddell, Annette

    1980-01-01

    for drainage. Why Wrap or Glaze? There are two reasons for wrapping or glazing a seafood product. One is to prevent oxidation (ran cidity) and the other is to prevent dehydration (freezer burn). Although fish is nutritious because of its high... under frozen storage longer than fish products. Most of the oxidation problem can be overcome by wrapping or glazing the product to keep the air out, and lowering the temperature as much as possible. Dehydration, or loss of moisture, can create a...

  1. Molecular C dynamics downstream: The biochemical decomposition sequence and its impact on soil organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    Decomposition Carbon Pyrolysis-GC/MS Disturbance 1. Introduction Soil organic matter (SOM) is an importantMolecular C dynamics downstream: The biochemical decomposition sequence and its impact on soil in spectroscopic and other chemical methods have greatly enhanced our ability to characterize soil organic matter

  2. Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream using Itezhi-Tezhi Reservoir (Zambia) as a model system aims at defining optimized turbine withdrawal. The water depth of turbine withdrawals was varied in a set of simulations to optimize outflow water quality

  3. DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    DOWNSTREAM EFFECTS OF DIVERSION DAMS ON SEDIMENT AND HYDRAULIC CONDITIONS OF ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS & Sons, Ltd. key words: flow diversion; dam; fine sediment; stream management; hydraulic alteration examined the effects of variable levels of flow diversion on fine-sediment deposition, hydraulic conditions

  4. The Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli (kmc7r@virginia.edu) and Joanna Crowe Curran (curran@virginia.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    increased to 77% with dam removal · % Sand on bed surface upstream and downstream of dam removal reducedThe Implications of Dam Deconstruction Methods on the Downstream Channel Bed Kristen M. Cannatelli it downstream. At the same time, the lack of sediment supply downstream leads to channel and bank erosion

  5. Saving Planetary Systems: Dead Zones & Planetary Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soko Matsumura; Ralph E. Pudritz; Edward W. Thommes

    2007-01-16

    The tidal interaction between a disk and a planet leads to the planet's migration. A long-standing question regarding this mechanism is how to stop the migration before planets plunge into their central stars. In this paper, we propose a new, simple mechanism to significantly slow down planet migration, and test the possibility by using a hybrid numerical integrator to simulate the disk-planet interaction. The key component of the scenario is the role of low viscosity regions in protostellar disks known as dead zones, which affect planetary migration in two ways. First of all, it allows a smaller-mass planet to open a gap, and hence switch the faster type I migration to the slower type II migration. Secondly, a low viscosity slows down type II migration itself, because type II migration is directly proportional to the viscosity. We present numerical simulations of planetary migration by using a hybrid symplectic integrator-gas dynamics code. Assuming that the disk viscosity parameter inside the dead zone is (alpha=1e-4-1e-5), we find that, when a low-mass planet (e.g. 1-10 Earth masses) migrates from outside the dead zone, its migration is stopped due to the mass accumulation inside the dead zone. When a low-mass planet migrates from inside the dead zone, it opens a gap and slows down its migration. A massive planet like Jupiter, on the other hand, opens a gap and slows down inside the dead zone, independent of its initial orbital radius. The final orbital radius of a Jupiter mass planet depends on the dead zone's viscosity. For the range of alpha's noted above, this can vary anywhere from 7 AU, to an orbital radius of 0.1 AU that is characteristic of the hot Jupiters.

  6. Santa Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Statistics Branch. Commercial fishing licenses and permitsSanta Cruz Harbor Commercial Fishing Community Profile, Julythe rate or level of fishing mortality that jeopardizes the

  7. Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2008-07-29

    Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

  8. Introduction Fish (Fish, 1996; Fish, 2000; Fish, 2001) proposed a model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Frank

    to determine the power output (Pt) and propulsive efficiency ( p). Manatees swam at velocities of 0.06­1.14·m is a rapid and relatively high-powered propulsive mode involved in cruising and migrating by a variety wave posteriorly along the body. The propulsive wave traveled at a higher velocity than the forward

  9. Liquid migration in sheared unsaturated granular media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman Mani; Dirk Kadau; Hans J. Herrmann

    2012-06-25

    We show how liquid migrates in sheared unsaturated granular media using a grain scale model for capillary bridges. Liquid is redistributed to neighboring contacts after rupture of individual capillary bridges leading to redistribution of liquid on large scales. The liquid profile evolution coincides with a recently developed continuum description for liquid migration in shear bands. The velocity profiles which are linked to the migration of liquid as well as the density profiles of wet and dry granular media are studied.

  10. Assessment of Mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) Downstream of Domestic Wastewater Effluents in the Bayous of Harris County 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Crystal

    2012-02-14

    The introduction of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) to aquatic systems has impacted development and reproductive health of fish in many regions of the world. This study investigated western mosquitofish ...

  11. Migration and Development Research Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , poverty, inequality and growth....................................................... 3 2.3. Socio the effects of migration and remittances on development indicators such as poverty, health, inequality, income

  12. Migration and Global Environmental DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    .....................................................................................................9 Cultural and information ecosystem services1 Migration and Global Environmental Change DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration .............................................................................................................................................5 Ecosystem services in low-lying coastal areas

  13. 46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 710, 2008/Reno, NV Upstream and downstream influence on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    08544 Statistical analysis of the upstream and downstream flow influence on shock unsteadiness in shock to further study the upstream and downstream flow influence on shock unsteadiness using direct numerical46th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting and Exhibit, January 7­10, 2008/Reno, NV Upstream

  14. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Adams, Marshall; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

  15. Upstream vs. Downstream CO2 Trading: A Comparison for the Electricity Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Bushnell, J.; Wolak, F. A.

    ; a charge paid by all California electricity consumers to fund cost- effective energy efficiency programs; the decoupling of utility revenues from sales; and rate-of-return incentives adopted by the CPUC in September 2007. With implementation of AB... In electricity, “downstream” CO2 regulation requires retail suppliers to buy energy from a mix of sources so that their weighted emissions satisfy a standard. It has been argued that such “load-based” regulation would solve emissions leakage, cost consumers...

  16. Migration Guide Microsoft SQL Server to SQL Server PDW Migration Guide (AU3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    SQL Server to SQL Server PDW Migration Guide (AU3) #12;Microsoft SQL Server to SQL Server PDW Migration Guide (AU3) Contents 4 Summary Statement 4 Introduction 4 SQL Server Family of Products 6 Differences between SMP and MPP 8 PDW Software Architecture 10 PDW Community 10 Migration Planning 11

  17. Meningeal Defects alter the tangential migration of cortical interneurons in Foxc1hith/hith mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarbalis, Konstantinos; Choe, Youngshik; Siegenthaler, Julie A; Orosco, Lori A; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2012-01-01

    migration presents the primary mode of migration of corticalbe the primary cause for the observed migration defects.tangen- tial migration defects being a primary defect rather

  18. COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT 2006 #12;Front cover photos: Top. #12;2006 ANNUAL REPORT iANNUAL REPORT 2006 COOPERATIVE FISH AND WILDLIFE RESEARCH UNITS PROGRAM Above Harbor, Alaska, to study the navigational needs of small boats and commercial fishing vessels. Laboratory

  19. FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHING PERMIT Eastern Shore Agricultural Research and Extension Center If all fields are not filled out, you do NOT have permission to fish! Name: ____________________________________________ Fishing Permit is valid for ONE YEAR. In return for this privilege, I agree to: 1. ABSOLVE the Eastern

  20. Asynchronous vertical migration and bimodal distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    Asynchronous vertical migration and bimodal distribution of motile phytoplankton DAVID K. RALSTON1 sources of nutrients in a vertical migration cycle: photosynthesis in the near-surface layer, transit to depth, uptake of the limiting nutrient and transit back to the surface layer. If all four steps can

  1. Curvature Capillary Migration of Microspheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nima Sharifi-Mood; Iris B. Liu; Kathleen J. Stebe

    2015-05-11

    We address the question: How does capillarity propel microspheres along curvature gradients? For a particle on a fluid interface, there are two conditions that can apply at the three phase contact line: Either the contact line adopts an equilibrium contact angle, or it can be pinned by kinetic trapping, e.g. at chemical heterogeneities, asperities or other pinning sites on the particle surface. We formulate the curvature capillary energy for both scenarios for particles smaller than the capillary length and far from any pinning boundaries. The scale and range of the distortion made by the particle are set by the particle radius; we use singular perturbation methods to find the distortions and to rigorously evaluate the associated capillary energies. For particles with equilibrium contact angles, contrary to the literature, we find that the capillary energy is negligible, with the first contribution bounded to fourth order in the product of the particle radius and the deviatoric curvature. For pinned contact lines, we find curvature capillary energies that are finite, with a functional form investigated previously by us for disks and microcylinders on curved interfaces. In experiments, we show microsphere migrate along deterministic trajectories toward regions of maximum deviatoric curvature with curvature capillary energies ranging from $6 \\times10^3 - 5 \\times 10^4~k_BT$. These data agree with the curvature capillary energy for the case of pinned contact lines. The underlying physics of this migration is a coupling of the interface deviatoric curvature with the quadrupolar mode of nanometric disturbances in the interface owing to the particle's contact line undulations. This work is an example of the major implications of nanometric roughness and contact line pinning for colloidal dynamics.

  2. RAT FR MIGRATION e.V. Integration und Illegalitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    RAT FÜR MIGRATION e.V. (RfM) Integration und Illegalität in Deutschland herausgegeben von Klaus J >Festung EuropaMigration. Von Klaus J. Bade Resolution des Rates für Migration zum Problem der aufenthaltsrechtlichen Illegalität

  3. Mexican Internal and International Migration: Empirical Evidence from Related Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Scheven, Elsa Beatrice

    2015-01-01

    and W. F. Maloney 2005 “Migration, Trade, and Toreign DirectD. 2012 “Mexico’s Great Migration. ” The Nation 294(4):11–Leach 2007 “Internal Migration in the Young Adult Foreign-

  4. Migration and Father Absence: Shifting Family Structure in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobles, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    the auspices of female migration from Mexico to the Unitedof the sacri?ce: Gender, migration and Mexican children’sgrass widows of Mexico: Migration and union dissolution in a

  5. Migration and Father Absence: Shifting Family Structure in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobles, Jenna

    2013-01-01

    The grass widows of Mexico: Migration and union dissolutionthe auspices of female migration from Mexico to the UnitedA. (2012). Net migration from Mexico falls to zero—and

  6. Campesino Foodways in the Context of Migration and Remittances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    Rural Sustainability and U.S. -Mexico Migration”, Hispanidada pattern of migration between Mexico and the US that may bestreet. Mass out migration from rural México to U.S. urban

  7. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fred A. Seaton, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE Arnie J. Suomela, C9mmislioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Library for Library of Congress ~ibrary of Congress catalog card for this bulletin: u. S. Fish and.A25 Llbr&r7 of Congrea 639.206178 II Library of Congress catalog card for the series, Fishery Bulletin of Cayuga Lake and Seneca Lake sea lampreys _ Spawning migration _ Tributaries of Cayuga Lake _ Water

  8. Migration and Distributive Politics in an Indigenous Community: Oportunidades, Educational Surveillance and Migration Patterns in La Gloria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gil-Garia, Oscar F.

    2013-01-01

    OF INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION - A REVIEW AND APPRAISAL."Worlds in motion: International migration at the end of theAngelucci, M. 2004. "Aid and Migration: An Analysis of the

  9. Inter-provincial Permanent and Temporary Migration in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mingjie

    2011-01-01

    typically ask in-depth questions about migration process anddepth analysis on migrants’ settlement intention would help to better understand the nature of temporary migration

  10. Efficiency of Fish Propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maertens, A P; Yue, D K P

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the system efficiency of a self-propelled flexible body is ill-defined unless one considers the concept of quasi-propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the power needed to tow a body in rigid-straight condition over the power it needs for self-propulsion, both measured for the same speed. Through examples we show that the quasi-propulsive efficiency is the only rational non-dimensional metric of the propulsive fitness of fish and fish-like mechanisms. Using two-dimensional viscous simulations and the concept of quasi-propulsive efficiency, we discuss the efficiency two-dimensional undulating foils. We show that low efficiencies, due to adverse body-propulsor hydrodynamic interactions, cannot be accounted for by the increase in friction drag.

  11. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Gao, Fei; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian

    2011-03-02

    Transition state searches have been employed to investigate the migration mechanisms of W clusters on W nanoparticles, and to determine the corresponding migration energies for the possible migration paths of these clusters. The tungsten clusters containing up to four adatoms are found to prefer 2D-compact structures with relatively low binding energies. The effect of interface and vertex regions on the migration behavior of the clusters is significantly strong, as compared to that of nanoparticle size. The migration mechanisms are quite different when the clusters are located at the center of the nanoparticle and near the interface or vertex areas. Near the interfaces and vertex areas, the substrate atoms tend to participate in the migration processes of the clusters, and can join the adatoms to form a larger cluster or lead to the dissociation of a cluster via the exchange mechanism, which results in the adatom crossing the facets. The lowest energy paths are used to be determined the energy barriers for W cluster migrations (from 1- to 4-atoms) on the facets, edges and vertex regions. The calculated energy barriers for the trimers suggest that the concerted migration is more probable than the successive jumping of a single adatom in the clusters. In addition, it of interest to note that the dimer shearing is a dominant migration mechanism for the tetramer, but needs to overcome a relatively higher migration energy than other clusters.

  12. comparison with allowing them to pro-ceed downstream on their own voli-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that complicate the maintenance of salmon runs when rivers are interrupted by dams, our runs of salmon can is already available for optimism. Theoretically, by reducing losses of young fish, the system has the potential for increasing the number of adult salmon and steelhead to the Columbia River Basin by 60 percent

  13. Downstream plasma transport and metal ionization in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Liang; Szott, Matthew M.; McLain, Jake T.; Ruzic, David N.; Yu, He

    2014-06-14

    Downstream plasma transport and ionization processes in a high-powered pulsed-plasma magnetron were studied. The temporal evolution and spatial distribution of electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) were characterized with a 3D scanning triple Langmuir probe. Plasma expanded from the racetrack region into the downstream region, where a high n{sub e} peak was formed some time into the pulse-off period. The expansion speed and directionality towards the substrate increased with a stronger magnetic field (B), largely as a consequence of a larger potential drop in the bulk plasma region during a relatively slower sheath formation. The fraction of Cu ions in the deposition flux was measured on the substrate using a gridded energy analyzer. It increased with higher pulse voltage. With increased B field from 200 to 800 Gauss above racetrack, n{sub e} increased but the Cu ion fraction decreased from 42% to 16%. A comprehensive model was built, including the diffusion of as-sputtered Cu flux, the Cu ionization in the entire plasma region using the mapped n{sub e} and T{sub e} data, and ion extraction efficiency based on the measured plasma potential (V{sub p}) distribution. The calculations matched the measurements and indicated the main causes of lower Cu ion fractions in stronger B fields to be the lower T{sub e} and inefficient ion extraction in a larger pre-sheath potential.

  14. Cosmic ray diffusive acceleration at shock waves with finite upstream and downstream escape boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ostrowski; R. Schlickeiser

    1996-04-18

    In the present paper we discuss the modifications introduced into the first-order Fermi shock acceleration process due to a finite extent of diffusive regions near the shock or due to boundary conditions leading to an increased particle escape upstream and/or downstream the shock. In the considered simple example of the planar shock wave we idealize the escape phenomenon by imposing a particle escape boundary at some distance from the shock. Presence of such a boundary (or boundaries) leads to coupled steepening of the accelerated particle spectrum and decreasing of the acceleration time scale. It allows for a semi-quantitative evaluation and, in some specific cases, also for modelling of the observed steep particle spectra as a result of the first-order Fermi shock acceleration. We also note that the particles close to the upper energy cut-off are younger than the estimate based on the respective acceleration time scale. In Appendix A we present a new time-dependent solution for infinite diffusive regions near the shock allowing for different constant diffusion coefficients upstream and downstream the shock.

  15. Electromagnetic energy conversion in downstream fronts from three dimensional kinetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenta, Giovanni [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium)] [Departement Wiskunde, KU Leuven, Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Goldman, Martin; Newman, David [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Colorado 80309 (United States); Markidis, Stefano [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz) Department, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Divin, Andrey [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)] [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-05-15

    The electromagnetic energy equation is analyzed term by term in a 3D simulation of kinetic reconnection previously reported by Vapirev et al. [J. Geophys. Res.: Space Phys. 118, 1435 (2013)]. The evolution presents the usual 2D-like topological structures caused by an initial perturbation independent of the third dimension. However, downstream of the reconnection site, where the jetting plasma encounters the yet unperturbed pre-existing plasma, a downstream front is formed and made unstable by the strong density gradient and the unfavorable local acceleration field. The energy exchange between plasma and fields is most intense at the instability, reaching several pW/m{sup 3}, alternating between load (energy going from fields to particles) and generator (energy going from particles to fields) regions. Energy exchange is instead purely that of a load at the reconnection site itself in a region focused around the x-line and elongated along the separatrix surfaces. Poynting fluxes are generated at all energy exchange regions and travel away from the reconnection site transporting an energy signal of the order of about S?10{sup ?3}W/m{sup 2}.

  16. Tumor cell migration in complex microenvironments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polacheck, William Joseph

    Tumor cell migration is essential for invasion and dissemination from primary solid tumors and for the establishment of lethal secondary metastases at distant organs. In vivo and in vitro models enabled identification of ...

  17. Migration and development in Mexican communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnabl, Peter A. (Peter Andrew)

    2008-01-01

    Migration from Mexico to the United States constitutes one of the world's largest labor flows and generates enormous capital flows in the opposite direction. Corresponding to each of these flows is a distinct view of the ...

  18. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish 47fish-hkturbineinteractionseprijacobs...

  19. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele; Berggren, Thomas J.; Filardo, Margaret

    2003-09-01

    The runoff volumes in 2002 were near average for the January to July period above Lower Granite Dam (80%) and The Dalles Dam (97%). The year 2002 hydrosystem operations and runoff conditions resulted in flows that were less than the seasonal Biological Opinion (Opinion) flow objectives at Lower Granite Dam for both the spring and summer period. The seasonal flow objectives for Priest Rapids and McNary dams were exceeded for the spring period, but at McNary Dam summer flow objectives were not met. While seasonal flow objectives were exceeded for the spring at McNary Dam, the 2002 season illustrated that Biological Opinion management to seasonal flow targets can result in conditions where a major portion of the juvenile fish migration migrates in conditions that are less than the flow objectives. The delay in runoff due to cool weather conditions and the inability of reservoirs to augment flows by drafting lower than the flood control elevations, resulted in flows less than the Opinion objectives until May 22, 2002. By this time approximately 73% of the yearling chinook and 56% of steelhead had already passed the project. For the most part, spill in 2002 was managed below the gas waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. The exception was at Lower Monumental Dam where no Biological Opinion spill occurred due to the need to conduct repairs in the stilling basin. Survival estimates obtained for PIT tagged juveniles were similar in range to those observed prior to 2001. A multi-year analysis of juvenile survival and the factors that affect it was conducted in 2002. A water transit time and flow relation was demonstrated for spring migrating chinook and steelhead of Snake River and Mid Columbia River origin. Returning numbers of adults observed at Bonneville Dam declined for spring chinook, steelhead and coho, while summer and fall chinook numbers increased. However, all numbers were far greater than observed in the past ten years averaged together. In 2002, about 87 million juvenile salmon were released from Federal, State, Tribal or private hatcheries into the Columbia River Basin above Bonneville Dam. This represents an increase over the past season, when only 71 million juvenile fish were released into the same area.

  20. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  1. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D simple models: comparison of triclinic anisotropy depth migration to calculate migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity models interface. The anisotropy in the upper layer is triclinic. We apply Kirch- hoff prestack depth migration

  2. Enabling Secure VM-vTPM Migration in Private Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capkun, Srdjan

    Enabling Secure VM-vTPM Migration in Private Clouds Boris Danev, Ramya Jayaram Masti, Ghassan O machines in private clouds. We detail the requirements that a secure VM-vTPM migration solution should-vTPM migration. We then leverage on this structure to construct a secure VM-vTPM migration protocol. We show

  3. Migration of cells in a social context Sren Vedela,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Migration of cells in a social context Søren Vedela,1 , Savas¸ Tayb,1 , Darius M. Johnstonc) In multicellular organisms and complex ecosystems, cells migrate in a social context. Whereas this is essential studies of collective migration of individual cells. cell migration | single-cell analysis | physical

  4. Gang Migration of Virtual Machines using Cluster-wide Deduplication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Kartik

    Gang Migration of Virtual Machines using Cluster-wide Deduplication Umesh Deshpande, Brandon}@binghamton.edu Abstract--Gang migration refers to the simultaneous live migration of multiple Virtual Machines (VMs) from failures. Gang migration generates a large volume of network traffic and can overload the core network

  5. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Crescent City Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    Stevens Act Provisions; Fishing Capacity Reduction Program;CDFG. Crescent City Fishing Community Profile Leidersdorf,W. L. 1954. California Fishing Ports. Fish Bulletin 96.

  6. BPA Fish Accords

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomassBudget BasicDeliveringOverview:defaultFish-Accords

  7. Fish Passage: A New Tool to Investigate Fish Movement: JSATS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2011-04-20

    A new system is being used to determine fish mortality issues related to hydroelectric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. Called the juvenile salmon acoustic telemetry system (JSATS), this tool allows researchers to better understand fish movement, behavior, and survival around dams and powerhouses.

  8. Upstream open loop control of the recirculation area downstream of a backward-facing step

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The flow downstream a backward-facing step is controlled using a pulsed jet placed upstream of the step edge. Experimental velocity fields are computed and used to the recirculation area quantify. The effects of jet amplitude, frequency and duty cycle on this recirculation area are investigated for two Reynolds numbers (Re=2070 and Re=2900). The results of this experimental study demonstrate that upstream actuation can be as efficient as actuation at the step edge when exciting the shear layer at its natural frequency. Moreover it is shown that it is possible to minimize both jet amplitude and duty cycle and still achieve optimal efficiency. With minimal amplitude and a duty-cycle as low as 10\\% the recirculation area is nearly canceled.

  9. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Predator and Bottom-Feeding Fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti Reservoirs in North-Central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Gonzales, P.R. Fresquez

    2006-03-01

    Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, we began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2005, six species of fish from Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs were collected and the edible portion (fillets) was analyzed for 209 possible PCB congeners. Fish from the reservoirs were last sampled in 2001. Mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Abiquiu Reservoir ({mu} = 2.4 ng/g) were statistically similar ({alpha} = 0.01; P (T{le}t) [range = 0.23-0.71]) to mean total PCB concentrations in fish from Cochiti Reservoir ({mu} = 2.7 ng/g), implying that LANL is not the source of PCBs in fish in Cochiti Reservoir. The levels of PCBs in fish from Cochiti Reservoir generally appear to be declining, at least since 2001, which is when PCB levels might have peaked resulting from storm water runoff after the Cerro Grande Fire. Although a PCB ''fingerprinting'' method can be used to relate PCB ''signatures'' in one area to signatures in another area, this method of implicating the source of PCBs cannot be effectively used for biota because they alter the PCB signature through metabolic processes. Regardless of the source of the PCBs, certain species of fish (catfish and carpsuckers) at both Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs continue to harbor levels of PCBs that could be harmful to human health if they are consistently eaten over a long period of time. Bottom-feeding fish (carpsucker and catfish) from Cochiti Reservoir contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-fillet-wet) than predator fish (walleye, northern pike, bass) ({mu} = 1.67 ng/g) and the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) charts. Similarly, bottom-feeding fish from Abiquiu Reservoir also contained statistically higher levels of total PCBs ({mu} = 4.25 ng/g-wet) than predator fish (walleye, bass) ({mu} = 0.68 ng/g-wet) and only the bottom-feeding fish had levels of PCBs that fall into a restricted consumption category in the EPA charts.

  10. TOWARD CHEMICAL CONSTRAINTS ON HOT JUPITER MIGRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Amin, Mustafa A.; Kennedy, Grant M., E-mail: nmadhu@ast.cam.ac.uk [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-10

    The origin of hot Jupiters—gas giant exoplanets orbiting very close to their host stars—is a long-standing puzzle. Planet formation theories suggest that such planets are unlikely to have formed in situ but instead may have formed at large orbital separations beyond the snow line and migrated inward to their present orbits. Two competing hypotheses suggest that the planets migrated either through interaction with the protoplanetary disk during their formation, or by disk-free mechanisms such as gravitational interactions with a third body. Observations of eccentricities and spin-orbit misalignments of hot Jupiter systems have been unable to differentiate between the two hypotheses. In the present work, we suggest that chemical depletions in hot Jupiter atmospheres might be able to constrain their migration mechanisms. We find that sub-solar carbon and oxygen abundances in Jovian-mass hot Jupiters around Sun-like stars are hard to explain by disk migration. Instead, such abundances are more readily explained by giant planets forming at large orbital separations, either by core accretion or gravitational instability, and migrating to close-in orbits via disk-free mechanisms involving dynamical encounters. Such planets also contain solar or super-solar C/O ratios. On the contrary, hot Jupiters with super-solar O and C abundances can be explained by a variety of formation-migration pathways which, however, lead to solar or sub-solar C/O ratios. Current estimates of low oxygen abundances in hot Jupiter atmospheres may be indicative of disk-free migration mechanisms. We discuss open questions in this area which future studies will need to investigate.

  11. Indian Fishing Contrivances / A Female Crusoe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Anonymous

    2008-01-01

    to my attention INDIAN FISHING CONTRIVANCES The abundance of1843, and the process of fishing he describes he saw on thatBluff a number of white men fishing with precisely the same

  12. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Amaral, Stephen V.; Castro-Santos, Theodore; Giza, Dan; Haro, Alexander J.; Hecker, George; McMahon, Brian; Perkins, Norman; Pioppi, Nick

    2012-12-31

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

  13. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines This factsheet explains studies conducted in a...

  14. Vietnam -- Bomb Crater Fish Ponds [Roots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campanella, Thomas J

    1995-01-01

    E T N A M Bomb Crater Fish Ponds Thomas J. Campanella One ofthe bomb craters into ponds for growing fish, a staple of

  15. Droplet migration characteristics in confined oscillatory microflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhury, Kaustav; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the migration characteristics of a droplet in an oscillatory flow field in a parallel plate micro-confinement. Using phase filed formalism, we capture the dynamical evolution of the droplet over a wide range of the frequency of the imposed oscillation in the flow field, drop size relative to the channel gap, and the capillary number. The latter two factors imply the contribution of droplet deformability, commonly considered in the study of droplet migration under steady shear flow conditions. We show that the imposed oscillation brings in additional time complexity in the droplet movement, realized through temporally varying drop-shape, flow direction and the inertial response of the droplet. As a consequence, we observe a spatially complicated pathway of the droplet along the transverse direction, in sharp contrast to the smooth migration under a similar yet steady shear flow condition. Intuitively, the longitudinal component of the droplet movement is in tandem with the flow continuity and evolve...

  16. Return Migration Among Latin American Elderly in the U.S.: A Study of its Magnitude, Characteristics and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega, Alma Celina

    2013-01-01

    Rates of Return Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .and Return Migration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Limitations of Data Sources Used to Study Migration . 2.3

  17. Alden Fish Friendly Turbine Allows for Safe Fish Passage | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    than 98% for fish less than eight inches in length. This turbine will provide a more sustainable option for producing electricity at more than 1,000 estimated environmentally...

  18. Comparative Survival [Rate] Study (CSS) of Hatchery PIT-tagged Chinook; Migration Years 1996-1998 Mark/Recapture Activities, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Thomas J.; Basham, Larry R.

    2000-10-01

    The Comparative Survival Rate Study (CSS) is a multi-year program of the fishery agencies and tribes to measure the smolt-to-adult survival rates of hatchery spring and summer chinook at major production hatcheries in the Snake River basin and at selected hatcheries in the lower Columbia River. The CSS also compares the smolt-to-adult survival rates for Snake River basin chinook that were transported versus those that migrated in-river to below Bonneville Dam. Estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates will be made both from Lower Granite Dam back to Lower Granite Dam (upriver stocks) and from the hatchery back to the hatchery (upriver and downriver stocks). This status report covers the first three migration years, 1996 to 1998, of the study. Study fish were implanted with a PIT (Passive Integrated Transponder) tag which allows unique identification of individual fish. Beginning in 1997, a predetermined proportion of the PIT tagged study fish in the collection/bypass channel at the transportation sites, such as Lower Granite and Little Goose dams, was purposely routed to the raceways for transportation and the rest was routed back to the river. Two categories of in-river migrating fish are used in this study. The in-river group most representative of the non-tagged fish are fish that migrate past Lower Granite, Little Goose, and Lower Monumental dams undetected in the bypass systems. This is because all non-tagged fish collected at these three dams are currently being transported. The other in-river group contains those fish remaining in-river below Lower Monumental Dam that had previously been detected at one or more dams. The number of fish starting at Lower Granite dam that are destined to one of these two in-river groups must be estimated. The Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methodology was used for that purpose. Adult (including jacks) study fish returning to the hatcheries in the Snake River basin were sampled at the Lower Granite Dam adult trap. There the PIT tag was recorded along with a measurement of length, a determination of sex, and a scale sample. The returns to the hatchery rack were adjusted for any sport and tribal harvest to provide an estimate of total return to the hatchery. Adult and jack return data from return years 1997 through 1999 are covered in this status report. Only the returns from the 1996 migration year are complete. A very low overall average of 0.136% survival rate from Lower Granite Dam and back to Lower Granite Dam was estimated for the 1996 migrants. The outcome expected for the 1997 migrants is much better. With one year of returns still to come, the overall average Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite Dam survival rate is 0.666%, with the McCall Hatchery and Imnaha Hatchery fish already producing return rates in excess of 1%. With 635 returning adults (plus jacks) from the 1997 migration year detected at Lower Granite Dam to date, and one additional year of returns to come, there will be a large sample size for statistically testing differences in transportation versus in- river survival rates next year. From the conduct of this study over a series of years, in addition to obtaining estimates of smolt-to-adult survival rates, we should be able to investigate what factors may be causing differences in survival rates among the various hatchery stocks used in this study.

  19. Acoustic And Elastic Reverse-Time Migration: Novel Angle-Domain Imaging Conditions And Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Rui

    2013-01-01

    S. Wu, 1996, Prestack depth migration with acoustic screenN. D. , 1983, Iterative depth migration by backward time1355. ——–, 2003, Prestack depth migration in angle-domain

  20. Repeat Migration between Europe and the United States, 1870-1914

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Drew

    2009-01-01

    one’s primary objective is to illuminate migration’s many-primary barrier keeping most Europeans from pursuing opportunities for economic improvement in America. Chain migration

  1. Gluteal silicone injections leading to extensive filler migration with induration and arthralgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Heidi; Wang, Iris; Meehan, Shane; Sanchez, Miguel; Smith, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    cellulitis, ulceration, and migration. Aesthetic Plast Surgto extensive filler migration with induration and arthralgiaa case of extensive filler migration causing bilateral lower

  2. Migration and the Sending Economy: A Disaggregated Rural Economy Wide Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, J. Edward; Dyer, George

    2006-01-01

    Understanding International Migration at the End of theA. de Brauw, 1999, Migration, remittances, and productivityProcess of International Migration from Western Mexico.

  3. Mexican migration to the U.S : patterns and the role of remittances, networks and globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Jose Navarro

    2007-01-01

    2003. “International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling:Social Insurance and Migration Costs. ” Journal of EconomicWhat’s driving Mexico–US migration? A theoretical, empirical

  4. Repeat Migration between Europe and the United States, 1870-1914

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Drew

    2009-01-01

    eds. International Migrations. New York: National Bureau of1996. Jerome, Harry. Migration and Business Cycles. NationalGerman-America Return Migration”. In A Century of European

  5. The nostalgia of change : a history of Mexican return migration to Acámbaro, Guanajuato, 1930-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pérez, Jesús Varela

    2010-01-01

    Culture of Migration in Southern Mexico. Austin: UniversityMexico. Return migration to Mexico has been understudied,studies of return migration to Mexico have been quite

  6. International Migration, Sex Ratios, and the Socioeconomic Outcomes of Non-migrant Mexican Women

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, Steven

    2009-01-01

    international migration from Mexico impacts the marital,international migration from Mexico impacts the marital,already been noted, migration from Mexico has increased at a

  7. Demobilizing the Revolution: Migration, Repatriation and Colonization in Mexico, 1911-1940

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Casey

    2000-01-01

    and agrarian history, Mexico set migration and colonizationMigration, Repatriation and Colonization in Mexico, 1911-Walsh / Migration, Repatriation and Colonization in Mexico,

  8. The Migration Industry in the Mexico-U.S. Migratory System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez-Leon, Ruben

    2005-01-01

    and Social Networks of Migration from Mexico to the United2001. “Urban Origin Migration from Mexico to the Unitedand Undocumented Migration from Mexico. ” Pp. 277-300 in

  9. Recent Trends in Internal and International Mexican Migration: Evidence from the Mexican Family Life Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenas, Erika; Conroy, Hector; Nobles, Jenna

    2008-01-01

    the Auspices of Female Migration from Mexico to the Unitedof internal migration within Mexico have been far lessregional nature of migration in Mexico (e.g. , Kandel and

  10. Migration and the Sending Economy: A Disaggregated Rural Economy Wide Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, J. Edward; Dyer, George

    2006-01-01

    1987. "Undocuented Mexico-US Migration and the Returns toof International Migration from Western Mexico. Berkeley andinternational migration in rural Mexico. Simulation findings

  11. Coping with the crisis : migration and settlement decisions of Yucateco migrants to the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Georgia Lynne

    2010-01-01

    M. (2009). Reverse Migration Rocks Mexico. Foreign Policy.2009) and “Reverse Migration Rocks Mexico (Beith 2009). Ita large-scale return migration to Mexico. Acknowledgements

  12. Determinants of Mexico-U.S. migration: the role of household assets and environmental factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Janvry, Alain; Sadoulet, Elisabeth; Davis, Benjamin; Seidel, Kevin; Winters, Paul

    1997-01-01

    of Undocumeted Migration: Mexico and the United States.economic incentives for migration from Mexico to the United'1975. "Illegal migration from Mexico to the United States: A

  13. Double layer in an expanding plasma: Simultaneous upstream and downstream measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byhring, H. S.; Fredriksen, A. [Institute of Science and Technology, University of Tromsoe, NO-9037 Tromsoe (Norway); Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2008-10-15

    Ion energy measurements were taken simultaneously using one retarding field energy analyzer placed at the open end of the plasma source, and one in the plasma diffusion region of an expanding low pressure argon plasma. An electric double layer was found, which is well separated from the region of high magnetic field and which is downstream of the maximum in the magnetic field gradient. An axially movable analyzer was used to determine the position of the double layer. It appears to be more closely connected to the rapid change in diameter from the source to the diffusion chamber, but still has a radial dimension close to that of the source diameter. These results suggest that the double layer forms, not as much as a result of a magnetic nozzle, but rather as a reaction to a dramatic change in boundary conditions. Still, a magnetic field of at least a few tens of Gauss in the double layer region is necessary for its spontaneous formation.

  14. Smoking Fish at Home--Safely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    PNW238 Smoking Fish at Home--Safely A PACIFIC NORTHWEST EXTENSION PUBLICATION WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY · OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY · UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO Three common factors in all hot fish-smok- ing-smoked fish safely. It also recom- mends refrigerated storage for all smoked fish. Note that the process

  15. NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING #12;#12;NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING A REPORT ON THE FIRST NATIONWIDE ^ ^ -. -- ECONOMIC SURVEY OF SPORT FISHING | Q U U AND HUNTING IN THE UNITED STATES, I, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE John L. Farley, Director Circular 44 For sale by the Superintendent

  16. Native Fish Society Molalla, OR 97308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Native Fish Society PO Box 568 Molalla, OR 97308 Conserving biological diversity of native fish are the state, federal and tribal fish management agencies that have limited authority over habitat conditions in the basin. That authority resides with other agencies, but the fish management agencies can certainly

  17. SURVEY OF FISHING IN 1000 PONDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SURVEY OF FISHING IN 1000 PONDS in 1959 HUG ^^^ri^L UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE Circular 86 #12;Cover. --Fishing in a pond, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Arnle J. Suomela, Coimnissioner BUREAU OF SPORT FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE

  18. Annual Report Exploratory Fishing and Gear Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipbuilding Corporation, Pascagoula, Miss ., for the construction of a new exploratory fishing vessel

  19. LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LATERAL LANDFILL GAS MIGRATION: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRELIMINARY MODELING RESULTS O.BOUR*, E in the geological layer. Prior to drilling new boreholes on the site, a preliminary simplified model will be built with the numerical code TOUGH2-LGM. A description of the geological units, methane flux and the results

  20. Technical Note Methane gas migration through geomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROOFS Technical Note Methane gas migration through geomembranes T. D. Stark1 and H. Choi2 1 flexible geomembranes, and to measure the methane gas transmission rate, permeance, and permeability). The measured methane gas permeability coefficient through a PVC geomembrane is 7.55 3 104 ml(STP).mil/m2.day

  1. Migrating Automotive Product Lines: a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    . Software Product Lines (SPL) are widely used to manage variability in the automotive industry. In a rapidly study from an automotive domain, that it is tractable to lift industrial-grade transforma- tionsMigrating Automotive Product Lines: a Case Study Michalis Famelis1 , Levi L´ucio2 , Gehan Selim3

  2. Capillary migration of microdisks on curved interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu Yao; Nima Sharifi-Mood; Iris B. Liu; Kathleen J. Stebe

    2014-12-23

    The capillary energy landscape for particles on curved fluid interfaces is strongly influenced by the particle wetting conditions. Contact line pinning has now been widely reported for colloidal particles, but its implications in capillary interactions have not been addressed. Here, we present experiment and analysis for disks with pinned contact lines on curved fluid interfaces. In experiment, we study microdisk migration on a host interface with zero mean curvature; the microdisks have contact lines pinned at their sharp edges and are sufficiently small that gravitational effects are negligible. The disks migrate away from planar regions toward regions of steep curvature with capillary energies inferred from the dissipation along particle trajectories which are linear in the deviatoric curvature. We derive the curvature capillary energy for an interface with arbitrary curvature, and discuss each contribution to the expression. By adsorbing to a curved interface, a particle eliminates a patch of fluid interface and perturbs the surrounding interface shape. Analysis predicts that perfectly smooth, circular disks do not migrate, and that nanometric deviations from a planar circular, contact line, like those around a weakly roughened planar disk, will drive migration with linear dependence on deviatoric curvature, in agreement with experiment.

  3. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  4. SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH;SUITABILITY OF SMALL FISH SPECIES FOR MONITORING THE EFFECTS OF PULP MILL EFFLUENT ON FISH POPULATIONS of the elements of study included monitoring the effects of pulp mill effluent on resident fish populations

  5. SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Milton

    SCHROEDER AND LOVE.: RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 43, 2002 RECREATIONAL FISHING AND MARINE FISH POPULATIONS IN CALIFORNIA DONNA M. SCHROEDER AND MILTON S. LOVE Marine@lifesci.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT We present and review information regarding recre- ational angling and exploited marine fish

  6. HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persisted after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HollyMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Native resident fish persistedMcLellan,ColvilleConfederatedTribes Resident Fish Division Surveys document increase in walleye and decrease in native fish abundance Native fish populations affected Sanpoil: wildkokanee and redband trout populations depressed Columbia

  7. Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal 2009 Keywords: Corbicula fluminea Coal-fired power plant Selenium Mercury Glutathione Condition index Bioaccumulation a b s t r a c t Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have

  8. Interaction between a flexible filament and a downstream rigid body Fang-Bao Tian,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Haoxiang

    Interaction between a flexible filament and a downstream rigid body Fang-Bao Tian,1,2 Haoxiang Luo, USA Received 11 February 2010; published 3 August 2010 A filament flapping in the bow wake of a rigid of the filament, and the drag force on both bodies is computed. It is shown that the results largely depend

  9. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1 Kelly Kibler, Desiree Tullos, and Mathias Kondolf 2 ABSTRACT: Dam removal is a promising river restoration technique, particularly for the vast number of rivers impounded by small dams

  10. Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-01-01

    VERTICAL GAS MIGRATION At a su?ciently large depth, the gasmigration, such an assumption is questionable, especially when dealing with shallow depths.migration and trapping. 9 If a con- nected gas plume extends between depths

  11. Scalable directoryless shared memory coherence using execution migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lis, Mieszko

    2010-11-22

    We introduce the concept of deadlock-free migration-based coherent shared memory to the NUCA family of architectures. Migration-based architectures move threads among cores to guarantee sequential semantics in large ...

  12. Deadlock-free fine-grained thread migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Myong Hyon

    Several recent studies have proposed fine-grained, hardware-level thread migration in multicores as a solution to power, reliability, and memory coherence problems. The need for fast thread migration has been well documented, ...

  13. Channel Meander Migration in Large-Scale Physical Model Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Po Hung

    2010-10-12

    A set of large-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to study channel meander migration. Factors affecting the migration of banklines, including the ratio of curvature to channel width, bend angle, and the Froude number were tested...

  14. "Them" or "Us"?: Assessing Responsibility for Undocumented Migration from Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krissman, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Stanford University Press. Diaz-Briquets, Sergio and Sidneyof migration (for example, Diaz-Briquets and Weintraub 1991,

  15. Structural Dynamics of Various Causes of Migration in Jaipur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayant Singh; Hansraj Yadav; Florentin Smarandache

    2008-04-06

    Various social causes for migration in Jaipur are studied and statistical hypotheses are made in this paper.

  16. Fish & Wildlife Annual Project Summary, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-07-01

    BPA's Division of Fish and Wildlife was created in 1982 to develop, coordinate and manage BPA's fish and wildlife program. Division activities protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife resources impacted by hydroelectric development and operation in the Columbia River Basin. At present the Division spends 95% of its budget on restoration projects. In 1983, 83 projects addressed all aspects of the anadromous fish life cycle, non-migratory fish problems and the status of wildlife living near reservoirs.

  17. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in simple models of various anisotropy V´aclav Bucha Department Republic, E-mail: bucha@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration anisotropy and monoclinic anisotropy. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in two ways: a

  18. Oceanic Spawning Migration of the European Eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernatchez, Louis

    by depth and tem- perature data showed that migrating eels encoun- tered a diverse range of environmentsOceanic Spawning Migration of the European Eel (Anguilla anguilla) Kim Aarestrup,1 * Finn Økland,2- take a ~5000-km spawning migration from Europe to the Sargasso Sea (1), although details

  19. Contemporary Mathematics Explicit schemes in seismic migration and isotropic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadakis, Manos

    Multiresolution Analyses (IMRA) for L2(Rd). We develop a wave equation based poststack depth migration schemeContemporary Mathematics Explicit schemes in seismic migration and isotropic multiscale, offers the possibility of reducing the cost of computation. 1. Introduction Migration is a seismic

  20. Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Part 2: Optimized Gaussian packets V#19;aclav Bucha packet prestack depth migration consists of four basic steps: (a) preparation of a velocity model su to the Gaussian packet prestack depth migration. Keywords Gaussian packets, Gaussian beams, prestack depth

  1. Seasonal migrations of morphometrically mature male snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for specific reproductive stages. Depth variation associated with this migration was examined to deter- mine in cara- pace width (CW), this migration is assumed to culminate on the outer shelf (depths of 100­200 m313 Seasonal migrations of morphometrically mature male snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio

  2. Essays on rural-urban migration in hinterland China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Lei

    2009-01-01

    primary school Mean Table 1.8: Determinants of Migration forprimary school and junior-high school is not endoge- nous with one’s migrationMigration, 16 - 65 in 2005, Continued Variable IV Finished Secondary School IV Father Primary

  3. A novel molecular index for secondary oil migration distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alteration of buried organic matter in source rocks, followed by oil expulsion (primary migration) outA novel molecular index for secondary oil migration distance Liuping Zhang1 , Maowen Li2 , Yang migration distances from source rocks to reservoirs can greatly help in the search for new petroleum

  4. Understanding the Effect of Climate Change on Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    factors are one of many causes for migration. But is the environment a primary factor (= a No 1 reasonUnderstanding the Effect of Climate Change on Migration Using Conceptual Models to Depict #12;2IHDP Open Meeting 2005 ,,The gravest effects of climate change may be those on human migration

  5. Enhancing the Performance of High Availability Lightweight Live Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Binoy

    on the primary host, and transfers the latest checkpoint to the backup host as whole-system migration. Once is that the primary host migrates the guest VM image (including CPU/memory status updates and new writes to the fileEnhancing the Performance of High Availability Lightweight Live Migration Peng Lu1, Binoy Ravindran

  6. Type II Migration: Varying Planet Mass and Disc Viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard G. Edgar

    2008-07-03

    This paper continues an earlier study of giant planet migration, examining the effect of planet mass and disc viscosity on the migration rate. We find that the migration rate of a gap-opening planet varies systematically with the planet's mass, as predicted in our earlier work. However, the variation with disc viscosity appears to be much weaker than expected.

  7. Migration cues and timing in leatherback sea turtles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Migration cues and timing in leatherback sea turtles Scott A. Sherrill-Mix, Michael C. James, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1 Atlantic leatherback sea turtles migrate annually from foraging grounds off's proportional hazards model, we investigated the individual timing of the southward migrations of 27 turtles

  8. Migration Health MIDSA Report -December 2009 Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    #12;Migration Health MIDSA Report - December 2009 Table of Contents 1 Foreword 1 2 Acronyms 3 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 4 .2 Plenary: Setting the Scene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ­ Migration Health Good Practices . . . . . . 8 Panel 1: Emergency and Crisis-Induced Migration and Associated Health

  9. PUSH PULL MIGRATION LAWS x Guido Dorigo* and Waldo Tobler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobler, Waldo

    PUSH PULL MIGRATION LAWS x Guido Dorigo* and Waldo Tobler Abstract:Themathematicsofapush-pullmodelareshowntoincorporatemanyofRavenstein's laws of migration, to be equivalent to a quadratic transportation problem, and to be related, Helmholz equation, migration theory, quadratic pro- gramming, spatial interaction. It is now approximately

  10. Interprovincial Migration and the Stringency of Energy Policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interprovincial Migration and the Stringency of Energy Policy in China Xiaohu Luo, Da Zhang, Justin;1 Interprovincial Migration and the Stringency of Energy Policy in China Xiaohu Luo* , Da Zhang , Justin Caron , Xiliang Zhang*, , Valerie J. Karplus Abstract Interprovincial migration flows involve substantial

  11. Data Collection and Restoration for Heterogeneous Process Migration *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xian-He

    Data Collection and Restoration for Heterogeneous Process Migration * Kasidit Chanchio Xian-He Sun,sung@cs.iit.edu Abstract This study presents a practical solution for data collec- tion and restoration to migrate- grams. Experimental and analytical results show that (1) a user-level process can be migrated across

  12. Understanding the Effect of Climate Change on Human Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Understanding the Effect of Climate Change on Human Migration The Contribution of Mathematical In the last two decades, several researchers have predicted mass migrations as a conse- quence of climate change as a push factor for migration. This diploma thesis contributes to the understanding of this topic

  13. Process Migration: A Generalized Approach Using a Virtualizing Operating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Partha

    Process Migration: A Generalized Approach Using a Virtualizing Operating System 1 Tom Boyd, a joint effort between Arizona State University and New York University. Abstract Process migration has have not benefited from process migration technolo- gies, mainly due to the lack of an effective

  14. Thermocapillary migration of long bubbles in polygonal tubes. II. Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lajeunesse, Eric

    Thermocapillary migration of long bubbles in polygonal tubes. II. Experiments E. Lajeunesse experimentally the thermocapillary migration of a long gas bubble in a horizontal pipe of rectangular cross migration of the bubble towards the hotter region. The bubble velocity is found to be independent of bubble

  15. Implied Migration Rates from Credit Barrier Models Claudio Albanese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    Implied Migration Rates from Credit Barrier Models Claudio Albanese , Oliver X. Chen Department The risk neutral credit migration process captures quantitative information which is relevant to the pricing theory and risk management of credit derivatives. In this article, we derive implied migration

  16. The Dynamic Cell 79 Kinesins in cell migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Dynamic Cell 79 Kinesins in cell migration Alice Bachmann* and Anne Straube*1 *Centre or regulating the dynamic assembly and disassembly of the microtubule polymer. In migrating cells, microtubules migration. The kinesin superfamily The first kinesin to be discovered, kinesin-1, was isolated

  17. Chapter 3 Migration on the C(110) Surface: Abinitio Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    89 Chapter 3 Migration on the C(110) Surface: Ab­initio Computations 3.1 Introduction Mobile the competi­ tiveness of surface migration with gas­surface reactions. In diamond surface science, the thermal­vapor deposition studies, activation barriers to migration of surface CH 2 and CH 3 [6] had been calculated, yet

  18. Antagonistic effects of seed dispersal and herbivory on plant migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    LETTER Antagonistic effects of seed dispersal and herbivory on plant migration Mark Vellend,1@interchange.ubc.ca Abstract The two factors that determine plant migration rates ­ seed dispersal and population growth ­ are generally treated independently, despite the fact that many animals simultaneously enhance plant migration

  19. Process Migration for Heterogeneous Distributed Systems Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process Migration for Heterogeneous Distributed Systems Matt Bishop Department of Computer Science and mechanisms for migrating processes in a distributed system become more complicated in a heterogeneous the means to migrate processes to the idle resources. In this paper, we present a graph model for single

  20. Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow E.S. van Baaren Master's Thesis for the salt migration in the groundwater underneath the polders near the coast. The problem description of this thesis is to investigate the possibilities of modelling salt migrations in density dependent groundwater

  1. INTRODUCTION Nuclear migration is essential for the movement of pronuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvitz, H. Robert

    INTRODUCTION Nuclear migration is essential for the movement of pronuclei during fertilization). For example, interphase nuclear migration is essential for axis determination, embryogenesis and eye, such as the vertebrate brain (reviewed by Morris et al., 1995). Molecular and genetic analyses of nuclear migration

  2. Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Maria Kourkina Cameron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Maria Kourkina

    Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron Diplom (Moscow Institute Dung-Hai Lee Spring 2007 #12;Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration Copyright c 2007 by Maria Kourkina Cameron #12;Abstract Seismic Velocity Estimation from Time Migration by Maria Kourkina Cameron

  3. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  4. Response of PCB contamination in stream fish to abatement actions at an industrial site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, G.R.; Peterson, M.J.; McCarthy, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Milne, G. [Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, used large quantities of PCBs in equipment associated with the great electric power requirements of isotopic enrichment of uranium. Historic losses of PCBs in the 1950s and 1960s have left a legacy of contamination at the site. A biological monitoring program implemented in 1987 found PCBs in PGDP effluents and in fish downstream from facility discharges. As a consequence, a fish consumption advisory was posted on Little Bayou Creek by the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1987, and regulatory discharge limits for PCBs at PGDP were reduced. Monitoring at multiple locations in receiving streams indicated that PGDP discharges were more important than in stream sediment contamination as sources of PCBs to fish. Environmental management and compliance staff at PGDP led an effort to reduce PCB discharges and monitor the effects of those actions. The active discharge of uncontaminated process water to historically PCB-contaminated drainage systems was found to mobilize PCBs into KPDES (Clean Water Act) regulated effluents. Efforts to locate PCB sources within the plant, coupled with improvements in management practices and remedial actions, appear to have been successful in reducing PCB discharges from these sources. Actions included emplacing passive monitors in the plant drainage system to identify this as a chronic source, and consolidating and re-routing effluents to minimize flow through PCB-contaminated channels. As a consequence, PCB contamination in fish in small streams receiving plant discharges decreased 75% over from 1992--1995.

  5. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    CA. 68-76. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Gotshall, D. W.G. 1969. The Commercial Fishing Industry in Humboldt County,13030/kt1g5001fm/. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Monroe,

  6. The modified Klein Gordon equation for neolithic population migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pelc; J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Kozlowski

    2007-03-11

    In this paper the model for the neolithic migration in Europe is developed. The new migration equation, the modified Klein Gordon equation is formulated and solved. It is shown that the migration process can be described as the hyperbolic diffusion with constant speed. In comparison to the existing models based on the generalization of the Fisher approach the present model describes the migration as the transport process with memory and offers the possibility to recover the initial state of migration which is the wave motion with finite velocity.

  7. New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Part I of IV, Summary Report, 1982-1984 Final Project Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orsborn, John F.

    1985-08-01

    The report looks at the most active periods of fishway research since 1938 as background for a project to apply fundamental fluid and bio-mechanics to fishway design, and develop more cost effective fish passage facilities with primary application to small scale hydropower facilities. Also discussed are new concepts in fishway design, an assessment of fishway development and design, and an analysis of barriers to upstream migration. (ACR)

  8. Resonant Removal of Exomoons During Planetary Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spalding, Christopher; Adams, Fred C

    2015-01-01

    Jupiter and Saturn play host to an impressive array of satellites, making it reasonable to suspect that similar systems of moons might exist around giant extrasolar planets. Furthermore, a significant population of such planets is known to reside at distances of several Astronomical Units (AU), leading to speculation that some moons thereof might support liquid water on their surfaces. However, giant planets are thought to undergo inward migration within their natal protoplanetary disks, suggesting that gas giants currently occupying their host star's habitable zone formed further out. Here we show that when a moon-hosting planet undergoes inward migration, dynamical interactions may naturally destroy the moon through capture into a so-called "evection resonance." Within this resonance, the lunar orbit's eccentricity grows until the moon eventually collides with the planet. Our work suggests that moons orbiting within about 10 planetary radii are susceptible to this mechanism, with the exact number dependent ...

  9. Migration of semiflexible polymers in microcapillary flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghunath Chelakkot; Roland. G. Winkler; Gerhard Gompper

    2010-06-23

    The non-equilibrium structural and dynamical properties of a semiflexible polymer confined in a cylindrical microchannel and exposed to a Poiseuille flow is studied by mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations. For a polymer with a length half of its persistence length, large variations in orientation and conformations are found as a function of radial distance and flow strength. In particular, the polymer exhibits U-shaped conformations near the channel center. Hydrodynamic interactions lead to strong cross-streamline migration. Outward migration is governed by the polymer orientation and the corresponding anisotropy in its diffusivity. Strong tumbling motion is observed, with a tumbling time which exhibits the same dependence on Peclet number as a polymer in shear flow.

  10. Life History of California Sheephead: Historical Comparisons and Fishing Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caselle, Jennifer; Hamilton, Scott L; Lowe, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Historical Comparisons and Fishing Effects Jennifer Caselle,By contrast, commercial fishing targets smaller, solid-rednew regula- tions on commercial fishing have sharply reduced

  11. Fishing and Early Jomon Foodways at Sannai Maruyama, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katayama, Mio

    2011-01-01

    7. 2. Archaeological Fishing Technology …………………………….. 7. 2.7. 3. 1. 2. Fishing ……………………………………. 7. 3. 1. 3.7. 3. 2. 2 Fishing ……………………………………….. 7. 3. 2. 3

  12. The effect of radial migration on galactic disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vera-Ciro, Carlos; D'Onghia, Elena; Navarro, Julio; Abadi, Mario

    2014-10-20

    We study the radial migration of stars driven by recurring multi-arm spiral features in an exponential disk embedded in a dark matter halo. The spiral perturbations redistribute angular momentum within the disk and lead to substantial radial displacements of individual stars, in a manner that largely preserves the circularity of their orbits and that results, after 5 Gyr (?40 full rotations at the disk scale length), in little radial heating and no appreciable changes to the vertical or radial structure of the disk. Our results clarify a number of issues related to the spatial distribution and kinematics of migrators. In particular, we find that migrators are a heavily biased subset of stars with preferentially low vertical velocity dispersions. This 'provenance bias' for migrators is not surprising in hindsight, for stars with small vertical excursions spend more time near the disk plane, and thus respond more readily to non-axisymmetric perturbations. We also find that the vertical velocity dispersion of outward migrators always decreases, whereas the opposite holds for inward migrators. To first order, newly arrived migrators simply replace stars that have migrated off to other radii, thus inheriting the vertical bias of the latter. Extreme migrators might therefore be recognized, if present, by the unexpectedly small amplitude of their vertical excursions. Our results show that migration, understood as changes in angular momentum that preserve circularity, can strongly affect the thin disk, but cast doubts on models that envision the Galactic thick disk as a relic of radial migration.

  13. Tilting Saturn without tilting Jupiter: Constraints on giant planet migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brasser, R

    2015-01-01

    The migration and encounter histories of the giant planets in our Solar System can be constrained by the obliquities of Jupiter and Saturn. We have performed secular simulations with imposed migration and N-body simulations with planetesimals to study the expected obliquity distribution of migrating planets with initial conditions resembling those of the smooth migration model, the resonant Nice model and two models with five giant planets initially in resonance (one compact and one loose configuration). For smooth migration, the secular spin-orbit resonance mechanism can tilt Saturn's spin axis to the current obliquity if the product of the migration time scale and the orbital inclinations is sufficiently large (exceeding 30 Myr deg). For the resonant Nice model with imposed migration, it is difficult to reproduce today's obliquity values, because the compactness of the initial system raises the frequency that tilts Saturn above the spin precession frequency of Jupiter, causing a Jupiter spin-orbit resonance...

  14. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    Stevens Act Provisions; Fishing Capacity Reduction Program;Industry Fee System for Fishing Capacity Reduction Loan.Trinidad Harbor Fishing Community Profile Ralston, S. 2002.

  15. Separating environmental effects from fishing impacts on the dynamics of fish populations of the Southern California region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, Chih-hao

    2006-01-01

    101 Chapter 4. Climatic and fishing effects on shifts in51 Chapter 3. Fishing elevates variability in the abundancelong-term evidence that fishing magnifies uncertainty in a

  16. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and O&M, Annual Progress Report 2007-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sellman, Jake; Perugini, Carol [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Shoshone-Paiute Tribes

    2009-02-20

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance Project (DV Fisheries) is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the federal hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View (MVR), Lake Billy Shaw (LBS), and Sheep Creek Reservoirs (SCR), the program is also designed to: maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period fall into three categories: operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and public outreach. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include maintaining fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs, stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles, equipment, and restroom facilities. Monitoring and evaluation activities include creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, and control of encroaching exotic vegetation. Public outreach activities include providing environmental education to school children, providing fishing reports to local newspapers and vendors, updating the website, hosting community environmental events, and fielding numerous phone calls from anglers. The reservoir monitoring program focuses on water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir and Lake Billy Shaw had less than productive trout growth due to water quality issues including dissolved oxygen and/or turbidity. Regardless, angler fishing experience was the highest at Lake Billy Shaw. Trout in Mountain View Reservoir were in the best condition of the three reservoirs and anglers reported very good fishing there. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) remain the main limiting factors in the fisheries, particularly in late August to early September.

  17. Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    Automatic Fish Classification for Underwater Species Behavior Understanding Concetto Spampinato an automatic fish classi- fication system that operates in the natural underwater en- vironment to assist marine biologists in understanding fish behavior. Fish classification is performed by combining two types

  18. Modeling of Carbon Migration During JET Injection Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, J. D.; Likonen, J.; Coad, P.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; Airila, M.; Andrew, P.; Brezinsek, S.; Corrigan, G.; Esser, H. G.; Jachmich, S.; Kallenbach, A.; Kirschner, A.; Kreter, A.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Pitts, R. A.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.; Wiesen, S.

    2008-10-15

    JET has performed two dedicated carbon migration experiments on the final run day of separate campaigns (2001 and 2004) using {sup 13}CH{sub 4} methane injected into repeated discharges. The EDGE2D/NIMBUS code modelled the carbon migration in both experiments. This paper describes this modelling and identifies a number of important migration pathways: (1) deposition and erosion near the injection location, (2) migration through the main chamber SOL, (3) migration through the private flux region aided by E x B drifts, and (4) neutral migration originating near the strike points. In H-Mode, type I ELMs are calculated to influence the migration by enhancing erosion during the ELM peak and increasing the long-range migration immediately following the ELM. The erosion/re-deposition cycle along the outer target leads to a multistep migration of {sup 13}C towards the separatrix which is called 'walking'. This walking created carbon neutrals at the outer strike point and led to {sup 13}C deposition in the private flux region. Although several migration pathways have been identified, quantitative analyses are hindered by experimental uncertainty in divertor leakage, and the lack of measurements at locations such as gaps and shadowed regions.

  19. Sensing bending in a compliant biomimetic fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaczmarek, Adam S

    2006-01-01

    This thesis examines the problem of sensing motion in a compliant biomimetic device. Specifically, it will examine the motion of a tail in a biomimetic fish. To date, the fish has been an open-loop system, the motion of ...

  20. PERSPECTIVE | FOCUS Fishing the Fermi sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    PERSPECTIVE | FOCUS Fishing the Fermi sea Paul C. Canfield is at Ames Laboratory, and Department feed villages and cities. Those skilled in the art of finding the `right place' to fish were deeply

  1. A chrestomathy Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avise, John

    A chrestomathy on fishes Darwin's Fishes: An Encyclopedia of Ichthyology, Ecology and Evolution- izing biological thinking (in The Origin of Species and The Descent of Man) and marine geology (in

  2. MFR PAPER 1230 Finding Fish With Satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensors, fishing vessels , spotter pilots, research vessels, and offshore oil platforms were used Investigation? A. It is an attempt to find out if satellites can help fishermen find fish. Our assumption

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    DEVELOPMENT OF FISH-LIKE SWIMMING BEHAVIOURS FOR AN AUTONOMOUS ROBOTIC FISH Jindong Liu, Ian Dukes CO4 3SQ, United Kingdom Email: {jliua, idukes, rrknig, hhu}@essex.ac.uk Keywords: Robotic fish the fish movement into several basic behaviours, namely straight cruise, cruise in turn and sharp turn

  4. A Methodology of Modelling Fish-like Swim Patterns for Robotic Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Huosheng

    A Methodology of Modelling Fish-like Swim Patterns for Robotic Fish Jindong Liu and Huosheng Hu@essex.ac.uk Abstract-- This paper presents a novel modelling methodology for our robotic fish, which considers the relative movement of the tail to the head in order to model variable swimming patterns for robotic fish

  5. u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    u.s. Fish Wildl. Servo eire. Upstream Passage of Anadromous Fish hrough Navigation Locks and Use OF THE INTERIOR u.s. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Circular 352 #12;Cover Photograph.- Brailing fish from haul seine into live car. #12;UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Walter J. Hickel

  6. Publications for Alexander Fish Bulinski, K., Fish, A. (2015). Plunnecke inequalities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Publications for Alexander Fish 2015 Bulinski, K., Fish, A. (2015). Plunnecke inequalities="http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/etds.2015.51">[More Information] Bjorklund, M., Fish, A. (2015). Plünnecke inequalities print. [More Information] Bjorklund, M., Fish

  7. The Fish Barcode of Life (FISH-BOL) special issue ROBERT HANNER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    EDITORIAL The Fish Barcode of Life (FISH-BOL) special issue ROBERT HANNER1 , ROB DESALLE2 , ROBERT, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia The fascinating diversity of fishes coupled with their broad socio and distribution of many, if not most species of fish. Climate change is likely to exacerbate these effects

  8. To appear in Proc. 2012 ICRA Putting the Fish in the Fish Tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    To appear in Proc. 2012 ICRA Putting the Fish in the Fish Tank: Immersive VR for Animal Behavior-reality framework for inves- tigating startle-response behavior in fish. Using real-time three- dimensional tracking of the looming stimuli change according to the fish's perspective and location in the tank. We demonstrate

  9. Qualitative assessment of the impacts of proposed system operating strategies to resident fish within selected Columbia River Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Geist, D.R.; Mavros, W.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) are presently conducting the System Operation Review (SOR) for the Columbia River basin. The SOR began in 1990 and is expected to provide an operating strategy that will take into consideration multiple uses of the Columbia River system including navigation, flood control, irrigation, power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, water supply, and water quality. This report provides descriptions of each of the non-modeled reservoirs and other specified river reaches. The descriptions focus on the distinct management goals for resident fish: biodiversity, species-specific concerns, and sport fisheries. In addition, this report provides a qualitative assessment of impacts to the resident fish within these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 alternative system operating strategies. In addition to this introduction, the report contains four more sections. Section 2.0 provides the methods that were used. Reservoir descriptions appear in Section 3.0, which is a synthesis of our literature review and interviews with resident fish experts. Section 4.0 contains a discussion of potential impacts to fish within each of these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 proposed system operating strategies. The references cited are listed in Section 5.0.

  10. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos-based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes that can swim hydrodynamically of artificial fishes in their virtual habitat are not entirely predictable because they are not scripted. 1

  11. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  12. Fish Population and Behavior Revealed by Instantaneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish Population and Behavior Revealed by Instantaneous Continental Shelf­Scale Imaging Nicholas C-transect methods from slow-moving research vessels. These methods significantly undersample fish populations in time and space, leaving an incomplete and ambiguous record of abundance and behavior. We show that fish

  13. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish *preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:07 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section D. 7 Title: Resident Fish Mitigation (pg 22-23) Overview Generally, entities recommend that the existing language

  14. Fish Cognition and Consciousness Colin Allen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Fish Cognition and Consciousness Colin Allen colallen@indiana.edu phone: +1-812-855-3622 fax: +1, Bloomington, IN 47405 USA Abstract Questions about fish consciousness and cognition are receiving increasing this hugely diverse set of species. Keywords Fish, learning, cognition, consciousness Submitted to J

  15. Foreign Fishery Developments The Polish Fishing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have resisted, preferring freshwater fish (i.e., carp and trout) to unfamiliar marine species. Poland and especially fuel costs will continue to rise. Poland hopes to increase fish supplies for the domestic market to sell privately as the government retail price for fish is heavily subsidized and has not been increased

  16. Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Perceptual Modeling for Behavioral Animation of Fishes Xiaoyuan Tu Demetri Terzopoulos Department worlds. We have created a virtual marine world inhabited by artificial fishes which can swim hydrody­ namically in simulated water through the motor control of internal muscles. Artificial fishes exploit

  17. Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Artificial Fishes: Physics, Locomotion, Perception, Behavior Xiaoyuan Tu and Demetri Terzopoulos the approach, we develop a physics­based, virtual marine world. The world is inhabited by artificial fishes. As in nature, the detailed motions of artificial fishes in their vir­ tual habitat are not entirely predictable

  18. COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Derek S.

    COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend Department/Number: NONC F040 F01 Credits: 0 to the art and science of fly casting, fishing and tying. Students will learn how use a fly rod to place a fly with pinpoint accuracy, tie fishing knots and construct their own leaders, and, most importantly

  19. The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villefranche sur mer

    The Motility Apparatus of Fish Spermatozoa + 0 ) 2 6 - 4 9 Jacky J. Cosson I. INTRODUCTION Spermatozoa are unique among cells generated by the metazoans and are haploid unicells. Fish sperm is released with extremely harmful conditions (fresh water, sea or brackish water) in the case for many fish species (Huxley

  20. Internet Fish Brian A. LaMacchia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMacchia, Brian A.

    Internet Fish by Brian A. LaMacchia Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and Department of Electrical Fish,'' a novel class of resource­discovery tools designed to help users extract useful information from the Internet. Internet Fish (IFish) are semi­autonomous, persistent information brokers; users

  1. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  2. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  3. Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the impacts of hydropower dams on fish and wildlife. It also helps direct more than $250 million each year habitats in tributaries that have been damaged by development. A broad range of entities propose projects issues, as well as an independent panel of economists to provide guidance on questions of cost

  4. Big Fish on the Yangtze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2013-12-04

    Broadcast Transcript: This is Randi Hacker with another Postcard from Asia from the KU Center for East Asian Studies. Once upon a time, in China's New Austerity Age, that is, now, a 2,300 ton, 295-foot glow-in-the-dark puffer fish statue...

  5. Publications Fish Disease Diagnosis and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publications Fish Disease Diagnosis and Basic Fishery Computer Programs The second edition of "Disease Diagnosis and Control in North American Marine Aquaculture," edited by Carl J. Sindermann edition should be a big help to aquaculturists and others involved in the detection, prevention

  6. Biomechanics Volumetric imaging of fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauder, George V.

    Biomechanics Volumetric imaging of fish locomotion Brooke E. Flammang1,*, George V. Lauder1, Daniel stability in a complex fluid environ- ment. We used a new approach, a volumetric velocimetry imaging system into the caudal fin vortex wake. These results show that volumetric imaging of biologi- cally generated flow

  7. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher plume propagation estimates in a high-permeability conduit like a vertical fracture.

  8. Cell Migration Model with Multiple Chemical Compasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuji Ishihara

    2013-01-29

    A simple model is proposed that describes the various morphodynamic principles of migrating cells from polar to amoeboidal motions. The model equation is derived using competing internal cellular compass variables and symmetries of the system. Fixed points for the $N = 2$ system are closely investigated to clarify how the competition among polaritors explains the observed morphodynamics. Response behaviors of cell--to--signal stimuli are also investigated. This model will be useful for classifying high-dimensional cell motions and investigating collective cellular behaviors.

  9. Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1989-10-01

    The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Sharks and Fish 1 ffl The fish are points with masses fishm i moving accord­ ing to Newton's laws's method to integrate. ffl Accumulate the mean­square­velocity of all the fish 2 6 4 #fish X i=1 velocity 2 i #fish 3 7 5 1=2 and plot it as a function of time. ffl Choose the time step dt in the integrator

  11. CO[subscript 2] migration in saline aquifers: Regimes in migration with dissolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMinn, C.W.

    We incorporate CO[subscript 2] dissolution due to convective mixing into a sharp-interface mathematical model for the post-injection migration of a plume of CO[subscript 2] in a saline aquifer. The model captures CO[subscript ...

  12. License Update and Migration Processes in Open Source Software Projects 1 License Update and Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    License Update and Migration Processes in Open Source Software Projects 1 License Update, and distribution. At present, we have little understanding of, what happens when these licenses change, what motivates such changes, and how new licenses are created, updated, and deployed. Similarly, little attention

  13. Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensz, Christopher

    2013-01-15

    Chris Hensz University of Kansas Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Biodiversity Institute Estimating Migration Resistance: a Case Study of Greenlandic Arctic Terns The Problem 1: How do migratory animals choose... d ay °C m /s Models ? Implemented in R ? Models: ? Linear exploration Southern Migration, 9 birds, n=929 Northern Migration, 9 birds, n=629 Future Directions 1: Finish non-linear model 2: Generalize procedure and include...

  14. A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healey, Christopher G.

    A Comparison of Immersive HMD, Fish Tank VR and Fish Tank with Haptics Displays for Volume: (1) head-mounted display (HMD); (2) fish tank VR (fish tank); and (3) fish tank VR augmented its structure. Fish tank and haptic participants saw the entire volume on-screen and rotated

  15. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and...

  16. The Built Environment and Migration: A Case Study of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    and Community Networks in Mexico-U.S. Migration. THe JournalTraditional Architecture of Mexico. London, UK: Thames anddevelopment: assessing Mexico's economic and social policy

  17. "OUT OF AFRICA: GENETICS AND HUMAN MIGRATIONS", Prof. Gyan Bhanot...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2012, 9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium "OUT OF AFRICA: GENETICS AND HUMAN MIGRATIONS", Prof. Gyan Bhanot, Department of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Physics,...

  18. Topography of Extracellular Matrix Mediates Vascular Morphogenesis and Migration Speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yi

    Topography of Extracellular Matrix Mediates Vascular Morphogenesis and Migration Speeds Amy L Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 1 Corresponding author. Address: Theoretical Division

  19. Exact solutions in a model of vertical gas migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, Dmitriy B.; Patzek, Tad W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-01-01

    gas leaking from seasonal gas storage, or for modeling ofmigration resulting from a gas storage leak, the gas ?owsof gas, created by a leaking gas storage reservoir, migrates

  20. Concrete Property and Radionuclide Migration Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Powers, Laura; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-10-01

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the DOE Complex. Part of theses services includes safe disposal of LLW and MLLW at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds (LLBG) in accordance with the requirements listed in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, a Performance Assessment (PA) analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires that continuing data collection be conducted to enhance confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied upon to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the Order. One critical assumption is that concrete will frequently be used as waste form or container material to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Data was collected to (1) quantify radionuclide migration through concrete materials similar to those used to encapsulate waste in the LLBG, (2) measure the properties of the concrete materials, especially those likely to influence radionuclide migration, and (3) quantify the stability of U-bearing solid phases of limited solubility in concrete.

  1. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  2. C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    C-3/Oxford/Fish Locomotion/Fish Loco Chap 7/Fish Loco Settings/II/ Chap 7/11-04-09/200 Ecology and Evolution of Swimming Performance in Fishes: Predicting Evolution with Biomechanics R. Brian Langerhans1, * and David N. Reznick2 NT NINTRODUCTIONTN NINTRODUCTION Residing within the immense diversity of fishes

  3. Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S; Coutant, Charles C

    2006-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

  4. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  5. Some Basic Ideas Migration is a long-term (> daily) movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher A.

    1 Migration Humpbacked Whales Some Basic Ideas Migration is a long-term (> daily) movement from one migrate yearly to find suitable substrate/water level/water temperature Costs and Benefits of Migration of breeding individuals Costs of migration include: Increased risk of predation or death from natural events

  6. Return Migration Among Latin American Elderly in the U.S.: A Study of its Magnitude, Characteristics and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega, Alma Celina

    2013-01-01

    of return migration for Latin American primary SocialPredictors of return migration among primary Social SecurityPredictors of return migration among primary Social Security

  7. Getting Nurses Here: Migration Industry and the Business of Connecting Philippine-Educated Nurses with United States Employers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acacio, Kristel Ann Santiago

    2011-01-01

    the primary individuals who can activate migration, reallycapital in migration studies). The primary function of thekinds of migration patterns we see today. Primary evidence

  8. Developing a Community Tradition of Migration: A Field Study in rural Zacatecas, Mexico, and California Settlement Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mines, Richard

    1981-01-01

    History of Mexican Migration Mexico has taken part in thepart an indirect migration Mexico's central from region,Van Kemper, eds. Migration Across Frontiers: Mexico and the

  9. Return Migration Among Latin American Elderly in the U.S.: A Study of its Magnitude, Characteristics and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega, Alma Celina

    2013-01-01

    Determinants of return migration to Mexico among Mexicans inthe auspices of female migration from Mexico to the Unitedimpact of return migration to Mexico. Estudios Econ´omicos,

  10. A Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    A Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services Asil A. Almonaies, Manar H. Alalfi-automatically migrat- ing monolithic legacy web applications to service oriented architecture (SOA) by separating potentially reusable features as web services. Software design re- covery and source transformation techniques

  11. NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-705 Migration and Dispersion of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;NOAA Technical Report NMFS SSRF-705 Migration and Dispersion of Tagged American Lobsters of recoveries Definition of lobster maturity Migration ver u di persion Compo ite tation resumes Composite Depth distribution at recapture verage monthly bottom temperatures oncJu ions ~ummary Acknowledgment

  12. Theoretical examination of picosecond phenol migration dynamics in phenylacetylene solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappe, Andrew M.

    Theoretical examination of picosecond phenol migration dynamics in phenylacetylene solution Lucas to simulate 2D-IR echo spectra using Fourier analysis. The resulting dynamics yields a phenol migration time between the two primary binding sites on phenylacetylene of 3­5 ps in excellent agreement with experiment

  13. Process Migration DEJAN S. MILO JI CI C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglis, Fred

    TOG Research Institute RICHARD WHEELER EMC AND SONGNIAN ZHOU University of Toronto and Platform migration is again receiving more attention in both research and product development. As high of the most important implementations. Design and implementation issues of process migration are analyzed

  14. Towards a Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    Towards a Framework for Migrating Web Applications to Web Services Asil A. Almonaies Manar H {asil,alalfi,cordy,dean}@cs.queensu.ca Abstract Migrating traditional legacy web applications to web services is an important step in the modernization of web-based business systems to more complex inter

  15. Planet Migration through a Self-Gravitating Planetesimal Disk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander J. Moore; Alice C. Quillen; Richard G. Edgar

    2008-09-17

    We simulate planet migration caused by interactions between planets and a planetesimal disk. We use an N-body integrator optimized for near-Keplerian motion that runs in parallel on a video graphics card, and that computes all pair-wise gravitational interactions. We find that the fraction of planetesimals found in mean motion resonances is reduced and planetary migration rates are on average about 50% slower when gravitational interactions between the planetesimals are computed than when planetesimal self-gravity is neglected. This is likely due to gravitational stirring of the planetesimal disk that is not present when self-gravity is neglected that reduces their capture efficiency because of the increased particle eccentricity dispersion. We find that migration is more stochastic when the disk is self-gravitating or comprised of more massive bodies. Previous studies have found that if the planetesimal disk density is below a critical level, migration is "damped" and the migration rate decays exponentially, otherwise it is "forced" and the planet's migration rate could accelerate exponentially. Migration rates measured from our undamped simulations suggest that the migration rate saturates at a level proportional to disk density and subsequently is approximately power law in form with time.

  16. Experimental implementation of reverse time migration for nondestructive evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental implementation of reverse time migration for nondestructive evaluation applications Geophysics Group (EES-17), Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS D443, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 pylb@lanl.gov, tju@lanl.gov Abstract: Reverse time migration (RTM) is a commonly employed imaging technique

  17. R326 Dispatch Nuclear migration: Cortical anchors for cytoplasmic dynein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R326 Dispatch Nuclear migration: Cortical anchors for cytoplasmic dynein Kerry Bloom Nuclear body that rolls around at random inside the sack of a eukaryotic cell. Controlled nuclear movements they are required during budding. Nuclear migration in budding yeast was first proposed by Hartwell et al. [1], more

  18. Migration, rural development, poverty and food security: a comparative perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Migration, rural development, poverty and food security: a comparative perspective Thomas Lacroix rural underdevelopment, poverty and food insecurity in rural areas? The case studies provide mixed poverty, even for non-migrant households. In the countries benefiting from temporary migration schemes

  19. This event is sponsored by the Migration Research Unit, UCL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    (UCL) `Home building', return migration and the eighteenth-century East India Company family 1.00pm-day workshop 16th June 2014, UCLLONDON'S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY #12;Front cover photo: 1 A `family house', Buea for different groups of the same family. Photo credit: Ben Page Welcome to Migration and homes: a one

  20. Cloud Migration: A Case Study of Migrating an Enterprise IT System to IaaS Ali Khajeh-Hosseini David Greenwood Ian Sommerville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    Cloud Migration: A Case Study of Migrating an Enterprise IT System to IaaS Ali Khajeh the potential benefits and risks associated with the migration of an IT system in the oil & gas industry from for this system. These findings seem significant enough to call for a migration of the system to the cloud but our

  1. Type I Planet Migration in Nearly Laminar Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Li; S. H. Lubow; S. Li; D. N. C. Lin

    2008-12-02

    We describe 2D hydrodynamic simulations of the migration of low-mass planets ($\\leq 30 M_{\\oplus}$) in nearly laminar disks (viscosity parameter $\\alpha laminar disks. For $\\alpha \\ga 10^{-3}$, density feedback effects are washed out and Type I migration persists. The critical masses are in good agreement with the analytic model of Rafikov (2002). In addition, for $\\alpha \\la 10^{-4}$ steep density gradients produce a vortex instability, resulting in a small time-varying eccentricity in the planet's orbit and a slight outward migration. Migration in nearly laminar disks may be sufficiently slow to reconcile the timescales of migration theory with those of giant planet formation in the core accretion model.

  2. Umatilla River Fish Passage Operations Project : Annual Progress Report October 2007 - September 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronson, James P.; Loffink, Ken; Duke, Bill

    2008-12-31

    Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were enumerated at Threemile Dam from June 7, 2007 to August 11, 2008. A total of 3,133 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 1,487 adult, 1,067 jack, and 999 subjack fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha); 5,140 adult and 150 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,009 adult, 517 jack, and 128 subjack spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha) were counted. All fish were enumerated at the east bank facility. Of the fish counted, 1,442 summer steelhead and 88 adult and 84 jack spring Chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 1,497 summer steelhead; 609 adult, 1,018 jack and 979 subjack fall Chinook; 5,036 adult and 144 jack coho; and 1,117 adult, 386 jack and 125 subjack spring Chinook either released at, or allowed to volitionally migrate past, Threemile Dam. Also, 110 summer steelhead; 878 adult and 43 jack fall Chinook; and 560 adult and 28 jack spring Chinook were collected as broodstock for the Umatilla River hatchery program. In addition, there were 241 adult and 15 jack spring Chinook collected at Threemile Dam for outplanting in the South Fork Walla Walla River and Mill Cr, a tributary of the mainstem Walla Walla River. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at river mile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for out-migrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The canal was open for 158 days between February 11, 2008 and July 18, 2008. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 150 days and were trapped 6 days. There were also 2 days when fish were directed into and held in the canal forebay between the time the bypass was closed and the trap opened. An estimated 64 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland trapping facility. Approximately 25.8% of the fish transported were salmonids. In addition, one adult Pacific lamprey was trapped and released above the Westland ladder this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was opened on March 11, 2008 in conjunction with water deliveries and continued through the summer. West Extension Irrigation District (WEID) discontinued diverting live flow on June 24, 2008 but the bypass remained open throughout the project year. The juvenile trap was not operated this project year.

  3. Comparison of Circadian Changes in the Retinas of Migrating and Non-migrating Blackcaps, Sylvia atricapilla 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shockley, Ross

    2006-07-11

    1 INTRODUCTION The Blackcap, Sylvia atricapilla, resides in northern Europe and migrates south in mid- October for the winter. In early April they will fly back north, repeating the cycle. It is well known that the migratory patterns..., 1996), or migratory restlessness. The birds express their internal migratory drive by flapping their wings and jumping up and down on their perches, all while facing the direction in which they wish to fly (Bartell et al., 2005). This night...

  4. Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-08-29

    In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

  5. Internal migration in China and the United States: a comparative analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chi

    1995-01-01

    This thesis presents a two-level analysis of China's temporary migration. The first part examines the interprovincial migration of China from the perspective of ecological theory and compares it with the inter-state migration of the United States...

  6. Imagining migration: cyber-cafés, sex and clandestine departures in the Casamance, Senegal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venables, Emilie

    2009-01-01

    Studies of migration are usually about movement, but what about people who aspire to migrate but whose attempts to do so remain largely unsuccessful? The focus of this thesis is not migration per se, but people’s aspirations ...

  7. The Migration Industry: Brokering Mobility in the Mexico-U.S. Migratory System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez-Leon, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    Epic Story of the Great Migrations that Made the AmericanR. F. “The Commerce of Migration. ” Canadian Ethnic Studies/Metropolitan Migrants: The Migration of Urban Mexicans to

  8. Labor Migration From Mexico And Free Trade: Lessons From A Transnational Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alacron, Rafael

    1994-01-01

    global economy, and migration from Mexico should be includeda global economy. migration from Mexico should be part o fUnited States and Mexico regarding labor migration from the

  9. Mexican migration to the U.S : patterns and the role of remittances, networks and globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Jose Navarro

    2007-01-01

    Migrants Mexico Net Migration Mexico 0-4 yrs 5-8 yrs FigureInternational Migration and Business Formation in Mexico. ”What’s driving Mexico–US migration? A theoretical, empirical

  10. Pollicy Reforms and the Gender Dynamics of Rural Mexico-to-U.S. Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richter, Susan M.; Taylor, J. Edward

    2005-01-01

    is the focus of Mexico Migration Project (MMP) surveys (for female and male migration from rural Mexico to farm andfemale and male migration from rural Mexico to the U.S. it

  11. Mexico’s experience of migration and development 1990-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García Zamora, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    on development and migration in Mexico 4. Institutionalhave shown that migration between U.S.A and Mexico has had ato do with migration and development in Mexico, the pressure

  12. The Uncertain Connection: Free Trade and Mexico-U.S. Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Wayne A.; Martin, Philip L

    1993-01-01

    of Maquiladoras on Migration in Mexico." Working Papers, No.Mexico on United States-Mexico Migration. Working Paper No.between internal migration in Mexico and emigration from

  13. The New Meaning of the Border: U.S.-Mexico Migration Since 9/11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waslin, Michele Ph.D.

    2003-01-01

    Committee Hearing: U.S. Mexico Migration Discussions: Anof the Border: U.S. - Mexico Migration Since 9/11 By MicheleSINCE 9/11 U.S. -Mexico migration relations have always been

  14. # Mexico-U.S. Migration and Labor Unions: Obstacles to Building Cross-Border Solidarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Julie

    2003-01-01

    behind the U.S. - Mexico migration talks. ” The Pew Hispanicthe bilateral migration agenda, and Mexico’s reticence toReform (1998) “Migration Between Mexico and the United

  15. International Migration and Educational Assortative Mating in Mexico and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Kate; Mare, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    2005. “The Grass of Mexico: Migration and Union DissolutionFamily, and U.S. Migration in Mexico. Presented in thecommunity level of migration in Mexico, the odds of marrying

  16. Cell division and migration in a 'genotype' for neural networks (Cell division and migration in neural networks)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cangelosi, Angelo

    Cell division and migration in a 'genotype' for neural networks (Cell division and migration in neural networks) Angelo Cangelosi Domenico Parisi Stefano Nolfi Institute of Psychology - CNR 15, viale@gracco.irmkant.cnr.it email stefano@kant.irmkant.cnr.it In press in Network: computation in neural systems #12;1 Cell division

  17. Foreign Fishery Developments The Norwegian Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -EEC fisheries agreement, which prevented Norwegian purse seiners from fishing North Sea brisling during the peak,200 t of meal (up 0.6 percent) and 164,600 t of oil (down 9.1 per- cent). Arctic Cod Quotas Quotas for Arctic.3 Fish oil 79,400 180.5 107,300 241.4 Cod liver oil 12,700 63.1 10,900 51.3 Canned fish 14,100 233.8 15

  18. Handling Whiting Aboard Fishing Vessels JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handling Whiting Aboard Fishing Vessels JOSEPH J. L1CCIARDELLO Introduction The same fundamental principles for handling fresh fish in general aboard fishing vessels apply to whiting. There- fore, this article will review the factors which influence the quality of fish aboard fishing boats and will offer re

  19. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  20. Technologies for Evaluating Fish Passage Through Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report evaluated the feasibility of two types of technologies to observe fish and near neutrally buoyant drogues as they move through hydropower turbines.

  1. Microsoft Word - Fish Letter _2_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and municipal water supply. The system is also operated to protect the river's fish, including salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and bull trout listed as threatened or...

  2. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Sys- tem (AHTS) Program supports the research and...

  3. Decommissioning abandoned roads to protect fish

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decommissioning-abandoned-roads-to-protect-fish Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects...

  4. Coping with the crisis : migration and settlement decisions of Yucateco migrants to the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Georgia Lynne

    2010-01-01

    points as primary motivating factors for migration (Starkunderstanding of migration. The primary tenet of this theorymigration. Despite the promise of wages in factories, the wages in the primary

  5. The Effect of Labor Migration and Remittances on Children's Education Among Blacks in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yao; Treiman, Donald J.

    2007-01-01

    visits are primary reasons for White migration (Cross 2003;primary and secondary school enrollment (although not on attainment), we think the period between the migration

  6. Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    345 Lead Fishing Weights and Other Fishing Tackle in Selected Waterbirds J. CHRISTIAN FRANSON 1,240 individuals of 28 species of waterbirds were examined in the United States for ingested lead fishing weights. A combination of radiography and visual examination of stomachs was used to search for lead weights and blood

  7. Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhindsa, Rajinder

    Fish condition in introduced tilapias of Ugandan crater lakes in relation to deforestation and fishing pressure Jackson Efitre & Lauren J. Chapman & Debra J. Murie Received: 22 June 2007 /Accepted: 2 crater lakes in western Uganda. We asked whether fish condition differs among lakes characterized

  8. Trace metal concentration and fish size: Variation among fish species in a Mediterranean river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    Trace metal concentration and fish size: Variation among fish species in a Mediterranean river 29 April 2014 Accepted 12 May 2014 Keywords: Bioaccumulation Heavy metals Llobregat River Mediterranean Cyprinid fish a b s t r a c t Concentration of trace metals (Al, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb

  9. Type I planet migration in nearly laminar disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Lubow, S H; Lin, D

    2008-01-01

    We describe two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the migration of low-mass planets ({<=}30 M{sub {circle_plus}}) in nearly laminar disks (viscosity parameter {alpha} < 10{sup -3}) over timescales of several thousand orbit periods. We consider disk masses of 1, 2, and 5 times the minimum mass solar nebula, disk thickness parameters of H/r = 0.035 and 0.05, and a variety of {alpha} values and planet masses. Disk self-gravity is fully included. Previous analytic work has suggested that Type I planet migration can be halted in disks of sufficiently low turbulent viscosity, for {alpha} {approx} 10{sup -4}. The halting is due to a feedback effect of breaking density waves that results in a slight mass redistribution and consequently an increased outward torque contribution. The simulations confirm the existence of a critical mass (M{sub {alpha}} {approx} 10M{sub {circle_plus}}) beyond which migration halts in nearly laminar disks. For {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -3}, density feedback effects are washed out and Type I migration persists. The critical masses are in good agreement with the analytic model of Rafikov. In addition, for {alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -4} steep density gradients produce a vortex instability, resulting in a small time-varying eccentricity in the planet's orbit and a slight outward migration. Migration in nearly laminar disks may be sufficiently slow to reconcile the timescales of migration theory with those of giant planet formation in the core accretion model.

  10. Verification of runaway migration in a massive disk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shengtai

    2009-01-01

    Runaway migration of a proto-planet was first proposed and observed by Masset and Papaloizou (2003). The semi-major axis of the proto-planet varies by 50% over just a few tens of orbits when runaway migration happens. More recent work by D'Angelo et al. (2005) solved the same problem with locally refined grid and found that the migration rate is sharply reduced and no runaway occurs when the grid cells surrounding the planet are refined enough. To verify these two seemly contradictory results, we independently perform high-resolution simulations, solving the same problem as Masset and Papaloizou (2003), with and without self-gravity. We find that the migration rate is highly dependent on the softening used in the gravitational force between thd disk and planet. When a small softening is used in a 2D massive disk, the mass of the circumplanetary disk (CPD) increases with time with enough resolution in the CPD region. It acts as the mass is continually accreted to the CPD, which cannot be settled down until after thousands of orbits. If the planet is held on a fixed orbit long enough, the mass of CPD will become so large that the condition for the runaway migration derived in Masset (2008) will not be satisfied, and hence the runaway migration will not be triggered. However, when a large softening is used, the mass of the CPD will begin to decrease after the initial increase stage. Our numerical results with and without disk-gravity confirm that the runaway migration indeed exists when the mass deficit is larger than the total mass of the planet and CPD. Our simulations results also show that the torque from the co-orbital region, in particular the planet's Hill sphere, is the main contributor to the runaway migration, and the CPD which is lagged behind by the planet becomes so asymmetric that it accelerates the migration.

  11. When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

  12. Exotic Earths: Forming Habitable Worlds with Giant Planet Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2006-09-08

    Close-in giant planets (e.g. ``Hot Jupiters'') are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth mass planets also form interior to the migrating Jovian planet, analogous to recently-discovered ``Hot Earths''. Very water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the Habitable Zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets.

  13. Control of charge migration in molecules by ultrashort laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolay V. Golubev; Alexander I. Kuleff

    2015-02-19

    Due to electronic many-body effects, the ionization of a molecule can trigger ultrafast electron dynamics appearing as a migration of the created hole charge throughout the system. Here we propose a scheme for control of the charge migration dynamics with a single ultrashort laser pulse. We demonstrate by fully ab initio calculations on a molecule containing a chromophore and an amine moieties that simple pulses can be used for stopping the charge-migration oscillations and localizing the charge on the desired site of the system. We argue that this control may be used to predetermine the follow-up nuclear rearrangement and thus the molecular reactivity.

  14. Detection of unusual fish trajectories from underwater videos 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beyan, Çigdem

    2015-06-29

    Fish behaviour analysis is a fundamental research area in marine ecology as it is helpful for detecting environmental changes by observing unusual fish patterns or new fish behaviours. The traditional way of analysing ...

  15. Fishing for lobsters indirectly increases epidemics in sea urchins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lafferty, K D

    2004-01-01

    M. Harmelin-Vivien. 1998. Fishing, trophic cascades, and theSociety of America FISHING FOR LOBSTERS INDIRECTLY INCREASESpersist (Sala et al. 1998). Fishing on the predators of sea

  16. Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terzopoulos, Demetri

    1 Artificial Fishes: Autonomous Locomotion, Perception, Behavior, and Learning in a Simulated inhabited by realistic artificial fishes. Our algorithms emulate not only the appearance, movement model each animal holistically. An artificial fish is an autonomous agent situated in a simulated

  17. Flirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesus Revolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Julianne

    2014-01-01

    1971. Raine, Susan. " Flirty Fishing in the Children of God:PhD student Flirty Fishing – Gender Ethics and the Jesusthe movement known as “flirty fishing. ” Who Were the Jesus

  18. The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale The Molecular Ingenuity of a Unique Fish Scale Print Monday, 25 November 2013 12:06 Arapaima gigas, a freshwater fish found in the...

  19. 2010 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tables 27 Table 1A: Total Cost of BPA Fish & Wildlife Actions 29 Table 1B: Cumulative Expenditures 1978 and habitat, of the Columbia River Basin that have been affected by hydroelectric development. This program fish and wildlife affected by hydropower dams in the Columbia River Basin. The Power Act requires

  20. MFR PAPER 1179 Offshore Headboat Fishing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1179 Offshore Headboat Fishing in North Carolina and South Carolina GENE R. HUNTSMAN. Bill Gulf Stream /I Mustang /I Comanche J. J. Operated in Fishing area t972 1973 OffShore X OUshore X X Ollshore X X Offshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X X Inshore X Inshore X X

  1. DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECTING THE MOVEMENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY Marine Biological Laboratory APR 21 1953 WOODS HOLE, Albert M. Day, Director DIRECTING THE MOVH-IENT OF FISH WITH ELECTRICITY by Alberton L. McLain Fishery of an electrical leading device 21 Literature cited. ..,...,..,..........·· 2k ILLUSTRATIONS Figure Page 1. Diagram

  2. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  3. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  4. In the following questions, please tell us about your fishing activity and experience. "Shore" fishing can include fishing from a beach, bank, jetty, pier, dock, bridge, break-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In the following questions, please tell us about your fishing activity and experience. "Shore" fishing can include fishing from a beach, bank, jetty, pier, dock, bridge, break- water, causeway person to go fishing. A "charterboat" is a boat which a group of people have paid a flat fee for use

  5. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  6. Graphene Layer Growth: Collision of Migrating Five-MemberRings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitesides, Russell; Kollias, Alexander C.; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

    2005-12-02

    A reaction pathway is explored in which two cyclopenta groups combine on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. The process is initiated by H addition to a five-membered ring, followed by opening of that ring and the formation of a six-membered ring adjacent to another five-membered ring. The elementary steps of the migration pathway are analyzed using density functional theory to examine the region of the potential energy surface associated with the pathway. The calculations are performed on a substrate modeled by the zigzag edge of tetracene. Based on the obtained energetics, the dynamics of the system are analyzed by solving the energy transfer master equations. The results indicate energetic and reaction-rate similarity between the cyclopenta combination and migration reactions. Also examined in the present study are desorption rates of migrating cyclopenta rings which are found to be comparable to cyclopenta ring migration.

  7. Campesino Foodways in the Context of Migration and Remittances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Esperanza

    2011-01-01

    migration and remittance-receiving and remittance- sending, in-depthdepth details about changes in food patterns in the context of the family migrationmigration times to more current times. During phase II, in-depth

  8. Planet heating prevents inward migration of planetary cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benítez-Llambay, Pablo; Koenigsberger, Gloria; Szulágyi, Judit

    2015-01-01

    Planetary systems are born in the disks of gas, dust and rocky fragments that surround newly formed stars. Solid content assembles into ever-larger rocky fragments that eventually become planetary embryos. These then continue their growth by accreting leftover material in the disc. Concurrently, tidal effects in the disc cause a radial drift in the embryo orbits, a process known as migration. Fast inward migration is predicted by theory for embryos smaller than three to five Earth masses. With only inward migration, these embryos can only rarely become giant planets located at Earth's distance from the Sun and beyond, in contrast with observations. Here we report that asymmetries in the temperature rise associated with accreting infalling material produce a force (which gives rise to an effect that we call "heating torque") that counteracts inward migration. This provides a channel for the formation of giant planets and also explains the strong planet-metallicity correlation found between the incidence of gia...

  9. Wandering Neuronal Migration in the Postnatal Vertebrate Forebrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Benjamin B.

    Most non-mammalian vertebrate species add new neurons to existing brain circuits throughout life, a process thought to be essential for tissue maintenance, repair, and learning. How these new neurons migrate through the ...

  10. Interprovincial Migration and the Stringency of Energy Policy in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaohu

    2014-12-02

    Interprovincial migration flows involve substantial relocation of people and productive activity, with implications for regional energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. In China, these flows are not explicitly considered ...

  11. Effects of interstitial flow on tumor cell migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polacheck, William J. (William Joseph)

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial flow is the convective transport of fluid through tissue extracellular matrix. This creeping fluid flow has been shown to affect the morphology and migration of cells such as fibroblasts, cancer cells, endothelial ...

  12. Quantifying stretching and rearrangement in epithelial sheet migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Rachel M.

    Although understanding the collective migration of cells, such as that seen in epithelial sheets, is essential for understanding diseases such as metastatic cancer, this motion is not yet as well characterized as individual ...

  13. Mechanotransduction of fluid stresses governs 3D cell migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polacheck, William J.

    Solid tumors are characterized by high interstitial fluid pressure, which drives fluid efflux from the tumor core. Tumor-associated interstitial flow (IF) at a rate of ?3 µm/s has been shown to induce cell migration in the ...

  14. Subpage migration and replication in CC-NUMA multiprocessors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadaanayakinahalu, Sudhindra

    1999-01-01

    the benefits of dynamic memory management schemes for large memory page sizes. This thesis proposes two new schemes, subpart migration/replication and partial page invalidation for better dynamic memory management. New hardware designs are suggested...

  15. WORKING PAPER N 2009 -41 Migration and capital accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , remittances, capital accumulation, rural poverty PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES LABORATOIRE D. Key Words: Migration; Remittances; Capital Accumulation; Rural Poverty. Paris School of Economics (PSE) and Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL Europe), 48 Boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris, France. chiodi

  16. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    3/29/10. Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community ProfileFort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile Henning.Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile PSMFC.

  17. Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDole, Tracey Shannon

    2012-01-01

    versus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems Aversus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems bywas to investigate the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

  18. Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jackson National Fish Hatchery Aquaculture Low Temperature...

  19. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center Shepherdstown, West Virginia, is the home of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Conservation...

  20. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural...

  1. California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name California Desert Fish Farm Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal...

  2. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume...

  3. Impacts of past glaciation events on contemporary fish assemblages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyron, Mark

    were characterized by Cyprinidae and Catostomidae assemblages with high abundances of tolerant fishes by Cyprinidae, Catostomidae, Centrarchidae and Percidae families with increased abundances of intolerant fishes

  4. Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife...

  5. Lasers, fish ears and environmental change | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lasers, fish ears and environmental change ORNL and TVA team up to study Kingston spill restoration efforts Researchers analyze fish otoliths using a laser to understand...

  6. Fast migration of low-mass planets in radiative discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierens, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Low-mass planets are known to undergo Type I migration and this process must have played a key role during the evolution of planetary systems. Analytical formulae for the disc torque have been derived assuming that the planet evolves on a fixed circular orbit. However, recent work has shown that in isothermal discs, a migrating protoplanet may also experience dynamical corotation torques that scale with the planet drift rate. The aim of this study is to examine whether dynamical corotation torques can also affect the migration of low-mass planets in non-isothermal discs. We performed 2D radiative hydrodynamical simulations to examine the orbital evolution outcome of migrating protoplanets as a function of disc mass. We find that a protoplanet can enter a fast migration regime when it migrates in the direction set by the entropy-related horseshoe drag and when the Toomre stability parameter is less than a threshold value below which the horseshoe region contracts into a tadpole-like region. In that case, an un...

  7. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunseok; Park, Jong In; Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min; Son, Kwang-Jae; Bang, Young-bong; Choy, Young Bin E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr; Ye, Sung-Joon E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. Methods: In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. Results: The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. Conclusions: The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  8. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in orthorhombic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the ray-based Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple with a differently rotated tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single

  9. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in 3-D models: Comparison of triclinic anisotropy with simpler the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to the calculation of migrated sections in 3-D simple anisotropic. We test Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with different types of anisotropy

  10. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without rotation of the tensor the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated images in simple anisotropic homogeneous velocity of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to correct single

  11. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in triclinic velocity models with differently rotated tensors use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic rotations of the tensor of elastic moduli. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to single- layer

  12. Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Kirchhoff prestack depth migration in velocity models with and without gradients: Comparison@seis.karlov.mff.cuni.cz Summary We use the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to calculate migrated sections in simple anisotropic is isotropic and homogeneous. We apply the Kirchhoff prestack depth migration to both heterogeneous

  13. 1,2-Thio Group Migration in Rh(II) Carbene Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianbo

    Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry of these compounds gave 1,2-thio group migration products. No 1,2-hydride or 1,2- aryl migration products were in certain cases. Among the 1,2-migration reac- tions, the 1,2-hydride migration is generally predomi- nant

  14. Back-Migration for MPI Jobs in HPC Environments , Frank Mueller1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Frank

    Back-Migration for MPI Jobs in HPC Environments Chao Wang1 , Frank Mueller1 , Christian Engelmann2 migration of MPI tasks to a spare nodes have been considered by us in prior work. However, a migrated task MPI tasks on a node if not enough spare nodes are available. This work contributes back migration

  15. GUI Migration across Heterogeneous Java Profiles Candy Wong, Hao-hua Chu, Masaji Katagiri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    GUI Migration across Heterogeneous Java Profiles Candy Wong, Hao-hua Chu, Masaji Katagiri Do-platform graphical user interface (GUI) development tools do not support migrate-able GUIs as they do not consider that can be migrated across heterogeneous Java profiles. In this paper, we will focus on two major problems

  16. Spatial migration of earthquakes within seismic clusters in Southern California: Evidence for fluid diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Rachel E.

    Spatial migration of earthquakes within seismic clusters in Southern California: Evidence for fluid to migrate slowly with time, which may reflect event triggering due to slow fault slip or fluid flow. We event migration within 69 previously observed seismicity bursts. We obtain best-fitting migration

  17. The migration story of a Kyrgyz family father -a mixed media approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    �öltekin, Arzu

    1 The migration story of a Kyrgyz family father - a mixed media approach Patrizia Russo (1), Arzu to migration, for example Harvey (1990, 1993) argues that power shapes who migrates where, and, in particular, which rung of a migration hierarchy any particular worker has access to. In this project we want

  18. Live Migration of Direct-Access Asim Kadav and Michael M. Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swift, Michael

    12/17/2008 1 Live Migration of Direct-Access Devices Asim Kadav and Michael M. Swift University of Wisconsin - Madison Live Migration · Migrating VM across different hosts without noticeable downtime · Uses of Live Migration ­ Reducing energy consumption by hardware consolidation ­ Perform non

  19. WALLDYN Simulations of Global Impurity Migration and Fuel Retention in JET and Extrapolations to ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WALLDYN Simulations of Global Impurity Migration and Fuel Retention in JET and Extrapolations to ITER

  20. Food Habits of Fall Migrating Least Sandpipers in the Tennessee River Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Wirwa Forestry Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar Series Introduction Transcontinental Migrations

  1. Radioactive contamination of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl exposed to Hanford effluents: Annual summaries, 1945--1972

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanf, R.W.; Dirkes, R.L.; Duncan, J.P.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project (HEDR) is to estimate the potential radiation doses received by people living within the sphere of influence of the Hanford Site. A potential critical pathway for human radiation exposure is through the consumption of waterfowl that frequent onsite waste-water ponds or through eating of fish, shellfish, and waterfowl that reside in/on the Columbia River and its tributaries downstream of the reactors. This document summarizes information on fish, shellfish, and waterfowl radiation contamination for samples collected by Hanford monitoring personnel and offsite agencies for the period 1945 to 1972. Specific information includes the types of organisms sampled, the kinds of tissues and organs analyzed, the sampling locations, and the radionuclides reported. Some tissue concentrations are also included. We anticipate that these yearly summaries will be helpful to individuals and organizations interested in evaluating aquatic pathway information for locations impacted by Hanford operations and will be useful for planning the direction of future HEDR studies.

  2. Augmented Fish Health Monitoring, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michak, Patty

    1990-05-01

    Since 1986 Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF) has participated in the Columbia Basin Augmented Fish Health Monitoring Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This interagency project was developed to provide a standardized level of fish health information from all Agencies rearing fish in the Columbia Basin. Agencies involved in the project are: WDF, Washington Department of Wildlife, Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Idaho Fish and Game, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. WDF has actively participated in this project, and completed its third year of fish health monitoring, data collection and pathogen inspection during 1989. This report will present data collected from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1989 and will compare sampling results from screening at spawning for viral pathogens and bacterial kidney disease (BKD), and evaluation of causes of pre-spawning loss. The juvenile analysis will include pre-release examination results, mid-term rearing exam results and evaluation of the Organosomatic Analysis completed on stocks. 2 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. d upstream downstream disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    microphone Cm (s) C e (s) Controller (a) m Pmd (s) d Cm (s) Pmu (s) P ed (s) u P eu (s) e C e (s) (b) Figure) #12; y 2 =m Pmd (s) w 1 =d w 2 D 2 C m (s) Pmu (s) z 2 P ed (s) D 1 W 2 W 3 z 3 D 3 w 3 1 0 0005 1 0

  4. 2,3-Migration in Rh(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of -Trifluoroacetamido

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianbo

    2,3-Migration in Rh(II)-Catalyzed Reactions of -Trifluoroacetamido r-Diazocarbonyl Compounds Feng(II)-catalyzed reactions of these diazo compounds gave 2,3-migration products in high yields. 1,2-Migration is one,2-migration reactions, the 1,2-hydride migration is generally predominant, but 1,2-alkyl, 1,2-aryl, 1,2-thio

  5. Cumulative watershed effects (CWEs) result from the overlapping effects of management activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    activities in time or space. The routing and downstream accumulation of sediment from forest management range from the short-term variability of sediment transport rates to the variability in annual sediment data indicated that 13-95% of the variation in sediment transport rates could be explained by discharge

  6. Simulating dam removal with a 1D hydraulic model: Accuracy and techniques for reservoir erosion and downstream deposition at the Chiloquin Dam removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Simulating dam removal with a 1D hydraulic model: Accuracy and techniques for reservoir erosion and downstream deposition at the Chiloquin Dam removal Desiree Tullos1 , Matt Cox1 , Cara Walter1 1 Department are often used to reduce uncertainty regarding the outcomes of dam removal, though the accuracy

  7. ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA By E. A. Tulian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA .", By E. A. Tulian Chief ofthe Section ofFish Culture, Ministry of Agriculture, Argentina Paper presented before the Fourth International Fishery #12;ACCLIMATIZATION OF AMERICAN FISHES IN ARGENTINA. ~ By E. A. TULIAN, Chief of the Section of Fish

  8. Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortenin.g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortenin.g UNITED STATES 'DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH FISHERIES, H. E. Crowther, Director Use of Fish Oils in Margarine and Shortening By J. HANNEWIJK Unilever Research Laboratory Vlaardingen, The Netherlands Chapter 18 reprinted from the book, "Fish Oils ," M. E

  9. FINDINGS IN BRIEF THEME: Water, aquaculture and fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINDINGS IN BRIEF THEME: Water, aquaculture and fish Photo:Jan-ErikJohansson,SLU Sustainable feed for farmed fish Farmed predatory fish (salmon, cod, etc.) need large quantities of feed, which at pre- sent consists of wildcaught marine fish spe- cies that are endangered to varying degrees. SLU researchers have

  10. The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The "FISH" Quad Hand Sensor Physics and Media Group MIT Media Laboratory 20 Ames Street E15 OF CONTENTS ----------------- 1. ASCII SERIAL FISH PROTOCAL 2. HOW TO MAKE FISH ANTENNA 3. CALIBRATION SOFTWARE INSTALLATION 4. HOW TO CALIBRATE A FISH 5. COMPONENT PLACEMENT 6. SCHEMATICS 7. PARTS LIST HOW

  11. MFR PAPER 1176 An Automated Unmanned Fishing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1176 An Automated Unmanned Fishing System to Harvest Coastal Pelagic Fish WILBER R. SEIDEL and THOMAS M. VANSELOUS ABSTRACT-Coastal pelagic fish resources of the Gulf of Mexico are basi- cally unutilized with the exception of menhaden, which are harvested exten- sively. The other fishes

  12. Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review by Mary Hayes Wagner UNITED 5T ATE5 DEPART MENT.A OF l'O~I,a;RCI!,L Fr RERIES, Donald L. 'McKernan, Director · Shark Fishing Gear: A historical review fishing References .................... . iii Page 1 2 2 5 6 6 8 10 12 14 #12;Shark Fishing Gear

  13. Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Review article Molecular biology of fish viruses: a review J Bernard, M Brémont* INRA, laboratoire aspects in the fish virus studies. Although more than 50 different fish virus have been isolated family, the fish lym- phocystis disease virus (FLDV) is the most studied. Retroviridae have been recently

  14. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  15. United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fished. Port au Port Bay, Newfound- land; Northumberland Strait, Prince Edward Island; the Digby

  16. Fish and Wildlife Toxicology Lecture Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    ; methods used to assess hazards contaminants pose to fish and wildlife; sublethal and indirect effects" Session 2: Laboratory Toxicity Tests/ "Anatomy of an Oil Spill" Session 3: Factors Governing Test Results

  17. Potomac River Fish Kills Study Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    /oomycete Raised clear, mucoid Fish Kills Potomac Drainage #12;4 Bacteria No consistent findings - LMBV and A lamellar fusion and inflammation Epithelial lifting, hypertrophy and Hyperplasia leading to fusion, mucous

  18. Fish Oil Industry in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been operating for many years experience has made these operations the more advanced industrial- ly oil, obtained generally by centrifugation of the press liquor in the processing of fish meal, amounted

  19. Interannual-to-Decadal Changes in Phytoplankton Phenology, Fish Spawning Habitat,and Larval Fish Phenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asch, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    and fishes with an offshore distribution. This spatialwere characterized by an offshore, epipelagic distribution,in the abundance of offshore species, such as ocean sunfish,

  20. Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-03-01

    In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

  1. EFFECTS OF MENHADEN FISHING UPON THE SUPPLY OF MENHADEN AND OF THE FISHES THAT PREY UPON THEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF MENHADEN FISHING UPON THE SUPPLY OF MENHADEN AND OF THE FISHES THAT PREY UPON THEM of the menhaden fishery upon predatory fishes .. __ - n - - - - - - - - - n - - _ _ - u - - u n u u _ 275 Conclusion ~ ------------------------______ 277 270 #12;EFFECTS OF MENHADEN FISHING UPON THE SUPPLY

  2. 10.1177/0270467603259787ARTICLEBULLETIN OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY / October 2003Roe / FISHING FOR IDENTITY Fishing for Identity: Mercury Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    / FISHING FOR IDENTITY Fishing for Identity: Mercury Contamination and Fish Consumption Among Indigenous Groups in the United States Amy Roe University of Delaware Mercury contamination of local fish stocks has disproportionately impacted by the risks of mercury contamination of their food source. Some of these groups

  3. Orbital migration and the period distribution of exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Del Popolo

    2005-08-28

    We use the model for the migration of planets introduced in Del Popolo, Yesilyurt & Ercan (2003) to calculate the observed mass and semimajor axis distribution of extra-solar planets. The assumption that the surface density in planetesimals is proportional to that of gas is relaxed, and in order to describe disc evolution we use a method which, using a series of simplifying assumptions, is able to simultaneously follow the evolution of gas and solid particles for up to $10^7 {\\rm yr}$. The distribution of planetesimals obtained after $10^7 {\\rm yr}$ is used to study the migration rate of a giant planet through the model of this paper. The disk and migration models are used to calculate the distribution of planets as function of mass and semimajor axis. The results show that the model can give a reasonable prediction of planets' semi-major axes and mass distribution. In particular there is a pile-up of planets at $a \\simeq 0.05$ AU, a minimum near 0.3 AU, indicating a paucity of planets at that distance, and a rise for semi-major axes larger than 0.3 AU, out to 3 AU. The semi-major axis distribution shows that the more massive planets (typically, masses larger than $4 M_{\\rm J}$) form preferentially in the outer regions and do not migrate much. Intermediate-mass objects migrate more easily whatever the distance they form, and that the lighter planets (masses from sub-Saturnian to Jovian) migrate easily.

  4. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunz, H.R.; Guthrie, R.J.; Katz, M.

    1987-03-17

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate. 5 figs.

  5. Electrolytic cell stack with molten electrolyte migration control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunz, H. Russell (Vernon, CT); Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT); Katz, Murray (Newington, CT)

    1988-08-02

    An electrolytic cell stack includes inactive electrolyte reservoirs at the upper and lower end portions thereof. The reservoirs are separated from the stack of the complete cells by impermeable, electrically conductive separators. Reservoirs at the negative end are initially low in electrolyte and the reservoirs at the positive end are high in electrolyte fill. During stack operation electrolyte migration from the positive to the negative end will be offset by the inactive reservoir capacity. In combination with the inactive reservoirs, a sealing member of high porosity and low electrolyte retention is employed to limit the electrolyte migration rate.

  6. Continuous Time Random Walk and Migration Proliferation Dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iomin

    2015-04-03

    A theory of fractional kinetics of glial cancer cells is presented. A role of the migration-proliferation dichotomy in the fractional cancer cell dynamics in the outer-invasive zone is discussed an explained in the framework of a continuous time random walk. The main suggested model is based on a construction of a 3D comb model, where the migration-proliferation dichotomy becomes naturally apparent and the outer-invasive zone of glioma cancer is considered as a fractal composite with a fractal dimension $\\frD<3$.

  7. A fish is too vAluAble to cAtch only once!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    A fish is too vAluAble to cAtch only once! Florida is the "Fishing Capital of the World," largely saltwater fish when we catch them to help maintain fish populations, and more and more anglers fishing experiences. For more information on catch-and-release fishing, proper fish handling techniques

  8. In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Limburg, Karin E.; Walther, Benjamin D.; Lu, Zunli; Jackman, George; Mohan, John; Walther, Yvonne; Nissling, Anders; Weber, Peter K.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2015-01-01

    Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely withmore »Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances.« less

  9. In search of the dead zone: Use of otoliths for tracking fish exposure to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limburg, Karin E.; Walther, Benjamin D.; Lu, Zunli; Jackman, George; Mohan, John; Walther, Yvonne; Nissling, Anders; Weber, Peter K.; Schmitt, Axel K.

    2015-01-01

    Otolith chemistry is often useful for tracking provenance of fishes, as well as examining migration histories. Whereas elements such as strontium and barium correlate well with salinity and temperature, experiments that examine manganese uptake as a function of these parameters have found no such correlation. Instead, dissolved manganese is available as a redox product, and as such, is indicative of low-oxygen conditions. Here we present evidence for that mechanism in a range of habitats from marine to freshwater, across species, and also present ancillary proxies that support the mechanism as well. For example, iodine is redox-sensitive and varies inversely with Mn; and sulfur stable isotope ratios provide evidence of anoxic sulfate reduction in some circumstances.

  10. RESIDENT FISH SECTION 10 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 10-1 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Hydroelectric projects have created a number of problems for resident fish. In the natural state, the Columbia, keeping gravel spawning beds clean. But hydroelectric projects slowed and decreased the flow, allowing is a species critically affected by hydroelectric development. Biologically an anadromous fish, the white

  11. IN SITU EXPERIMENTS WITH COASTAL PELAGIC FISHES TO ESTABLISH DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ELECTRICAL FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN SITU EXPERIMENTS WITH COASTAL PELAGIC FISHES TO ESTABLISH DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ELECTRICAL FISH of a scale electrical harvesting system were conducted off Panama City, Fla. with both captured and wild- tional Marine Fisheries Service has been engaged in the design and development of an electrical

  12. The effects of migrant remittances on population–environment dynamics in migrant origin areas: international migration, fertility, and consumption in highland Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Jason; Lopez-Carr, David

    2010-01-01

    family aintenance, and Mexico-US migration. Demographic2009). Compared with Mexico, migration between Guatemala andof migration on infant survival in Mexico. Demography, 36(

  13. Where the Land Meets The Sea: Integrated Sustainable Fisheries Development and Artisanal Fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Squires, Dale; Grafton, R. Quentin

    1998-01-01

    Production Behavior of Fishing Firms in Selected Fisheriesfor Combating Cyanide Fishing in Southeast Asia and Beyond.Economics of Aquaculture, Sea Fishing and Coastal Resource

  14. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    G. 1969. The Commercial Fishing Industry in Humboldt County,13030/kt1g5001fm/. Eureka Fishing Community Profile Monroe,Stevens Act Provisions; Fishing Capacity Reduction Program;

  15. Fishing the line near marine reserves in single and multispecies fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellner, Julie B; Tetreault, Irene; Gaines, Steven D; Nisbet, Roger M

    2007-01-01

    14:129–137. June 2007 FISHING THE LINE NEAR MARINE RESERVESEcological Society of America FISHING THE LINE NEAR MARINEregulated by ?shing. Fishing has two components: total ?

  16. Fishing Revenue, Productivity and Product Choice in the Alaskan Pollock Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Catherine J.; O. Torres, Marcelo; Felthoven, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    10.1007/s10640-009-9295-3 Fishing Revenue, Productivity andand Hannesson (2002). Fishing Revenue, Productivity andof price signals observed. Fishing Revenue, Productivity and

  17. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Project Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    California’s North Coast Fishing Communities HistoricalCalifornia’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historicalprovided by North Coast fishing community members, including

  18. Next-Generation Sensor Fish to Provide Data That Will Help Protect...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has redesigned the Sensor Fish, a small device deployed to study the conditions faced by fish swimming through hydropower installations. Danger to fish is a major concern when...

  19. Coordination of Contractility, Adhesion and Flow in Migrating Physarum Amoebae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guy, Bob

    by contracting and pushing-off the surrounding environment. This versatility has also spurred the exploratory, substrate adhesion and cytoplasmic flow in migrating amoebae of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum network. This flow is driven by pressure gradients created by contraction of the actomyosin network within

  20. HETEROGENEOUS PROCESS MIGRATION SCALABLE NETWORK OF WORKSTATIONS (SNOW)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xian-He

    HETEROGENEOUS PROCESS MIGRATION for SCALABLE NETWORK OF WORKSTATIONS (SNOW) Xian-He Sun Department of Computer Science Louisiana State University sun@bit.csc.lsu.edu URL: http://www.csc.lsu.edu/ scs/SNOW/ Nov and restoration mechanism The SNOW/MpPVM Software Environment Components and Implementation Issues Experimental

  1. Migration of Applications and Information to Data Center Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    Migration of Applications and Information to Data Center Services Information Technology Office administers two data centers that serve the University's application hosting and information protection needs. With the exception of a very few technical systems, all applications within the data centers are owned by schools

  2. Greening the Cloud Using Renewable-Energy-Aware Service Migration*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 Greening the Cloud Using Renewable-Energy-Aware Service Migration* Uttam Mandal, M. Farhan Habib this energy consumption, and hence, carbon footprint and green house gas emission of cloud computing, is contributing to increased energy consumption, and hence, carbon footprint and green house gas emission

  3. The migration of gas giant planets in gravitationally unstable discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Planets form in the discs of gas and dust that surround young stars. It is not known whether gas giant planets on wide orbits form the same way as Jupiter or by fragmentation of gravitationally unstable discs. Here we show that a giant planet, which has formed in the outer regions of a protostellar disc, initially migrates fast towards the central star (migration timescale ~10,000 yr) while accreting gas from the disc. However, in contrast with previous studies, we find that the planet eventually opens up a gap in the disc and the migration is essentially halted. At the same time, accretion-powered radiative feedback from the planet, significantly limits its mass growth, keeping it within the planetary mass regime (i.e. below the deuterium burning limit) at least for the initial stages of disc evolution. Giant planets may therefore be able to survive on wide orbits despite their initial fast inward migration, shaping the environment in which terrestrial planets that may harbour life form.

  4. Migration Chronicles: Reporting on the Paradoxes of Migrant Visibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    in the history of migration from Mexico to the U.S. Themigration experience, awarded prizes to authors living in both the U.S. and Mexicomigration as it relates to the village of Cherán, a traditional sending community in the mountains of western Mexico.

  5. Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Outlook export contacts and groups Migrate Outlook Contacts to gmail 1. In Outlook 2007 on the File menu, click Import and Export. 1a. For Outlook 2010 on the File menu, click Open, then Import 2. Click Export to a file, and then click Next. #12;3. Click Comma Separated Values (Windows), and then click Next

  6. A hydrograph-based prediction of meander migration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    2006-08-16

    Meander migration is a process in which water flow erodes soil on one bank and deposits it on the opposite bank creating a gradual shift of the bank line over time. For bridges crossing such a river, the soil foundation of the abutments may...

  7. SONIC EQUIPMENT FOR TRACKING INDIVIDUAL FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The equipment can be used in varied hydraulic conditions and in fresh or salt water to track the movements of individual adult salmon in relation to Columbia River dams. Each dam on the Columbia River presents a chance for delay in migration with injurious consequences if the delay is prolonged. Since new dams are under

  8. Advanced Sensor Fish Device for ImprovedTurbine Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.

    2009-09-14

    Juvenile salmon (smolts) passing through hydroelectric turbines are subjected to environmental conditions that can potentially kill or injure them. Many turbines are reaching the end of their operational life expectancies and will be replaced with new turbines that incorporate advanced “fish friendly” designs devised to prevent injury and death to fish. To design a fish friendly turbine, it is first necessary to define the current conditions fish encounter. One such device used by biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was the sensor fish device to collect data that measures the forces fish experience during passage through hydroelectric projects.

  9. Rhamm-/- mice are defective in skin wound repair due to aberrant ERK1,2 signaling in fibroblast migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolg, Cornelia; Hamilton, Sara R.; Kooshesh, Pari; McCarthy, James B.; Bissell, Mina J.; Turley, Eva A.

    2006-01-01

    gel (Fig. 5B). Migration of primary Rh-/- dermal fibroblastsRhamm reduces migration and invasion of primary fibroblasts.showing the migration and invasion of primary Wt and Rh-/-

  10. Rhamm-/- mice are defective in skin wound repair due to aberrant ERK1,2 signaling in fibroblast migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    gel (Fig. 5B). Migration of primary Rh-/- dermal fibroblastsRhamm Reduces Migration and Invasion of Wt and Rh-/- PrimaryRhamm Reduces Migration and Invasion of Wt and Rh-/- Primary

  11. High Glucose Inhibits the AMPK-AKT2-ATF-2-MMP2 Pathway and Endothelial Cell Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lemar Irvin

    2013-01-01

    primary component of neovascularization is endothelial cell (EC) migrationPrimary prevention of the vascular complications of HG, ie, impaired EC migrationEC migration. In the capillary vasculature the primary ECM

  12. Eastward Migration or Marshward Dispersal: Exercising Survey Data to Elicit an Understanding of Seasonal Movement of Delta Smelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Dennis Daniel; Hamilton, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Drake V. 2007. What is migration? BioScience 57:113–121.JC. 2007. Regulation of migration. BioScience 57:135–154.POD.pdf Lack D. 1968. Bird migration and natural selection.

  13. International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiquiar, Daniel; Hanson, Gordon H.

    2002-01-01

    Rural Economy in Migration from Western Mexico: 1965-1994. ”in the states of Mexico where migration to the United StatesU.S. migration may raise wage dispersion in Mexico. Combined

  14. Development and application of chemical tools for investigating dynamic processes in cell migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Brenda Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration is a dynamic process essential for many fundamental physiological functions, including wound repair and the immune response. Migration relies on precisely orchestrated events that are regulated in a spatially ...

  15. EARLY HISTORY AND SEAWARD MIGRATION OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA AND SACRAMENTO RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EARLY HISTORY AND SEAWARD MIGRATION OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA AND SACRAMENTO RIVERS ,;f. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 History of the investigation. .. ...... .. . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . 72 2 #12;EARLY HISTORY AND SEAWARD MIGRATION OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA AND SACRAMENTO RIVERS

  16. Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanchani, Jitesh

    1994-01-01

    to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Detailed petrographic analysis was undertaken to study the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. The important components...

  17. Physiological properties and factors affecting migration of neural precursor cells in the adult olfactory bulb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darcy, Daniel Paul

    2007-01-01

    primary hypothesis that AMPAR-mediated inhibition of migrationprimary mediator between AMPARs and the reduction of NPC migration.Migration by Ca 2+ - permeable AMPA Receptors. ” The dissertation author is the primary

  18. Modeling active electrolocation in weakly electric fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib Ammari; Thomas Boulier; Josselin Garnier

    2013-03-06

    In this paper, we provide a mathematical model for the electrolocation in weakly electric fishes. We first investigate the forward complex conductivity problem and derive the approximate boundary conditions on the skin of the fish. Then we provide a dipole approximation for small targets away from the fish. Based on this approximation, we obtain a non-iterative location search algorithm using multi-frequency measurements. We present numerical experiments to illustrate the performance and the stability of the proposed multi-frequency location search algorithm. Finally, in the case of disk- and ellipse-shaped targets, we provide a method to reconstruct separately the conductivity, the permittivity, and the size of the targets from multi-frequency measurements.

  19. The Unequal Burdens of Repatriation: A Gendered Analysis of the Transnational Migration of Mongolia's Kazakh Population 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Cynthia; Barcus, Holly R.

    2015-01-01

    primary driver for what they refer to as the “age of migration,” in which international migration is increasingly affecting all countries of the world as either sending or receiving countries. The interdisciplinary liter- ature on international migration... 2012). On a practical level, transnational migration means that Kazakh women are more likely than men to be separated from primary links in their social networks. Women rely on these links, for example, for things like small loans, house- hold labor...

  20. The pendulum dilemma of fish orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HongSheng Zhao

    1999-06-15

    The shape of a galaxy is constrained both by mechanisms of formation (dissipational vs. dissipationless) and by the available orbit families (the shape and amount of regular and stochastic orbits). It is shown that, despite the often very flattened shapes of banana and fish orbits, these boxlet orbits generally do not fit a triaxial galaxy in detail because, similar to loop orbits, they spend too little time at the major axis of the model density distribution. This constraint from the shape of fish orbits is relaxed at (large) radii where the density profile of a galaxy is steep.