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1

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Background The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction converts a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide-derived from coal, methane or biomass-to liquid fuels. The Department of Energy (DOE) refers to the coal-based process as Coal-to-Liquids. The F-T process was discovered by German scientists and used to make fuels during World War II. There has been continued interest of varying intensity in F-T technology

2

HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses This is a presentation from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels...

3

FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

This project has two primary purposes: (1) Build a small-footprint (SFP) fuel production plant to prove the feasibility of this relatively transportable technology on an intermediate scale (i.e. between laboratory-bench and commercial capacity) and produce as much as 150,000 gallons of hydrogen-saturated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel; and (2) Use the virtually sulfur-free fuel produced to demonstrate (over a period of at least six months) that it can not only be used in existing diesel engines, but that it also can enable significantly increased effectiveness and life of the next-generation exhaust-after-treatment emission control systems that are currently under development and that will be required for future diesel engines. Furthermore, a well-to-wheels economic analysis will be performed to characterize the overall costs and benefits that would be associated with the actual commercial production, distribution and use of such FT diesel fuel made by the process under consideration, from the currently underutilized (or entirely un-used) energy resources targeted, primarily natural gas that is stranded, sub-quality, off-shore, etc. During the first year of the project, which is the subject of this report, there have been two significant areas of progress: (1) Most of the preparatory work required to build the SFP fuel-production plant has been completed, and (2) Relationships have been established, and necessary project coordination has been started, with the half dozen project-partner organizations that will have a role in the fuel demonstration and evaluation phase of the project. Additional project tasks directly related to the State of Alaska have also been added to the project. These include: A study of underutilized potential Alaska energy resources that could contribute to domestic diesel and distillate fuel production by providing input energy for future commercial-size SFP fuel production plants; Demonstration of the use of the product fuel in a heavy-duty diesel vehicle during the Alaska winter; a comparative study of the cold-starting characteristics of FT and conventional diesel fuel; and demonstration of the use of the fuel to generate electricity for rural Alaskan villages using both a diesel generator set, and a reformer-equipped fuel cell.

Stephen P. Bergin

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

4

Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview...

5

Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology...

6

Subtask 3.4 - Fischer - Tropsch Fuels Development  

SciTech Connect

Under Subtask 3.4, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) examined the opportunities and challenges facing Fischerâ??Tropsch (FT) technology in the United States today. Work was completed in two distinct budget periods (BPs). In BP1, the EERC examined the technical feasibility of using modern warm-gas cleanup techniques for FT synthesis. FT synthesis is typically done using more expensive and complex cold-gas sweetening. Warm-gas cleanup could greatly reduce capital and operating costs, making FT synthesis more attractive for domestic fuel production. Syngas was generated from a variety of coal and biomass types; cleaned of sulfur, moisture, and condensables; and then passed over a pilot-scale FT catalyst bed. Laboratory and modeling work done in support of the pilot-scale effort suggested that the catalyst was performing suboptimally with warm-gas cleanup. Long-term trends showed that the catalyst was also quickly deactivating. In BP3, the EERC compared FT catalyst results using warm-gas cleanup to results using cold-gas sweetening. A gas-sweetening absorption system (GSAS) was designed, modeled, and constructed to sweeten syngas between the gasifier and the pilot-scale FT reactor. Results verified that the catalyst performed much better with gas sweetening than it had with warm-gas cleanup. The catalyst also showed no signs of rapid deactivation when the GSAS was running. Laboratory tests in support of this effort verified that the catalyst had deactivated quickly in BP1 because of exposure to syngas, not because of any design flaw with the pilot-scale FT reactor itself. Based on these results, the EERC concludes that the two biggest issues with using syngas treated with warm-gas cleanup for FT synthesis are high concentrations of CO{sub 2} and volatile organic matter. Other catalysts tested by the EERC may be more tolerant of CO{sub 2}, but volatile matter removal is critical to ensuring long-term FT catalyst operation. This subtask was funded through the EERCâ??U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding for BP1 was provided by the North Dakota Industrial Commissionâ??s (NDIC) Renewable Energy Council.

Joshua Strege; Anthony Snyder; Jason Laumb; Joshua Stanislowski; Michael Swanson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Syntroleum plant is mechanically complete and currently undergoing start-up. The fuel production and demonstration plan is near completion. The study on the impact of small footprint plant (SFP) fuel on engine performance is about half-completed. Cold start testing has been completed. Preparations have been completed for testing the fuel in diesel electric generators in Alaska. Preparations are in progress for testing the fuel in bus fleets at Denali National Park and the Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority. The experiments and analyses conducted during this project show that Fischer-Tropsch (FT) gas-to-liquid diesel fuel can easily be used in a diesel engine with little to no modifications. Additionally, based on the results and discussion presented, further improvements in performance and emissions can be realized by configuring the engine to take advantage of FT diesel fuel's properties. The FT fuel also shows excellent cold start properties and enabled the engine tested to start at more the ten degrees than traditional fuels would allow. This plant produced through this project will produce large amounts of FT fuel. This will allow the fuel to be tested extensively, in current, prototype, and advanced diesel engines. The fuel may also contribute to the nation's energy security. The military has expressed interest in testing the fuel in aircraft and ground vehicles.

Steve Bergin

2003-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

8

The selective catalytic cracking of Fischer-Tropsch liquids to high value transportation fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Amoco Oil Company, investigated a selective catalytic cracking process (FCC) to convert the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) gasoline and wax fractions to high value transportation fuels. The primary tasks of this contract were to (1) optimize the catalyst and process conditions of the FCC process for maximum conversion of F-T wax into reactive olefins for later production of C{sub 4}{minus}C{sub 8} ethers, and (2) use the olefin-containing light naphtha obtained from FCC processing of the F-T wax as feedstock for the synthesis of ethers. The catalytic cracking of F-T wax feedstocks gave high conversions with low activity catalysts and low process severities. HZSM-5 and beta zeolite catalysts gave higher yields of propylene, isobutylene, and isoamylenes but a lower gasoline yield than Y zeolite catalysts. Catalyst selection and process optimization will depend on product valuation. For a given catalyst and process condition, Sasol and LaPorte waxes gave similar conversions and product selectivities. The contaminant iron F-T catalyst fines in the LaPorte wax caused higher coke and hydrogen yields.

Schwartz, M.M.; Reagon, W.J.; Nicholas, J.J.; Hughes, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SBA-15-supported iron catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch production of diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect

Iron supported on SBA-15, a mesoporous structured silica, has been developed as a catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons. The catalysts retain the high surface area of the support, {approximately}500 m{sup 2}/g, average pore size, and pore volume. Inclusion of aluminum into the SBA-15 did not significantly alter these parameters. XRD, XAFS, and Moessbauer spectroscopies were used to characterize the catalyst before and after being subjected to the reaction conditions. Prior to reaction, the iron was distributed among {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ferrihydrite, and minor {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. After reaction, the iron phases detected were nonmagnetic iron oxides, iron carbide, and metallic iron. The length of the induction period typically seen with iron-based F-T catalysts was strongly dependent on the amount of aluminum present in the catalyst. With no aluminum, the induction period lasted about 25 h, whereas the induction period decreased to less than 5 h with an Al:Si mass ratio of 0.010. A further increase in aluminum content lengthened the induction period, but always remained less than that without aluminum. Catalyst activity and product selectivity were also strongly dependent on aluminum content with the maximum diesel fuel fraction, C{sub 11+}, occurring with the Al:Si ratio of 0.010 and a CO conversion of 37%. The small concentration of aluminum may serve to increase the rate of iron carbide formation, whereas higher concentrations may begin to inhibit the rate. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Dae Jung Kim; Brian C. Dunn; Frank Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman; Min Kang; Jae Eui Yie; Edward M. Eyring [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Department of Chemistry

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch  

SciTech Connect

The slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process has attracted considerable attention recently. The process can make liquid fuels by reacting hydrogen-lean synthesis gas produced from modern energy-efficient gasifiers. continuing assessment of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) has a high priority within an indirect liquefaction program, a part of the liquid fuels program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and executed by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Funding for the indirect liquefaction program in 1990:0090 is anticipated to be about $8.5 million compared to $6.6 million in 1989 and a like amount in the year before. The studies within the program are conducted by industry, universities, national laboratories and in-house PETC research and development. This article reviews preparation and properties of iron-based catalysts, including recent patent activities and in-depth process analysis of slurry-phase FTS. The review provides an analysis of Fischer-Tropsch catalyst research and development trends and describes options to increase selectivity for iron-based catalysts in a slurry phase.

Srivastava, R.D. (Burns and Roe Services Corp. (US)); Rao, V.U.S.; Cinquegrane, G.; Stiegel, G.J. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fischer-Tropsch process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing a product selective and stable catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Orefield, PA); Withers, Howard P. (Douglassville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Monetization of Nigeria coal by conversion to hydrocarbon fuels through Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect

Given the instability of crude oil prices and the disruptions in crude oil supply chains, this article offers a complementing investment proposal through diversification of Nigeria's energy source and dependence. Therefore, the following issues were examined and reported: A comparative survey of coal and hydrocarbon reserve bases in Nigeria was undertaken and presented. An excursion into the economic, environmental, and technological justifications for the proposed diversification and roll-back to coal-based resource was also undertaken and presented. The technology available for coal beneficiation for environmental pollution control was reviewed and reported. The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and its advances into Sasol's slurry phase distillate process were reviewed. Specifically, the adoption of Sasol's advanced synthol process and the slurry phase distillate process were recommended as ways of processing the products of coal gasification. The article concludes by discussing all the above-mentioned issues with regard to value addition as a means of wealth creation and investment.

Oguejiofor, G.C. [Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka (Nigeria). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Assessment of Fuel-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Fischer?Tropsch Diesel from Coal and Cellulosic Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessment of Fuel-Cycle Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Fischer?Tropsch Diesel from Coal and Cellulosic Biomass ... There are two general designs for FTD production:(7, 30) recycling (RC) design and once-through (OT) design, as illustrated in Figure 2. ... Wang, M. Q.GREET 1.0 — Transportation Fuel Cycles Model: Methodology and Use, Argonne National Laboratory: Argonne, IL, ANL/ESD-33. ...

Xiaomin Xie; Michael Wang; Jeongwoo Han

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

15

Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be demonstrated that materials with adequate pore volume can be produced. During the attrition resistance tests, it was learned that the glass-ceramic materials are very abrasive. Attention should be paid in any further developmental efforts to the potential for these hard, abrasive materials to damage reactors.

Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Fossil-fuel processing technical/professional services: comparison of Fischer-Tropsch reactor systems. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch reaction was commercialized in Germany and used to produce military fuels in fixed bed reactors. It was recognized from the start that this reactor system had severe operating and yield limitations and alternative reactor systems were sought. In 1955 the Sasol I complex, using an entrained bed (Synthol) reactor system, was started up in South Africa. Although this reactor was a definite improvement and is still operating, the literature is filled with proponents of other reactor systems, each claiming its own advantages. This report provides a summary of the results of a study to compare the development potential of three of these reactor systems with the commercially operating Synthol-entrained bed reactor system. The commercial Synthol reactor is used as a benchmark against which the development potential of the other three reactors can be compared. Most of the information on which this study is based was supplied by the M.W. Kellogg Co. No information beyond that in the literature on the operation of the Synthol reactor system was available for consideration in preparing this study, nor were any details of the changes made to the original Synthol system to overcome the operating problems reported in the literature. Because of conflicting claims and results found in the literature, it was decided to concentrate a large part of this study on a kinetic analysis of the reactor systems, in order to provide a theoretical analysis of intrinsic strengths and weaknesses of the reactors unclouded by different catalysts, operating conditions and feed compositions. The remainder of the study considers the physical attributes of the four reactor systems and compares their respective investment costs, yields, catalyst requirements and thermal efficiencies from simplified conceptual designs.

Thompson, G.J.; Riekena, M.L.; Vickers, A.G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

INTEGRATED FISCHER TROPSCH MODULAR PROCESS MODEL  

SciTech Connect

With declining petroleum reserves, increased world demand, and unstable politics in some of the world’s richest oil producing regions, the capability for the U.S. to produce synthetic liquid fuels from domestic resources is critical to national security and economic stability. Coal, biomass and other carbonaceous materials can be converted to liquid fuels using several conversion processes. The leading candidate for large-scale conversion of coal to liquid fuels is the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process. Process configuration, component selection, and performance are interrelated and dependent on feed characteristics. This paper outlines a flexible modular approach to model an integrated FT process that utilizes a library of key component models, supporting kinetic data and materials and transport properties allowing rapid development of custom integrated plant models. The modular construction will permit rapid assessment of alternative designs and feed stocks. The modeling approach consists of three thrust areas, or “strands” – model/module development, integration of the model elements into an end to end integrated system model, and utilization of the model for plant design. Strand 1, model/module development, entails identifying, developing, and assembling a library of codes, user blocks, and data for FT process unit operations for a custom feedstock and plant description. Strand 2, integration development, provides the framework for linking these component and subsystem models to form an integrated FT plant simulation. Strand 3, plant design, includes testing and validation of the comprehensive model and performing design evaluation analyses.

Donna Post Guillen; Richard Boardman; Anastasia M. Gribik; Rick A. Wood; Robert A. Carrington

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Influence of Biodiesel Addition to Fischer?Tropsch Fuel on Diesel Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zhu, R.; Wang, X.; Miao, H.; Huang, Z.; Gao, J.; Jiang, D.Performance and Emission Characteristics of Diesel Engines Fueled with Diesel-Dimethoxymethane (DMM) Blends Energy Fuels 2009, 23, 286– 293 ... Results showed that, without changing the fuel supply system and the combustion system of a diesel engine, when using blended fuel with increased DMM percentage, break-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) is higher for a smaller lower heating value of DMM, while thermal efficiency increases a little. ... To investigate influences of fuel design on regulated and non-regulated emissions of heavy-duty diesel engines, a Mercedes-Benz OM 906 Euro 3 engine was run with common diesel fuel (DF), first- and second-generation alternative fuels (Gas-to-liq. ...

Md. Nurun Nabi; Johan Einar Hustad

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Chapter 13 - Substitute Natural Gas and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the direct conversion of syngas to hydrocarbons, either substitute natural gas, or higher hydrocarbons via the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. Substitute natural gas (SNG), also known as synthetic natural gas, is methane that is formed during gasification. The syngas generally contain carbon dioxide that can be hydrogenated to produce methane. Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis is a polymerization reaction. An alkane chain, absorbed on a catalyst site, reacts with carbon monoxide and hydrogen to add a methyl unit (CH2). The heat of reaction per methyl group, estimated from the gas phase heat of formation for dodecane, is –155.5 kJ/mole. This heat of reaction is about 20% of the heat of combustion of the feed gases. FT diesel fuel, due to its high alkane content, has very high cetane numbers. Blends of FT and conventional diesel are sold as premium products in Europe. Normal alkanes, however, have high melting points compared to branched or cyclic hydrocarbons. An FT diesel produced simply by distilling an FT fluid would have poor low temperature properties. Most FT diesel, however, is not simply an FT fluid distillation product, but a blend of this distillation product and products of hydrocracked FT wax.

David A Bell; Brian F Towler; Maohong Fan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Emissions Characteristics of a Turbine Engine and Research Combustor Burning a Fischer?Tropsch Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GTL and CTL technologies were discovered in Germany in the mid-1910s and further developed in 1923 by German scientists Drs. ... The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Fuels Branch of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/PRTG) established a collaborative research and development program in 2000 to study and demonstrate clean aviation fuels as part of the DOE Ultra Clean Transportation Fuels Initiative. ... 21 Gaseous emissions were quantified using an MKS MultiGas 2030 Fourier-transform infrared based gas analyzer and a flame ionization detector based total hydrocarbon analyzer. ...

Edwin Corporan; Matthew J. DeWitt; Vincent Belovich; Robert Pawlik; Amy C. Lynch; James R. Gord; Terrence R. Meyer

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ultra-Clean Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: Dynamometer Durability Testing, the Denali Bus Fleet Demonstration, Bus Fleet Demonstrations Emissions Analysis, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Emissions Analysis, Feasibility Study of SFPs for Rural Alaska, and Cold Weather Testing of Ultra Clean Fuel.

Steve Bergin

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

Making Fischer?Tropsch Fuels and Electricity from Coal and Biomass: Performance and Cost Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We employ a unified analytical framework to systematically analyze 16 separate process designs, simulating for each detailed mass/energy balances using Aspen Plus software, and calculating their full lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. ... In the plant designs with electricity as a major coproduct, designated as “once-through” (OT) configurations (Figure 1b), the syngas passes only once through the synthesis reactor, and all of the unconverted syngas plus light gases from FTL refining are compressed and supplied to the power island where a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle (GTCC) provides the power needed to operate the plant, as well as a substantial amount of export power (up to 37% of the total plant output of fuel (LHV) and power—see Table 3). ... (27) The gasifier is followed by a tar cracking unit, modeled as an ATR with a syngas exit temperature of 882 °C that converts into syngas the heavy hydrocarbons that form at typical biomass gasification temperatures and that would otherwise condense and cause operating difficulties downstream. ...

Guangjian Liu; Eric D. Larson; Robert H. Williams; Thomas G. Kreutz; Xiangbo Guo

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

EA-1642-S1: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE’s proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

25

On-Road Use of Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Blends  

SciTech Connect

Alternative compression ignition engine fuels are of interest both to reduce emissions and to reduce U.S. petroleum fuel demand. A Malaysian Fischer-Tropsch gas-to-liquid fuel was compared with California No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from over the road Class 8 tractors with Caterpillar 3176 engines, using a chassis dynamometer and full scale dilution tunnel. The 5-Mile route was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 42,000 lb. Levels of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) were reduced by an average of 12% and particulate matter (PM) by 25% for the Fischer-Tropsch fuel over the California diesel fuel. Another distillate fuel produced catalytically from Fischer-Tropsch products originally derived from natural gas by Mossgas was also compared with 49-state No.2 diesel by characterizing emissions from Detroit Diesel 6V-92 powered transit buses, three of them equipped with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, and three without. The CBD cycle was employed as the test schedule, with a test weight of 33,050 lb. For those buses with catalytic converters and rebuilt engines, NO x was reduced by 8% and PM was reduced by 31% on average, while for those buses without, NO x was reduced by 5% and PM was reduced by 20% on average. It is concluded that advanced compression ignition fuels from non-petroleum sources can offer environmental advantages in typical line haul and city transit applications.

Nigel Clark; Mridul Gautam; Donald Lyons; Chris Atkinson; Wenwei Xie; Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

Tailored fischer-tropsch synthesis product distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel methods of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis are described. It has been discovered that conducting the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a catalyst with a catalytically active surface layer of 35 microns or less results in a liquid hydrocarbon product with a high ratio of C.sub.5-C.sub.20:C.sub.20+. Descriptions of novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts and reactors are also provided. Novel hydrocarbon compositions with a high ratio of C.sub.5-C.sub.20:C.sub.20+ are also described.

Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Cao, Chunshe (Kennewick, WA); Li, Xiaohong Shari (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fischer-Tropsch Wastewater Utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is generally directed to handling the wastewater, or condensate, from a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor. More particularly, the present invention provides a process wherein the wastewater of a hydrocarbon synthesis reactor, such as a Fischer-Tropsch reactor, is sent to a gasifier and subsequently reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas. The wastewater may also be recycled back to a slurry preparation stage, where solid combustible organic materials are pulverized and mixed with process water and the wastewater to form a slurry, after which the slurry fed to a gasifier where it is reacted with steam and oxygen at high temperatures and pressures so as to produce synthesis gas.

Shah, Lalit S. (Sugar Land, TX)

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Impact of Biomass Pretreatment on the Feasibility of Overseas Biomass Conversion to Fischer?Tropsch Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Impact of Biomass Pretreatment on the Feasibility of Overseas Biomass Conversion to Fischer?Tropsch Products ... One of the most promising options to produce transportation fuels from biomass is the so-called biomass-to-liquids (BtL) route, in which biomass is converted to syngas from which high-quality Fischer?Tropsch (FT) fuels are synthesized. ... Alternatively to converting biomass into liquids or coal-like material, new and dedicated feeding systems for biomass can be developed. ...

Robin W. R. Zwart; Harold Boerrigter; Abraham van der Drift

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Platinum-Modulated Cobalt Nanocatalysts for Low-Temperature Aqueous-Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), which converts fossil fuel- based syngas to liquid fuel products over Ru as the source for the production of syngas, with the surging consumption of fossil fuels, FTS is once again catalytic process for liquid fuel generation, which converts coal/shale gas/biomass-derived syngas (a

Li, Weixue

30

Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

Vollhardt, Kurt P. C. (Kensington, CA); Perkins, Patrick (Berkeley, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula: PS --R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS --H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS --Br; treating said PS --Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS --Li; substituting said PS-- Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

Vollhardt, Kurt P. C. (Kensington, CA); Perkins, Patrick (Berkeley, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Novel Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel polymer-supported metal complexes of the formula PS -R Me(CO).sub.n H.sub.m where: PS represents a divinylbenzene crosslinked polystyrene in which the divinylbenzene crosslinking is greater than 1% and less than about 18%; R represents a cycloalkadienyl radical of 4 through 6 carbon atoms; Me represents a Group VIII metal; CO represents a carbonyl radical; H represents hydrogen; n represents an integer varying from 0 through 3; m represents an integer varying from 0 through 2 inclusively with the further provision that 2n+m must total 18 when added to the electrons in R and Me, or n+m must total 0; are prepared by: brominating PS -H by treating same with bromine in the presence of a thallium salt in a partially or fully halogenated solvent to form PS -Br; treating said PS -Br so produced with a lithium alkyl of 1 through 12 carbon atoms in an aromatic solvent to produce PS -Li; substituting said PS - Li so produced by reaction with a 2-cycloalkenone of 4 to 6 carbon atoms in the presence of an ether solvent and using a water work-up to form a cycloalkenylalcohol-substituted PS ; dehydrating said alcohol so produced by heating under a vacuum to produce a cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS ; reacting the cycloalkadienyl-substituted PS with metal carbonyl in the presence of a partially or fully halogenated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon of 6 through 8 carbon atoms, ethers, or esters of 4 through 10 carbon atoms as a solvent to produce a polystyrene-supported cycloalkadienyl metal carbonyl. The novel compounds are used as improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts particularly for the conversion of CO+H.sub.2 to gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons at milder conditions than with prior catalysts.

Vollhardt, Kurt P. C. (Kensington, CA); Perkins, Patrick (Berkeley, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Effect of engine operating parameters and fuel characteristics on diesel engine emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To examine the effects of using synthetic Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel in a modern compression ignition engine, experiments were conducted on a MY 2002 Cummins 5.9 L diesel engine outfitted with high pressure, common ...

Acar, Joseph, 1977-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Assessment of fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for Fischer-Tropsch diesel from coal and cellulosic biomass.  

SciTech Connect

This study expands and uses the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model to assess the effects of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology and cellulosic biomass and coal cofeeding in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) plants on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of FT diesel (FTD). To demonstrate the influence of the coproduct credit methods on FTD life-cycle analysis (LCA) results, two allocation methods based on the energy value and the market revenue of different products and a hybrid method are employed. With the energy-based allocation method, fossil energy use of FTD is less than that of petroleum diesel, and GHG emissions of FTD could be close to zero or even less than zero with CCS when forest residue accounts for 55% or more of the total dry mass input to FTD plants. Without CCS, GHG emissions are reduced to a level equivalent to that from petroleum diesel plants when forest residue accounts for 61% of the total dry mass input. Moreover, we show that coproduct method selection is crucial for LCA results of FTD when a large amount of coproducts is produced.

Xie, X.; Wang, M.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Potential for Reduction of Exhaust Emissions in a Common-Rail Direct-Injection Diesel Engine by Fueling with Fischer–Tropsch Diesel Fuel Synthesized from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the constant speed/varying load test modes, the use of CFT also resulted in a general reduction of regulated emissions. ... (5, 6) Moreover, FT diesel fuels can be used in contemporary diesel engines without any modification and with a negligible or weak improvement of engine efficiency. ... Liu, Z.; Shi, S.; Li, Y.Coal liquefaction technologies—Development in China and challenges in chemical reaction engineering Chem. ...

Chonglin Song; Guohong Gong; Jinou Song; Gang Lv; Xiaofeng Cao; Lidong Liu; Yiqiang Pei

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS)reaction is the established technology for the production of liquid fuels from coal by an indirect route using coal-derived syngas (CO + H{sub 2}). Modern FTS catalysts are potassium- and copper-promoted iron preparations. These catalysts exhibit moderate activity with carbon monoxide-rich feedstocks such as the syngas produced by advanced coal gasification processes. However, the relatively large yields of by-product methane and high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes detract from the production of desired liquid products in the C{sub 5}-C{sub 16} range needed for motor and aviation fuel. The goal of this program is to decrease undesirable portions of the FTS hydrocarbon yield by altering the Schultz-Flory polymerization product distribution through design and formulation of improved catalysts. Two approaches were taken: (1) reducing the yield of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes by using highly dispersed catalysts produced from surface-confined multiatomic clusters on acid supports and (2) suppressing methane production by uniformly pretreating active, selective conventional FTS catalysts with submonolayer levels of sulfur.

Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Tong, G.T.; Chan, Y.W.; Huang, H.W.; McCarty, J.G.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Alternative Fuels -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Fischer-Tropsch Fuels SunDiesel fuel This Sun Diesel BTL fuel, made from wood chips, results in lower particulate matter and nitrogen oxide emissions. Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels are synthetic diesel fuels produced by converting gaseous hydrocarbons, such as natural gas and gasified coal or biomass, into liquid fuel. These fuels are commonly categorized into the following groups: Biomass to liquids (BTL) Gas to liquids (GTL) Coal to liquids (CTL) Argonne engineers are investigating the performance and emissions data of F-T fuels for both older and newer vehicles. The goal is to provide this data to the U.S. Department of Energy, the auto industry and energy suppliers. Part of the lab's strategy also includes publishing the data to solicit ideas and input from the fuels and combustion community.

39

Transportation fuels from synthetic gas  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-five experimental Fischer-Tropsch synthesis runs were made with 14 different catalysts or combinations of catalysts using a Berty reactor system. Two catalysts showed increased selectivity to transportation fuels compared to typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. With a catalyst consisting of 5 wt % ruthenium impregnated on a Y zeolite (run number 24), 63 to 70 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the gasoline boiling range. Using a 0.5 wt % ruthenium on alumina catalyst (run number 22), 64 to 78 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the diesel fuel boiling range. Not enough sample was produced to determine the octane number of the gasoline from run number 24, but it is probably somewhat better than typical Fischer-Tropsch gasoline (approx. 50) and less than unleaded gasoline (approx. 88). The diesel fuel produced in run number 22 consisted of mostly straight chained paraffins and should be an excellent transportation fuel without further refining. The yield of transportation fuels from biomass via gasification and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with the ruthenium catalysts identified in the previous paragraph is somewhat less, on a Btu basis, than methanol (via gasification) and wood oil (PERC and LBL processes) yields from biomass. However, the products of the F-T synthesis are higher quality transportation fuels. The yield of transportation fuels via the F-T synthesis is similar to the yield of gasoline via methanol synthesis and the Mobil MTG process.

Baker, E.G.; Cuello, R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Comparative Study on Engine Performance and Diesel Emissions with European Diesel Fuel (DF)?Diethylene Glycol Dimethyl Ether (DGM) and Fischer?Tropsch (FT)?DGM Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

† Department of Energy and Process Engineering ... The general picture of the methyl- and methylene-related vibrations in the DF used here confirms the results of the GC analyses; i.e., that the DF resembles a n-alkane-dominated hydrocarbon mixture. ... To investigate influences of fuel design on regulated and non-regulated emissions of heavy-duty diesel engines, a Mercedes-Benz OM 906 Euro 3 engine was run with common diesel fuel (DF), first- and second-generation alternative fuels (Gas-to-liq. ...

Md. Nurun Nabi; Rudolf Schmid; Johan Einar Hustad

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

BASELINE DESIGN/ECONOMICS FOR ADVANCED FISCHER-TROPSCH TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, along with Amoco as the main subcontractor, developed a Baseline design, two alternative designs, and computer process simulation models for indirect coal liquefaction based on advanced Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology for the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC).

None

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a process for the separation of catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The separation is accomplished by extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic. The purified catalyst can be upgraded by various methods.

White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Migration of potassium in an iron-based Fischer-Tropsch/zeolite composite catalyst.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. The product of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is low in aromatics and as a result has relatively poor gasoline quality (with respect to the… (more)

Gwagwa, Xoliswa Yolanda.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Development and process evaluation of improved Fischer-Tropsch slurry catalysts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating improved catalysts for a slurry Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process for converting synthesis gas to high quality transportation fuels (gasoline and distillate). The improvements in catalyst performance were sought by studying effects of pretreatment conditions, promoters and binders/supports. A total of 20 different, iron based, catalysts were evaluated in 58 fixed bed reactor tests and 10 slurry reactor tests. The major accomplishments and conclusions are summarized below. The pretreatment conditions (temperature, duration and the nature of reducing gas) have significant effect on catalyst performance (activity, selectivity and stability) during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. One of precipitated unsupported catalysts had hydrocarbon selectivity similar to Mobil`s I-B catalyst in high wax mode operation, and had not experienced any loss in activity during 460 hours of testing under variable process conditions in a slurry reactor. The effect of promoters (copper and potassium) on catalyst performance during FT synthesis has been studied in a systematic way. It was found that potassium promotion increases activities of the FT and water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions, the average molecular weight of hydrocarbon products, and suppresses the olefin hydrogenation and isomerization reactions. The addition of binders/supports (silica or alumina) to precipitated Fe/Cu/K catalysts, decreased their activity but improved their stability and hydrocarbon selectivity. The performance of catalysts of this type was very promising and additional studies are recommended to evaluate their potential for use in commercial slurry reactors.

Bukur, D.B.; Mukesh, D.; Patel, S.A.; Zimmerman, W.H.; Rosynek, M.P. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Kellogg, L.J. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

ATTACHMENT IX Review of Air Products Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IX.1-Draft ATTACHMENT IX Review of Air Products Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Work During the 1980s, Air Products & Chemicals worked on several aspects of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These included, exhibited similar activity and product selectivity, showing that the preparative method was reproducible

Kentucky, University of

46

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

petroleum based fuels * Non-petroleum based fuels: - Biodiesel and new generation biofuels - Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels - Oil sand derived fuels Reduce mechanisms for...

48

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-rhodium alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the nature of iron-rhodium alloy catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a combination of experimental techniques were applied. Infrared spectroscopy was mainly used to extract direct information on the surface of catalysts under the reaction conditions. In addition, Mossbauer spectroscopy was employed to study the iron alloy catalysts. Further characterization of the catalysts was performed by chemisorption measurements. Hydrocarbon products of the CO + H/sub 2/ synthesis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography. The working surface of a silica-supported rhodium catalyst was found to be saturated with molecular carbon monoxide. The intensity of the linear carbonyl absorption band remained constant compared to that for room temperature CO adsorption, while that of the bridge-bonded carbonyl absorption band was drastically reduced during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The bridge-bonded adsorption sites are assumed to be the active sites for dissociating carbon monoxide. The hydrogenation rate of the linearly adsorbed carbon monoxide was much slower than the steady state reaction rate. The alloy catalyst did not form a bulk carbide, but the presence of surface carbon was suggested by the large shift of the linear carbonyl absorption band. On the other hand, infrared spectra on an iron catalyst showed only weak bands, indicating a high degree of CO dissociation. On a silica-supported iron-rhodium alloy catalyst, surface analysis by infrared spectroscopy presents evidence of well-mixed alloy formation. Three models of carbon monoxide adsorption were identified.

Choi, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Supported fischer-tropsch catalyst and method of making the catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a method of making the catalyst for a Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas, is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Orefield, PA); Withers, Howard P. (Douglassville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Investigation of Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Coal Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Background Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes gasify coal, biomass, and mixtures of coal/ biomass to produce synthesis gas (syngas) that can be converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Positive benefits of these processes include the use of feedstocks from domestic sources and lower greenhouse gas production than can be achieved from using conventional petroleum-based fuels. However, syngas generated by coal and biomass co-gasification contains a myriad of trace contaminants that may poison the water- gas-shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts used in the gas-to-liquid processes. While the effect of coal contaminants on FT processes is well studied, more research

51

Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effect of surface modification by chelating agents on Fischer-Tropsch performance of Co/SiO2 catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The silica support of a Co-based catalyst for Fischer?Tropsch (FT) synthesis was modified by the chelating agents (CAs) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the modification, characterization of the fresh and spent catalysts shows reduced crystallite sizes, a better-dispersed Co3O4 phase on the calcined samples, and increased metal dispersions for the reduced samples. The CA-modified catalysts display higher CO conversions, product yields, reaction rates, and rate constants. The improved FT performance of CA-modified catalysts is attributed to the formation of stable complexes with Co. The superior performance of the EDTA-modified catalyst in comparison to the NTA-modified catalyst is due to the higher affinity of the former for complex formation with Co ions. 1. INTRODUCTION Fischer?Tropsch (FT) synthesis has been recognized as one of the most promising technologies for the conversion of coal, natural gas, and biomass-derived syngas into liquid fuels and chemicals.1 Limited oil reserves, energy supply security concerns, carbon credits,1 pollution abatement laws, and, most notably, uncertainty about fuel prices have increased the prospect of commercializing the FT process. Catalysts that are typically used for FT synthesis include supported Co or Fe. Cobased catalysts have the advantage of higher syngas conversion, more high-

Bambal, Ashish S. [WVU; Kyugler, Edwin L. [WVU; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE; Dadyburjor, Dady B. [WVU

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

Huffman, Gerald P

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the United States-Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The United States has the world's largest coal reserves and Montana the highest potential for mega-mine development. Consequently, a large-scale effort to convert coal to liquids (CTL) has been proposed to create a major source of domestic transportation fuels from coal, and some prominent Montanans want to be at the center of that effort. We calculate that the energy efficiency of the best existing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process applied to average coal in Montana is less than 1/2 of the corresponding efficiency of an average crude oil refining process. The resulting CO{sub 2} emissions are 20 times (2000%) higher for CTL than for conventional petroleum products. One barrel of the FT fuel requires roughly 800 kg of coal and 800 kg of water. The minimum energy cost of subsurface CO{sub 2} sequestration would be at least 40% of the FT fuel energy, essentially halving energy efficiency of the process. We argue therefore that CTL conversion is not the most valuable use for the coal, nor will it ever be, as long as it is economical to use natural gas for electric power generation. This finding results from the low efficiency inherent in FT synthesis, and is independent of the monumental FT plant construction costs, mine construction costs, acute lack of water, and the associated environmental impacts for Montana.

Patzek, Tad W. [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@mail.utexas.edu; Croft, Gregory D. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Synthetic fuels technology overview with health and environmental impacts  

SciTech Connect

An introduction is presented to the following synthetic fuels technologies: (1) the Lurgi gasification of coal (2) the Fischer-Tropsch liquefaction of coal (3) coal-methanol conversion (4) donor solvent gas liquefaction (5) Tosco surface shale retorting ethanol production from coal and (6) the coal-methanol-gasoline conversion process. After establishing the system characteristics of these six technologies, consideration is given to their potential major health, safety, environmental and socio-economic impacts at the global, regional and local levels. It is determined that the main global consequence of synfuels development is climate modification, to which may be added the regional impact of dry and wet deposition of gaseous and particulate pollutants, and land and water quality deterioration due to soil erosion at the local level.

Bentz, E.J. Jr.; Salmon, E.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber o-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile o-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fuIly synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fueL

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Interactions of Jet Fuels with Nitrile O-Rings: Petroleum-Derived versus Synthetic Fuels  

SciTech Connect

A transition from petroleum-derived jet fuels to blends with Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, and ultimately fully synthetic hydro-isomerized F-T fuels has raised concern about the fate of plasticizers in nitrile-butadiene rubber a-rings that are contacted by the fuels as this transition occurs. The partitioning of plasticizers and fuel molecules between nitrile a-rings and petroleum-derived, synthetic, and additized-synthetic jet fuels has been measured. Thermal desorption of o-rings soaked in the various jet fuels followed by gas chromatographic analysis with a mass spectrometric detector showed many of the plasticizer and stabilizer compounds were removed from the o-rings regardless of the contact fuel. Fuel molecules were observed to migrate into the o-rings for the petroleum-derived fuel as did both the fuel and additive for a synthetic F-T jet fuel additized with benzyl alcohol, but less for the unadditized synthetic fuel. The specific compounds or classes of compounds involved in the partitioning were identified and a semiquantitative comparison of relative partitioning of the compounds of interest was made. The results provide another step forward in improving the confidence level of using additized, fully synthetic jet fuel in the place of petroleum-derived fuel.

Gormley, R.J.; Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Improved Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS)reaction is the established technology for the production of liquid fuels from coal by an indirect route using coal-derived syngas (CO + H{sub 2}). Modern FTS catalysts are potassium- and copper-promoted iron preparations. These catalysts exhibit moderate activity with carbon monoxide-rich feedstocks such as the syngas produced by advanced coal gasification processes. However, the relatively large yields of by-product methane and high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes detract from the production of desired liquid products in the C{sub 5}-C{sub 16} range needed for motor and aviation fuel. The goal of this program is to decrease undesirable portions of the FTS hydrocarbon yield by altering the Schultz-Flory polymerization product distribution through design and formulation of improved catalysts. Two approaches were taken: (1) reducing the yield of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbon waxes by using highly dispersed catalysts produced from surface-confined multiatomic clusters on acid supports and (2) suppressing methane production by uniformly pretreating active, selective conventional FTS catalysts with submonolayer levels of sulfur.

Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Tong, G.T.; Chan, Y.W.; Huang, H.W.; McCarty, J.G.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EA-1642: Design and Construction of an Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Design and Construction of an Early Lead Mini 42: Design and Construction of an Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research Near Lexington, Kentucky EA-1642: Design and Construction of an Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research Near Lexington, Kentucky SUMMARY DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory prepared this environmental assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts of providing funding for the proposed Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery. The early lead facility would be located at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research in Fayette County Kentucky. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

60

Attrition resistant catalysts for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T because they are relatively inexpensive and possess reasonable activity for F-T synthesis (FTS). Their most advantages trait is their high water-gas shift (WGS) activity compared to their competitor, namely cobalt. This enables Fe F-T catalysts to process low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas without an external shift reaction step. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, make the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, an d result in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research were to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance.

K. Jothimurugesan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Combined Steam Reforming of Methane and Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis for the Formation of Hydrocarbons: A Proof of Concept Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of combining the reactions of methane steam reforming and the Fischer–Tropsch synthesis is explored in an attempt to convert methane directly to hydrocarbons. Consideration of the thermodynamics ... c...

Meleri Johns; Paul Collier; Michael S. Spencer; Tony Alderson…

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Fischer Tropsch synthesis in supercritical fluids. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Objectives for the first quarter for Task A, Diffusion Coefficients of F-T Products in Supercritical Fluids, were to measure diffusion coefficients of 1-tetradecene in subcritical propane and the diffusion coefficients of 1-octene and 1-tetradecene in subcritical propane and the diffusion coefficients of 1-octene and 1-tetradecene in subcritical and supercritical ethane. We planned to use ethane as a solvent because its lower critical temperature enabled measurements without modification of the existing unit. Our objective was to investigate the behavior of the diffusion coefficients in crossing from subcritical to supercritical conditions. Objectives for Task B, Fischer Tropsch reaction related studies, were: (1) to install and test the temperature probe and the flammable gas detector: (2) to conduct Fischer-Tropsch experiments at baseline conditions and at a high pressure in order to test the newly constructed fixed bed reactor assembly. Accomplishments and problems, are presented.

Akgerman, A.; Bukur, D.B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

SciTech Connect

This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], Cu/MnO/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H[sub 2]/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of potential additives to promote seal swelling on the thermal stability of synthetic jet fuels  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic fuels derived from the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process using natural gas or coal-derived synthesis gas as feedstocks can be used for powering of ground vehicles, aircraft and ships. Because of their chemical and physical properties, F-T fuels will probably require additives in order to meet specifications with respect to lubricity and seal swell capability for use in ground and air vehicles. These additives can include oxygenates and compounds containing other heteroatoms that may adversely affect thermal stability. In order to understand what additives will be the most beneficial, a comprehensive experimental and computational study of conventional and additized fuels has been undertaken. The experimental approach includes analysis of the trace oxygenate and nitrogen-containing compounds present in conventional petroleum-derived fuels and trying to relate their presence (or absence) to changes in the desired properties of the fuels. This paper describes the results of efforts to test the thermal stability of synthetic fuels and surrogate fuels containing single-component additives that have been identified in earlier research as the best potential additives for promoting seal swelling in synthetic fuels, as well as mixtures of synthetic and petroleum-derived fuels.

Lind, D.D.; Gormley, R.G.; Zandhuis, P.H.; Baltrus, J.P.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Advanced Fuels Synthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Fuels Synthesis Advanced Fuels Synthesis Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Advanced Fuels Synthesis The Advanced Fuels Synthesis Key Technology is focused on catalyst and reactor optimization for producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels from coal/biomass mixtures, supports the development and demonstration of advanced separation technologies, and sponsors research on novel technologies to convert coal/biomass to liquid fuels. Active projects within the program portfolio include the following: Fischer-Tropsch fuels synthesis Small Scale Coal Biomass Liquids Production Using Highly Selective Fischer Tropsch Catalyst Small Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal/Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels Via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Coal Fuels Alliance: Design and Construction of Early Lead Mini Fischer-Tropsch Refinery

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

coal through the Fischer-Tropsch process, and compressed or liquefied gas derived from biomass. The incentive must first be taken as a credit against the blender's alternative fuel...

67

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Characterization and Reaction Testing of Cobalt Carbide  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide was investigated for cobalt carbide synthesized from Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} by CO carburization in a fixed-bed reactor. The cobalt carbide synthesized was characterized by BET surface area, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The catalysts were tested in the slurry phase using a continuously stirred tank reactor at P = 2.0 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO = 2:1 in the temperature range of 493-523 K, and with space velocities varying from 1 to 3 Nl h{sup -1} g{sub cat}{sup -1}. The results strongly suggest that a fraction of cobalt converts to a form with greater metallic character under the conditions employed. This was more pronounced on a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis run conducted at a higher temperature (523 versus 493 K).

Khalid S.; Mohandas J.C.; Gnanamani M.K.; Jacobs G.; Ma W.; Ji Y.; Davis B.H.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction  

SciTech Connect

The proposed process of using supercritical fluid extraction in conjunction with the Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column reactor has been examined using the ASPEN Plus simulator by the research group at North Carolina State University. Qualitative results have been obtained for varying the following process parameters: solvent-to-wax ratio, solvent type (pentane or hexane), extraction temperature and pressure, and recovery unit temperature and pressure. The region of retrograde behavior was determined for pentane and hexane. Initial results show hexane to be the superior solvent; compared to pentane, hexane requires lower quantities of solvent makeup (the amount of solvent which needs to be added to account for solvent that cannot be recycled), and also results in a lower average molecular weight of slurry in the reactor. Studies indicate that increasing the extraction temperature, extraction pressure, recovery temperature, or solvent to wax ratio decreases the amount solvent makeup required. Decreasing the recovery pressure was found to decrease the makeup flowrate.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Miscibility of Ethanol in Diesel Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fuels selected were as follows:? US-1D, US-2D, kerosene, light cycle oil, #1 fuel oil, Fischer Tropsch Liquid 2 (FTL-2, FTL refers to a broad-cut fraction of Fischer?Tropsch products not meeting diesel volatility specifications.), ... The close proximity of a mixture's UCST to the fuel's cloud point masked the classical UCST phase behavior for the FTL fuels and light cycle oil; however, the general trends persisted. ...

K. R. Gerdes; G. J. Suppes

2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical fluid extraction. Technical progress report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

Goal is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column reactor into two fractions: a catalyst-free wax containing <10 ppM solids and a concentrated catalyst slurry ready for recycle/regeneration. Efforts focused on programming and testing of the SAFT equation and automation of the continuous-flow apparatus.

Thies, M.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

xTL Fuels to someone xTL Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels xTL Fuels Synthetic liquid transportation fuels, collectively known as xTL fuels, are produced through specialized conversion processes. These production methods, including the Fischer-Tropsch process, produce fuels from carbon-based feedstocks, such as biomass, coal, or natural gas, and can

72

FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies  

Energy Savers (EERE)

For example, oil-sand-derived fuels from Canada, Fischer-Tropsch fuels made from natural gas, and biofuels derived from fats and vegetable oils will play increasingly important...

73

Catalytic Reforming of Biomass Raw Fuel Gas to Syngas for FT Liquid Fuels Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of biomass to obtain a syngas provides a competitive means for clean FT (Fischer-Tropsch) liquid fuels from renewable resources. The feasibility of the process depends on the upgrading of raw ...

Tiejun Wang; Chenguang Wang; Qi Zhang…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Kinetic studies for elucidation of the promoter effect of alkali in Fischer-Tropsch iron catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of the formation of hydrocarbons in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and of consecutive reactions, i.e., hydrogenation and double bond isomerization of primarily formed 1-alkenes, were studied in a slurry-phase reactor using alkalized and nonalkalized precipitated iron catalysts. Both consecutive reactions have an order of about -2 with respect to carbon monoxide and an order of about 1 with respect to 1-alkenes. The order with respect to hydrogen is 1 for the hydrocarbon formation and also 1 for the consecutive hydrogenation, but 0 for the consecutive isomerization. The reaction orders are not changed by addition of K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to the catalyst. The kinetics of consecutive reactions can be interpreted by competitive adsorption of 1-alkene and carbon monoxide. Alkali addition causes an increase in the strength of carbon monoxide adsorption and consequently a decrease in 1-alkene adsorption so that the rates of the consecutive reactions are reduced. This hypothesis could be proved by studies of 1-hexene hydrogenation in the presence and absence of carbon monoxide for alkalized and nonalkalized iron catalysts. The kinetics were studied in the ranges 1.3 < P{sub CO}(10{sup 5} Pa) < 7, 1.6 < P{sub H{sub 2}}(10{sup 5} Pa) < 9, and 490 K < T < 530 K.

Herzog, K.; Gaube, J. (Institut fuer Chemische Technologie der Technischen Hochschule Darmstadt, Darmstadt (West Germany))

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX FROM CATALYST BY SUPERCRITICAL EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for the recovery and fractionation of the wax product from the slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. The wax, comprised mostly of branched and linear alkanes with a broad molecular weight distribution up to C{sub 100}, is to be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300 C. Aspen Plus{trademark} was used to perform process simulation studies on the proposed extraction process, with Redlich-Kwong-Soave (RKS) being used for the thermodynamic property model. In summary, we have made comprehensive VLE measurements for short alkane + long alkane systems over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, dramatically increasing the amount of high-quality data available for these simple, yet highly relevant systems. In addition, our work has demonstrated that, surprisingly, no current thermodynamic model can adequately predict VLE behavior for these systems. Thus, process simulations (such as those for our proposed SCF extraction process) that incorporate these systems can currently only give results that are qualitative at best. Although significant progress has been made in the past decade, more experimental and theoretical work remain to be done before the phase equilibria of asymmetric alkane mixtures can be predicted with confidence.

Patrick C. Joyce; Mark C. Thies

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Potential Additives to Promote Seal Swell in Synthetic Fuels and Their Effect on Thermal Stability  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic fuels derived from the Fischer–Tropsch (F-T) process using natural gas or coal-derived synthesis gas as feedstocks can be used for powering ground vehicles, aircraft, and ships. Because of their chemical and physical properties, F-T fuels will probably require additives in order to meet specifications with respect to lubricity and seal swell capability for use in ground and air vehicles. Using both experimental and computational studies, the propensity of certain species to enhance the seal swell characteristics of synthetic fuels and surrogates has been determined, and promising additives have been identified. Important structural characteristics for potential additives, namely an aromatic ring along with a polar constituent, are described. The thermal stability of synthetic and surrogate fuels containing the single-component additive benzyl alcohol, which is representative of this structural class, has been determined by batch stressing of the mixtures at 350 °C for up to 12 h. Synthetic fuels spiked with benzyl alcohol at concentrations (vol %) of 1.0, 0.75, and 0.5 have demonstrated the ability to swell nitrile rubber o-rings to a comparable degree as petroleum jet fuel. Further, batch reactor studies have shown that addition of benzyl alcohol does not degrade the thermal oxidative stability of the fuel based on gravimetric analysis of the solid deposits after stressing. GC-MS was used to characterize the products from thermal stressing of neat and additized surrogate jet fuel, and their compositions were compared with respect to the creation of certain species and their potential effect on deposition.

Link, D.D.; Gormley, R.J.; Baltrus, J.P.; Anderson, R.R.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Studying Fischer-Tropsch catalysts using transmission electron microscopy and model systems of nanoparticles on planar supports.  

SciTech Connect

Nanoparticle model systems on planar supports form a versatile platform for studying morphological and compositional changes of catalysts due to exposure to realistic reaction conditions. We review examples from our work on iron and cobalt catalysts, which can undergo significant rearrangement in the reactive environment of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The use of specially designed, silicon based supports with thin film SiO{sub 2} enables the application of transmission electron microscopy, which has furnished important insight into e.g. the mechanisms of catalyst regeneration.

Thune, P. C.; Weststrate, C. J.; Moodley, P.; Saib, A. M.; van de Loosdrecht, J.; Miller, J. T.; Niemantsverdriet, J. W. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Eindhoven Univ. of Technology); (Sasol Technology)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical fluid extraction. Technical progress report, January--March 1995  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F- T) slurry bubble column reactor into a wax and a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle/regeneration. The automated apparatus was evaluated using a toluene-petroleum pitch system. The Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT) equation will be used to fit the VLE and LLE data for F-T wax-solvent systems; this equation was successful in predicting both phase compositions and average molecular weight distributions.

Thies, M.C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Synthetic Fuel  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

83

NOx Emissions of Alternative Diesel Fuels:? A Comparative Analysis of Biodiesel and FT Diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the diesel injection and combustion processes in an effort to better understand the differences in NOx emissions between biodiesel, Fischer?Tropsch (FT) diesel, and their blends with a conventional diesel fuel. Emissions studies were ...

James P. Szybist; Stephen R. Kirby; André L. Boehman

2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Density and Speed of Sound Measurements of Jet A and S-8 Aviation Turbine Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Properties of Fluids Group, Thermophysical Properties Division, Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80305-3337 ... In conjunction, environmental concerns and the desire to become more energy independent have led to the development of a synthetic fluid S-8 (CAS 437986-20-4) produced from natural gas by the Fischer?Tropsch process, as a blending stock for JP-8. ... The major chemical constituents of JP-8 are nearly identical to those of Jet A, the most common commercial gas turbine fuel. ...

Stephanie Outcalt; Arno Laesecke; Malte Brian Freund

2009-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

Toward a More Comprehensive Greenhouse Gas Emissions Assessment of Biofuels: The Case of Forest-Based Fischer–Tropsch Diesel Production in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technology and feedstock production chain-specific factors, market-mediated factors and climate policy time frame issues are reflected using as a case study Fischer–Tropsch diesel derived from boreal forest biomass in Finland. ... Hochman, G.; Rajagopal, D.; Zilberman, D.The effect of biofuels on crude oil markets AgBioForum 2010, 13 ( 2) 112– 118 ...

Sampo Soimakallio

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Synthetic Jet Fuel Production Design and evaluate cost-competitiveness of co-gasification facility for producing primarily Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel. Includes...

87

Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 2, December 26, 1990--March 26, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalyst for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble-column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 5, September 26, 1991--December 26, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Objective is to develop producing active, stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to synthesize such catalysts on a large scale for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. A mixed oxalate of Fe, Cu, and K was prepared; a catalyst will be prepared from this material. An evaluation run was performed on an Fe-based UCI catalyst, which was shown to produce low levels of C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} paraffins; e.g., at the end of the run, when the catalyst was converting 60% of the CO, the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} paraffin selectivities were 4.2 and 1.0, respectively.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

89

Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 1, September 26, 1990--December 26, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scale-up procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2}:CO in the ratio of 0.5 to 1.0, the catalyst performance target in the slurry bubble column reactor is 88% CO + H{sub 2}conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/h/gFe. The methane + ethane selectivity is desired to be no more than 4% and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effect of Surface Modification by Chelating Agents on Fischer- Tropsch Performance of Co/SiO{sub 2} Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The silica support of a Co-based catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was modified by the chelating agents (CAs) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After the modification, characterization of the fresh and spent catalysts show reduced crystallite sizes, a better-dispersed Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase on the calcined samples, and increased metal dispersions for the reduced samples. The CA-modified catalysts display higher CO conversions, product yields, reaction rates and rate constants. The improved FT performance of CA-modified catalysts is attributed to the formation of stable complexes with Co. The superior performance of the EDTA-modified catalyst in comparison to the NTA-modified catalyst is due to the higher affinity of the former for complex formation with Co ions.

Bambal, Ashish S.; Kugler, Edwin L.; Gardner, Todd H.; Dadyburjor, Dady B.

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst. [Quarterly] report, June 30, 1988--September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu/MnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H{sub 2}/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 10, December 26, 1992--March 26, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract tasks are as follows: 1.0: Catalyst development; 1.1--Technology assessment; 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development; 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation; 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment; 1.5--Catalyst characterization; 2.0--Catalyst testing; 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress made on Task 1.2 and 2.0.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 9, September 26, 1992--December 26, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract Tasks are as follows: 1.0--Catalyst development, 1.1--Technology assessment, 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development, 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation, 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment, 1.5--Catalyst characterization, 2.0--Catalyst testing, 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress on Task 1.3.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Technology development for iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Technical progress report No. 6, December 26, 1991--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract are to develop a technology for the production of active and stable iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts for use in slurry-phase synthesis reactors and to develop a scaleup procedure for large-scale synthesis of such catalysts for process development and long-term testing in slurry bubble-column reactors. With a feed containing H{sub 2} and CO in the molar ratio of 0.5 to 1.0 to the slurry bubble-column reactor, the catalyst performance target is 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion at a minimum space velocity of 2.4 NL/hr/gFe. The desired sum of methane and ethane selectivities is no more than 4%, and the conversion loss per week is not to exceed 1%. Contract Tasks are as follows: 1.0--Catalyst development, 1.1--Technology assessment, 1.2--Precipitated catalyst preparation method development, 1.3--Novel catalyst preparation methods investigation, 1.4--Catalyst pretreatment, 1.5--Catalyst characterization, 2.0--Catalyst testing, 3.0--Catalyst aging studies, and 4.0--Preliminary design and cost estimate of a catalyst synthesis facility. This paper reports progress made on catalyst development.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical extraction. Quarterly report, July 1, 1996 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research projects is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e. 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the projects depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, the must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. The project includes three tasks (1) equilibrium solubility measurements, (2) thermodynamic modeling, and (3) process design studies.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States); Sherrard, D.; Biales, J.; Kilpatrick, P.; Roberts, G. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

Programming and testing of the highly complex Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (or SAFT) equation of state is essentially complete. As an accuracy check, results from our program were compared and found to be in excellent agreement with those of two other research groups (one in the US and two in Europe) for both a nonassociating (methane-hexadecane) and an associating (carbon dioxide-methanol) system. This equation is being used to model the solubility our model Fischer-Tropsch compounds in supercritical solvents such as hexane. SAFT has been chosen for this work because of its fundamental rigor. Therefore, extension of our model compound results to the poorly defined Fischer-Tropsch waxes should be more successful compared to more empirical equations such as Peng-Robinson. Computer-controlled automation of one of our dynamic supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction apparatus is complete. The apparatus collects samples automatically, dramatically reducing operator manpower and fatigue, and is also capable of controlling the operating pressure more precisely (i.e., within {plus_minus}2 psi). This apparatus (SFE I) will be used for future experiments with actual Fischer-Tropsch waxes. Modification/construction of another apparatus (SCF II) that will be used for our model component-SCF phase equilibria/solubility studies is nearly complete; it is currently being leak-tested. This apparatus was built to handle the low mass flow rates that will be required when measuring solubility data for the more expensive model compounds, such as n-C40. Anticipated results for the next quarter include VLE measurements for hexane-squalane at temperatures to 573 K.

Thies, M.C.; Joyce, P.C.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fischer-Tropsch chemistry: structure of a seminal eta/sup 2/-CH cluster derivative, HFe/sub 4/(eta/sup 2/-CH)(CO)/sub 12/  

SciTech Connect

Results of x-ray crystallographic studies of the complex HFe/sub 4/(eta/sup 2/-CH)(CO)/sub 12/ are reported. The complex may provide information that relates to intermediates in some metal-surface catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reactions. The complex was found to contain a butterfly array of four Fe atoms, each with three terminal carbonyl ligands, with the carbidic C atom nestled near the center of the top of the wings of the Fe/sub 4/ array where it forms a strong C-H-Fe interaction. Measurements of the bond distances are given. (BLM)

Beno, M.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Williams, J.M.; Tachikawa, M.; Muetterties, E.L.

1980-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

98

Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect

Work continued on the development of a microkinetic model of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on supported and unsupported Fe catalysts. The following aspects of the FT mechanism on unsupported iron catalysts were investigated on during this third year: (1) the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor based on sequential design of experiments; (2) CO adsorption and CO-TPD for obtaining the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron; and (3) isothermal hydrogenation (IH) after Fischer Tropsch reaction to identify and quantify surface carbonaceous species. Rates of C{sub 2+} formation on unsupported iron catalysts at 220 C and 20 atm correlated well to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be rate-determining steps. From desorption of molecularly adsorbed CO at different temperatures the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron was determined to be 100 kJ/mol. Amounts and types of carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for 5-10 minutes at 150, 175, 200 and 285 C vary significantly with temperature. Mr. Brian Critchfield completed his M.S. thesis work on a statistically designed study of the kinetics of FTS on 20% Fe/alumina. Preparation of a paper describing this work is in progress. Results of these studies were reported at the Annual Meeting of the Western States Catalysis and at the San Francisco AIChE meeting. In the coming period, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on unsupported Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters by SSITKA method. This study will help us to (1) understand effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) build a microkinetics model for FTS on iron. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on models of defected Fe surfaces, most significantly the stepped Fe(211) surface. Binding Energies (BE's), preferred adsorption sites and geometries of all the FTS relevant stable species and intermediates were evaluated. Each elementary step of our reaction model was fully characterized with respect to its thermochemistry and comparisons between the stepped Fe(211) facet and the most-stable Fe(110) facet were established. In most cases the BE's on Fe(211) reflected the trends observed earlier on Fe(110), yet there were significant variations imposed on the underlying trends. Vibrational frequencies were evaluated for the preferred adsorption configurations of each species with the aim of evaluating the entropy-changes and preexponential factors for each elementary step. Kinetic studies were performed for the early steps of FTS (up to CH{sub 4} formation) and CO dissociation. This involved evaluation of the Minimum Energy Pathway (MEP) and activation energy barrier for the steps involved. We concluded that Fe(211) would allow for far more facile CO dissociation in comparison to other Fe catalysts studied so far, but the other FTS steps studied remained mostly unchanged.

Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Rahul P. Nabar

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emissions from the Combustion of Alternative Fuels in a Gas Turbine Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

? Centre of Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409, United States ... Within the aviation sector, the development and certification of alternative drop-in fuels are progressing at a rapid pace: a standard specification for aviation fuel containing synthesized hydrocarbons was approved by ASTM in 2009,(4) Hydrogenated esters and fatty acids (HEFA), also often referred to as hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ), qualified as a 50/50 blend with petroleum Jet A-1 in 2011,(4) and the Commercial Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI) anticipate fully synthetic Fischer–Tropsch (FT) fuel to qualify in 2012. ... Impact of Alternative Fuels on Emissions Characteristics of a Gas Turbine Engine – Part 1: Gaseous and Particulate Matter Emissions ...

Simon Christie; David Raper; David S. Lee; Paul I. Williams; Lucas Rye; Simon Blakey; Chris W. Wilson; Prem Lobo; Donald Hagen; Philip D. Whitefield

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Performance Synergies between Low-Temperature and High-Temperature Fischer?Tropsch Diesel Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With both LTFT and HTFT diesels being nontraditional, alternative diesel fuels that can be used directly in the current fuelling infrastructure, the objective of this study was to investigate the potential synergies in fuel properties with blends of LTFT diesel and HTFT DHT diesel. ... Regulated exhaust emissions measured over the engine dynamometer test cycle in grams of pollutant per unit of mechanical energy delivered by the engine (g/kW h) included total hydrocarbon (THC), generally referred to as HC, CO, carbon dioxide (CO2), NOx, and PM. ... However, the general consumer should most probably not be able to notice the difference in volumetric fuel consumption. ...

Delanie Lamprecht; Luis P. Dancuart; Kaveer Harrilall

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fischer-Tropsch slurry phase process variations to understand wax formations: Quarterly report for period October 1, 1987 to December 31, 1987  

SciTech Connect

Effects of high syngas conversion on the secondary reactions of olefins formed by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on a reduced fused magnetite catalyst were simulated by studies of olefins in the presence of hydrogen and low concentrations of CO, or none at all. kinetic models were developed for the effect of CO partial pressure on hydrogenation rates at 232)degree)C and 0.30 to 0.79 MPa. In the absence of carbon monoxide, olefin hydrogenation was more rapid than in its presence. A model indicated that a hydrogenated carbon monoxide species on the catalyst may be responsible for the inhibition of olefin hydrogenation, and that olefin adsorption is rate-limiting. The formation of secondary olefins appeared to follow similar trends with carbon monoxide partial pressure. Olefin incorporation was not observed in the small amount of Fischer-Tropsch products obtained in these experiments. The chain growth probability, alpha, appeared to correlate with the H/sub 2/CO feed ratio. 14 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Satterfield, C.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fischer?Tropsch Synfuels from Biomass: Maximizing Carbon Efficiency and Hydrocarbon Yield  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper collects yield and efficiency estimates for FT synfuel production from biomass feedstocks. ... In comparison to other biofuels, advantages include (i) flexible use of all kinds of biomass feedstocks (including waste materials) and, therefore, no competition with the production of food, (ii) relatively high yields per arable land (100?180 GJ ha?1 year?1), and (iii) high fuel qualities to be used in present distribution infrastructures and high-efficiency engine technologies. ... Flow scheme for the conversion of biomass feedstocks to liquid hydrocarbon fuels (BTL) and formal chemical reactions. ...

Dominik Unruh; Kyra Pabst; Georg Schaub

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach  

SciTech Connect

This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient measurements. The results provide a platform for further development of microkinetic models of FTS on Fe and a basis for more precise modeling of FTS activity of Fe catalysts. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on various realistic models of industrial, Fe-based FTS catalysts. Close-packed, most stable Fe(110) facet was analyzed and subsequently carbide formation was found to be facile leading to the choice of the FeC(110) model representing a Fe facet with a sub-surface C atom. The Pt adatom (Fe{sup Pt}(110)) was found to be the most stable model for our studies into Pt promotion and finally the role of steps was elucidated by recourse to the defected Fe(211) facet. Binding Energies(BEs), preferred adsorption sites and geometries for all FTS relevant stable species and intermediates were evaluated on each model catalyst facet. A mechanistic model (comprising of 32 elementary steps involving 19 species) was constructed and each elementary step therein was fully characterized with respect to its thermochemistry and kinetics. Kinetic calculations involved evaluation of the Minimum Energy Pathways (MEPs) and activation energies (barriers) for each step. Vibrational frequencies were evaluated for the preferred adsorption configuration of each species with the aim of evaluating entropy-changes, pre exponential factors and serving as a useful connection with experimental surface science techniques. Comparative analysis among these four facets revealed important trends in their relative behavior and roles in FTS catalysis. Overall the First Principles Calculations afforded us a new insight into FTS catalysis on Fe and modified-Fe catalysts.

Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to create a synthetic bio- based fuel that is chemicallyBoeing/NASA Synthetic bio-based fuels, Fischer-Tropsch (FT)ICAO 2009b). Synthetic bio-based fuels include bio-based jet

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Feasibility of Steam Hydrogasification of Microalgae for Production of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is followed by steam methane reforming ( SMR). The finalReaction: Steam Methane Reforming: Fischer–Tropsch Reaction:methane and steam in steam methane reforming generates the

Suemanotham, Amornrat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Poisoning of a silica-supported cobalt catalyst due to presence of sulfur impurities in syngas during Fischer-Tropsch: Effects of chelating agent  

SciTech Connect

The effects of sulfur impurities on the performance of cobalt-based Fischer?Tropsch catalysts are evaluated under industrially relevant operating conditions of temperature, pressure, and impurity levels. Chelating agents (CAs) were used to modify the SiO2 support, and the performances of the CA-modified catalysts are compared with conventional Co/SiO2 catalysts. For both the Co/SiO2 and CA-modified catalysts, the presence of sulfur in the inlet syngas results in a notable drop in the CO conversion, an undesired shift in the hydrocarbon selectivity toward short-chain hydrocarbons, more olefins in the products, and lower product yields. In the post-poisoning stage, i.e., after termination of sulfur introduction in the inlet syngas, the CA-modified catalysts recover activity and selectivity (to some extent at least), whereas such trends are not observed for the base-case, i.e., unmodified Co/SiO2 catalyst. The improved performance of the CA-modified catalysts in the presence of sulfur is attributed to higher densities of active sites.

Bambal, Ashish S. [WVU; Guggilla, Vidya S. [WVU; Kugler, Edwin L. [WVU; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE; Dadyburjor, Dady B. [WVU

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fischer Tropsch synthesis : influence of Mn on the carburization rates and activities of Fe-based catalysts by TPR-EXAFS/XANES and catalyst testing.  

SciTech Connect

Fe-based catalysts containing different amounts of Mn were tested for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using a stirred tank reactor at 270 C, 1.21 MPa, and H{sub 2}:CO = 0.7. Catalyst activation by carburization with 10% CO/He was followed by Temperature Programmed Reduction/X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (TPR-EXAFS/XANES) from room temperature to 300 C. {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was converted into iron carbides, whereas MnO{sub x} was reduced to oxygen deficient MnO. Mn hindered Fe carburization, such that the carburized catalyst displayed higher Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} content than the catalyst without Mn. EXAFS fitting indicates that the carburized catalyst contained a mixture of Hgg carbide, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and Mn oxides. Increasing Mn content led to higher CH{sub 4} and light product selectivities, and lower light olefin selectivities. Higher and stable conversions were obtained with a catalyst containing an almost equimolar Fe/Mn ratio relative to the catalyst without Mn. Selectivity trends are attributed to the higher WGS rates observed on the FeMn catalysts, consistent with the structural differences observed.

Ribeiro, M. C.; Jacobs, G.; Pendyala, R.; Davis, B. H.; Cronauer, D. C.; Kropf, A. J.; Marshall, C. L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Univ. of Kentucky)

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of SCF extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer- Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. To implement our objectives, the following task structure is being implemented: Task 1 equilibrium solubility measurements; Task 2 thermodynamic modeling; and Task 3 process design studies. Progress reports are presented for each task.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1996--31 March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200--300 {degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. The success of the project depends on two major factors. First, the supercritical solvent must be able to dissolve the F-T wax; furthermore, this must be accomplished without entraining the solid catalyst. Second, the extraction must be controlled so as not to favor the removal of the low molecular weight wax compounds, i.e., a constant carbon-number distribution of the alkanes in the wax slurry must be maintained at steady-state column operation. During this quarter work focused on task 1b, experimental measurement of selected model systems. Vapor-liquid equilibrium experiments for the n- hexane/squalane system, which we initiated in the previous quarter, were continued and results are discussed in this report.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

New approach to the generation of metal-bearing, medium-pore, shape-selective zeolites for Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. Spectroscopic studies of zeolites  

SciTech Connect

Two recent developments in zeolite synthesis and modification were successfully combined to demonstrate a new approach to the generation of metal-bearing, medium-pore, shape-selective zeolites for use as catalysts in Fischer-Tropsch conversions. The steps are: (1) synthesis of an aluminoferrisilicate zeolite having the ZSM-5-type structure; (2) removal of the organic base template incorporated in the channel system during synthesis; (3) formation of a polycyano inclusion compound in the AFS zeolite; and (4) reduction of the inclusion compound by hydrogen at approx. 400/sup 0/C. PAS and EPR spectroscopy have been used to establish that the as-synthesized AFS zeolite contains Fe/sup 3 +/ ions in both framework and non-framework sites. FMR spectroscopy has been used to confirm the formation of the metallic (Fe) and bimetallic (Fe/Ru and Fe/Co) particles as products of the reduction of the inclusion compounds by hydrogen. The application of other spectroscopic techniques in recent studies of cations, complexes, and metal particles in zeolites is reviewed: high-resolution solid-state NMR, nuclear-spin-relaxation studies, FMR, EXAFS, and XANES.

Iton, L.E.; Beal, R.B.; Hodul, D.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels from Coal and Biomass Thomas G. Kreutz, Eric D. Larson, Guangjian Liu, Robert H. Williams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................................8 2.2.2 Biomass as feedstock

112

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FTR: Fischer-Tropsch reactor LCA: life cycle analysis LCI:software. Life cycle analyses (LCA) using a modified GREETfor the process. Keywords: LCA, Fischer-Tropsch, avation

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

114

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Alternative Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels NREL's Fleet Test and Evaluation Team works with industry partners to evaluate the use of alternative fuels in delivery, transit, and freight vehicles. Although biodiesel is the most commonly used alternative fuel in medium- and heavy-duty diesel vehicles, compressed and liquefied natural gas and Fischer-Tropsch diesel are also viable options for trucking companies. Learn more about the team's evaluations of alternative fuels in fleet operations: Biodiesel Compressed Natural Gas Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Liquefied Natural Gas Printable Version Fleet Test and Evaluation Home Research & Development Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Electric & Plug-in Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Truck Stop Electrification

115

Future Prospects of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important for the future of this nation to reach the goal of demonstrated definition and quantification of the parameters which influence the ability to use this country's vast resources of coal and oil shale for production of synthetic fuels...

Fryback, M. G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst using supercritical fluid extraction. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1995--31 December 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project is to evaluate the potential of supercritical fluid (SCF) extraction for separating the catalyst slurry of a Fischer-Tropsch slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor into two fractions: (1) a catalyst-free wax containing less than 10 ppm particulate matter and (2) a concentrated catalyst slurry that is ready for recycle or regeneration. The wax will be extracted with a hydrocarbon solvent that has a critical temperature near the operating temperature of the SBC reactor, i.e., 200-300{degrees}C. Initial work is being performed using n-hexane as the solvent. During the reporting period, work on the small-scale, continuous-flow apparatus continued. Initial experiments have been performed on a binary mixture of n-hexane (solvent) and squalane (model compound) at 200{degrees}C. A total of fifteen samples were collected at 135, 160, and 208 psig, with pressures being controlled to within {plus_minus}2 psi. Results indicate that the equilibrium phase compositions can in principle be measured to a reproducibility of {plus_minus}0.5% in the squalane-rich bottomphase and {plus_minus}2% in the hexane-rich top phase, with respect to the minor component. However, other data measured at these same conditions at another time exhibited scatter that was as much as 5 times greater. We believe that improvements in (1) the method of preheating the feed to the view cell/phase separator and to (2) the sample collection technique are required before data of high accuracy can consistently be generated. The apparatus modifications required to effect these improvements are currently underway and should be completed by the middle of February.

Thies, M.C.; Joyce, P.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass Project Summary Full Title: Gasification-Based Fuels and Electricity Production from Biomass, without and with Carbon Capture and Storage Project ID: 226 Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Keywords: Biomass; Fischer Tropsch; hydrogen Purpose Develop and analyze process designs for gasification-based thermochemical conversion of switchgrass into Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels, dimethyl ether (DME), and hydrogen. All process designs will have some level of co-production of electricity, and some will include capture of byproduct CO2 for underground storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric D. Larson Organization: Princeton University Telephone: 609-258-4966 Email: elarson@princeton.edu

118

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Catalyst and process for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Synthetic fuels, carbon dioxide and climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The observed increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has been attributed to the use of fossil fuels. There is concern that the generation and use of synthetic fuels derived from oil shale and coal will accelerate the increase of CO2.

Alex R. Sapre; John R. Hummel; Ruth A. Reck

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ULTRACLEAN FUELS PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: ADVANCES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

Fox, E.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fuels - Biodiesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Biodiesel * Biodiesel * Butanol * Ethanol * Hydrogen * Natural Gas * Fischer-Tropsch Batteries Cross-Cutting Assessments Engines GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Clean Diesel Fuels Background Reducing our country's dependence on foreign oil and the rising costs of crude oil are primary reasons for a renewed interest in alternative fuels for the transportation sector. Stringent emissions regulations and public concern about mobile sources of air pollution provide additional incentives to develop fuels that generate fewer emissions, potentially reducing the need for sophisticated, expensive exhaust after-treatment devices.

124

Efficient Utilization of Greenhouse Gases in a Gas-to-Liquids Process Combined with CO2/Steam-Mixed Reforming and Fe-Based Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the reforming unit, CO2 reforming and steam reforming of methane are combined together to produce syngas in flexible composition. ... In the burner-type reformer, NG is used as a heating fuel, in order to reduce the consumption of NG, the vent gas can be applied to the burner to replace some part of NG as fuel. ...

Chundong Zhang; Ki-Won Jun; Kyoung-Su Ha; Yun-Jo Lee; Seok Chang Kang

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

This project extends previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities for feedstocks consisting of synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic results previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During the third and fourth reporting periods, we improved the catalysts preparation method, which led to Fe-based FT catalysts with the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported, a finding that allowed their operation at lower temperatures and pressures with high selectivity to desired products (C{sub 5+}, olefins). During the fifth reporting period, we studied the effects of different promoters on catalytic performance, specifically how their sequence of addition dramatically influenced the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We also continued our studies of the kinetic behavior of these materials. Specifically, the effects of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} on the rates and selectivities of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis reactions led us to propose a new sequence of elementary steps on Fe and Co Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. More specifically, we were focused on the roles of hydrogen-assisted and alkali-assisted dissociation of CO in determining rates and CO{sub 2} selectivities. During this sixth reporting period, we have studied the validity of the mechanism that we propose by analyzing the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} kinetic isotope effect (r{sub H}/r{sub D}) over a conventional iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst Fe-Zn-K-Cu. We have observed experimentally that the use of D{sub 2} instead of H{sub 2} leads to higher hydrocarbons formation rates (inverse kinetic isotopic effect). On the contrary, primary carbon dioxide formation is not influenced. These experimental observations can be explained by the two CO activation pathways we propose. During this reporting period, the experimental kinetic study has been also complemented with periodic, self-consistent, DFT-GGA investigations in a parallel collaboration with the group of Manos Mavrikakis at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. These DFT calculations suggest minimal energy paths for proposed elementary steps on Fe(110) and Co(0001) surfaces. These calculations support our novel conclusions about the preferential dissociation of CO dissociation via H-assisted pathways on Fe-based catalysts. Unassisted CO dissociation also occurs and lead to the formation of CO{sub 2} as a primary oxygen scavenging mechanism after CO dissociation on Fe-based catalysts. Simulations and our experimental data show also that unassisted CO dissociation route is much less likely on Co surfaces and that hydrocarbons form exclusively via H-assisted pathways with the formation of H{sub 2}O as the sole oxygen rejection product. We have also started a study of the use of colloidal precipitation methods for the synthesis of small Fe and Co clusters using recently developed methods to explore possible further improvements in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities. We have found that colloidal synthesis makes possible the preparation of small cobalt particles, although large amount of cobalt silicate species, which are difficult to reduce, are formed. The nature of the cobalt precursor and the modification of the support seem to be critical parameters in order to obtain highly dispersed and reducible Co nanoparticles.

Akio; Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Nan Yao; Enrique Iglesia

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Alternatives to Diesel Fuel in California - Fuel Cycle Energy and Emission Effects of Possible Replacements Due to the TAC Diesel Particulate Decision  

SciTech Connect

Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression ignition by spark ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, ressionignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOx emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM10 reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

Christopher L. Saraicks; Donald M. Rote; Frank Stodolsky; James J. Eberhardt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

1 - Gasification and synthetic liquid fuel production: an overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter discusses general considerations on gasification processes and synthetic liquid fuel production. It provides an overview of state-of-the-art gasification technologies, feedstocks and applications in power generation, and synthetic fuels production, together with some recent future trends in the field.

R. Luque; J.G. Speight

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Multi-stage Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for producing paraffinic hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen comprising: (a) introducing carbon monoxide and hydrogen into a reaction zone wherein the carbon monoxide and hydrogen contact in a first bed a first catalyst having a high olefin selectivity selected from the group consisting of Fe/Ce/Zn/K, Fe/Mn/K and Fe/Co/K; and (b) contacting the resulting olefin in a second bed with a second catalyst having a high selectivity for converting olefins to heavier paraffinic hydrocarbons selected from the group consisting of Ru/TiO/sub 2/, Ru/SiO/sub 2/ and Ru/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/.

Kim, C.J.; Fiato, R.A.

1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

129

Energy: A Geoscience Perspective:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...internal combustion engine (along with the...Gt) OF FOSSIL FUEL PROVEN RESERVES AND...by reducing energy consumption. This does not necessarily...internal combustion engine with the high-efficiency...allowing transportation fuel to come from carbon-free...biomass into synthetic diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch...

Daniel P. Schrag

130

Naphthenic acid corrosion in synthetic fuels production  

SciTech Connect

Serious corrosion damage to carbon steel piping in a fractionation unit associated with synthetic fuels production has been ascribed to the presence of naphthenic acids. Investigation of the problem revealed total acids numbers (TAN) ranging from 8--12mg KOH/g in the feed to the unit. Damage typically occurred in the temperature range 180--240 C and manifested as localized pitting, preferential weld corrosion, general wall thinning and end-grain attack. Filming amine corrosion inhibitors designed for refinery overhead systems have been proven ineffective and high temperature phosphate-based inhibitors could not be used due to potential catalyst poisoning in downstream refinery units. Coupon exposures indicated corrosion rates in the order of 2 mm/y on carbon steel in a reboiler line as well as pitting to austenitic stainless steel type UNS S30403. Line replacement in austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 has been proven effective. The performance of this alloy is mainly ascribed to its molybdenum content. The absence of sulfur in the feed to the unit is also contributing to the alloy performance despite the extremely high total acid numbers.

Bruyn, H.I. de [Mossgas Ltd., Mossel Bay (South Africa)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Synthetic fuels handbook: properties, process and performance  

SciTech Connect

The handbook is a comprehensive guide to the benefits and trade-offs of numerous alternative fuels, presenting expert analyses of the different properties, processes, and performance characteristics of each fuel. It discusses the concept systems and technology involved in the production of fuels on both industrial and individual scales. Chapters 5 and 7 are of special interest to the coal industry. Contents: Chapter 1. Fuel Sources - Conventional and Non-conventional; Chapter 2. Natural Gas; Chapter 3. Fuels From Petroleum and Heavy Oil; Chapter 4. Fuels From Tar Sand Bitumen; Chapter 5. Fuels From Coal; Chapter 6. Fuels From Oil Shale; Chapter 7. Fuels From Synthesis Gas; Chapter 8. Fuels From Biomass; Chapter 9. Fuels From Crops; Chapter 10. Fuels From Wood; Chapter 11. Fuels From Domestic and Industrial Waste; Chapter 12. Landfill Gas. 3 apps.

Speight, J. [University of Utah, UT (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Defossiling Fuel: How Synthetic Biology Can Transform Biofuel Production David F. Savage , Jeffrey through natural intermediates to final molecule is long, and biofuel production is perhaps the ultimate engineering, economic, political, and environmental realities. Are biofuels sustainable? Consider U

133

Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results (Brochure)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Results Results Prepared for South Coast Air Quality Management District by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory CRD-01-098 Fischer-Tropsch Synthetic Fuel Demonstration in a Southern California Vehicle Fleet Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report i Alternative Fuel Trucks YOSEMITE WATERS VEHICLE EVALUATION REPORT Authors Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

134

Energy: A Geoscience Perspective:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...individuals around the world. But fundamental questions remain about these...example, the internal combustion engine (along with the gas turbine...low-efficiency internal combustion engine with the high-efficiency...conversion of biomass into synthetic diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch...

Daniel P. Schrag

135

Energy: A Geoscience Perspective:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the internal combustion engine (along with the gas...developed countries. In general, countries with higher...low-efficiency internal combustion engine with the high-efficiency...biomass into synthetic diesel fuel via the Fischer-Tropsch...House et al. 2006). In general, the storage issues...

Daniel P. Schrag

136

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

coal through the Fischer-Tropsch process, and compressed or liquefied gas derived from biomass. For an entity to be eligible to claim the credit they must be liable for reporting...

137

EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in 7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA Summary This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project was selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

138

Design, Synthesis and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

This project extends previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rates and selectivities for synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic results previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During the third and fourth reporting periods, we improved the catalysts preparation method, which led to Fe-based materials with the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported, a finding that allowed their operation at lower temperatures and pressures with high selectivity to desired products (C{sub 5+}, olefins). During the fifth and sixth reporting period, we studied the effects of different promoters on catalytic performance, specifically how their sequence of addition dramatically influenced the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. We also continued our studies of the kinetic behavior of these materials during the sixth reporting period. Specifically, the effects of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} on the rates and selectivities of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis reactions led us to propose a new sequence of elementary steps on Fe and Co Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. Finally, we also started a study of the use of colloidal precipitation methods for the synthesis small Co clusters using recently developed methods to explore possible further improvements in FTS rates and selectivities. We found that colloidal synthesis makes possible the preparation of small cobalt particles, although large amount of cobalt silicate species, which are difficult to reduce, were formed. During this seventh reporting period, we have explored several methods to modify the silanol groups on SiO{sub 2} by using either a homogeneous deposition-precipitation method or surface titration of Si-OH on SiO{sub 2} with zirconium (IV) ethoxide to prevent the formation of unreducible and unreactive CoO{sub x} species during synthesis and FTS catalysis. We have synthesized monometallic Co/ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts with different Co loadings (11-20 wt%) by incipient wetness impregnation methods and characterized the prepared Co supported catalysts by H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and H{sub 2}-chemisorption. We have measured the catalytic performance in FTS reactions and shown that although the hydroxyl groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface are difficult to be fully titrated by ZrO{sub 2}, modification of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} surface can improve the Co clusters dispersion and lead to a larger number of exposed Co surface atoms after reduction and during FTS reactions. During this seventh reporting period, we have also advanced our development of the reaction mechanism proposed in the previous reporting period. Specifically, we have shown that our novel proposal for the pathways involved in CO activation on Fe and Co catalysts is consistent with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations carried out in collaboration with Prof. Manos Mavrikakis (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Finally, we have also worked on the preparation of several manuscripts describing our findings about the preparation, activation and mechanism of the FTS with Fe-based catalysts and we have started redacting the final report for this project.

Akio Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Nan Yao; Enrique Iglesia

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Economical production of transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, and other carbonaceous feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

The Nation`s economy and security will continue to be vitally linked to an efficient transportation system of air, rail, and highway vehicles that depend on a continuous supply of liquid fuels at a reasonable price and with characteristics that can help the vehicle manufacturers meet increasingly strict environmental regulations. However, an analysis of US oil production and demand shows that, between now and 2015, a significant increase in imported oil will be needed to meet transportation fuel requirements. One element of an overall Department of Energy`s (DOE) strategy to address this energy security issue while helping meet emissions requirements is to produce premium transportation fuels from non-petroleum feedstocks, such as coal, natural gas, and biomass, via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) and other synthesis gas conversion technologies.

Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Winslow, J.C.; Venkataraman, V.K.; Driscoll, D.J. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Path to the Formulation of New Generations of Synthetic Jet Fuel Derived from Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with industry and academia to study synthetic jet fuels derived from natural gas. These studies are being implemented at its Fuel Characterization Lab where the most advanced testing equipment is used and strict Quality Management and safety systems are followed...

Al-Nuaimi, Ibrahim Awni Omar Hassan

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pathways, such as gasification. However, the current studysuch as MSW, the gasification to Fischer- Tropsch fuelof research on biomass gasification to FT-fuels compared to

Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

June 3, 2014 Webinar - Features, Events, and Processes: Practical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses Proceedings of 3rd USGerman Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Eastern Wind Integration...

143

Otimização da produção de hidrogênio pela reforma a vapor do metano em reator com membrana laboratorial.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen is used as fuel and as a feedstock in important processes such as ammonia and methanol production and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, besides the increasing use… (more)

Leandro Cardoso Silva

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Emission characteristics of GTL fuel as an alternative to conventional marine gas oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study examine the gaseous, smoke and particulate matter emission characteristics of a turbocharged heavy-duty diesel engine operated on conventional marine gas oil and gas-to-liquid Fischer–Tropsch fuel under modes of propulsion and generator operation. The gas-to-liquid showed average reductions up to 19% in nitrogen oxides, 25% in carbon monoxide, 4% in carbon dioxide and 30% in smoke with slight increase in unburned hydrocarbon emissions. Particulate number concentrations for gas-to-liquid were up to 21% higher, whereas particulates mass showed a 16% decrease at medium and high loads, while increasing by 12–15% under lower load conditions. Very low aromatic content of gas-to-liquid fuel and nearly zero sulfur level are responsible for particulate reduction.

Sergey Ushakov; Nadine G.M. Halvorsen; Harald Valland; Dag H. Williksen; Vilmar Æsøy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

SciTech Connect

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Production of synthetic gasoline and diesel fuel from nonpetroleum resources  

SciTech Connect

In late 1985, the New Zealand Gas-to-Gasoline Complex was successfully streamed producing high octane gasoline from natural gas. The heart of this complex is the Mobil fixed-bed Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) section which represents one of several newly developed technologies for production of synthetic gasoline and diesel fuels. All of these technologies are based on production of methanol by conventional technology, followed by conversion of the methanol to transportation fuel. The fixed-bed (MTG) process has been developed and commercialized. The fluid-bed version of the MTG process, which is now also available for commercial license, has a higher thermal efficiency and possesses substantial yield and octane number advantages over the fixed-bed. Successful scale-up was completed in 1984 in a 100 BPD semi-works plant in Wesseling, Federal Republic of Germany. The project was funded jointly by the U.S. and German governments and by the industrial participants: Mobil, Union Rheinsche Braunkohlen Kraftstoff, AG; and Uhde, GmbH. This fluid-bed MTG project was extended recently to demonstrate a related fluid-bed process for selective conversion of methanol to olefins (MTO). The MTO process can be combined with Mobil's commercially available olefins conversion process (Mobil-Olefins-to-Gasoline-and-Distillate, MOGD) for coproduction of high quality gasoline and distillate via methanol. This MTO process was also successfully demonstrated at the Wesseling semiworks with this project being completed in late 1985.

Tabak, S.A.; Avidan, A.A.; Krambeck, F.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Societal lifecycle costs of cars with alternative fuels/engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effectively addressing concerns about air pollution (especially health impacts of small-particle air pollution), climate change, and oil supply insecurity will probably require radical changes in automotive engine/fuel technologies in directions that offer both the potential for achieving near-zero emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases and a diversification of the transport fuel system away from its present exclusive dependence on petroleum. The basis for comparing alternative automotive engine/fuel options in evolving toward these goals in the present analysis is the “societal lifecycle cost” of transportation, including the vehicle first cost (assuming large-scale mass production), fuel costs (assuming a fully developed fuel infrastructure), externality costs for oil supply security, and damage costs for emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases calculated over the full fuel cycle. Several engine/fuel options are considered—including current gasoline internal combustion engines and a variety of advanced lightweight vehicles: internal combustion engine vehicles fueled with gasoline or hydrogen; internal combustion engine/hybrid electric vehicles fueled with gasoline, compressed natural gas, Diesel, Fischer–Tropsch liquids or hydrogen; and fuel cell vehicles fueled with gasoline, methanol or hydrogen (from natural gas, coal or wind power). To account for large uncertainties inherent in the analysis (for example in environmental damage costs, in oil supply security costs and in projected mass-produced costs of future vehicles), lifecycle costs are estimated for a range of possible future conditions. Under base-case conditions, several advanced options have roughly comparable lifecycle costs that are lower than for today's conventional gasoline internal combustion engine cars, when environmental and oil supply insecurity externalities are counted—including advanced gasoline internal combustion engine cars, internal combustion engine/hybrid electric cars fueled with gasoline, Diesel, Fischer–Tropsch liquids or compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fuel cell cars. The hydrogen fuel cell car stands out as having the lowest externality costs of any option and, when mass produced and with high valuations of externalities, the least projected lifecycle cost. Particular attention is given to strategies that would enhance the prospects that the hydrogen fuel cell car would eventually become the Car of the Future, while pursuing innovations relating to options based on internal combustion engines that would both assist a transition to hydrogen fuel cell cars and provide significant reductions of externality costs in the near term.

Joan M Ogden; Robert H Williams; Eric D Larson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Activation studies with promoted precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Ruhrchemie catalyst, the catalyst activity and stability changed markedly with reduction procedure. Hs reduction at 220'C was repeated since it gave very loiv activity. The reproducibility of this test ivas good. Hs reduction at 250 gave higher catalyst...

Manne, Rama Krishna

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cobalt-ruthenium catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A hydrocarbon synthesis process is described which comprises reacting hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a catalyst comprised of cobalt and ruthenium on titania, at reaction conditions suitable for the formation of higher hydrocarbons. The catalyst is prepared by impregnating titania with solutions of cobalt and ruthenium salts, drying the impregnated support, reducing the cobalt and ruthenium, treating the reduced metals with an oxygen containing stream at conditions sufficient to form oxides of cobalt and oxides of ruthenium and reducing the cobalt and ruthenium oxides.

Iglesia, E.; Soled, S.L.; Fiato, R.A.

1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

VLE MEASUREMENTS FOR ASYMMETRIC MIXTURES OF FISCHER-TROPSCH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect

The ability to model the thermodynamic phase behavior of long-chain and short-chain alkane mixtures is of considerable industrial and theoretical interest. However, attempts to accurately describe the phase behavior of what we call asymmetric mixtures of hydrocarbons (AMoHs) have met with only limited success. Vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) data are surprisingly scarce, and the limited data that are available suggest that cubic equations of state may not be capable of fitting (much less predicting) the phase behavior of AMoHs. The following tasks, which address the problems described above, were accomplished during the one-year period of this Phase I UCR grant: (1) A continuous-flow apparatus was modified for the measurement of AMoHs and used to measure VLE for propane + hexadecane mixtures at temperatures from 473 to 626 K and pressures up to the mixture critical pressures of about 100 bar. (2) The extent to which cubic vs. modern, statistical mechanics-based equations of state (EoS) are applicable to AMoHs was evaluated. Peng-Robinson (PR) was found to be a surprisingly accurate equation for fitting AMoHs, but only if its pure component parameters were regressed to liquid densities and vapor pressures. However, even this form of PR was still not a predictive equation, as there was a significant variation of kij with temperature. In spite of its deficiencies in terms of vapor-phase predictions and modeling of the critical region, PC-SAFT was found to be the most appropriate EoS for truly predicting the phase behavior of highly asymmetric mixtures of alkanes. (3) Finally, a dense-gas extraction (DGE) apparatus was designed and constructed for the fractionation of F-T waxes into cuts of pure oligomers. Such oligomers are needed in g-sized quantities to perform VLE measurements with long-chain alkanes with carbon numbers greater than 40. The dense gas and the solute mixture to be extracted are contacted in a packed column that has a separation power significantly greater than what can be achieved in one equilibrium stage. Thus, wax oligomer purities are expected to be much better than what can be obtained by conventional supercritical extraction processes.

Mark C. Thies

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sulphur. They have no aromatics due to the isomerisation of the highly paraffinic Fischer-Tropsch liquids into GTL fuels and are practically100%iso-paraffinic,thustheyhaveveryhighcetaneratings. The... and sulphur. They have no aromatics due to the isomerisation of the highly paraffinic Fischer-Tropsch liquids into GTL fuels and are practically100%iso-paraffinic,thustheyhaveveryhighcetaneratings. The...

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Task 3.3: Warm Syngas Cleanup and Catalytic Processes for Syngas Conversion to Fuels Subtask 3: Advanced Syngas Conversion to Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This collaborative joint research project is in the area of advanced gasification and conversion, within the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)-Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Memorandum of Understanding. The goal for this subtask is the development of advanced syngas conversion technologies. Two areas of investigation were evaluated: Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Syngas The conversion of synthetic gas (syngas) to synthetic natural gas (SNG) is typically catalyzed by nickel catalysts performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C). The reaction is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated, which can lead to process thermal imbalance and destruction of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is typically limited, and substantial syngas recycle is employed. Commercial methanation catalysts and processes have been developed by Haldor Topsoe, and in some reports, they have indicated that there is a need and opportunity for thermally more robust methanation catalysts to allow for higher per-pass conversion in methanation units. SNG process requires the syngas feed with a higher H2/CO ratio than typically produced from gasification processes. Therefore, the water-gas shift reaction (WGS) will be required to tailor the H2/CO ratio. Integration with CO2 separation could potentially eliminate the need for a separate WGS unit, thereby integrating WGS, methanation, and CO2 capture into one single unit operation and, consequently, leading to improved process efficiency. The SNG process also has the benefit of producing a product stream with high CO2 concentrations, which makes CO2 separation more readily achievable. The use of either adsorbents or membranes that selectively separate the CO2 from the H2 and CO would shift the methanation reaction (by driving WGS for hydrogen production) and greatly improve the overall efficiency and economics of the process. The scope of this activity was to develop methods and enabling materials for syngas conversion to SNG with readily CO2 separation. Suitable methanation catalyst and CO2 sorbent materials were developed. Successful proof-of-concept for the combined reaction-sorption process was demonstrated, which culminated in a research publication. With successful demonstration, a decision was made to switch focus to an area of fuels research of more interest to all three research institutions (CAS-NETL-PNNL). Syngas-to-Hydrocarbon Fuels through Higher Alcohol Intermediates There are two types of processes in syngas conversion to fuels that are attracting R&D interest: 1) syngas conversion to mixed alcohols; and 2) syngas conversion to gasoline via the methanol-to-gasoline process developed by Exxon-Mobil in the 1970s. The focus of this task was to develop a one-step conversion technology by effectively incorporating both processes, which is expected to reduce the capital and operational cost associated with the conversion of coal-derived syngas to liquid fuels. It should be noted that this work did not further study the classic Fischer-Tropsch reaction pathway. Rather, we focused on the studies for unique catalyst pathways that involve the direct liquid fuel synthesis enabled by oxygenated intermediates. Recent advances made in the area of higher alcohol synthesis including the novel catalytic composite materials recently developed by CAS using base metal catalysts were used.

Lebarbier Dagel, Vanessa M.; Li, J.; Taylor, Charles E.; Wang, Yong; Dagle, Robert A.; Deshmane, Chinmay A.; Bao, Xinhe

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

The German plan for synthetic fuel self-sufficiency, 1933-1942  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major Subject: History THE GERMAN PLAN FOR SYNTHETIC FUEL SELF-SUFFICIENCY, 1933-1942 A Thesis by TERRY HUNT TOOLEY Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Depart ent ~kaM PL~~~~ Member Member Member -. December... 1978 111 ABSTRACT The German Plan for Synthet1c Fuel Self-SuFficiency, 1933-1942 (December 1978) Terry Hunt Tooley, B. A. , Texas ARM Dn1versity Cha1rman of Advisory Committee: Or. Arnold P. Krammer By ach1eving a cooperation between industry...

Tooley, Terry Hunt

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Synthetic fuel concept to steal CO2 from air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to steal CO2 from air Lab has developed a low-risk, transformational concept, called Green Freedom(tm), for large-scale production of carbon-neutral, sulfur-free fuels and...

156

Combustion behavior of a spark ignition engine fueled with synthetic gases derived from biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combustion results obtained from a spark ignition engine fueled with two synthetic gases obtained from catalytic decomposition of biogas are presented in this paper. These results are compared with those obtained when the engine was fueled with gasoline, methane and with the biogas from which synthetic gases are extracted. Experimental tests were performed under a wide range of speeds and at three equivalence ratios. Results showed that fractions of hydrogen in synthetic gases increased maximum pressures inside cylinder. Moreover, peak pressures were detected closer to top dead center than methane and biogas. Despite the fraction of diluents in the composition of synthetic gases, high speeds and lean conditions resulted in higher indicated efficiencies than those obtained with gasoline. Moreover, combustion speed and heat release rate were strongly influenced by the proportion of diluents and hydrogen in gaseous blends. CO and CO2 content in the composition of synthetic gases contributed to increase the exhaust concentrations of these pollutants compared with the other fuels, while HC decreased because of the small fraction of methane which remained unburned. Although \\{NOx\\} emissions were mitigated by diluents, like CO2 and air excess, high hydrogen fraction in composition of syngas involved elevated \\{NOx\\} emissions due to the increase in flame temperature that hydrogen produces.

J. Arroyo; F. Moreno; M. Muñoz; C. Monné; N. Bernal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Synthetic and Jet Fuels Pyrolysis for Cooling and Combustion Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phenomenon (heat and mass transfers, pyrolysis, combustion) in a cooling channel surrounding a SCRamjet regeneratively cooled SCRamjet is provided to get a large vision of the fuel nature impact on the system of supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRamjet) [1]. For such high velocity, the total temperature of external air

Boyer, Edmond

158

An investigation of synthetic fuel production via chemical looping  

SciTech Connect

Producing liquid hydrocarbon fuels with a reduced greenhouse gas emissions profile would ease the transition to a carbon-neutral energy sector with the transportation industry being the immediate beneficiary followed by the power industry. Revolutionary solutions in transportation, such as electricity and hydrogen, depend on the deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies and/or renewable energy systems. Additionally, high oil prices may increase the development of unconventional sources, such as tar sands, that have a higher emissions profile. One process that is gaining interest is a system for producing reduced carbon fuels though chemical looping technologies. An investigation of the implications of such a process using methane and carbon dioxide that is reformed to yield methanol has been done. An important aspect of the investigation is the use of off-the-shelf technologies to achieve the results. The ability of the process to yield reduced emissions fuels depends on the source for the feed and process heat. For the range of conditions considered, the emissions profile of methanol produced in this method varies from 0.475 to 1.645 moles carbon dioxide per mole methanol. The thermal load can be provided by methane, coal or carbon neutral (biogas). The upper bound can be lowered to 0.750 by applying CCS and/or using nonfossil heat sources for the reforming. The process provides an initial pathway to incorporate CO{sub 2} into fuels independent of electrolytic hydrogen or developments in other sectors of the economy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Frank Zeman; Marco Castaldi [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States). Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

NETL: LabNotes - May 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers Gain New Insight into Activating Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Researchers Gain New Insight into Activating Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts An array of model Fischer-Tropsch catalyst particles. The image on the left shows an array of model Fischer-Tropsch catalyst particles, as seen using a special scan- ning tunneling microscope at NETL. The image on the right is an enlargement of the surface of one of these particles showing a regular array of closely packed oxygen atoms, which appear as small circular ‘bumps’ in the images. The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process is a set of chemical reactions that historically has been used to produce a petroleum substitute from coal, natural gas, or biomass by nations looking for an alternative to importing it. The F-T process has received intermittent attention as a source of low-sulfur diesel fuel whenever the cost of petroleum gets sufficiently

160

3 - Preparation of feedstocks for gasification for synthetic liquid fuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification has been considered as a potential thermo-chemical method of conversion to effectively utilize the carbon (organic content) present in the feedstock. Preparation and handling methods of some of the potential feedstocks (i.e., coal, petroleum residue, biomass, and municipal solid waste (MSW) to produce the synthetic gas) for various applications are discussed. The pre-treatment process for feedstock constitutes the steps that must be imposed on the raw material in preparation for use in a gasification reactor. The properties of fuel that influence the gasification are energy content, moisture content, particle size and distribution, form of the fuel, bulk density of the fuel, volatile matter content, ash content, and composition and reactivity of the fuel.

B. Bhavya; R. Singh; T. Bhaskar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy and Climate Impacts of Producing Synthetic Hydrocarbon Fuels from CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These platforms make the case for (more) research on the conversion of CO2 into synthetic fuels as means to utilize CO2 and thereby mitigate its accumulation in the atmosphere. ... Stechel, E. B.; Miller, J. E.Re-energizing CO2 to fuels with the sun: Issues of efficiency, scale, and economics J. CO2 Util. ... Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per ton of CO2, making it cost competitive with mainstream CO2 mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO2 emitting point sources. ...

Coen van der Giesen; René Kleijn; Gert Jan Kramer

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis  

SciTech Connect

Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The potential utilization of nuclear hydrogen for synthetic fuels production at a coal–to–liquid facility / Steven Chiuta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of synthetic fuels (synfuels) in coal–to–liquids (CTL) facilities has contributed to global warming due to the huge CO2 emissions of the process. This… (more)

Chiuta, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Engine combustion, performance and emission characteristics of gas to liquid (GTL) fuels and its blends with diesel and bio-diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Crude oil price hikes, energy security concerns and environmental drivers have turned the focus to alternative fuels. Gas to liquid (GTL) diesel is regarded as a promising alternative diesel fuel, considering the adeptness to use directly as a diesel fuel or in blends with petroleum-derived diesel or bio-diesel. GTL fuel derived from Fischer–Tropsch synthesis is of distinctly different characteristics than fossil diesel fuel due to its paraffinic nature, virtually zero sulfur, low aromatic contents and very high cetane number. GTL fuel is referred to as a “clean fuel” for its inherent ability to reduce engine exhaust emission even with blends of diesel and bio-diesel. This paper illustrates feasibility of GTL fuel in context of comparative fuel properties with conventional diesel and bio-diesels. This review also describes the technical attributes of GTL and its blends with diesel and bio-diesel focusing their impact on engine performance and emission characteristics on the basis of the previous research works. It can introduce an efficacious guideline to devise several blends of alternative fuels, further the development of engine performance and constrain exhaust emission to cope with the relentless efforts to manufacture efficient and environment friendly powertrains.

H. Sajjad; H.H. Masjuki; M. Varman; M.A. Kalam; M.I. Arbab; S. Imtenan; S.M. Ashrafur Rahman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

A diesel engine study of conventional and alternative diesel and jet fuels: Ignition and emissions characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Measurements of ignition delay, CO and NO emissions, and fuel consumption were carried out in a light-duty single-cylinder direct-injection diesel engine for operation with petroleum and alternative hydroprocessed and Fischer–Tropsch diesel and jet fuels. Ignition measurements carried out for a fixed engine speed and injection timing quantify the decrease in in-cylinder ignition delay with increasing derived cetane number (DCN) over a range of DCN relevant to diesel engine operation (DCN = 40–80) and show no discernible dependence of ignition delay on other fuel properties. Brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) was found to decrease with increasing DCN with strong correlation due to a reduction in ignition time for fixed-injection-timed operation. Brake specific CO emissions were also found to decrease with increasing DCN due to increased time provided for CO burn out due to earlier ignition. Brake specific NO emissions were found to decrease with increasing hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) ratio, due to the lower peak combustion temperatures and thermal \\{NOx\\} occurring for fuels with higher H/C.

Sandeep Gowdagiri; Xander M. Cesari; Mingdi Huang; Matthew A. Oehlschlaeger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Comparison of costs for automobile energy conservation vs synthetic fuel production  

SciTech Connect

This preliminary analysis suggests that there are a large number of potential technical options for reducing energy consumption in automobiles. Furthermore, the cost to the user of purchasing these conservation options is less than the discounted cost of purchasing the additional fuel required if the conservation option is not chosen. There is a significant cost savings even if fuel costs remain at current levels. These savings would increase if fuel prices continue to rise or if more costly than synthetic fuels, at least for another 15 to 20 years. Cost-effective conservation could enable new vehicles to reach 40 to 50 mpg corporate average fuel economy by the year 2000. It is clear that the potential for making these changes exists, but better data are needed to evaluate many of these options and to ensure the development and implementation of those that are desirable. Specifically, there is a need for more applied research in government and industry laboratories. Key areas for this work are discussed here for: (1) optimized engine designs, and (2) efficient vehicle body structures. 10 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

Gorman, R.; Heitner, K.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Indirect thermal liquefaction process for producing liquid fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

A progress report on an indirect liquefaction process to convert biomass type materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels by gasification followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis has been presented. A wide variety of feedstocks can be processed through the gasification system to a gas with a heating value of 500 + Btu/SCF. Some feedstocks are more attractive than others with regard to producing a high olefin content. This appears to be related to hydrocarbon content of the material. The H/sub 2//CO ratio can be manipulated over a wide range in the gasification system with steam addition. Some feedstocks require the aid of a water-gas shift catalyst while others appear to exhibit an auto-catalytic effect to achieve the conversion. H/sub 2/S content (beyond the gasification system wet scrubber) is negligible for the feedstocks surveyed. The water gas shift reaction appears to be enhanced with an increase in pyrolysis reactor temperature over the range of 1300 to 1700/sup 0/F. Reactor temperature in the Fischer-Tropsch step is a significant factor with regard to manipulating product composition analysis. The optimum temperature however will probably correspond to maximum conversion to liquid hydrocarbons in the C/sub 5/ - C/sub 17/ range. Continuing research includes integrated system performance assessment, alternative feedstock characterization (through gasification) and factor studies for gasification (e.g., catalyst usage, alternate heat transfer media, steam usage, recycle effects, residence time study) and liquefaction (e.g., improved catalysts, catalyst activity characterization).

Kuester, J.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Efforts intensify to convert methane to fuels directly  

SciTech Connect

Until now the assumption has been that synthesis gas - mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen - would be the principal source for many of the chemicals and fuels to be made via C/sub 1/ chemistry. Efforts to make cheap synthesis gas continue. But the pressure to circumvent the stranglehold that OPEC has on petroleum has caused other avenues to be explored. The current oversupply of natural gas offers an interim solution to the problem of nonpetroleum alternate source materials for C/sub 1/ chemicals production. The paper discusses the constraints and advantages of four processes: conventional steam reforming, steam reforming with oxygen secondary, partial oxidation, and catalytic partial oxidation. The end product in all cases is methanol. Direct use of methanol as a fuel has encountered numerous difficulties. conversion of methanol is, thus, of more immediate interest in C/sub 1/ chemistry. The Mobil MTG process and its second-generation modifications, both producing high-grade gasoline, are discussed. Also, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, and the Sasol coal liquefaction processes are summarized.

Haggin, J.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Efficiency and emissions of a spark ignition engine fueled with synthetic gases obtained from catalytic decomposition of biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the tests developed in a naturally aspirated spark ignition engine, intended for installation in vehicles, fueled with synthetic gases obtained from catalytic decomposition of biogas. The experimental tests were carried out at three equivalence ratios and different speeds and loads. Two synthetic blends were used and the results were compared with those of gasoline and methane. Efficiency and emissions were calculated for the different fuels under the same operation conditions and it was found that at lean equivalence ratios, brake thermal efficiency with synthetic gases approached to the traditional fuels and even improved it at ? = 0.7. BSCO2 emissions increased due to the CO2 content of the gaseous blends. While CO increased at stoichiometric conditions, it decreased at lean conditions because the H2 contained in synthetic gases improved combustion at these conditions. BSHC measured were very low with synthetic gases because of the low content of methane in blends. The change in the fraction of H2 and CO2 of the synthetic blends led to quite different results in BSNOx. Syngas 1 \\{BSNOx\\} emissions were the lowest of all fuels, while syngas 2 \\{BSNOx\\} were the highest because of its high H2 fraction.

J. Arroyo; F. Moreno; M. Muñoz; C. Monné

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect

This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

Andile B. Mzinyati [Sasol Technology Research and Development, Sasolburg (South Africa). Fischer-Tropsch Refinery Catalysis

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

EA-1642S: Finding of No Significant Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, Kentucky

175

CX-002358: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels DevelopmentCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 05/10/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

176

CX-011112: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Innovative Gasification to Produce Fischer-Tropsch Jet and Diesel Fuel CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/15/2013 Location(s): Iowa Offices(s): Golden Field Office

177

EA-1642S: Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, Kentucky

178

Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results  

SciTech Connect

Document details the evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch diesel, a gas-to-liquid fuel, in medium-duty delivery vehicles at Yosemite Waters. The study was conducted by NREL at the company's Fullerton, California, bottling headquarters.

Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Alleman, T. L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Prospects for Coal-To-Liquid Conversion: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the economics of coal-to-liquid (CTL) conversion, a polygeneration technology that produces liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity by coal gasification and Fischer-Tropsch process. CTL is more expensive ...

Chen, Y.-H. Henry

180

Coal liquefaction and gas conversion: Proceedings. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: Indirect Liquefaction (oxygenated fuels); and Indirect Liquefaction (Fischer-Tropsch technology). Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Summary report : direct approaches for recycling carbon dioxide into synthetic fuel.  

SciTech Connect

The consumption of petroleum by the transportation sector in the United States is roughly equivalent to petroleum imports into the country, which have totaled over 12 million barrels a day every year since 2004. This reliance on foreign oil is a strategic vulnerability for the economy and national security. Further, the effect of unmitigated CO{sub 2} releases on the global climate is a growing concern both here and abroad. Independence from problematic oil producers can be achieved to a great degree through the utilization of non-conventional hydrocarbon resources such as coal, oil-shale and tarsands. However, tapping into and converting these resources into liquid fuels exacerbates green house gas (GHG) emissions as they are carbon rich, but hydrogen deficient. Revolutionary thinking about energy and fuels must be adopted. We must recognize that hydrocarbon fuels are ideal energy carriers, but not primary energy sources. The energy stored in a chemical fuel is released for utilization by oxidation. In the case of hydrogen fuel the chemical product is water; in the case of a hydrocarbon fuel, water and carbon dioxide are produced. The hydrogen economy envisions a cycle in which H{sub 2}O is re-energized by splitting water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, by electrolysis for example. We envision a hydrocarbon analogy in which both carbon dioxide and water are re-energized through the application of a persistent energy source (e.g. solar or nuclear). This is of course essentially what the process of photosynthesis accomplishes, albeit with a relatively low sunlight-to-hydrocarbon efficiency. The goal of this project then was the creation of a direct and efficient process for the solar or nuclear driven thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO (and O{sub 2}), one of the basic building blocks of synthetic fuels. This process would potentially provide the basis for an alternate hydrocarbon economy that is carbon neutral, provides a pathway to energy independence, and is compatible with much of the existing fuel infrastructure.

Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Miller, James Edward; Gelbard, Fred; Evans, Lindsey R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Engine performance and emissions from the combustion of low-temperature Fischerâ??Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel and biodiesel rapeseed methyl ester blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of oxygenated biodiesel (rapeseed methyl ester (RME)) improves the engine-out particulate matter, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, while the low-temperature Fischerâ??Tropsch synthetic paraffinic diesel fuel improves engine-out NOx, CO, hydrocarbon and particulate matter emissions. Blending synthetic diesel (SD) fuel with oxygenated biodiesel could unlock potential performance synergies in the fuel properties (e.g. O2 content in RME and high cetane number of the synthetic fuels) of such blends and benefit engine performance and emissions. The combustion of synthetic diesel fuel/RME blend, named synthetic diesel B50, has shown similar combustion characteristics to diesel fuel, while simultaneous improvements in engine efficiency and smoke-NOx trade-off were achieved by taking advantage of the fuel's properties. The engine thermal efficiency was dependent on the fuel type, and followed the general trend: synthetic diesel > SDB50 > diesel > RME. Therefore, it has been shown that the design of a synthetic fuel with properties similar to the fuel blends presented in this work could improve engine-out NOx, smoke and hydrocarbon emissions and maintain or improve engine performance.

Kampanart Theinnoi; Athanasios Tsolakis; Sathaporn Chuepeng; Andrew P.E. York; Roger F. Cracknell; Richard H. Clark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

C–H Bond Activation by Pd-substituted CeO2: Substituted Ions versus Reduced Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While large reserves of CH4 exist and considerable portions of these reserves are currently used to heat homes and generate hydrogen for other synthetic processes, it is widely accepted that the conversion of CH4 to liquid hydrocarbon fuels efficiently with an inexpensive and robust catalyst would be a substantial contribution to alternative energy research. ... (40) The usual Fischer–Tropsch strategy requires oxidation to mixtures of CO and H2, which are then converted to higher hydrocarbons. ... While heating any hydrocarbon in the presence of oxygen to high temperatures, combustion products are expected. ...

Lauren M. Misch; Joshua A. Kurzman; Alan R. Derk; Young-Il Kim; Ram Seshadri; Horia Metiu; Eric W. McFarland; Galen D. Stucky

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Elephant in the Room: Dealing with Carbon Emissions from Synthetic Transportation Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide (CO2), produced by conversion of hydrocarbons to energy, primarily via fossil fuel combustion, is one of the most ubiquitous and significant greenhouse gases (GHGs). Concerns over climate change precipitated by rising atmospheric GHG concentrations have prompted many industrialized nations to begin adopting limits on emissions to inhibit increases in atmospheric CO2 levels. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change states as a key goal the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 at a level that prevents “dangerous anthropogenic interference” with the planet’s climate systems. This will require sharply reducing emissions growth rates in developing nations, and reducing CO2 emissions in the industrialized world to half current rates in the next 50 years. And ultimately, stabilization will require that annual emissions drop to almost zero.Recently, there has been interest in producing synthetic transportation fuels via coal-to-liquids (CTL) production, particularly in countries where there is an abundant supply of domestic coal, including the United States. This paper provides an overview of the current state of CTL technologies and deployment, a discussion of costs and technical requirements for mitigating the CO2 impacts associated with a CTL facility, and the challenges facing the CTL industry as it moves toward maturity.

Parker, Graham B.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

On the evaluation of synthetic and natural ilmenite using syngas as fuel in chemical-looping combustion (CLC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technique where the CO2 produced is inherently separated from the rest of the flue gases with a considerably low energy penalty. For this reason, CLC has emerged as one of the more attractive options to capture CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. When applying CLC with solid fuels, the use of a low cost oxygen carrier is highly important, and one such low cost oxygen carrier is the mineral ilmenite. The current work investigates the reactivity of several ilmenites, some which are synthetically produced by freeze granulation and two natural minerals, one Norwegian ilmenite and one South African ilmenite. A laboratory fluidized bed reactor made of quartz was used to simulate a two reactor CLC system by alternating the reduction and oxidation phase. The fuel was syngas containing 50% CO and 50% H2. A mixture of 6 g of ilmenite with 9 g inert quartz of diameter 125–180 ?m was exposed to a flow of 900 mLn/min syngas in the reduction phase. During the oxidation phase, a 900 mLn/min flow of 10% O2 diluted in N2 was used. The experimental results showed that all ilmenites give higher conversion of H2 than of CO. Generally, synthetic ilmenites have better CO and H2 conversion than natural ilmenites and synthetic ilmenites prepared with an excess of Fe generally showed higher total conversion of CO than synthetic ilmenites with an excess of Ti. Most synthetic ilmenites and the Norwegian ilmenite showed good fluidization properties during the experiments. However, for two of the synthetically produced materials, and for the South African ilmenite, particle agglomerations were visible at the end of the experiment.

Muhammad Mufti Azis; Erik Jerndal; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels from syngas. Second annual report, March 1982-February 1983  

SciTech Connect

Initial Task 1 tests used methanol as the feed. It was found that catalysts of interest tended to make highly methylated aromatics in the Berty reactor. Although a simulated distillation showed that these products boiled in the gasoline and diesel range, most were solid at room temperature. Aromatic products frequently are desirable constituents of gasoline, but highly methylated aromatics which precipitate at the concentrations found are undesirable. Since small olefins are products and intermediates in reactions over Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, propylene was chosen as feedstock to replace methanol. Catalysts for syngas feed (task 2) have a metal component (MC) and a shape-selective component (SSC). Four techniques have been used in synthesizing our bi-functional catalysts. The data presented show that catalysts and conditions have been found which enable converting 1:1 H/sub 2//CO syngas feed at reasonable conversions in one step to motor fuel range products with quite acceptable selectivity to C/sub 5//sup +/ products. Two effects should be noted. The molecular sieves used reduced the high boiling (wax) component of the product as compared to physical mixture with the relatively inert ..cap alpha..-alumina. Also the quality of the gasoline range product with the molecular sieve is much better than with the F-T type catalyst.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

Unknown

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Feasibility of Steam Hydrogasification of Microalgae for Production of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

major bottleneck to algae-based fuels. Journal of Renewablesystem boundary for algae–based fuels. The boundary definesMurphy, Renewable fuels from algae: an answer to debatable

Suemanotham, Amornrat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Feasibility of Steam Hydrogasification of Microalgae for Production of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasifier Intermediate products Low Energy Gas Final product Power Steam Gas Synthetic Liquids Spark and diesel engines Process Heat & Power Medium &

Suemanotham, Amornrat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT-DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002.

Unknown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co--product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases: Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's third quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001.

John W. Rich

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Alternative fuel and chemicals from synthesis gas  

SciTech Connect

Development of a reliable and cost-effective method of wax/catalyst separation is a key step toward a commercially viable slurry reactor process with iron oxide-based catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of hydrocarbon transportation fuels. Although a variety of suitable catalysts (including, for example, cobalt-based catalysts) are available, iron oxide-based catalysts are preferred for coal-derived, CO-rich syngas because, in addition to catalyzing the F-T reaction, they simultaneously catalyze the reaction stifling CO to H{sub 2}, obviating a separate shift process block and associated costs. Because of the importance of development of this wax/catalyst separation, a study was initiated in February 1991. P. Z. Zhou of Burns and Roe reviewed the status of F-T wax/catalyst separation techniques. This led to the selection of a filtration system for the separation. Pilot tests were conducted by Mott Porous Metal Products in 1992 to develop this system. Initial results were good, but problems were encountered in follow-up testing. As a result of the testing, a filter was selected for use on the pilot plant. In LaPorte, Texas, APCI has been operating a pilot plant for the development of various synthesis gas technologies with DOE and industry support. The APCI F-T program builds on the DOE-sponsored laboratory-scale work by Mobil, reported in the mid-1980s, which used an iron oxide catalyst to produce high-quality F-T liquids in relatively compact reactors. Separation of the catalyst solids from the wax still represents a challenge. In the summer of 1992, testing of the selected filter was begun as part of the pilot plant testing. The filter performed poorly. Separation of the catalyst was primarily by sedimentation. It was recommended that the wax/catalyst separation be developed further.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Deep oxidation of glucose in enzymatic fuel cells through a synthetic enzymatic pathway containing a cascade of two thermostable dehydrogenases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep Deep oxidation of glucose in enzymatic fuel cells through a synthetic enzymatic pathway containing a cascade of two thermostable dehydrogenases Zhiguang Zhu a , Fangfang Sun a , Xiaozhou Zhang a,d , Y.-H. Percival Zhang a,b,c,d,n a Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA b Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA c DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA d Gate Fuels Inc., 2200 Kraft Drive, Suite 1200B, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 12 January 2012 Received in revised form 26 March 2012 Accepted 4 April 2012 Keywords: Deep oxidation Enzymatic fuel cell Glucose biobattery Thermoenzyme

195

Mobility chains analysis of technologies for passenger cars and light duty vehicles fueled with biofuels : application of the Greet model to project the role of biomass in America's energy future (RBAEF) project.  

SciTech Connect

The Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) is a multi-institution, multiple-sponsor research project. The primary focus of the project is to analyze and assess the potential of transportation fuels derived from cellulosic biomass in the years 2015 to 2030. For this project, researchers at Dartmouth College and Princeton University designed and simulated an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity using the ASPEN Plus{trademark} model. With support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted, for the RBAEF project, a mobility chains or well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at ANL. The mobility chains analysis was intended to estimate the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of different production biofuels in light-duty vehicle technologies.

Wu, M.; Wu, Y.; Wang, M; Energy Systems

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Feasibility of Steam Hydrogasification of Microalgae for Production of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processing of biomass conversion into fuels, chemical andby microalgae biomass conversion using biochemical,by microalgae biomass conversion using biochemical,

Suemanotham, Amornrat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Processes and palladium-promoted catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for hydrocarbon synthesis comprising the step of reacting a synthesis gas in the presence of a cobalt catalyst promoted with palladium.

Singleton, Alan H. (Baden, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Gibsonia, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Cranberry Township, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Safety and Techno-Economic Analysis of Solvent Selection for Supercritical Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fixed-bed reactor, among other disadvantages, is that the reaction is very exothermic, which is a concern in terms of safety hazards and also in terms of cost of heat removal. With the slurry reactor, a problem is that in the liquid media... at different lengths.4 After the reaction takes place, the amount of carbon monoxide consumed decreases and carbon dioxide is produced as a side product.9 The FTS reaction is an extremely exothermic process, which represents serious challenges...

Hamad, Natalie

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Effect of Liquid Composition on the Slurry Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. 1. Rate of Reaction  

SciTech Connect

With a reduced fused magnetite catalyst, the rate of reaction in the presence of phenanthrene is nearly twice that observed in the presence of n-octacosane even though the solubility of H/sub 2/ and CO is moderately less in phenanthrene. The rate in the presence of triphenylmethane was about the same as in n-octacosane. In the presence of a perfluoropolyether, the rate of reaction was markedly reduced, even though H/sub 2/ and CO solubilities are much higher than in hydrocarbons. This was attributed to substantial mass transfer resistances through an encapsulating hydrocarbon layer around the catalyst particles. The effect of the nature of a liquid on several other reactions is also discussed.

Satterfield, C.N.; Stenger, H.G.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Effect of Liquid Composition on the Slurry Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis. 2. Product Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

With a reduced, fused magnetite catalyst, secondary reactions, consisting of olefin hydrogenation, olefin isomerization, and incorporation of ethylene and/or ethyl alcohol into product, were slightly greater in octacosane than in phenanthrene at 232/sup 0/C but essentially the same at 263/sup 0/C. This is attributed to competitiv adsorption effects with phenanthrene which adsorbs significantly onto the catalyst at 232/sup 0/C, but not at 263/sup 0/C. All secondary reactions are enhanced by conditions minimizing CO adsorption. Oxygenates were greatly diminished at high conversions. C/sub 2/ incorporation into product stops chain growth by a scavenging effect. In the presence of a perfluoropolyether (Fomblin), in which hydrocarbons are immiscible, catalyst is preferentially wetted by hydrocarbons and secondary reactions are greatly enhanced by mass transfer resistances.

Stenger, H.G.; Satterfield, C.N.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

Mark C. Thies; Patrick C. Joyce

1998-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over a fused iron catalyst in a three phase slurry reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variables and ranges were temperature, 235 C to 280 C, pressure, 200 to 400 psig, space velocity, 0, 71 to 4. 5N liter/hr gram unreduced catalyst and H /CO feed, 0. 64 to 2. 4. Increases in temperature and space velocity were found to shift product... Neter; L Drierite Tube; N Vater Saturator; N Vet Test Meter. 24 Catalyst Transfer Configuration for Catalyst Charging. 26 3-4 Carle Refinery Gas Analyzer Chromatogram for Gas Phase Analysis of Light Gases from Run 510. 29 3-5 Varian Aerograph...

Buck, Henry J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development of a Fischer-Tropsch Gasoline Process for the Steam Hydrogasification Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial   &  engineering  chemistry  research,  2005.  Industrial   &   engineering   chemistry   research,  Industrial   &   engineering   chemistry  research,  1995.  

Li, Yang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Co/Pillared Clay Bifunctional Catalyst for Controlling the Product Distribution of Fischer?Tropsch Synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results indicate that the activities of the catalysts (i.e., CO conversions) increase in the order of Co/Na-Clay ? Co/Si-PILC ? Co/acid-clay ? Co/Al-PILC PILC ? Co/SiO2. ... After calcination at 773 K for 4 h, zirconia-pillared clay (Zr-PILC) was obtained. ... Following the same procedure as used for preparing Zr-PILC, Al-PILC and Si-PILC were obtained. ...

Qing-Qing Hao; Guang-Wei Wang; Zhao-Tie Liu; Jian Lu; Zhong-Wen Liu

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

FischerTropsch synthesis on a model Co/SiO2 catalyst , Zhoujun Wang a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, although made vulnerable by the dramatic changes in crude oil prices, is still one of the few technologies and Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history on crude oil, and much effort has been made to develop renewable energy technologies, such as solar, wind

Goodman, Wayne

206

Technology Development for Iron and Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States agency thereof. #12;2 Abstract CAER Tight control of catalyst distribution within SBCRs should . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Kentucky, University of

207

A study of Fischer-Tropsch model compounds reacting over ZSM-5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on small hydrocarbons have been studied by many investigators. The conversion of methanol to I , hydrocarbons has been studied by Chang and Silvestri (1977), Derouane, et ' al. (1978), Anderson, et al. (1979), Dejaifve, et al. (1980), and Vedrine, et al... on small hydrocarbons have been studied by many investigators. The conversion of methanol to I , hydrocarbons has been studied by Chang and Silvestri (1977), Derouane, et ' al. (1978), Anderson, et al. (1979), Dejaifve, et al. (1980), and Vedrine, et al...

Riley, Mark Garner

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst by Supercritical Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Further progress in achieving the objectives of the project was made in the period of January I to March 31, 1998. The direct numerical simulation of particle removal process in turbulent gas flows was completed. Variations of particle trajectories are studied. It is shown that the near wall vortices profoundly affect the particle removal process in turbulent boundary layer flows. Experimental data for transport and deposition of fibrous particles in the aerosol wind tunnel was obtained. The measured deposition velocity for irregular fibrous particles is compared with the empirical correlation and the available data for glass fibers and discussed. Additional progress on the sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition and resuspension in turbulent flows was made.

Mark C. Thies; Patrick C. Joyce

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Feasibility of Steam Hydrogasification of Microalgae for Production of Synthetic Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Murphy, Renewable fuels from algae: an answer to debatableprogram biodiesel from algae, 1998, National Renewableet al. , Biodiesel from algae: challenges and prospects.

Suemanotham, Amornrat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases  

SciTech Connect

The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

211

Chemical Recycling of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol and Dimethyl Ether: From Greenhouse Gas to Renewable, Environmentally Carbon Neutral Fuels and Synthetic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Recycling of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol and Dimethyl Ether: From Greenhouse Gas to Renewable, Environmentally Carbon Neutral Fuels and Synthetic Hydrocarbons ... (1, 3-6) Methanol and derived dimethyl ether (DME) are also excellent fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE) and in a new generation of direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFC), as well as convenient starting materials for producing light olefins (ethylene and propylene) and subsequently practically any derived hydrocarbon product. ... Methanol produced this way was used in the 19th century for lighting, cooking, and heating purposes but was later replaced by cheaper fuels, especially kerosene. ...

George A. Olah; Alain Goeppert; G. K. Surya Prakash

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

212

An assessment of carbon sources for the production of synthetic fuels from nuclear hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the transportation sector, the current dependence on petroleum to satisfy large transportation fuel demand in the US is unsustainable. Oil resources are finite, and causing heavy US reliance on oil imports. Therefore, ...

Leung, MinWah

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Testing Synthetic Fuels for Use in U.S. Army Ground Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

214

LDRD final report on "fundamentals of synthetic conversion of CO2 to simple hydrocarbon fuels" (LDRD 113486).  

SciTech Connect

Energy production is inextricably linked to national security and poses the danger of altering the environment in potentially catastrophic ways. There is no greater problem than sustainable energy production. Our purpose was to attack this problem by examining processes, technology, and science needed for recycling CO{sub 2} back into transportation fuels. This approach can be thought of as 'bio-inspired' as nature employs the same basic inputs, CO{sub 2}/energy/water, to produce biomass. We addressed two key deficiencies apparent in current efforts. First, a detailed process analysis comparing the potential for chemical and conventional engineering methods to provide a route for the conversion of CO{sub 2} and water to fuel has been completed. No apparent 'showstoppers' are apparent in the synthetic route. Opportunities to improve current processes have also been identified and examined. Second, we have also specifically addressed the fundamental science of the direct production of methanol from CO{sub 2} using H{sub 2} as a reductant.

Maravelias, Christos T. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kemp, Richard Alan; Mavrikakis, Manos (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Miller, James Edward; Stewart, Constantine A.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FIFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION - DOE/NETL FIFTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION - DOE/NETL May 8 - 11, 2006 CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS Comparing Climate-Change Mitigating Potentials of Alternative Synthetic Liquid Fuel Technologies Using Biomass and Coal Robert H. Williams 1 , Eric D. Larson 1 , Haiming Jin 2 1 Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University Guyot Hall, Washington Road, Princeton, NJ, 08544 2 TX Energy, 1330 Post Oak Boulevard, Suite 1600, Houston, TX, 77056 Abstract The climate-change mitigation potentials of alternative options for making synthetic liquid fuel from coal and biomass without and with CO 2 capture and storage are explored. The emphasis is on making Fischer-Tropsch liquids, with comparisons to cellulosic ethanol. Particular attention is

216

EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and 642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY SUMMARY This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

217

Powered by technology or powering technology? – Belief-based decision-making in nuclear power and synthetic fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The overarching question in this study is how and why technical-fixes in energy policy failed. In the post-WWII era, civilian nuclear power and synthetic… (more)

Yang, Chi-Jen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Efficient recovery of nano-sized iron oxide particles from synthetic acid-mine drainage (AMD) water using fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient recovery of nano-sized iron oxide particles from synthetic acid-mine drainage (AMD) water electricity. Here we show that this approach can also be used as a technique to generate spherical nano

219

Availability Assessment of Carbonaceous Biomass in California as a Feedstock for Thermo-chemical Conversion to Synthetic Liquid Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

148% of the state’s diesel fuel market or 22% of total U.S.diesel gallon equivalent, therefore 6.5 dge amounts to 4.46 (10 -5 ) mi/kJ. California Clean Fuels Market

Valkenburg, C; Norbeck, J N; Park, C S

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Synthetic Design of New Metal-Organic Framework Materials for Hydrogen Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Pingyun Feng (Primary Contact), Qipu Lin, Xiang Zhao Department of Chemistry University of California Riverside, CA 92521 Phone: (951) 827-2042 Email: pingyun.feng@ucr.edu DOE Program Officer: Dr. Michael Sennett Phone: (301) 903-6051 Email: Michael.Sennett@science.doe.gov Objectives Design and * synthesize new metal-organic framework materials using lightweight chemical elements to help improve gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity. Develop new synthetic strategies to generate novel * active binding sites on metal ions and ligands to enhance solid-gas interactions for increased uptake near ambient conditions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect

The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

A First-Principle Study of Chain Propagation Steps in the Fischer?Tropsch Synthesis on Fe(100)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This finding is consistent with the LEED and TDS observations that propyl is the dominant product instead of propane in the hydrogenation reaction of propylene on Fe(100) below 200 K.(51) ... thanks the Canadian Government for a Canada Research Chair in Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry. ...

John M. H. Lo; Tom Ziegler

2008-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

223

Síntese de Fischer-Tropsch sobre perovskitas LayCu0,4Fe0,6O3.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A produção atual de 52 milhões mdia-1 de gás natural e os grandes projetos para esta expansão vem estabelecendo novas fronteiras para a indústria nacional… (more)

José Roberto de Souza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax from Catalyst Using Near-Critical Fluid Extraction: Analysis of Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

", can be produced from materials such as coal, natural gas, waste biomass, and petroleum coke. A great of coal and natural gas exist in many geographical regions that lack sufficient petroleum. Therefore

Kilpatrick, Peter K.

225

Selective adsorption of manganese onto cobalt for optimized Mn/Co/TiO2 FischerTropsch catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Sorbonnelaan 16, 3584 CA Utrecht Adsorption (SEA) method was applied to the rational design of a promoted Co catalyst for Fischer­Tropsch (FT (SEA) method, which has been successfully applied to prepare highly dis- persed, monometallic catalysts

Regalbuto, John R.

226

Characterization of new Co and Ru on -WC catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Influence of the carbide surface state.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[8]. Among the group VI transition metal carbides, the hexagonal tungsten carbide WC is a remarkable proceeds on supported transition metal catalysts, Co or Fe on oxide supports generally Al2O3 or SiO2 [1 of the carbide surface state. A. Griboval-Constant(1) *, J.-M. Giraudon(1) , I. Twagishema(1) , G. Leclercq(1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

227

Characterization of new Co and Ru on -WC catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Influence of the carbide surface state.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the metallic particles [8]. Among the group VI transition metal carbides, the hexagonal tungsten carbide WC monoxide and hydrogen. FT synthesis proceeds on supported transition metal catalysts, Co or Fe on oxide of the carbide surface state. A. Griboval-Constant(1) *, J.-M. Giraudon(1) , I. Twagishema(1) , G. Leclercq(1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch wax from catalyst by supercritical extraction. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

One of the major objectives of this research project is to predict the phase behavior of model wax compounds in dense supercritical fluids such as hexane. Because initial results with the SAFT equation have been less promising than expected, the group at North Carolina State University has focused their recent attention on cubic equations of state, in particular the Peng-Robinson and Soave-Redlich-Kwong versions. The focus of this work has been on developing correlations that can be used to predict binary interaction parameters (i.e., k{sub ij}s) for a given binary wax-solvent system. As a first step, k{sub ij}s were first calculated from experimental data on systems containing alkanes between nC{sub 4} and nC{sub 23} at temperatures between 25 and 357{degrees} C. Attempts were then made to correlate these parameters with specific pure component properties of the alkanes of interest. Reasonably good agreement between experimental and predicted k{sub ij}s was found using a correlation that incorporates both temperature and the molecular size of the alkanes. As phase equilibrium data becomes available for higher molecular weight model wax compounds, the ability of the correlation to handle such systems will need to be tested. The phase equilibrium apparatus is currently undergoing modifications that will allow the system to run components that are solids at ambient temperatures. Some problems are still being resolved, as the heavy component tends to precipitate in the sample lines. Modifications have been made that should allow the system to operate reliably.

Joyce, P.C.; Thies, M.C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

innovative research fa l l 2 0 0 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, to make fuel cells, to cleanly liquefy coal, and to meet the dramatically increasing global demand of the Journal of Catalysis,two editions of the Handbook of Heterogeneous Catalysis, as well as a special issue control, methane com- bustion, selective hydrogenation, Fischer- Tropsch synthesis,methanol steam

New Mexico, University of

230

Development of a synthetic fuel reciprocating charge pump. Quarterly technical progress report for the period of: 1 January 1987--31 March 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the third quarter of the third phase of the reciprocating charge pump improvement program. The program was begun in 1982 for the purpose of improving the operating life of packings and plungers used in 300 psig, 300F coal/solvent slurry pumps employed in synthetic fuel generating plants. The testing to be performed during this phase has been modified since the last quarterly report. This test measured the effects of slurry migration past the floating piston seal and the time to wear the packing and plunger beyond the acceptable limit. Table 1 summarizes all testing to date, 456 hours total at this time with 72 hours on 35% slurry. It denotes the valve problems seen with rapid pressure decay when pumping slurry. Throughout this time, 33 specific and different equipment failures and operation problems occurred that delayed the testing.

Bonney, G.E.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Evaluation of synthetic-fuel character effects on rich-lean stationary gas-turbine combustion systems. Volume 2. Full-scale test program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The effect of burner geometric scale on the emissions and performance produced by staged, rich lean combustors was investigated. Tests were conducted using a 25-cm diameter burner and the results obtained were compared with results previously obtained using a similar, but smaller (12.5-cm diameter) burner. The larger burner employed a convectively-cooled rich-burn section; the size of the burner is the size of the burner cans employed in the 25 Megawatt FT4 industrial gas turbine. Scale effects are of concern in staged rich/lean combustors because of the suspected critical importance of quench air jet penetration and fuel injector spray distribution, both processes being scaled dependent. Tests were conducted both with No. 2 petroleum distillate and with a nitrogen-bearing, middle-distillate synthetic fuel produced by the H-Coal process. Measurements of burner exit temperature profile, liner temperature, gaseous emission, and smoke emissions are presented and the results compared with subscale test results.

Kennedy, J.B.; McVey, J.B.; Rosfjord, T.J.; Russel, P.; Beal, G.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The DOE/WMPI Cooperative Agreement was modified on May 2003 to expand the project team to include Shell Global Solutions, U.S. and Uhde GmbH as the engineering contractor. The addition of Shell and Uhde strengthen both the technical capability and financing ability of the project. Uhde, as the prime EPC contractor, has the responsibility to develop a LSTK (lump sum turnkey) engineering design package for the EECP leading to the eventual detailed engineering, construction and operation of the proposed concept. Major technical activities during the reporting period include: (1) finalizing contractual agreements between DOE, Uhde and other technology providers, focusing on intellectual-property-right issues, (2) Uhde's preparation of a LSTK project execution plan and other project engineering procedural documents, and (3) Uhde's preliminary project technical concept assessment and trade-off evaluations.

John W. Rich

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Synthetic Rubber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... acutely sensitive, justifiably, about synthetic rubber. His review of my book in NATURE of December 26, p. 751, is unfair in several respects. Undoubtedly, there are errors in ...

HARRY BARRON

1943-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development of a Sorption Enhanced Steam Hydrogasification Process for In-situ Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Removal and Enhanced Synthetic Fuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to fuel range by hydrotreating[36]. These fuel products candistillate undergo hydrotreating to saturate the olefins.be used for further hydrotreating of some FT products like

Liu, Zhongzhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels: Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Fuels: Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis F-T Efficiency & Performance - DOE R&D Comparing liquid transportation fuels production from coal gasification to fuels from traditional production methods is a difficult undertaking because of the vastly diverse configuration options available for gasification processing. Traditionally, fuels like gasoline and diesel are refined from crude oil, a (comparatively) more uniform feedstock than coal -or, for that matter, biomass, petcoke, refinery waste, etc. Each potential feedstock, even between different coal ranks, has variable characteristics that can necessitate design changes (ash content, sulfur concentration, feed handling issues, etc.). Additionally, as a relatively new approach to producing liquid fuels, gasification has not had years of refinement to develop a "best," most productive or cost-efficient approach, in part, due to the aforementioned flexibility in choosing feedstock, product, synthesis gas (syngas) cleaning and conditioning units. In fact, besides multiple gasifier options and configurations, the liquid fuel synthesis component itself can be approached multiple ways: methanol-to-gasoline or Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, to name the two most important. Essentially, comparing petroleum-refinery produced transportation fuels and gasification-derived fuels requires design assumptions and limiting the scope of the comparison in order to arrive at meaningful conclusions.

236

Analysis of Syngas Quality from Portuguese Biomasses: An Experimental and Numerical Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the other hand, the use of gasifiers instead of combustors shows clear advantages, namely, the generation of a syngas with improved quality to be used in the production of Fischer-tropsch liquids, fuel cells, clean fuel combustion, and cheaper CO2 underground sequestration. ... Field, M. A.Rate of combustion of size-graded fractions of char from a low rank coal between 1200K-2000K Combust. ...

Valter Silva; Eliseu Monteiro; Nuno Couto; Paulo Brito; Abel Rouboa

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

238

Development of a Sorption Enhanced Steam Hydrogasification Process for In-situ Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Removal and Enhanced Synthetic Fuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Different types of gasifiers and their integration withCO 2 in a pressurized-gasifier-based process. Energ Fuel.fluidized bed biomass steam gasifier-bed material and fuel

Liu, Zhongzhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Availability and Assessment of Carbonaceous Biomass in the United States as a Feedstock for Thermo-chemical Conversion to Synthetic Liquid Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

148% of the state’s diesel fuel market or 22% of total U.S.diesel gallon equivalent, therefore 6.5 dge amounts to 4.46 (10 -5 ) mi/kJ. California Clean Fuels Market

Valkenburg, C; Park, C S; Norbeck, J N

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

EA-1642S: Supplemental Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EA-1642S: Supplemental Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1642S: Supplemental Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1642S: Supplemental Draft Environmental Assessment Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, Kentucky This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of DOE providing financial assistance to the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) to partially fund the completion of the design, construction and operation of a small-scale pilot plant for research related to the gasification of coal and coal-biomass blends and conversion of derived syngas to liquid fuels via Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. This project is intended to evaluate the commercial and technical viability of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 13320 of 31,917 results. 11 - 13320 of 31,917 results. Download Vision for 2025: A Framework for Change http://energy.gov/downloads/vision-2025-framework-change Page EA-1642S: Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, KY Draft SEA: Comment Period Ends 01/22/14 This draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE's proposed action of providing cost-shared funding for the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis project and of the No-Action Alternative.

242

Fischer-T.qxd  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fischer-Tropsch One in a series of fact sheets United States Environmental Protection Agency EPA420-F-00-036 March 2002 www.epa.gov Transportation and Air Quality Transportation and Regional Programs Division C L E A N A L T E R N A T I V E F U E L S C L E A N E R A I R For the past 50 years, Fischer-Tropsch fuels have powered all of South Africa's vehicles-from buses to trucks to taxicabs. The fuel is primarily sup- plied by Sasol, a world leader in Fischer-Tropsch technologies. Sasol's South African facility produces more than 150,000 barrels of high- quality fuel from domestic low-grade coal daily. The popular fuel is cost-com- petitive with crude oil- based petroleum products in South Africa. During the next several years, experts predict use of Fischer-Trop- sch fuels will grow as a high-end blend stock in

243

Guest Editors' Introduction: Synthetic Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(microbial production of diesel fuels from fatty acids in Escherichia coli (E. coli) and yeast+ undergraduate participants from around the world. Synthetic Biology had a global market which gene- rated $233, and genetic engineering. The buzz phrasing has not arrived yet. ``Bio Design Automation (BDA)'' or ``Genetic

Densmore, Douglas

244

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

(Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs  

SciTech Connect

Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

None

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

First methanol-to-gasoline plant nears startup in New Zealand  

SciTech Connect

Sometime during the summer 1985, New Zealand Synthetic Fuels Co. was scheduled to begin operating its new plant at Motunui, New Zealand. It marks the first commercial application of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Moreover, as the result of a modular approach directed by Bechtel Corp. personnel, the plant represents a major construction success. It is also the first example of a new technology that may seriously challenge traditional Fischer-Tropsch chemistry as a route to synthetic fuels and organic feedstocks. The MTG plant will produce 14,000 barrels per day of gasoline with an octane number rating of 92 to 94 (according to research results). This amount is about one third of present New Zealand demand. The gasoline will be made by catalytic conversion of methanol coming from two plants, each producing about 220 metric tons per day for the single-train MTG plant. The methanol, in turn, is derived from reforming of natural gas from offshore fields in the Tasman Sea.

Haggin, J.

1985-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Larson, E. D.; Consonni, S.; Katofsky, R. E.; Iisa, K.; Frederick, W. J., Jr.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2S 2S Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment for University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Lexington, KY December 2013 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1642S Fischer-Tropsch Process Development Unit December 2013 Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), to partially fund the completion of the design, construction, and operation of a small-scale pilot plant for research related to the gasification of coal

250

Fischer?Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of Mn on the Carburization Rates and Activities of Fe-Based Catalysts by TPR-EXAFS/XANES and Catalyst Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, the structure of the catalyst changes as a function of reaction time, with the mixed oxide phase decomposing into iron carbides, magnetite, and MnO, thereby resulting in lower olefin selectivities. ... (7-10) Nevertheless, in examining the Fe K-edge results, although we observed differences in rates of carburization between catalyst samples with and without Mn, we did not detect discernible line shape differences in the XANES spectra between the intermediary iron oxides along the TPR trajectory. ... (35) Epsilon carbide is typically formed at lower temperatures (350 °C; cementite is formed at temperatures above 350 °C. ...

Mauro C. Ribeiro; Gary Jacobs; Ramana Pendyala; Burtron H. Davis; Donald C. Cronauer; A. Jeremy Kropf; Christopher L. Marshall

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to carry out a Moessbauer spectroscopy study of Iron-based catalysts to identify iron phases present and correlate with water gas shift and FT activities. A total of 15 catalysts were evaluated so far. Results are presented on the amounts in each catalyst of the following phases: superparamagnetic phase, hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), Chi-carbide phase ({chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}), and an epsilon-carbide phase ({var_epsilon}-Fe{sub 2.2}C).

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

New approach to the generation of metal-bearing, medium-pore, shape-selective zeolites for Fischer-Tropsch catalysis. [Aluminoferrisilicate  

SciTech Connect

A new method of combining the shape-selective characteristics of zeolites with a group VIII metal component is described. It involves the following sequence of steps: (1) synthesis of an aluminoferrisilicate (AFS) zeolite, having a crystal structure analogous to zeolite ZSM-5, but which incorporates ferric ions into the structure during synthesis; (2) removal of the organic base used as a template in crystallization of the AFS zeolite; (3) reaction of the AFS zeolite with a transition metal complex anion in aqueous solution to precipitate an inclusion compound in the AFS zeolite, and (4) reduction of the inclusion compound with hydrogen at elevated temperature.

Iton, L.E.; Beal, R.B.; Hodul, D.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

Peter J. Tijrn

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Handbook of Synthetic Photochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Handbook of Synthetic Photochemistry ... Comprehensive overviews of synthetically relevant photochemical processes have appeared previously, most recently in Synthetic Organic Photochemistry, edited by Griesbeck and Mattay (2005), and in the CRC Handbook of Organic Photochemistry and Photobiology, edited by Horspool and Lenci (2004). ... Handbook of Synthetic Photochemistry . ...

Frederick G. West

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

255

Catalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of InorganicSynthetic Modeling of Inorganic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Importance Hydrogen technology in fuel cellsHydrogen technology in fuel cells As a combustion fuel, it producesCatalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of Inorganic of evolution ·Optimized catalyst for water splitting in all oxygenic phototrophs S0 S4 S1 S2 S3 O2 2 H O2 e- e

Petta, Jason

256

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Characteristics of Gasification Characteristics of Coal/Biomass Mixed Fuels Background Domestically abundant coal is a primary energy source and when mixed with optimum levels of biomass during the production of liquid fuels may have lower carbon footprints compared to petroleum fuel baselines. Coal and biomass mixtures are converted via gasification into synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which can be subsequently converted to liquid fuels by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting research focused on using coal and biomass to produce clean and affordable power, fuels and chemicals. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is partnering with Leland Stanford Junior

257

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

gas produced from biomass, where biomass is defined as any organic material other than oil, natural gas, and coal; liquid, gaseous or solid synthetic fuels produced from coal; or...

258

A new technology for producing synthetic liquid hydrocarbons from gaseous hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional technologies of synthetic liquid fuels (SLF) production from gaseous hydrocarbons by producing synthesis ... liquid hydrocarbons are examined. A high-efficiency SLF production technology that allows ...

D. L. Astanovskii; L. Z. Astanovskii; A. L. Lapidus

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoscale Molecular Transport by Synthetic DNA Machines Jong-Shik Shin1 and Niles A. Pierce1,2 1 a processive bipedal DNA walker. Powered by externally controlled DNA fuel strands, the walker locomotes with a 5 nm stride by advancing the trailing foot to the lead at each step. On a periodic DNA track

Pierce, Niles A.

260

Gasoline Jet Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C4n= Diesel Gasoline Jet Fuels C O C5: Xylose C6 Fermentation of sugars Biofuel "Nanobowls" are inorganic catalysts that could provide the selectivity for converting sugars to fuels IACT Proposes Synthetic, Inorganic Catalysts to Produce Biofuels Current Process

Kemner, Ken

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Synthetic biology: Cultural divide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Currently based at the software-design firm Autodesk in San Francisco, California, Hessel represents an increasingly impatient and outspoken faction of synthetic ...

Bryn Nelson

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Synthetic fuels summary. [1850 to 1979  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the federal government's experience in synfuels, the market potential of synfuels, the US energy resources base, and the numerous technologies available. Technologies and energy resources are reviewed and compared to provide the facts needed to understand existing energy-related problems. This introductory manual is an overview of synfuel technologies, and markets. It is not meant to be the sole source of information on which multi-billion dollar investment decisions for specific synfuel plants would be based. The report, published originally in August 1980, has been revised to incorporate appropriate corrections and clarifications. The intent behind these revisions is to present the best technical and programmatic information available as of the original publication date, August 1980. The original report included certain information about the relative costs of selected synfuels technologies. Economics are especially sensitive to recent events and updated information, and it would possibly be misleading to restate the original cost data in this report. It was felt that the original cost data needed major updating and reconciliation due to differences in project scope, basic assumptions, and costing methodologies. ESCOE believes that reliable economic comparisons require timely data and a recognition of any major differences in scope or methodology. Therefore, ESCOE, in a separate task, is undertaking an updated commercial scale economic comparison of selected synfuel processes, on a normalized basis. The results of this task will be published as a separate ESCOE report.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Formalizing Synthetic Domain Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthetic Domain Theory (SDT) is a constructive variant of Domain Theory where all functions are continuous following Dana Scott‘s idea of “domains as sets”. Recently there have been suggested more abstract axiomatizations encompassing ... Keywords: LCF, domain theory, formal verification, programming logics, synthetic domain theory, type theory

Bernhard Reus

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Synthetic Solutions for Correcting Voltage Fade in LMR-NMC Cathodes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about synthetic...

265

Designing Synthetic Biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(14) The science of biology and the practice of engineering (knowing and making(15)) are especially connected in parts-based synthetic biology, where many engineers and scientists seek to “build life to understand it” through the assembly of standardized genetic modules. ... This iterative refinement of the refactored operon led to a detailed mapping of the genetic design space and an engineered pathway that produced wild-type levels of nitrogen fixation. ... (22) The positive feedback between science and engineering in synthetic biology has been compared to the history of other disciplines and industries, such as aviation(23) or synthetic chemistry. ...

Christina M. Agapakis

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

Vision of the U.S. Biofuel Future:? A Case for Hydrogen-Enriched Biomass Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of external hydrogen can make this possible as (1) a fuel in the burners, (2) a reactant (to more easily convert the carbon to a gaseous form), and (3) a diluent to increase the H2/CO gas molar ratio needed by the Fischer?Tropsch reactions. ... 26 This syngas is used in the burner to provide the process heat for the extruder, and the char that still remains is discarded. ... (4) Process the cleaned raw syngases in the 800 °C methane reformer to produce a high-quality syngas without the hydrocarbons; ...

Mark A. Dietenberger; Mark Anderson

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Research Councils UK Synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, bioinformatics approaches and DNA synthesis, all of which are central to the current field of synthetic biologyResearch Councils UK Synthetic biology #12;Synthetic biology Research funded by the Research them commercially. Synthetic biology is one of `Eight Great Technologies' identified by the Chancellor

Berzins, M.

268

Biodegradable synthetic bone composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides for a biodegradable synthetic bone composition comprising a biodegradable hydrogel polymer scaffold comprising a plurality of hydrolytically unstable linkages, and an inorganic component; such as a biodegradable poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate)/hydroxyapatite (pHEMA/HA) hydrogel composite possessing mineral content approximately that of human bone.

Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Solar Fuels via Artificial Photosynthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar Fuels via Artificial Photosynthesis ... Indeed, all of the fossil-fuel-based energy consumed today derives from sunlight harvested by photosynthetic organisms. ... One is artificial photosynthesis, the use of the fundamental science underlying photosynthetic energy conversion to design synthetic systems for converting light into stored chemical energy. ...

Devens Gust; Thomas A. Moore; Ana L. Moore

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Life after the synthetic cell Natureaskedeightsynthetic-biologyexpertsabouttheimplicationsforscienceandsocietyofthe"synthetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

already had confidence in our ability to make synthetic DNA and get it to function in cells. The grandLife after the synthetic cell Natureaskedeightsynthetic-biologyexpertsabouttheimplicationsforscienceandsocietyofthe"synthetic"madebytheJ.CraigVenterInstitute(JCVI).Theinstitute'steamassembled,modifiedandimplanteda synthesizedgenomeintoaDNA-freebacterialshelltomakeaself-replicatingMycoplasmamycoides. The power and the pitfalls Mark

Goldberg, Bennett

271

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

Synthetic Rubber Production in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... called the Polymer Corporation, Ltd., with headquarters in Toronto, which will undertake the production in Canada of synthetic ... in Canada of synthetic rubber of the Buna type. According to the Ottawa correspondent of The Times, Mr. ...

1942-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

INTRODUCTION Synthetic biology: history, challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at a rapid pace over the last 35 years, the cloning and assembly of synthetic DNA sequences remains a largely to establish improved software and bio- logical tools for the design and assembly of synthetic DNA synthetic systems to be described at the level of logical interactions between DNA

Haseloff, Jim

274

A review of the combustion and emissions properties of advanced transportation biofuels and their impact on existing and future engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fundamental combustion and emissions properties of advanced biofuels are reviewed, and their impact on engine performance is discussed, in order to guide the selection of optimal conversion routes for obtaining desired fuel combustion properties. Advanced biofuels from second- and third-generation feedstocks can result in significantly reduced life-cycle greenhouse-gas emissions, compared to traditional fossil fuels or first-generation biofuels from food-based feedstocks. These advanced biofuels include alcohols, biodiesel, or synthetic hydrocarbons obtained either from hydrotreatment of oxygenated biofuels or from Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. The engine performance and exhaust pollutant emissions of advanced biofuels are linked to their fundamental combustion properties, which can be modeled using combustion chemical-kinetic mechanisms and surrogate fuel blends. In general, first-generation or advanced biofuels perform well in existing combustion engines, either as blend additives with petro-fuels or as pure “drop-in” replacements. Generally, oxygenated biofuels produce lower intrinsic nitric-oxide and soot emissions than hydrocarbon fuels in fundamental experiments, but engine-test results can be complicated by multiple factors. In order to reduce engine emissions and improve fuel efficiency, several novel technologies, including engines and fuel cells, are being developed. The future fuel requirements for a selection of such novel power-generation technologies, along with their potential performance improvements over existing technologies, are discussed. The trend in the biofuels and transportation industries appears to be moving towards drop-in fuels that require little changes in vehicle or fueling infrastructure, but this comes at a cost of reduced life-cycle efficiencies for the overall alternative-fuel production and utilization system. In the future, fuel-flexible, high-efficiency, and ultra-low-emissions heat-engine and fuel-cell technologies promise to enable consumers to switch to the lowest-cost and cleanest fuel available in their market at any given time. This would also enable society as a whole to maximize its global level of transportation activity, while maintaining urban air quality, within an energy- and carbon-constrained world.

Jeffrey M. Bergthorson; Murray J. Thomson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Influence of CO Conversion on Selectivities H2/CO Usage Ratios and Catalyst Stability for a 0.27 percent Ru 25 percent Co/Al2O3 using a Slurry Phase Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The effect of CO conversion on hydrocarbon selectivities (i.e., CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, olefin and paraffin), H{sub 2}/CO usage ratios, CO{sub 2} selectivity, and catalyst stability over a wide range of CO conversion (12-94%) on 0.27%Ru-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was studied under the conditions of 220 C, 1.5 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 2.1 and gas space velocities of 0.3-15 NL/g-cat/h in a 1-L continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Catalyst samples were withdrawn from the CSTR at different CO conversion levels, and Co phases (Co, CoO) in the slurry samples were characterized by XANES, and in the case of the fresh catalysts, EXAFS as well. Ru was responsible for increasing the extent of Co reduction, thus boosting the active site density. At 1%Ru loading, EXAFS indicates that coordination of Ru at the atomic level was virtually solely with Co. It was found that the selectivities to CH{sub 4}, C{sub 5+}, and CO{sub 2} on the Co catalyst are functions of CO conversion. At high CO conversions, i.e. above 80%, CH{sub 4} selectivity experienced a change in the trend, and began to increase, and CO{sub 2} selectivity experienced a rapid increase. H{sub 2}/CO usage ratio and olefin content were found to decrease with increasing CO conversion in the range of 12-94%. The observed results are consistent with water reoxidation of Co during FTS at high conversion. XANES spectroscopy of used catalyst samples displayed spectra consistent with the presence of more CoO at higher CO conversion levels.

W Ma; G Jacobs; Y Ji; T Bhatelia; D Bukur; S Khalid; B Davis

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fischer?Tropsch Synthesis: An In-Situ TPR-EXAFS/XANES Investigation of the Influence of Group I Alkali Promoters on the Local Atomic and Electronic Structure of Carburized Iron/Silica Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After 10 h of treatment the samples containing K, Rb, and Cs were completely carburized, and residual quantities of iron oxides were detected in both unpromoted and Li-promoted samples. ... To further constrain the model, global parameters (i.e., over all samples) were used for the isotropic lattice expansion (?) and Debye?Waller factor (?2) parameters for carbide (i.e., combined epsilon and Hägg) and oxide (i.e., Fe3O4) fractions. ... Au particles smaller than about 30 Å were also reactive to air, leading to oxidn. of up to 15% of the atoms of the gold particles, depending on the size; larger particles were not oxidized. ...

Mauro C. Ribeiro; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis; Donald C. Cronauer; A. Jeremy Kropf; Christopher L. Marshall

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As such, it deals with the engineering (design, construction, and optimization) of native as well as non-natural routes of product synthesis, aided in this task by the availability of synthetic DNA, the core enabling technology of synthetic biology. ... In this context, metabolic engineering is about engineering cell factories for the biological manufacturing of chemical and pharmaceutical products, whereas the main focus of synthetic biology is fundamental biological research facilitated by the use of synthetic DNA and genetic circuits. ... This was soon followed by the emergence of companies offering synthetic DNA as product. ...

Gregory Stephanopoulos

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Use of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Commercial Use of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Operating Facilities - Sasol Production of liquid fuels and chemicals from coal on a large scale has been a reality in South Africa for decades. Sasol Synfuels owns and operates Sasol II and Sasol III, which are two F-T synthesis-based fuels production plants in Secunda, South Africa. The Sasol plants represent the most significant example of commercialized F-T synthesis in the world. Construction of Sasol II began in the mid 1970s, with operation of the two plants commencing in the early 1980s. The two plants contain 80 Sasol-Lurgi Fixed Bed Dry Bottom (FBDB) gasifiers, and total output from both of the plants is approximately 150,000 barrels per day (bpd), reaching 160,000 bpd in 2006. The feedstock for the plants is sub-bituminous coal supplied by Sasol Mining, a sister company of Sasol Synfuels. Natural gas is also used as a supplemental feedstock. A proprietary iron-based Fisher-Tropsch (FT) process is used to convert the synthesis gas (syngas) produced by the gasifiers to gasoline, light olefins (alkenes), and a variety of other products.

280

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY TEXACO ENERGY SERVICES...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the integration of four existing commercial modules (gasification, air separation, combined cycle process, and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology into a unified whole unit...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DISTRIBUTED AND COLLABORATIVE SYNTHETIC ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the functions required for the geometric engine of a synthetic environment system. · A distribution on networked desktop machines. Geometric Engine A critical subsystem in all synthetic environment systems is the geometric engine, or the software module responsible for creating a realistic view of the simulated world

Texas at Austin, University of

282

HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF H2O AND CO2 FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen content (an example is the Athabasca Oil Sands). Additionally, the higher contents of sulfur and nitrogen of these resources requires processes such as hydrotreating to meet environmental requirements. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $50 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. The syngas can then be used for synthetic fuel production. This program is a combination of experimental and computational activities. Since the solid oxide electrolyte material is a conductor of oxygen ions, CO can be produced by electrolyzing CO2 sequestered from some greenhouse gas-emitting process. Under certain conditions, however, CO can further electrolyze to produce carbon, which can then deposit on cell surfaces and reduce cell performance. The understanding of the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is also complicated by the competing water-gas shift reaction. Results of experiments and calculations to date of CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis will be presented and discussed. These will include electrolysis performance at various temperatures, gas mixtures, and electrical settings. Product gas compositions, as measured via a gas analyser, and their relationship to conversion efficiencies will be presented. These measurements will be compared to predictions obtained from chemical equilibrium computer codes. Better understanding of the feasibility of producing syngas using high-temperature electrolysis will initiate the systematic investigation of nuclear-powered synfuel production as a bridge to the future hydrogen economy and ultimate independence from foreign energy resources.

Stoots, C.M.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Synthetic biology: Understanding biological design from synthetic circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An important aim of synthetic biology is to uncover the design principles of natural biological systems through the rational design of gene and protein circuits. Here, we highlight how the process of engineering biological ...

Mukherji, Shankar

284

High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes  

SciTech Connect

Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Synthetic and Mechanistic publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Dave Thorn Chemistry Program Manager Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Energy security is vital to our future national security and the efficient functioning of our market economy." -LANL Director Charles McMillan Harshini Mukundan, Hongzhi Xie, Aaron S. Anderson, W. Kevin Grace, John E. Shively, and Basil I. Swanson, "Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers: Evaluating fluorescent labels and functional surfaces," Bioconjugate Chemistry 20(2), 222-230 (2009).

286

Exoelectron Emission from Synthetic Corundums  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Exoelectron Emission from Synthetic Corundums M. Yousif Charif R. Gout J. Barthe M. Petel Corundums (Alpha Al2O3) have been synthesised by the thermal dehydration of hydrargilite (Al2O3, H2O......

M. Yousif Charif; R. Gout; J. Barthe; M. Petel

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Monomers for Synthetic Rubber Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to describe briefly industrial processes for the manufacture of the more common of the olefinic monomers which are used in the production of synthetic rubbers. Some indication of th...

D. C. Blackley B.Sc.; Ph.D.; F.P.R.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Synthetic biology and crop engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-A: Synthetic Biology and the Promise of Biofuels Jonathan Burbaum, Program Director, Department of Energy, Office of Science, ARPA–E

289

Fuels & Lubricant Technologies- FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels & Lubricants Technology Fuels and lubricants research at FEERC involves study of the impacts of fuel and lubricant properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes liquid fuels from synthetic and renewable sources as well as conventional and unconventional fossil-based sources. Combustion and emissions studies are leveraged with relevant single and multi-cylinder engine setups in the FEERC and access to a suite of unique diagnostic tools and a vehicle dynamometer laboratory. ORNL/DOE research has been cited by EPA in important decisions such as the 2006 diesel sulfur rule and the 2010/2011 E15 waiver decision. Major program categories and examples

290

Rapid Separation of Petroleum Fuels by Hydrocarbon Type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......below) . A comparison of two turbine fuels is presented in Figure...MIN Figure 3. Comparison of Turbine Fuels. Elution order: satu...constructed. A synthetic sample of turbine fuel was prepared from pure...coefficient characterizing efficiency of the fractionation. In contrast......

Robert Stevenson

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis, using high-temperature nuclear process heat and electricity. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%.

Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

In Vitro Synthetic Transcriptional Networks Jongmin Kim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, we engineered artificial tran- scriptional networks consisting of synthetic DNA switches, regulated

Winfree, Erik

293

Gas turbine alternative fuels combustion characteristics  

SciTech Connect

An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain combustion performance and exhaust pollutant concentrations for specific synthetic hydrocarbon fuels. Baseline comparison fuels used were gasoline and diesel fuel number two. Testing was done over a range of fuel to air mass ratios, total mass flow rates, and input combustion air temperatures in a flame-tube-type gas turbine combustor. Test results were obtained in terms of released heat and combustion gas emission values. The results were comparable to those obtained with the base fuels with variations being obtained with changing operating conditions. The release of carbon particles during the tests was minimal. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Rollbuhler, R.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

295

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

296

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - ReFUEL Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development focuses on overcoming barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass, and improving vehicle efficiency. Using biofuels and improving vehicle efficiency reduces our dependence on imported petroleum and enhances our national energy security. The ReFUEL Laboratory houses the following specialized equipment: Heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with a simulation capability of 8,000 to 80,000 lbs for vehicle performance and emissions research Heavy-duty (up to 600 hp) and light-duty (up to 75 hp) engine

297

Mobility with Hydrogen Fuel Cells Becomes Reality! 2Daimler AG / 09.02.2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bio-Mass Natural Gas Crude Oil Conventional fuels sulphur-free, free of aromatic compounds fuels system & stack Electric engine H2 tank system Infrastructure Hydrogen costs Reliable refueling technology Synthetic fuels (GTL) sulphur-free, free of aromatic compounds Natural Gas (CNG) 1. Gen. Bio-Fuels (Ethanol

California at Davis, University of

298

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

299

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57: Final Environmental Impact Statement 57: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

300

Range Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Range Fuels Name Range Fuels Address 11101 W. 120th Avenue Place Broomfield, Colorado Zip 80021 Sector Biomass Product Uses a thermochemical process to turn biomass into synthetic gas and then fuel Website http://www.rangefuels.com/ Coordinates 39.915572°, -105.122053° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.915572,"lon":-105.122053,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Combinatorial Discovery of Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discovery of Fuel Cell Discovery of Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts Eugene S. Smotkin University of Puerto Rico @ Rio Piedras Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop March 21, 2003 Marriot courtyard - Convention Center New Orleans, Louisiana Combinatorial Discovery of Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts Eugene S. Smotkin University of Puerto Rico @ Rio Piedras Non-Platinum Electrocatalysts Workshop March 21, 2003 Marriot courtyard - Convention Center New Orleans, Louisiana Overview „ Parallel Screening methods „ Optical Screening method „ Array fuel cell „ Array synthetic methods „ Partial review of non-Pt cathode work Overview „ Parallel Screening methods „ Optical Screening method „ Array fuel cell „ Array synthetic methods „ Partial review of non-Pt cathode work Optical Screening of Electrocatalyst Libraries

302

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alcohol-based fuels from syngases. [Alkanol fuels  

SciTech Connect

Explains how a mixture of methanol and C/sub 2/-C/sub 6/ saturated alcohols (Alkanol fuel) has the potential for providing a gasoline-blending stock superior to that of straight-run methanol or ethanol. Summarizes the technical and economic advantages of producing and utilizing Alkanol fuels. Although methanol is cheaper, Alkanols represent a higher-quality fuel product with lower-oxygen content and higher hydrogen content. Increasing the methanol content of the Alkanol mixture has the potential to reduce the Alkanols cost of production to the equivalent of that of methanol on a constant heating value basis. The optimal composition will depend on production costs as well as on the properties of Alkanol mixtures necessary to generate a premium, synthetic transportation fuel. The Mobil M-Gasoline Process is an alternative route to converting methanol to synthetic transportation fuels. Concludes that development of the Alkanols Process is in its early stages and further work needs to be done in identifying and solving potential technical bottlenecks related to catalyst stability/selectivity and recovery of water-free Alkanol fuel mixtures. Current work is involved in the study of the performance and stability of several catalyst candidates utilizing a slurry reaction system and in the identification of optimal compositions of Alkanols for use as gasoline blending stocks.

Greene, M.I.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Physical Characteristics of Synthetic Rubbers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A summary of the nature and special applications of the more important types of synthetic rubbers is given. Two series of rubber and synthetic rubber stocks compounded on the basis of comparable pigmentation were selected for study. In addition to the conventional physical properties (tensile strength and elongation at rupture modulus aging etc.) a number of other mechanical properties such as dynamic rigidity hysteresis loss ``blowout resistance '' ``running temperature '' and tensile strength at elevated temperature were measured. Swelling tests in various solvents were also made. Results are plotted in the form of correlation charts in an effort to select proper methods of measurement. Some observations on comparative service tests in tires in the case of three synthetic rubbers indicate them to be satisfactory on a quality basis for use in time of emergency. The importance of care in selecting the proper physical tests and methods of analysis is emphasized in the light of the results given. It is concluded that rubbertesting techniques and interpretation must be modified in certain instances in evaluating synthetic rubber stocks.

J. N. Street; J. H. Dillon

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

307

Renewable Energy from Synthetic Biology (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Jay Keasling, co-leader of Berkeley Lab's Helios Project, is a groundbreaking researcher in the new scientific field of synthetic biology. In Helios, he directs the biology program, incorporating a range of approaches to increasing the efficacy and economy of plants and cellulose-degrading microbes to make solar-based fuels. He is a UC Berkeley professor of Chemical and Bioengineering, and founder of Amyris Biotechnologies, a company that was honored as a Technology Pioneer for 2006 by the World Economic Forum. Keasling has succeeded in using synthetic biology to develop a yeast-based production scheme for precursors of the antimalarial drug artemisinin in work funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Keasling, Jay

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

5 - Gasification reaction kinetics for synthetic liquid fuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The gasification process is a chemically and physically complex operation. This chapter presents a description of the chemistry of gasification reactions. It also discusses the assorted reactions involved in gasification and the various thermodynamic aspects of these reactions that dictate the process parameters used to produce the various gases.

J.G. Speight

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Synthetic Fuels: Will Government Lend the Oil Industry a Hand?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...500 million; production costs are pegged...4 and $6 per 42-galloni...feet of gas a day' (abouLt the...North American production w\\ithouLt...one Satur-day afternoon...30 November 1973). Some of...the Defense Production Act of 1950...thesis is that OPEC, like any cartel...

Robert Gillette

1974-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Application of Synthetic Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Potential of GTL Diesel to Meet Future Exhaust Emission Limits Performance Characteristics of Coal-to-Liquids (CTL) Diesel in a 50-State Emissions Compliant Passenger Car...

311

Scalable Genetic System Design Using Synthetic RNA Regulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

longest length of synthetic DNA increases exponentially (DNA sequencing, DNA synthesis, and synthetic biology……. …3of DNA sequencing, DNA synthesis, and synthetic biology. (A)

Qi, Lei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Synthetic biology: history, challenges and prospects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...over the last 35 years, the cloning and assembly of synthetic DNA sequences remains a largely bespoke affair. The field...and biological tools for the design and assembly of synthetic DNA-based programmes. Matsuoka et al. (2009) describe...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pioneer's name written in synthetic DNA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Craig Venter has “signed” his name into the sequence of the synthetic bacterial genome his lab created

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

315

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY WMPI. INC., AND TEXACO, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WMPI. INC., AND TEXACO, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC WMPI. INC., AND TEXACO, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN INVENTION RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC26-00NT40693, W(A)-00-026, CH-1041 The Petitioner Waste Management and Processors, Inc. (WMPI), was awarded this cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Early Entrance Coproduction Plant- Decentralized Gasification Cogenerating Transportation Fuels and Steam from Available Feedstocks". Petitioner Texaco Power & Gasification (Texaco) is a subcontractor to WMPI. The overall purpose of the cooperative agreement is to prove the feasibility of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces ultraclean fuels of Fischer-Tropsch naphtha and diesel with either power or steam as the major co-product. The objective includes the design and

316

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry Security at center of chemical and mechanistic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Synthetic chemistry includes work in ligands for catalysts, fission-products separations for isotope. Conducting separations for (1) medical isotope purification and (2) nuclear fuel cycles. Performing of molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) from uranium sulfate solution using a separation flow sheet designed by Argonne

317

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

318

Design, Synthesis, and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study of the catalyst composition, preparation and activation protocol of Fe-based catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) have been carried out in this project. We have studied the effects of different promoters on the catalytic performance of Fe-based catalysts. Specifically, we have focused on how their sequence of addition dramatically influences the performance of these materials in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The resulting procedures have been optimized to improve further upon the already unprecedented rates and C{sub 5+} selectivities of the Fe-based catalysts that we have developed as part of this project. Selectivity to C{sub 5+} hydrocarbon was close to 90 % (CO{sub 2}-free basis) and CO conversion rate was about 6.7 mol h{sup -1} g-at Fe{sup -1} at 2.14 MPa, 508 K and with substoichiometric synthesis gas; these rates were larger than any reported previously for Fe-based FTS catalysts at these conditions. We also tested the stability of Fe-based catalysts during FTS reaction (10 days); as a result, the high hydrocarbon formation rates were maintained during 10 days, though the gradual deactivation was observed. Our investigation has also focused on the evaluation of Fe-based catalysts with hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams (H{sub 2}/CO=1). We have observed that the Fe-based catalysts prepared in this project display also a high hydrocarbon synthesis rate with substoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=1) stream, which is a less desirable reactant mixture than stoichiometric synthesis gas (H{sub 2}/CO=2). We have improved the catalyst preparation protocols and achieved the highest FTS reaction rates and selectivities so far reported at the low temperatures required for selectivity and stability. Also, we have characterized the catalyst structural change and active phases formed, and their catalytic behavior during the activation process to evaluate their influences on FTS reaction. The efforts of this project led to (i) structural evolution of Fe-Zn oxide promoted with K and Cu, and (ii) evaluation of hydrocarbon and CH{sub 4} formation rates during activation procedures at various temperature and H{sub 2}/CO ratios. On the basis of the obtained results, we suggest that lower reactor temperature can be sufficient to activate catalysts and lead to the high FTS performance. In this project, we have also carried out a detailed kinetic and mechanistic study of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis with Fe-based catalysts. We have proposed a reaction mechanism with two CO activation pathways: unassisted and H-assisted. Both routes lead to the formation of the same surface monomers (CH{sub 2}). However, the oxygen removal mechanism is different. In the H-assisted route, oxygen is removed exclusively as water, while oxygen is rejected as carbon dioxide in the unassisted CO dissociation. The validity of the mechanism here proposed has been found to be in agreement with the experimental observation and with theoretical calculations over a Fe(110) surface. Also, we have studied the validity of the mechanism that we propose by analyzing the H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} kinetic isotope effect (r{sub H}/r{sub D}) over a conventional iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalyst Fe-Zn-K-Cu. We have observed experimentally that the use of D{sub 2} instead of H{sub 2} leads to higher hydrocarbons formation rates (inverse kinetic isotopic effect). On the contrary, primary carbon dioxide formation is not influenced. These experimental observations can be explained by two CO activation pathways. We have also explored the catalytic performance of Co-based catalysts prepared by using inverse micelles techniques. We have studied several methods in order to terminate the silanol groups on SiO{sub 2} support including impregnation, urea homogeneous deposition-precipitation, or zirconium (IV) ethoxide titration. Although hydroxyl groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface are difficult to be stoichiometrically titrated by ZrO{sub 2}, a requirement to prevent the formation of strongly-interacting Co oxide species on SiO{sub 2}, modification of ZrO{

Enrique Iglesia; Akio Ishikawa; Manual Ojeda; Nan Yao

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Digg

320

Fuel System and Fuel Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel management provides optimal solutions to reduce fuel consumption. Merchant vessels, such as container ships, drive at a reduced speed to save fuel since the reduction of the speed from...?1 lowers consumption

Michael Palocz-Andresen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

323

Microstructured Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro fuel cells ; Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells ; Proton exchange membrane fuel cells ...

Luc G. Frechette

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The definition of an alternative fuel includes natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electricity, hydrogen, fuel mixtures containing not less

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Promotion The Missouri Alternative Fuels Commission (Commission) promotes the continued production and use of alternative transportation fuels in

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

329

Modeling and economic evaluation of the integration of carbon capture and storage technologies into coal to liquids plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper analyzes the technical and economic feasibility of the integration of Fischer–Tropsch process based Coal to Liquid (CTL) plants with Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies (CCS). CTL plants could be multipurpose, and for this reason, starting from coal can produce different energy products like liquid fuels, such as diesel and gasoline, chemicals, electricity and hydrogen. Different plant configurations are possible especially in the case of integration with CCS technologies. Obviously, the choice of the optimal process configuration is one that better meets technical and economical requirements. In order to make a first assessment, a screening of suitable technologies has been made. The CTL facility study here proposed is based on commercial coal gasification and Fischer–Tropsch technologies. The system configuration selected and the plant performance has been evaluated using Aspen Plus software. The plant size considered is about 10,000 bbl/d of liquid fuel products, equivalent to a consumption of about 4500 ton/d of coal fed to the gasification island. The declared objective is to evaluate the potential of the identified plant and to perform a first economic evaluation. The ultimate goal is to determine the specific cost of produced liquid fuels and to evaluate the economic performance of the system. The economic analysis was done to estimate the Internal Rate of Return (IRR), the payback period and the net present value for configurations with CCS or without CO2 capture. Results shows that the CCS introduction in CTL plants has a lighter impact on plant costs and performance since CO2 capture it is already included in the base plant.

Claudia Bassano; Paolo Deiana; Giuseppe Girardi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F-T plant development in the U.S. is in the Alaskan oil fields.

Gerald P. Huffman

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

331

Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessments (EA) Environmental Assessments (EA) Environmental Assessments (EA) Environmental Assessments are concise public documents that a Federal agency prepares under NEPA to provide sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether a proposed agency action would require preparation of an environmental impact statement or a finding of no significant impact. If you have any trouble finding a specific document, please contact AskNEPA@hq.doe.gov for assistance. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 19, 2013 EA-1642S: Supplemental Draft Environmental Assessment Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Lexington, Kentucky November 15, 2013 EA-1752: Draft Environmental Assessment

332

Energy Analysis Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Product List Analysis > Product List HeaderLine Energy Analysis Publications Products BRIEFS: Showing Results 1 to 5 of 23 Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Nuclear Technology Assessment Brief (Aug 2012) Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Hydropower Technology Assessment Brief (Aug 2012) Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Geothermal Technology Assessment Brief (Aug 2012) Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Solar Thermal Technology Assessment Brief (Aug 2012) Role of Alternative Energy Sources: Wind Technology Assessment Brief (Aug 2012) View All MODELS/TOOLS: Showing Results 1 to 5 of 23 Power Plant Flexible Model (Nov 2013) NETL Upstream Dashboard Tool (Aug 2012) Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power LCAT) (Jun 2012) Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Advanced Jet Propulsion Fuels: Fischer-Tropsch Based SPK-1 Case Study - Model (Dec 2011)

333

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Biofuels in Light-Duty Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Mobility Chains Analysis of Technologies for Passenger Cars and Light-Duty Vehicles Fueled with Biofuels: Application of the GREET Model to the Role of Biomass in America's Energy Future (RBAEF) Project Project ID: 82 Principal Investigator: Michael Wang Brief Description: The mobility chains analysis estimated the energy consumption and emissions associated with the use of various biofuels in light-duty vehicles. Keywords: Well-to-wheels (WTW); ethanol; biofuels; Fischer Tropsch diesel; hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) Purpose The project was a multi-organization, multi-sponsor project to examine the potential of biofuels in the U.S. Argonne was responsible for the well-to-wheels analysis of biofuel production and use.

334

NETL: Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids - Systems and Industry Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C&CBTL > Systems Analyses C&CBTL > Systems Analyses Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Reference Shelf – Systems and Industry Analyses Studies DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. Coal and Coal/Biomass to Liquids Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Advanced Jet Propulsion Fuels: Fischer-Tropsch Based SPK-1 Case Study - Presentation

335

Phase Progression of ?-Al2O3 Nanoparticles Synthesized in a Solvent-Deficient Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The metastable transitional Al2O3 phases (chi (?), eta (?), kappa (?), gamma (?), delta (?), theta (?)) are porous and can be dehydrated and “activated” for use as adsorbents or desiccants. ... The most widely used of these transitional phases is the ? phase; its porous nature, intrinsically high surface area, and catalytic activity(25) make it a popular catalyst support for a variety of processes including hydrocarbon processing,(26, 27) the dehydration of alcohols,(28, 29) automotive exhaust gas processing (as in catalytic converters),(30, 31) and the Fischer–Tropsch process of converting CO into hydrocarbons for use as fuel. ... High-resoln., solid-state Al NMR with magic-angle spinning was used to study the coordination of Al ions in Al hydroxides subjected to various dehydration temps. ...

Stacey J. Smith; Samrat Amin; Brian F. Woodfield; Juliana Boerio-Goates; Branton J. Campbell

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE studies on coal-to-liquids  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory has issued reports that examine the feasibility of coal-to-liquids (CTL) facilities, both general and site specific, which are available at www.netl.gov/energy-analyses/ref-shelf.html. The US Department of Defence has been investigating use of Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Congress is considering various CTL proposals while the private sector is building pilot plants and performing feasibility studies for proposed plants. The article includes a table listing 14 coal-to-liquids plants under consideration. The private sector has formed the coal-to-liquids coalition (www.futurecoalfuels.org). The article mentions other CTL projects in South Africa, China, Indonesia, the Philippines and New Zealand. 1 tab.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

MTG Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The first commercial plant based on this unique chemistry has been onstream for five years in New Zealand, where it converts 140 million standard cubic feet per day of natural gas mainly from the offshore Maui gas field, to methanol, thence to 14,500 barrels per day of gasoline for premium unleaded specifications. The plant is designed to supply one third of New Zealand's current gasoline demand, and was key to their attainment of 50% self-sufficiency in transport fuels, a strategic goal of the government. In a historical sense, the MTG (Methanol-to-Gasoline) Process was the first major advance in synfuels technology in half a century since the Fischer-Tropsch Process. Developed in the wake of the Arab oil embargo, MTG technology was a timely response to the subsequent "energy crisis". The chapter also presents a brief discourse on the still unsolved reaction mechanism.

Clarence D. Chang

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Netlog, Volume 18, July, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Tracer Technology Successfully Tested CO2 Tracer Technology Successfully Tested NETL and CMU Launch Collaborative Initiative High Speed Particle Imaging Shows Success CO2 Reuse Photocatalysts One of Top 10 Most Accessed Papers Applying CFD Techniques to Fluidized-bed Reactors Book Published NETL Researchers Contribute to New Syngas Combustion New Insight into Activating Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Seismic Surveys Track Carbon Dioxide Movement Underground Coal Seam Carbon Sequestration Successfully Simulated NETL Explores Potential Beneficial Uses of Captured CO2 NETL Initiates the World's Most Comprehensive Benchmarking of Fluid Dynamic Models Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid System Successfully Simulated New Inspection Sensor for Plastic Pipeline Recent NETL Publications Contact National Energy Technology Laboratory

339

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2010 0, 2010 CX-002284: Categorical Exclusion Determination Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.3, B3.6, A9 Date: 05/10/2010 Location(s): Muskegot Bay Area, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 10, 2010 CX-002358: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Development CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/10/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory May 10, 2010 CX-002353: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research and Development of a Silicon Carbide Fault Current Limiter (SSFCL) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 05/10/2010 Location(s): Fayetteville, Arkansas

340

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biomass for the H 2 CAR process will always...improvement in PV cell and electrolyzer efficiencies...generate electricity or hydrogen from solar cells or an alternative...energy as synthetic fuels. Comparison with...requirement for the H 2 CAR process with the...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on AddThis.com... More in this section...

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on AddThis.com...

346

Definition: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) utilizes SAR images from two different time periods to generate maps of surface deformation. The technique can potentially measure millimeter-scale changes in the Earth's surface.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As InSAR, IfSAR Related Terms Synthetic Aperture Radar, radar, sustainability References ↑ Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry to Measure Earth's Surface Topography and Its Deformation (Burgmann et al. 2000) ↑ Improved Visulaization of Satellite Radar InSAR Observed Structural Controls at Producing Geothermal Field Using Modeled Horizontal Surface Displacements(Opplinger et al. 2006)

347

The carbon footprint and non-renewable energy demand of algae-derived biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We determine the environmental impact of different biodiesel production strategies from algae feedstock in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-renewable energy consumption, we then benchmark the results against those of conventional and synthetic diesel obtained from fossil resources. The algae cultivation in open pond raceways and the transesterification process for the conversion of algae oil into biodiesel constitute the common elements among all considered scenarios. Anaerobic digestion and hydrothermal gasification are considered for the conversion of the residues from the wet oil extraction route; while integrated gasification–heat and power generation and gasification–Fischer–Tropsch processes are considered for the conversion of the residues from the dry oil extraction route. The GHG emissions per unit energy of the biodiesel are calculated as follows: 41 g e-CO2/MJb for hydrothermal gasification, 86 g e-CO2/MJb for anaerobic digestion, 109 g e-CO2/MJb for gasification–power generation, and 124 g e-CO2/MJb for gasification–Fischer–Tropsch. As expected, non-renewable energy consumptions are closely correlated to the GHG values. Also, using the High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) method, a global sensitivity analysis over the entire space of input parameters is performed to rank them with respect to their influence on key sustainability metrics. Considering reasonable ranges over which each parameter can vary, the most influential input parameters for the wet extraction route include extractor energy demand and methane yield generated from anaerobic digestion or hydrothermal gasification of the oil extracted-algae. The dominant process input parameters for the dry extraction route include algae oil content, dryer energy demand, and algae annual productivity. The results imply that algal biodiesel production from a dried feedstock may only prove sustainable if a low carbon solution such as solar drying is implemented to help reducing the water content of the feedstock.

Pooya Azadi; George Brownbridge; Sebastian Mosbach; Andrew Smallbone; Amit Bhave; Oliver Inderwildi; Markus Kraft

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A Synthetic DNA Walker for Molecular Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Synthetic DNA Walker for Molecular Transport ... The authors report the incrementally staged design, synthesis, characterization, and operation of a mol. ...

Jong-Shik Shin; Niles A. Pierce

2004-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Synthetic gene oscillators and their applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 25 overlapping DNA fragments to form a complete syntheticof synthetic organisms, and ”bottom- up” DNA construction ofsynthetic biologists’ attempts to design life by constructing DNA

Danino, Tal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Performance evaluation of synthetically lined landfills  

SciTech Connect

Landfill design and performance standards for new facilities frequently require the use of geomembrane composite and double liners. Performance data from synthetically lined landfill sites have not been widely available. This report presents data obtained by monitoring three recently constructed synthetically lined landfill sites. Quantities of leachate removed by the primary and secondary collection systems from these landfills were tabulated. The data show that properly designed and constructed synthetic landfill liners provide effective containment of leachate. The environmental protection provided by synthetic liners is equivalent or superior to that of typical clay-lined facilities.

Maule, J. [Champion International Corp., Norway, MI (United States); Lowe, R.K. [STS Consultants Ltd., Green Bay, WI (United States); McCulloch, J.L. [Cross Pointe Paper Co., Park Falls, WI (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Oxygenated fuels for clean heavy-duty diesel engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For diesel engines, changing the fuel composition is an alternative route towards achieving lower emission levels. The potential of oxygenated fuels to significantly reduce particulate matter emissions has already been demonstrated earlier. In this study, this research has been extrapolated towards lower emission levels. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) was applied to a modern EURO-3-type HD diesel engine. Tests were done at different engine working points, with EGR-levels and start of fuel delivery timings set to give NOx emissions between 3.5 and 2.0 g/kWh with regular diesel fuel. Fourteen blends of a low-sulphur diesel fuel respectively of a gas-to-liquid synthetic diesel fuel with different oxygenates were tested. The corresponding fuel matrix covers a range of fuel oxygen mass fractions up to 15%. Results are presented and the impact of fuel oxygen mass fraction and Cetane Number are analysed and compared with results from previous research.

P.J.M. Frijters; R.S.G. Baert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

353

Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components  

SciTech Connect

Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

Wilson III, George R. (Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin (United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)); Freerks, Robert L. (Rentech, Incorporated, 1331 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States))

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Preparation of synthetic hydrocarbon lubricants  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for preparing synthetic lubricating materials which process comprises: (a) reacting (i) at least a portion of a reaction product of the liquid phase oligomerization of propylene, butylene or mixtures thereof containing a C/sub 6/ olefin component, (ii) a linear olefin reactant having an average carbon number ranging from about 10 to about 18 in the presence of a catalyst, (b) separating from the reaction mixture of (a) hydrocarbons which distill at a temperature above about 660/sup 0/ F. (316/sup 0/ C.), and (c) hydrogenating the reaction product of (b) by contact with hydrogen with or without a catalyst at a temperature ranging from about 25/sup 0/ C. to about 300/sup 0/ C.

Johnson, T.H.

1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty Ctystallume, 3506 Bassett Street, Santa Clara, California 1995) The fracture behavior of synthetic diamond has been investigated using indentation methods and by the tensile testing of pre-notched fracture-mechanics type samples. Specifically, the fracture toughness

Ritchie, Robert

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Emerging Alternative Fuels Several emerging alternative fuels are under development or already developed and may be available in the United States. These fuels may

358

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

359

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to

360

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide." Sciencefor CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyCTLs, or CTL synfuels), and oil shale-based synthetic crude

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Produce Synthetic Fuels,5.4 million dry metric tons of sludge annually or 47pounds of sewage sludge (dry weight basis) for every

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Single Molecule and Synthetic Biology Studies of Transcription  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GenScript returned the synthetic DNA cloned into the EcoRIis pre-formed using synthetic DNA and RNA oligonucleotides.synthetic oligonucleotides, including those used as PCR primers, were synthesized by Integrated DNA

Zamft, Bradley Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Synthetic Promoters Functional in Francisella novicida and Escherichia coli  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...facultative intracellular pathogen. Synthetic DNA fragments consisting of the tetracycline...controllable promoters from a library of synthetic DNA molecules. We show that the strongest...flanking BamHI restriction sites) synthetic DNA fragments with a nearly central...

Ralph L. McWhinnie; Francis E. Nano

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

364

Building a metal-responsive promoter with synthetic regulatory elements.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...function of MREs, we inserted a synthetic DNA fragment containing the sequence...function of MREs, we inserted a synthetic DNA fragment containing the sequence...function of MREs, we inserted a synthetic DNA fragment containing the sequence...

P F Searle; G W Stuart; R D Palmiter

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Abstract The rapidly emerging field of synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract The rapidly emerging field of synthetic biology originated, as synthetic biology has expanded into mammalian systems, it is increasingly more. Biomaterials will play an important role in advancing synthetic biology

Reisslein, Martin

366

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

367

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on AddThis.com... Fuel Prices As gasoline prices increase, alternative fuels appeal more to vehicle fleet managers and consumers. Like gasoline, alternative fuel prices can fluctuate based on location, time of year, and political climate. Alternative Fuel Price Report

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Any person acting as an alternative fuels dealer must hold a valid alternative fuel license and certificate from the Wisconsin Department of Administration. Except for alternative fuels that a dealer delivers into a

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Alternative fuel providers, bulk users, and retailers, or any person who fuels an alternative fuel vehicle from a private source that does not pay

370

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

371

Single Molecule and Synthetic Biology Studies of Transcription  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GenScript returned the synthetic DNA cloned into the EcoRIis pre-formed using synthetic DNA and RNA oligonucleotides.

Zamft, Bradley Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with SyntheticManganese...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite. Abstract: Plutonium(VI) sorption on the surface of well-characterized synthetic manganese-substituted goethite...

373

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG)...

374

Alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the preliminary results of a review, of the experiences of Brazil, Canada, and New Zealand, which have implemented programs to encourage the use of alternative motor fuels. It will also discuss the results of a separate completed review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) progress in implementing the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. The act calls for, among other things, the federal government to use alternative-fueled vehicles in its fleet. The Persian Gulf War, environmental concerns, and the administration's National Energy Strategy have greatly heightened interest in the use of alternative fuels in this country.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust...

376

Definition: Synthetic Aperture Radar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aperture Radar Aperture Radar Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Synthetic Aperture Radar Synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) is an active microwave remote sensing technology that measures the phase difference between a radar wave emitted from an antennae attached to a satellite or aircraft to generate high-resolution images of a surface.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As SAR Related Terms radar References ↑ Synthetic Aperature Radar: Systems and Signal Processing (Curlander and McDonough - 1991 - book) fue LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. l cell, Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Synthetic_Aperture_Radar&oldid=493069" Category: Definitions What links here Related changes

377

The assessment of DNA-synthetic activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is described by which a numerical value can be assigned to the amount of DNA-synthesis shown graphically by population-histograms obtained ... index appeared to give a reasonable measure of DNA-synthetic

L. A. Coulton; B. Henderson; J. Chayen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Recognition of DNA by Synthetic Antibodies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recognition of DNA by Synthetic Antibodies ... The recombinant anti-ssDNA Fab, DNA-1, and 16 heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) mutant variants were selected for thermodynamic characterization of ssDNA binding. ...

Shana M. Barbas; Peter Ghazal; Carlos F. Barbas III; Dennis R. Burton

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

DNA interaction with synthetic polymers in solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The complexes in which a DNA molecule is compact and protected from the ... lipids, inactivated viral particles, polymeric micelles and synthetic polycations are used [12–23...]. The latter have important advanta...

Nina Kasyanenko; Daria Afanasieva; Boris Dribinsky; Dmitry Mukhin…

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Synthetic Biology Moving into the Clinic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...secrete key molecules for potential disease treatment, including insulinotropic...murine interleukin-2 in response to xylan . J. Appl. Microbiol. 98 , 1191...of synthetic biology therapies for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer, as...

Warren C. Ruder; Ting Lu; James J. Collins

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Iterative synthetic aperture radar imaging algorithms   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic aperture radar is an important tool in a wide range of civilian and military imaging applications. This is primarily due to its ability to image in all weather conditions, during both the day and the night, ...

Kelly, Shaun Innes

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fuzzy Synthetic Evaluation of Gas Station Safety  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the comprehensive analysis of hazard factors and evaluation indexes in gas stations, gas station safety is assessed in a fuzzy synthetic ... comprehensive evaluation, the specific safety level of gas stations

Xiaohua Hao; Xiao Feng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Macroporous nanowire nanoelectronic scaffolds for synthetic tissues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of three-dimensional (3D) synthetic biomaterials as structural and bioactive scaffolds is central to fields ranging from cellular biophysics to regenerative medicine. As of yet, these scaffolds cannot ...

Tian, Bozhi

384

Foundational platform for mammalian synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergent field of synthetic biology is different from many other biological engineering efforts, in that its roots, design principles, and forward engineering perspective have been adopted from electrical engineering ...

Davidsohn, Noah (Noah Justin)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Fuel Electricity Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Electricity Fuel Basics Photo of a plug-in hybrid vehicle fueling. Electricity is considered an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act

386

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The following fuels are defined as alternative fuels by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992: pure methanol, ethanol, and other alcohols; blends of

387

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax A state excise tax is imposed on the use of alternative fuels. Alternative fuels include liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane), compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The current tax rates are as

388

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard RFS Volumes by Year Enlarge illustration The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a federal program that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Excise taxes on alternative fuels are imposed on a gasoline gallon equivalent basis. The tax rate for each alternative fuel type is based on the number of motor vehicles licensed in the state that use the specific

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Loans Fuel Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Loans The Oregon Department of Energy administers the State Energy Loan Program (SELP) which offers low-interest loans for qualified projects. Eligible alternative fuel projects include fuel production facilities, dedicated

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative fuels are subject to an excise tax at a rate of $0.205 per gasoline gallon equivalent, with a variable component equal to at least 5% of the average wholesale price of the fuel. (Reference Senate Bill 454,

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax The excise tax imposed on an alternative fuel distributed in New Mexico is $0.12 per gallon. Alternative fuels subject to the excise tax include liquefied petroleum gas (or propane), compressed natural gas, and liquefied

393

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The Minnesota Department of Revenue imposes an excise tax on the first licensed distributor that receives E85 fuel products in the state and on distributors, special fuel dealers, or bulk purchasers of other alternative

394

Fuel Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... FUEL research was discussed by Sir Harry McGowan, who succeeds Sir William Larke as president of the Institute of Fuel, in ... has a ragged front, and new knowledge is continually changing relative national positions. Sir Harry McGowan referred to the domestic use of raw coal, which is still preferred to ...

1934-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fuel and Vehicle Technology Choices for Passenger Vehicles in Achieving Stringent CO2 Targets: Connections between Transportation and Other Energy Sectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Five fuel options (petroleum, natural gas, synthetic fuels (coal to liquid, CTL; gas to liquid, GTL; biomass to liquid, BTL), electricity, and hydrogen) and five vehicle technologies (ICEV, HEV, BEV, PHEV, and FCV) were considered. ... Petro ICEV, Synth ICEV, NG ICEV, H2 ICEV = internal combustion engine vehicle fueled either by petroleum, synthetic fuel (CTL, GTL, or BTL), natural gas, or gaseous hydrogen; HEV = hybrid electric vehicle; BEV = battery electric vehicle, PHEV = plug-in hybrid electric vehicle; Petro FCV, Synth FCV, H2 FCV = fuel-cell vehicle fueled either by petroleum, synthetic fuel, or gaseous hydrogen. ... In their CO2 reduction scenario (reduction from 1990 of 50% by 2050 and 75% by 2100), the car sector is dominated by gasoline/diesel (first in ICEVs, then HEVs and to a small extent also PHEVs) with hydrogen-fueled FCVs becoming dominant by 2100. ...

M. Grahn; C. Azar; M. I. Williander; J. E. Anderson; S. A. Mueller; T. J. Wallington

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Assessment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Assessment The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) prepared a report, Opportunities for DOD Use of Alternative and Renewable Fuels, on the use and potential use of

397

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be

398

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard At least 2% of all diesel fuel sold in Washington must be biodiesel or renewable diesel. This requirement will increase to 5% 180 days after the

399

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Fuel Use to Biodiesel Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT) may purchase biodiesel for use in IDOT vehicles through the biodiesel fuel revolving fund created in the state treasury. The fund consists of money received from the sale of Energy

400

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Special fuels, including biodiesel, biodiesel blends, biomass-based diesel, biomass-based diesel blends, and liquefied natural gas, have a reduced tax rate of $0.27 per gallon. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Special Fuel Tax to Special Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Special Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, certain special fuels sold or used to propel motor vehicles are subject to a license tax. Liquefied natural gas is subject to a tax of $0.16 per diesel gallon equivalent. Compressed natural

402

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics to Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use to Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The South Dakota Department of Transportation and employees using state diesel vehicles must stock and use fuel blends containing a minimum of 2% biodiesel (B2) that meets or exceeds the most current ASTM specification

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen Fuel Specifications to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Fuel Specifications The California Department of Food and Agriculture, Division of Measurement Standards (DMS) established interim specifications for hydrogen fuels for

405

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Flexible Fuel Vehicles Photo of a flexible fuel vehicle.

406

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Use All state employees operating flexible fuel or diesel vehicles as part of the state fleet must use E85 or biodiesel blends whenever reasonably available. Additionally, the Nebraska Transportation Services Bureau and

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative fuels used to propel vehicles of any kind on public highways are taxed at a rate determined on a gasoline gallon equivalent basis. The tax rates are posted in the Pennsylvania Bulletin. (Reference Title 75

408

California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation by Chris White of the California Fuel Cell Partnership provides information about alternative fuels research.

409

Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meta-DNA: synthetic biology via DNA nanostructures and hybridization reactions Harish Chandran1 strands and may be modified to allow for mutations. Keywords: DNA self-assembly; synthetic biology; DNA nanostructures 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1. Synthetic biology using DNA nanosystems A major goal of synthetic biology

Reif, John H.

410

Synthetic Datasets Rong Huang, Rada Chirkova, Yahya Fathi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthetic Datasets Rong Huang, Rada Chirkova, Yahya Fathi 1 Introduction Datasets may be generated will define symmetric synthetic dataset and two types of non-symmetric synthetic datasets that has some introduce symmetric synthetic dataset, its structure and the properties of the associated views. In Section

Young, R. Michael

411

Fuel Processing Valri Lightner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ORNL, NETL #12;Accomplishments · Demonstrated in the lab an advanced fuel flexible fuel processor

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate All gasoline sold in the state must be blended with 10% ethanol (E10). Gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or above is exempt from this mandate,

413

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Promotion Recognizing that biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel will be an important part of the state's energy economy and advanced research in

414

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Quality Standards Fuel Quality Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Quality Standards The South Dakota Department of Public Safety may promulgate rules establishing: Standards for the maximum volume percentages of ethanol and methanol

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate One year after in-state production has reached 350 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol and sustained this volume for three months, all gasoline

416

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Promotion The state of Hawaii has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Energy to collaborate to produce 70% of the state's

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The excise tax imposed on compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) used to operate a vehicle can be paid through an annual flat rate sticker tax based on the

418

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Promotion The Texas Bioenergy Policy Council and the Texas Bioenergy Research Committee were established to promote the goal of making biofuels a

419

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard Within six months following the point at which monthly production of denatured ethanol produced in Louisiana equals or exceeds a minimum annualized production volume of 50 million gallons, at least 2% of the

420

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The state road tax for vehicles that operate on propane (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) or natural gas is paid through the purchase of an annual flat fee sticker, and the amount is based on the vehicle's gross

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Stations to someone by E-mail Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fueling Stations Photo of a liquefied petroleum gas fueling station. Thousands of liquefied petroleum gas (propane) fueling stations are

422

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Study Alternative Fuel Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Study As directed by the Nevada Legislature, the Legislative Commission (Commission) conducted an interim study in 2011 concerning the production and use of energy in the state. The study included information on the use

423

CX-009372: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Small Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Using Highly Selective Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/17/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

424

Analyzing Biomass Conversion into Liquid Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Variants of the Fischer–Tropsch producer-gas conversion into liquid hydrocarbons are analyzed under the ... is attained in the reactions occurring in the biomass gasification. When the raw material is wood ... th...

V. D. Meshcheryakov; V. A. Kirillov

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Die Rolle der Kohlenwasserstoffe bei der Herstellung synthetischer Fettprodukte durch Oxydation in Deutschland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Es werden ein Gesamtüberblick über die Fischer-Tropsch-Synthese gegeben und die besonderen Reaktionsbedingungen beschrieben, die eine Paraffin-Bildung bei der Synthese begünstigen. Im Zusammenhang damit werden...

Anton Zwergal

426

Theoretical Cluster Studies on the Catalytic Sulfidation of MoO3 Xue-Rong Shi,,,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, State Key Laboratory of Coal ConVersion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (HDN) processes and exhibit also high activity for methanation and for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and sulfur adsor- bates as well as hydrogen

427

UHV Studies on CO and Methanol Adsorption and Decomposition on Pristine and Oxidized Alumina-Supported Co Nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although cobalt is an important Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, there is only limited fundamental knowledge about the factors determining the elementary steps, such as the dissociation of CO, the influence of adsorbed ...

T. Nowitzki; V. Zielasek; M. Bäumer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chemicals from coal  

SciTech Connect

This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Autothermal oxidative pyrolysis of biomass feedstocks over noble metal catalysts to liquid products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two thermal processing technologies have emerged for processing biomass into renewable liquid products: pyrolysis and gasification/Fischer-Tropsch processing. The work presented here will demonstrate oxidative pyrolysis… (more)

Balonek, Christine Marie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Utilization of alternative fuels in diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

The important findings for a 41-month research grant entitled The Utilization of Alternate Fuels in Diesel Engines are summarized. The procedure followed was to collect performance and emission data for various candidate alternate fuels and compare these data to that for a certified petroleum-based number two Diesel fuel oil. The method of test-fuel introduction was either via fumigation or to use the engine stock injection system. Results for methanol, ethanol, four vegetable oils, two shale-derived oils, and two coal-derived oils are reported. Based upon this study, alcohol fumigation does not appear to be a practical method for utilizing low combustion quality fuels in a Diesel engine. The reasons being, the need for a complex fuel management system and a narrow operating range bounded by wet misfire on the low load end and by severe knock at medium to high loads. Also, it was misfire on the low load end and by severe knock at medium to high loads. Also, it was found that alcohol fumigation enhances the bioactivity of the emitted exhaust particles. Finally, this study showed that while it is possible to inject many synthetic fuels using the engine stock injection system, wholly acceptable performance is only obtained from a fuel whose specifications closely approach those of a finished petroleum-based Diesel oil.

Lestz, S.S.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nuclear Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The core of a nuclear reactor is composed of a controlled critical configuration of a fissile material, which in strict a sense is the fuel. This fissile material is contained in a matrix, normally a ceramic c...

Rudy J. M. Konings; Thierry Wiss…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fuel economizer  

SciTech Connect

A fuel economizer device for use with an internal combustion engine fitted with a carburetor is disclosed. The fuel economizer includes a plate member which is mounted between the carburetor and the intake portion of the intake manifold. The plate member further has at least one aperture formed therein. One tube is inserted through the at least one aperture in the plate member. The one tube extends longitudinally in the passage of the intake manifold from the intake portion toward the exit portion thereof. The one tube concentrates the mixture of fuel and air from the carburetor and conveys the mixture of fuel and air to a point adjacent but spaced away from the inlet port of the internal combustion engine.

Zwierzelewski, V.F.

1984-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Definition to someone by E-mail Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition Alternative fuel is defined as compressed natural gas, propane, ethanol, or any mixture containing 85% or more ethanol (E85) with gasoline or other

434

Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY)

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

435

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Presentation covers stationary fuel cells...

436

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Fuel Cell Seminar on November...

437

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Fuel Cell Seminar on November 1, 2011. Fuel Cell...

438

Fuel Processing Valri Lightner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hydrogen · Fuel Processors for PEM Fuel Cells Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc. GE Catalytica ANL PNNL University-Board Fuel Processing Barriers $35/kW Fuel Processor $10/kW Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW by 2010 BARRIERS · Fuel processor start-up/ transient operation · Durability · Cost · Emissions and environmental issues

439

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

motor fuel containing at least 10% alcohol) or alternative fuels whenever feasible and cost effective. DOA must place a list of gasohol and alternative fueling station locations...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

special fuels. Special fuels include compressed and liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), hydrogen, and fuel suitable for use in diesel engines. In addition,...

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) capable of operating on natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas (propane), or bi-fuel vehicles capable of operating on conventional fuel or...

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Use and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Requirements State-owned vehicle fleets must implement petroleum displacement plans to increase the use of alternative fuels and fuel-efficient...

444

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Special Fuel Definitions The definition of alternative fuel includes liquefied petroleum gas (propane). Special fuel is defined as all combustible gases and liquids that are...

445

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement Biodiesel, biobutanol, and ethanol blend dispensers must be affixed with decals identifying the type of fuel blend. If fuel blends containing...

446

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and alternative fuel vehicles; promotes the development, sale, distribution, and consumption of alternative fuels; promotes the development and use of alternative fuel vehicles...

448

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

providers to install biofuel fueling facilities. Fueling facilities include storage tanks and fuel pumps dedicated to dispensing E85 and biodiesel blends of 20% (B20). TDOT...

449

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

interest in the qualified property. Renewable fuel is defined as a fuel produced from biomass that is used to replace or reduce conventional fuel use. (Reference Florida Statutes...

450

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alternative fuel vehicles use fuel types other than petroleum and include such fuels as electricity, ethanol, biodiesel, natural gas, hydrogen, and propane. Compared to petroleum, these...

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Grants and Rebates The Arkansas Alternative Fuels Development Program (Program) provides grants to alternative fuel producers, feedstock processors, and...

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Exclusivity Contract Regulation Motor fuel franchise dealers may obtain alternative fuels from a supplier other than a franchise distributor. Any franchise provision that...

453

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements All hydrogen fuel produced and sold in Michigan must meet state fuel quality requirements. Any retailer offering hydrogen fuel for sale...

454

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

that operate using at least 90% alternative fuel. Eligible alternative fuels include electricity, propane, natural gas, or hydrogen fuel. Medium-duty hybrid electric vehicles also...

455

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Promotion and Information The Center for Alternative Fuels (Center) promotes alternative fuels as viable energy sources in the state. The Center must assess the...

456

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Definition The following fuels are defined as alternative fuels by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992: pure methanol, ethanol, and other alcohols; blends of 85%...

457

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Labeling Requirement Retailers must display ratings on fueling pumps that are consistent with the percentage by volume of the alternative fuel being dispensed....

459

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

is defined as a renewable transportation fuel, transportation fuel additive, heating oil, or jet fuel that meets the definition of either biodiesel or non-ester renewable...

460

1 Synthetic Texturing 1.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Synthetic Texturing 1.1 Introduction This dissertation describes improved methods for computer of this, the top of Figure 1.1 shows a horse model with a white surface and the bottom shows this same-hocformulasforlightreflection Figure 1.1: Stripe texture created using reaction-diffusion. Top is an untextured horse and the bottom

Turk, Greg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fischer-tropsch synthetic fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Experimental Results for SimFuels  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the performance of Spent (or Used) Nuclear Fuel (UNF) in geological repository requires quantification of time-dependent phenomena that may influence its behavior on a time-scale up to millions of years. A high-level waste repository environment will be a dynamic redox system because of the time-dependent generation of radiolytic oxidants and reductants and the corrosion of Fe-bearing canister materials. One major difference between used fuel and natural analogues, including unirradiated UO2, is the intense radiolytic field. The radiation emitted by used fuel can produce radiolysis products in the presence of water vapor or a thin-film of water that may increase the waste form degradation rate and change radionuclide behavior. To study UNF, we have been working on producing synthetic UO2 ceramics, or SimFuels that can be used in testing and which will contain specific radionuclides or non-radioactive analogs so that we can test the impact of radiolysis on fuel corrosion without using actual spent fuel. Although, testing actual UNF would be ideal for understanding the long term behavior of UNF, it requires the use of hot cells and is extremely expensive. In this report, we discuss, factors influencing the preparation of SimFuels and the requirements for dopants to mimic the behavior of UNF. We have developed a reliable procedure for producing large grain UO2 at moderate temperatures. This process will be applied to a series of different formulations.

Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Andrew M.; Skomurski, Frances N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Wittman, Richard S.; Mcnamara, Bruce K.

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

462

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

463

Solar Thermochemical Fuels Production: Solar Fuels via Partial Redox Cycles with Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The University of Minnesota is developing a solar thermochemical reactor that will efficiently produce fuel from sunlight, using solar energy to produce heat to break chemical bonds. The University of Minnesota is envisioning producing the fuel by using partial redox cycles and ceria-based reactive materials. The team will achieve unprecedented solar-to-fuel conversion efficiencies of more than 10% (where current state-of-the-art efficiency is 1%) by combined efforts and innovations in material development, and reactor design with effective heat recovery mechanisms and demonstration. This new technology will allow for the effective use of vast domestic solar resources to produce precursors to synthetic fuels that could replace gasoline.

None

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fuel Cells & Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cells & Alternative Fuels Fuel Cells & Alternative Fuels Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and...

465

Development of inexpensive metal macrocyclic complexes for use in fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Several metal macrocyclic complexes were synthesized for use as catalysts in fuel cells. An initial evaluation of their ability to catalyze the fuel cell reactions were completed. Based on this initial evaluation, one metal macrocyclic catalyst was selected and long-term stability testing in a fuel cell was initiated. The fuel cell employing this catalyst was operated continuously for one year with little signs of catalyst degradation. The effect of synthetic reformates on the performance of the catalyst in the fuel cell environment also demonstrated high tolerance of this catalyst for common contaminants and poisons.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Lithium Battery Research and Development Dept.; Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; Hamdan, M. [Giner, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Feedback control of flow separation using synthetic jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this research is to assess the effect of synthetic jets on flow separation and provide a feedback control strategy for flow separation using synthetic jets. The feedback control synthesis is conducted based upon CFD simulation...

Kim, Kihwan

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

467

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption The biodiesel or ethanol portion of blended fuel containing taxable diesel is exempt from the diesel fuel tax. The biodiesel or ethanol fuel blend...

468

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

fuels include liquid non-petroleum based fuel that can be placed in motor vehicle fuel tanks and used to operate on-road vehicles, including all forms of fuel commonly or...

469

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

fuel blends of at least 20% biodiesel fuel or that mix fuel from separate storage tanks and allow the user to select the percentage of renewable fuel. The maximum credit...

470

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

License Alternative fuel providers, bulk users, and retailers, or any person who fuels an alternative fuel vehicle from a private source that does not pay the alternative fuels tax...

471

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition,  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Digg