National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fire suppression equipment

  1. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  2. Technical evaluation of equipment maintenance on fire alarm detection, suppression, and signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korslund, S.M.

    1994-10-01

    This document delineates the application of WHC-CM-4-3, Program E-2 to Fire Systems on the Hanford Site.

  3. Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttrey, K.E.

    1980-12-19

    Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

  4. Standard on fire protection for self-propelled and mobile surface mining equipment. 2001 ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-07-01

    Safeguard life and property against fire and related hazards in mines with the latest requirements in NFPA 121. This 2001 edition covers fire detection, suppression, ignition sources, fire risk assessment and maintenance of mining equipment systems. 4 apps.

  5. Fire suppressing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttrey, Kenneth E.

    1982-11-02

    Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubes depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

  6. Reduction of fire hazards on large mining equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maria I. De Rosa

    2008-09-15

    Although standards and regulations are in place to prevent large mining equipment fires, recent analyses of mine accident data show that mining equipment fires still occur with alarming frequency and grave consequences, particularly at all surface mines and in underground metal/nonmetal mines. Recently technological advances in fire protection, combined with the statistical data on equipment fires, led NIOSH to reinvestigate this and to improve operator safety. NIOSH demonstrated that newly developed technologies, such as dual cab fire inerting systems and engine compartment fire barriers, can greatly enhance operator safety and lessen the damage of property during large mobile equipment fires. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  7. DOE Fire Protection Handbook, Volume II. Fire effects and electrical and electronic equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-08-18

    Electrical and electronic equipment, including computers, are used at critical facilities throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). Hughes Associates, Inc. was tasked to evaluate the potential thermal and nonthermal effects of a fire on the electrical and electronic equipment and methods to analyze, evaluate, and assist in controlling the potential effects. This report is a result of a literature review and analysis on the effects of fire on electrical equipment. It is directed at three objectives: (1) Provide a state-of-the-art review and analysis of thermal and nonthermal damage to electrical and electronic equipment; (2) Develop a procedure for estimating thermal and nonthermal damage considerations using current knowledge; and (3) Develop an R&D/T&E program to fill gaps in the current knowledge needed to further perfect the procedure. The literature review was performed utilizing existing electronic databases. Sources searched included scientific and engineering databases including Dialog, NTIS, SciSearch and NIST BFRL literature. Incorporated in the analysis is unpublished literature and conversations with members of the ASTM E-5.21, Smoke Corrosivity, and researchers in the electronics field. This report does not consider the effects of fire suppression systems or efforts. Further analysis of the potential impact is required in the future.

  8. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  9. Calculation of Fire Severity Factors and Fire Non-Suppression Probabilities For A DOE Facility Fire PRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Jim Bouchard; Heather Lucek

    2011-03-01

    Over a 12 month period, a fire PRA was developed for a DOE facility using the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology. The fire PRA modeling included calculation of fire severity factors (SFs) and fire non-suppression probabilities (PNS) for each safe shutdown (SSD) component considered in the fire PRA model. The SFs were developed by performing detailed fire modeling through a combination of CFAST fire zone model calculations and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). Component damage times and automatic fire suppression system actuation times calculated in the CFAST LHS analyses were then input to a time-dependent model of fire non-suppression probability. The fire non-suppression probability model is based on the modeling approach outlined in NUREG/CR-6850 and is supplemented with plant specific data. This paper presents the methodology used in the DOE facility fire PRA for modeling fire-induced SSD component failures and includes discussions of modeling techniques for: • Development of time-dependent fire heat release rate profiles (required as input to CFAST), • Calculation of fire severity factors based on CFAST detailed fire modeling, and • Calculation of fire non-suppression probabilities.

  10. Alternative approach for fire suppression of class A, B and C fires in gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberger, Mark S; Tsiagkouris, James A

    2011-02-10

    Department of Energy (DOE) Orders and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards require fire suppression in gloveboxes. Several potential solutions have been and are currently being considered at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective is to provide reliable, minimally invasive, and seismically robust fire suppression capable of extinguishing Class A, B, and C fires; achieve compliance with DOE and NFPA requirements; and provide value-added improvements to fire safety in gloveboxes. This report provides a brief summary of current approaches and also documents the successful fire tests conducted to prove that one approach, specifically Fire Foe{trademark} tubes, is capable of achieving the requirement to provide reliable fire protection in gloveboxes in a cost-effective manner.

  11. Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Waked, R. Ryan; Granzow, Howard N.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Moreover, plutonium gloveboxes present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials; these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. Several studies have been conducted to determine the robustness of selfcontained fire extinguishers in plutonium gloveboxes in a nuclear facility, verification tests must be performed. These tests include activation and mass loss calorimeter tests. In addition, compatibility issues with chemical components of the self-contained fire extinguishers need to be addressed. Our study presents activation andmore » mass loss calorimeter test results. After extensive studies, no critical areas of concern have been identified for the plutonium glovebox application of Fire Foe™, except for glovebox operations that use large quantities of bulk plutonium or uranium metal such as metal casting and pyro-chemistry operations.« less

  12. Verification study of an emerging fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Waked, R. Ryan; Granzow, Howard N.; Gubernatis, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Moreover, plutonium gloveboxes present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials; these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. Several studies have been conducted to determine the robustness of selfcontained fire extinguishers in plutonium gloveboxes in a nuclear facility, verification tests must be performed. These tests include activation and mass loss calorimeter tests. In addition, compatibility issues with chemical components of the self-contained fire extinguishers need to be addressed. Our study presents activation and mass loss calorimeter test results. After extensive studies, no critical areas of concern have been identified for the plutonium glovebox application of Fire Foe™, except for glovebox operations that use large quantities of bulk plutonium or uranium metal such as metal casting and pyro-chemistry operations.

  13. Reliability study of an emerging fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David A.; Rossati, Lyric M.; Fritz, Nathan K.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Granzow, Howard N.

    2015-02-07

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Plutonium gloveboxes are known to present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials, these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. The primary component of interest in self-contained fire extinguishers is the nylon 6-6 machined tube that comprises the main body of the system.Thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of nylon 6-6 for use in plutonium glovebox applications has been carried out. Data has been generated regarding property degradation leading to poor, or reduced, engineering performance of nylon 6-6 components. In this study, nylon 6-6 tensile specimens conforming to the casing of self-contained fire extinguisher systems have been exposed to hydrochloric, nitric, and sulfuric acids. This information was used to predict the performance of a load bearing engineering component comprised of nylon 6-6 and designed to operate in a consistent manner over a specified time period. The study provides a fundamental understanding of the engineering performance of the fire suppression system and the effects of environmental degradation due to acid exposure on engineering performance. Data generated help identify the limitations of self-contained fire extinguishers. No critical areas of concern for plutonium glovebox applications of nylon 6-6 have been identified when considering exposure to mineral acid.

  14. Reliability study of an emerging fire suppression system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, David A.; Rossati, Lyric M.; Fritz, Nathan K.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Granzow, Howard N.

    2015-02-07

    Self-contained fire extinguishers are a robust, reliable and minimally invasive means of fire suppression for gloveboxes. Plutonium gloveboxes are known to present harsh environmental conditions for polymer materials, these include radiation damage and chemical exposure, both of which tend to degrade the lifetime of engineered polymer components. The primary component of interest in self-contained fire extinguishers is the nylon 6-6 machined tube that comprises the main body of the system.Thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of nylon 6-6 for use in plutonium glovebox applications has been carried out. Data has been generated regarding property degradation leading to poor, or reduced, engineering performancemore » of nylon 6-6 components. In this study, nylon 6-6 tensile specimens conforming to the casing of self-contained fire extinguisher systems have been exposed to hydrochloric, nitric, and sulfuric acids. This information was used to predict the performance of a load bearing engineering component comprised of nylon 6-6 and designed to operate in a consistent manner over a specified time period. The study provides a fundamental understanding of the engineering performance of the fire suppression system and the effects of environmental degradation due to acid exposure on engineering performance. Data generated help identify the limitations of self-contained fire extinguishers. No critical areas of concern for plutonium glovebox applications of nylon 6-6 have been identified when considering exposure to mineral acid.« less

  15. Memorandum, Managed Phase Out of Halon Fixed Fire Suppression Systems- May 5, 1993

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this memorandum is to provide additional interim departmental criteria on the management of the reduction and potential elimination of Halon fire extinguishing systems within the Department of Energy (DOE). This memorandum supplements the joint Office of Safety and Quality Assurance/Office of Projects and Facilities Management memorandum of September 27, 1990, in which guidance was provided on the installation of new Halon 1301 fixed fire suppression systems and halon 1211 portable fire extinguishers.

  16. Decreases in Soil Moisture and Organic Matter Quality Suppress Microbial Decomposition Following a Boreal Forest Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, Sandra R.; Berhe, Asmeret A.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2015-08-01

    Climate warming is projected to increase the frequency and severity of wildfires in boreal forests, and increased wildfire activity may alter the large soil carbon (C) stocks in boreal forests. Changes in boreal soil C stocks that result from increased wildfire activity will be regulated in part by the response of microbial decomposition to fire, but post-fire changes in microbial decomposition are poorly understood. Here, we investigate the response of microbial decomposition to a boreal forest fire in interior Alaska and test the mechanisms that control post-fire changes in microbial decomposition. We used a reciprocal transplant between a recently burned boreal forest stand and a late successional boreal forest stand to test how post-fire changes in abiotic conditions, soil organic matter (SOM) composition, and soil microbial communities influence microbial decomposition. We found that SOM decomposing at the burned site lost 30.9% less mass over two years than SOM decomposing at the unburned site, indicating that post-fire changes in abiotic conditions suppress microbial decomposition. Our results suggest that moisture availability is one abiotic factor that constrains microbial decomposition in recently burned forests. In addition, we observed that burned SOM decomposed more slowly than unburned SOM, but the exact nature of SOM changes in the recently burned stand are unclear. Finally, we found no evidence that post-fire changes in soil microbial community composition significantly affect decomposition. Taken together, our study has demonstrated that boreal forest fires can suppress microbial decomposition due to post-fire changes in abiotic factors and the composition of SOM. Models that predict the consequences of increased wildfires for C storage in boreal forests may increase their predictive power by incorporating the observed negative response of microbial decomposition to boreal wildfires.

  17. New Emergency Equipment Notifications 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notifications 2016 Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Todd A. Shrader/CBFO and Philip J. Breidenbach/NWP dated January 8, 2016 Underground Fire Suppression Vehicles

  18. High energy arcing fault fires in switchgear equipment : a literature review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Brown, Jason W.; Wyant, Francis John

    2008-10-01

    In power generating plants, switchgear provide a means to isolate and de-energize specific electrical components and buses in order to clear downstream faults, perform routine maintenance, and replace necessary electrical equipment. These protective devices may be categorized by the insulating medium, such as air or oil, and are typically specified by voltage classes, i.e. low, medium, and high voltage. Given their high energy content, catastrophic failure of switchgear by means of a high energy arcing fault (HEAF) may occur. An incident such as this may lead to an explosion and fire within the switchgear, directly impact adjacent components, and possibly render dependent electrical equipment inoperable. Historically, HEAF events have been poorly documented and discussed in little detail. Recent incidents involving switchgear components at nuclear power plants, however, were scrupulously investigated. The phenomena itself is only understood on a very elementary level from preliminary experiments and theories; though many have argued that these early experiments were inaccurate due to primitive instrumentation or poorly justified methodologies and thus require re-evaluation. Within the past two decades, however, there has been a resurgence of research that analyzes previous work and modern technology. Developing a greater understanding of the HEAF phenomena, in particular the affects on switchgear equipment and other associated switching components, would allow power generating industries to minimize and possibly prevent future occurrences, thereby reducing costs associated with repair and downtime. This report presents the findings of a literature review focused on arc fault studies for electrical switching equipment. The specific objective of this review was to assess the availability of the types of information needed to support development of improved treatment methods in fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for nuclear power plant applications.

  19. New Emergency Equipment Notifications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notifications Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Todd A. Shrader/CBFO and Philip J. Breidenbach/NWP dated October 20, 2015 Underground Fire Suppression Vehicles (2) Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dana C. Bryson/CBFO and Philip J. Breidenbach/NWP dated September 30, 2015 Underground Ambulance #3 Addition of New Emergency Equipment, Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number:

  20. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. D. Bigbee

    2000-06-21

    The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System provides the capability to detect, control, and extinguish fires and/or mitigate explosions throughout the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Fire protection includes appropriate water-based and non-water-based suppression, as appropriate, and includes the distribution and delivery systems for the fire suppression agents. The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System includes fire or explosion detection panel(s) controlling various detectors, system actuation, annunciators, equipment controls, and signal outputs. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for mounting of fire protection equipment and components, location of fire suppression equipment, suppression agent runoff, and locating fire rated barriers. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for adequate drainage and removal capabilities of liquid runoff resulting from fire protection discharges. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building Electrical Distribution System for power to operate, and with the Site Fire Protection System for fire protection water supply to automatic sprinklers, standpipes, and hose stations. The system interfaces with the Site Fire Protection System for fire signal transmission outside the WHB as needed to respond to a fire emergency, and with the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System to detect smoke and fire in specific areas, to protect building high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and to control portions of the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System for smoke management and manual override capability. The system interfaces with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Operations Monitoring and Control System for annunciation, and condition status.

  1. Independent Oversight Review of the Technical Area 55 Safety Class Fire Suppression System at Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 2013

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technical Area 55 Safety Class Fire Suppression System at Los Alamos National Laboratory December 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background

  2. Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katherine Dombrowski

    2009-12-31

    This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any balance

  3. Thermal Integration of CO{sub 2} Compression Processes with Coal-Fired Power Plants Equipped with Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy

    2012-06-29

    Coal-fired power plants, equipped either with oxycombustion or post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture, will require a CO{sub 2} compression system to increase the pressure of the CO{sub 2} to the level needed for sequestration. Most analyses show that CO{sub 2} compression will have a significant effect on parasitic load, will be a major capital cost, and will contribute significantly to reduced unit efficiency. This project used first principle engineering analyses and computer simulations to determine the effects of utilizing compressor waste heat to improve power plant efficiency and increase net power output of coal-fired power plants with carbon capture. This was done for units with post combustion solvent-based CO{sub 2} capture systems and for oxyfired power plants, firing bituminous, PRB and lignite coals. The thermal integration opportunities analyzed for oxycombustion capture are use of compressor waste heat to reheat recirculated flue gas, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals prior to pulverizing the coal. Among the thermal integration opportunities analyzed for post combustion capture systems are use of compressor waste heat and heat recovered from the stripper condenser to regenerate post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture solvent, preheat boiler feedwater and predry high-moisture coals. The overall conclusion from the oxyfuel simulations is that thermal integration of compressor heat has the potential to improve net unit heat rate by up to 8.4 percent, but the actual magnitude of the improvement will depend on the type of heat sink used and to a lesser extent, compressor design and coal rank. The simulations of a unit with a MEA post combustion capture system showed that thermal integration of either compressor heat or stripper condenser heat to preheat boiler feedwater would result in heat rate improvements from 1.20 percent to 4.19 percent. The MEA capture simulations further showed that partial drying of low rank coals, done in combination

  4. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, William; Basso, Thomas; Coddington, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  5. Degradation of Nylon 6,6 Fire-Suppression Casing from Plutonium Glove Boxes Under Alpha and Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millsap, Donald W.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Wang, Matthew Y.

    2015-04-23

    Nylon 6,6 tensile specimens, conforming to the casing for self-contained fire extinguisher systems, have been irradiated using both an accelerator He++ ion beam and a 5-Ci PuBe neutron source to model the radiation damage these systems would likely incur over a lifetime of operation within glove boxes. Following irradiation, these samples were mechanically tested using standard practices as described in ASTM D638. The results of the He++ study indicate that the tensile strength of the nylon specimens undergoes some slight (<10%) degradation while other properties of the samples, such as elongation and tangent modulus, appear to fluctuate with increasing dose levels. The He++-irradiated specimens also have a noticeable level of discoloration corresponding to increasing levels of dose. The neutron-irradiated samples show a higher degree of mechanical degradation than the He++-irradiated samples.

  6. Degradation of Nylon 6,6 Fire-Suppression Casing from Plutonium Glove Boxes Under Alpha and Neutron Irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Millsap, Donald W.; Cournoyer, Michael E.; Landsberger, Sheldon; Tesmer, Joseph R.; Wang, Matthew Y.

    2015-04-23

    Nylon 6,6 tensile specimens, conforming to the casing for self-contained fire extinguisher systems, have been irradiated using both an accelerator He++ ion beam and a 5-Ci PuBe neutron source to model the radiation damage these systems would likely incur over a lifetime of operation within glove boxes. Following irradiation, these samples were mechanically tested using standard practices as described in ASTM D638. The results of the He++ study indicate that the tensile strength of the nylon specimens undergoes some slight (<10%) degradation while other properties of the samples, such as elongation and tangent modulus, appear to fluctuate with increasing dosemore » levels. The He++-irradiated specimens also have a noticeable level of discoloration corresponding to increasing levels of dose. The neutron-irradiated samples show a higher degree of mechanical degradation than the He++-irradiated samples.« less

  7. Fire Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources Emergency Communication Fire Information Fire Information Focusing on fire prevention and protection. Contact Fire Management Officer Manuel J. L'Esperance...

  8. Your Home Fire Safety Checklist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YourHome FireSafety Checklist U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Washington, D.C. 20207 Table of Contents About the Commission Introduction Sources Of Fire Supplemental Home Heating Equipment . . . . . . . . . . 1 Cooking Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Cigarette Lighters and Matches . . . 4 Materials That Burn Upholstered Furniture . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mattresses and Bedding . . . . . . . . . 6 Wearing Apparel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Flammable Liquids . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

  9. Field Guide for Testing Existing Photovoltaic Systems for Ground Faults and Installing Equipment to Mitigate Fire Hazards: November 2012 - October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, William

    2015-02-01

    Ground faults and arc faults are the two most common reasons for fires in photovoltaic (PV) arrays and methods exist that can mitigate the hazards. This report provides field procedures for testing PV arrays for ground faults, and for implementing high resolution ground fault and arc fault detectors in existing and new PV system designs.

  10. fire rescue | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    fire rescue NNSA labs fight fire with simulation Fire season is in full swing in the driest parts of the United States, and capabilities of NNSA's labs are helping equip firefighters in the heated battle to save property and environment. NNSA's labs are perfectly suited to support emergency response related to fire. A long history of... Savannah River Site "Live Burn" Training Sharpens Skills As part of the training that equips them to ensure safe operations, Savannah River Site

  11. MSHA (Mine Safety and Health Administration) approved mine rescue - training module (coal): fires, fire fighting, and explosions. Mine rescue team series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Mine rescue teams frequently must fight fires and guard against the propagation of fires or explosions during a rescue and recovery operation. The team's ability to fight fires depends a great deal on hands-on experience with different fire fighting agents and equipment. The team's work includes an assessment of fire conditions, mine fire gases and other potential hazards associated with fire fighting activity. This training module covers the underlying principles of the fire triangle and the different methods for controlling, containing and extinguishing fires in a mine. The manual also covers fire-fighting equipment, considerations involved in a sealing operation and the cause-effect of explosions.

  12. Enhanced Fire Events Database to Support Fire PRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Baranowsky; Ken Canavan; Shawn St. Germain

    2010-06-01

    Abstract: This paper provides a description of the updated and enhanced Fire Events Data Base (FEDB) developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in cooperation with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The FEDB is the principal source of fire incident operational data for use in fire PRAs. It provides a comprehensive and consolidated source of fire incident information for nuclear power plants operating in the U.S. The database classification scheme identifies important attributes of fire incidents to characterize their nature, causal factors, and severity consistent with available data. The database provides sufficient detail to delineate important plant specific attributes of the incidents to the extent practical. A significant enhancement to the updated FEDB is the reorganization and refinement of the database structure and data fields and fire characterization details added to more rigorously capture the nature and magnitude of the fire and damage to the ignition source and nearby equipment and structures

  13. Annual Fire Protection Program Summary for Calendar Year 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report, required by Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, is the primary source for quantifying fire and fire-related monetary losses of properties, facilities, and equipment across the DOE Complex.

  14. Fire protection program fiscal year 1997 site support program plan - Hanford fire department

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Good, D.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fires Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford Site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. this includes response to surrounding fire department districts under mutual aids agreements and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site. the fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing, and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention and education.

  15. Coal-fired boiler for petroleum refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketterman, W.R.; Heinzmann, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    There has been a significant amount of interest in conversion from oil/gas fired boilers to coal-fired equipment since the Arab oil embargo of 1973. The CRA Incorporated Coffeyville Refinery decided in 1977 to proceed with the installation of a 86.183 Kg/h coal fired boiler to generate process steam at 650 psig (4,482 k Pa) 596/sup 0/F (313/sup 0/C). A significant portion of this steam is passed through steam turbines to obtain mechanical power. Building and operating a coal-fired steam plant is a ''Different Kettle of Fish'' from building and operating an oil/gas-fired steam plant. The intention of this paper is to deal with some of the ''Why's and Wherefores'' of the conversion to coal-fired equipment.

  16. Fire Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-05

    This Standard was developed to provide acceptable methods and approaches for meeting DOE fire protection program and design requirements and to address special or unique fire protection issues at DOE facilities that are not comprehensively or adequately addressed in national consensus standards or other design criteria.

  17. California State Fire Marshal Information Bulletin

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    California State Fire Marshal Information Bulletin April 27, 2009 INFORMATION REGARDING PLACEMENT OF E85 FUEL DISPENSING EQUIPMENT ON STATE OWNED OR STATE LEASED FACILITIES In an effort to assist interested parties with criteria addressing E85 dispensing equipment, the Office of the State Fire Marshal (OSFM) is providing this informational bulletin. E85 is the acronym for an alcohol-blended gasoline fuel that contains between 15 to 85 percent ethanol (alcohol). Presently, there are over 10,000

  18. Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

    2008-09-29

    post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

  19. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, John S

    2003-04-01

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  20. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment - April 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irving, J.S.

    2003-04-30

    DOE prepared an environmental assessment (EA)for wildland fire management activities on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (DOE/EA-1372). The EA was developed to evaluate wildland fire management options for pre-fire, fire suppression, and post fire activities. Those activities have an important role in minimizing the conversion of the native sagebrush steppe ecosystem found on the INEEL to non-native weeds. Four alternative management approaches were analyzed: Alternative 1 - maximum fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 2 - balanced fire protection; Alternative 3 - protect infrastructure and personnel; and Alternative 4 - no action/traditional fire protection.

  1. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwager, K.; Green, T. M.

    2014-10-01

    The DOE policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by DOE and/or Its various contractors which can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wildland fire, operational, and prescribed fires. FMPs provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. The plan will be reviewed periodically to ensure fire program advances and will evolve with the missions of DOE and BNL.

  2. Emergency sacrificial sealing method in filters, equipment, or systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Erik P

    2014-09-30

    A system seals a filter or equipment component to a base and will continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire. The system includes a first sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base; and a second sealing material between the filter or equipment component and the base and proximate the first sealing material. The first sealing material and the second seal material are positioned relative to each other and relative to the filter or equipment component and the base to seal the filter or equipment component to the base and upon the event of fire the second sealing material will be activated and expand to continue to seal the filter or equipment component to the base in the event of hot air or fire.

  3. Mitigating Wildland Fires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mitigating Wildland Fires Mitigating Wildland Fires Our interactive wildland fire map displays the locations of wildland fire mitigation activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email View in Google Maps What we are doing to mitigate wildland fires Recent large wildfires in the area, including the La Mesa Fire (1977), the Dome Fire (1996), the Oso Fire (1998), the Cerro Grande Fire (2000), and the Las

  4. Variable Voltage Substation Electric Fire and Emergency Response |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Variable Voltage Substation Electric Fire and Emergency Response Variable Voltage Substation Electric Fire and Emergency Response Question from Participant: My question is from an emergency response perspective. It was stated that it took ~ ½ for electricians to de-energize the electrical components before firefighters were allowed in to fight the fire. This delay causes more damage to equipment and potential propagation of the fire. Is there not a "master"

  5. Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program provides published fire safety directives (orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary.

  6. DOE-STD-1044-93 CN-1; Guide to Good Practices for Equipment and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... loss of proper control of nuclear materials and processes. ... distribution and lighting panels C Emergency equipment (fire ... of compressed air, fuel oil, lube oil, and cooling ...

  7. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Applications

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Select the "Search Equipment" menu link. Enter the type of equipment desired into the search box or choose the "Equipment List" link, which will allow you see a complete list of ...

  8. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment List Already know the item control number? Submit Reset Item Control Number Equipment Name Date Entered Condition Picture 89022961820152 75164 VACUUM CONDENSER 07272016 ...

  9. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Before you Apply, please Print This Page for your records Equipment Details No Package found. Item Control Number: Equipment Type: Condition: Date Entered: (you have 30 days from ...

  10. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Before you Apply, please Print This Page for your records Equipment Details No Package found. Item Control Number: Equipment Type: Condition: Date Entered: (you have 30 days from this date to acquire equipment) Manufacturer: Make: Model: FSC Number: Detailed Description: Location of Equipment: Address Line 2: Address Line 3: City: State: Zip: Contact: Phone: Fax: Email address: Quantity: Original Acquisition Cost: $0.00

  11. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To facilitate conformance with its fire safety directives and the implementation of a comprehensive fire protection program, DOE has developed a number of "model" program documents. These include a comprehensive model fire protection program, model fire hazards analyses and assessments, fire protection system inspection and testing procedures, and related material.

  12. Concrete Dust Suppression System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The improved technology is a water-based dust suppression system for controlling concrete dust generated by demolition equipment, in this case a demolition ram. This demonstration was performed to assess the effectiveness of this system to (1) minimize the amount of water used to suppress potentially contaminated dust, (2) focus the water spray on the dust-generating source and (3) minimize the dust cloud generated by the demolition activity. The technology successfully reduced the water required by a factor of eight compared to the traditional (baseline) method, controlled the dust generated, and permitted a reduction in the work force. The water spray can be focused at the ram point, but it is affected by wind. Prior to the use of this dust control system, dust generated by the demolition ram was controlled manually by spraying with fire hoses (the baseline technology). The improved technology is 18% less expensive than the baseline technology for the conditions and parameters of this demonstration, however, the automated system can save up to 80% versus the baseline whenever waste water treatment costs are considered. For demolishing one high-walled room and a long slab with a total of 413 m{sup 3} (14,580 ft{sup 3}) of concrete, the savings are $105,000 (waste water treatment included). The improved technology reduced the need for water consumption and treatment by about 88% which results in most of the savings.

  13. NNSA labs fight fire with simulation | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) labs fight fire with simulation Tuesday, July 19, 2016 - 10:01am Los Alamos National Laboratory uses high-performance computing to simulate wildfire behavior. Fire season is in full swing in the driest parts of the United States, and capabilities of NNSA's labs are helping equip firefighters in the heated battle to save property and environment. NNSA's labs are perfectly suited to support emergency response related to fire. A long history of adapting to climate change

  14. Fire Hazards Listing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazards Listing Fire Hazards Listing Focusing on fire prevention and protection. Contact Fire Management Officer Manuel J. L'Esperance Emergency Management (505) 667-1692 Email Currently reported fire hazards Below are the currently reported fire hazards. The list is updated each day by the close of business. Current fire hazards Hazard Description Date Submitted Status No hazards currently reported. Legend: R=Resolved, P=Pending, NAR=No Action Required

  15. Model Fire Protection Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program demonstrates acceptable methods and examples to assist each DOE site in meeting the fire protection objectives provided in DOE Order 5480.7A, "Fire Protection."

  16. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site

  17. Fire Safety Training: Fire Modeling- NUREG 1934

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Frederick W. Mowrer, Ph.D., P.E. Director Fire Protection Engineering Programs - Cal Poly – SLO

  18. POST-FIRE REVEGETATION AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROOS RC; JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; RODRIGUEZ JM; WILDE JW

    2010-01-05

    Range fires on the Hanford Site can have a long lasting effect on native plant communities. Wind erosion following removal of protective vegetation from fragile soils compound the damaging effect of fires. Dust storms caused by erosion create health and safety hazards to personnel, and damage facilities and equipment. The Integrated Biological Control Program (IBC) revegetates burned areas to control erosion and consequent dust. Use of native, perennial vegetation in revegetation moves the resulting plant community away from fire-prone annual weeds, and toward the native shrub-steppe that is much less likely to burn in the future. Over the past 10 years, IBC has revegetated major fire areas with good success. IBC staff is monitoring the success of these efforts, and using lessons learned to improve future efforts.

  19. Line Equipment Operator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There are several Line Equipment Operator positions located in Washington and Oregon. A successful candidate in this position will perform Line Equipment Operator work operating trucks and all...

  20. Fire Danger Matrix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Danger Matrix Fire Danger Matrix Focusing on fire prevention and protection. Matrix of fire danger ratings and descriptions Fire Danger Ratings Fire Danger Rating Wind Parameters Shot, Burn Activity Construction Sites Fuels Mitigation Spark Producing Activities Non- Motorized Activities Red Flag PROHIBITED: Approved with Restrictions: Approved Hazard Control Plan PROHIBITED: PROHIBITED: Approved with Restrictions: Two-way Communications Management Accountability Extreme *<10 mph Approved with

  1. Contact Hanford Fire Department - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department Contact Hanford Fire Department Hanford Fire Department Hanford Fire Department Home About Hanford Fire Department Fire and Life Safety Information Hot Links to Cool...

  2. Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zeiss Axiovert 200 Optical Microscope Spark Cutter Fully Equipped Metallographic Laboratory Electropolisher Dimpler

  3. University of Delaware | CCEI Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CCEI Equipment Click column headings to sort Type Equipment Details Institution Professor Type Equipment Details Institution Lab BACK TO TOP

  4. Health-Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 85-150-1767, Warwick Fire Department, Warwick, Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenlyside, R.A.; House, L.A.; Kent, G.; Durand, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    In answer to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), an evaluation was made of health complaints noted by fire fighters exposed to plastic products and pesticides during two separate fires attended to by the Warwick Fire Department, located in Warwick, Rhode Island. Questionnaires were administered to 43 persons who were only present at the plastics fire and 46 who were only present at the pesticide fire and to 13 present at both fires. The men who fought the plastic products fire and the pesticide fire apparently experienced acute symptoms related to smoke and chemical inhalation during the fires, including headache, cough, sore throat, wheezing, shortness of breath, rash, dizziness, nausea, blurred vision, and numbness. The authors conclude that fire fighters at these two fires experienced acute irritant symptoms from smoke and chemical inhalation. The authors recommend use of protective clothing, use of protective equipment, prefire planning, implementation of medical surveillance for all fire fighters, and the proper cleanup of protective clothing and equipment after fires.

  5. WIPP Firefighters Complete Fire Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 24, 2016 WIPP Firefighters Complete Fire Training Members of the WIPP fire department recently participated in Live Fire Training at the Permian Basin Regional Training Center ...

  6. Fire Protection Program Metrics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Perry E. D ’Antonio, P.E., Acting Sr. Manager, Fire Protection - Sandia National Laboratories

  7. Fire Safety Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Department of Energy /National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE) Fire Safety Committee is to provide a forum to facilitate the interaction between the DOE, its program offices and contractor personnel with common interests regarding the identification and resolution of fire safety-related issues including the development of appropriate fire protection Orders, Guides, and Technical Standards.

  8. MECS 2006- Transportation Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment (NAICS 336) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  9. Bracing for fire?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bracing for fire Bracing for fire Understanding what drives big fires and predicting their behavior helps the fire community prepare for the next blaze through appropriate land management, emergency plans and firefighting strategies. July 20, 2016 Human-gorilla divergence may have occurred two million years earlier than thought (Photo : Flickr: Rod Waddington) A photo from space of the Las Conchas fire in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, N.M. just after its start at 1:30 p.m. on June 26,

  10. Fire Protection Program Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharry, J A

    2012-05-18

    This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

  11. Development of the IPRO-zone for fire PSA and its applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, D. I.; Han, S. H.

    2012-07-01

    A PSA analyst has been manually determining fire-induced component failure modes and modeling them into the PSA logics. These can be difficult and time-consuming tasks as they need much information and many events are to be modeled. KAERI has been developing the IPRO-ZONE (interface program for constructing zone effect table) to facilitate fire PSA works for identifying and modeling fire-induced component failure modes, and to construct a one top fire event PSA model. With the output of the IPRO-ZONE, the AIMS-PSA, and internal event one top PSA model, one top fire events PSA model is automatically constructed. The outputs of the IPRO-ZONE include information on fire zones/fire scenarios, fire propagation areas, equipment failure modes affected by a fire, internal PSA basic events corresponding to fire-induced equipment failure modes, and fire events to be modeled. This paper introduces the IPRO-ZONE, and its application results to fire PSA of Ulchin Unit 3 and SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). (authors)

  12. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment List

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equipment List Already know the item control number? Submit Reset Item Control Number Equipment Name Date Entered Condition Picture 89022962080110 216969 LEPS HIGH PURITY GERMANIUM 08/16/2016 Repairable N/A 89022962080111 220131 DETECTOR GAMMA RAY 08/16/2016 Repairable N/A 89022962240034 220131 DETECTOR GAMMA RAY 08/31/2016 Repairable N/A 89022962170049 73415 CHROMATOGRAPHY SYSTEMS 08/24/2016 Repairable N/A 89022962170057 74147 THERMAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPH 08/24/2016 Repairable N/A 89022962170061

  13. Tested by Fire - How two recent Wildfires affected Accelerator Operations at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spickermann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    In a little more than a decade two large wild fires threatened Los Alamos and impacted accelerator operations at LANL. In 2000 the Cerro Grande Fire destroyed hundreds of homes, as well as structures and equipment at the DARHT facility. The DARHT accelerators were safe in a fire-proof building. In 2011 the Las Conchas Fire burned about 630 square kilometers (250 square miles) and came dangerously close to Los Alamos/LANL. LANSCE accelerator operations Lessons Learned during Las Conchas fire: (1) Develop a plan to efficiently shut down the accelerator on short notice; (2) Establish clear lines of communication in emergency situations; and (3) Plan recovery and keep squirrels out.

  14. Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget January 09, 2014 WASHINGTON, D.C. - Work on the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) High Pressure Fire Loop (HPFL) project at its Pantex Plant, located near Amarillo, Texas, was completed in December 2013 on schedule and more than $5 million under budget. Completion of HPFL enhances the reliability of safety-class fire suppression systems to ensure that the

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying facility fire protection system design description (SYS 24)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) fire protection system (FPS). The FPS provides fire detection, suppression, and loss limitation for the CVDF structure, personnel, and in-process spent nuclear fuel. The system provides, along with supporting interfacing systems, detection, alarm, and activation instrumentation and controls, distributive piping system, isolation valves, and materials and controls to limit combustibles and the associated fire loadings.

  16. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a challenging and rewarding career, while working, living, and playing in the Pacific Northwest. The Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (HMEM)...

  17. Mitigating Wildland Fires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area will be assigned a retreatment cycle and will be incorporated into the LANL Wildland fire maintenance program. Environmental Protection What We Monitor & Why Cultural...

  18. Co-firing biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Tennant, D.

    2009-11-15

    Concern about global warming has altered the landscape for fossil-fuel combustion. The advantages and challenges of co-firing biomass and coal are discussed. 2 photos.

  19. Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, national Fire Protection Association Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard, along with other delineated criteria, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  20. BlueFire Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, California Proposed Facility Location: Mecca, ... or Southern California Materials Recovery Facilities to ethanol and other products. ...

  1. Direct-fired biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The direct-fired biomass section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  2. LDRD report: Smoke effects on electrical equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TANAKA,TINA J.; BAYNES JR.,EDWARD E.; NOWLEN,STEVEN P.; BROCKMANN,JOHN E.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.; SHADDIX,CHRISTOPHER R.

    2000-03-01

    Smoke is known to cause electrical equipment failure, but the likelihood of immediate failure during a fire is unknown. Traditional failure assessment techniques measure the density of ionic contaminants deposited on surfaces to determine the need for cleaning or replacement of electronic equipment exposed to smoke. Such techniques focus on long-term effects, such as corrosion, but do not address the immediate effects of the fire. This document reports the results of tests on the immediate effects of smoke on electronic equipment. Various circuits and components were exposed to smoke from different fields in a static smoke exposure chamber and were monitored throughout the exposure. Electrically, the loss of insulation resistance was the most important change caused by smoke. For direct current circuits, soot collected on high-voltage surfaces sometimes formed semi-conductive soot bridges that shorted the circuit. For high voltage alternating current circuits, the smoke also tended to increase the likelihood of arcing, but did not accumulate on the surfaces. Static random access memory chips failed for high levels of smoke, but hard disk drives did not. High humidity increased the conductive properties of the smoke. The conductivity does not increase linearly with smoke density as first proposed; however, it does increase with quantity. The data can be used to give a rough estimate of the amount of smoke that will cause failures in CMOS memory chips, dc and ac circuits. Comparisons of this data to other fire tests can be made through the optical and mass density measurements of the smoke.

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Major Residential HVAC Equipment Lifetimes, Ages, and Replacement Picture Equipment Type Central Air Conditioners 8 - 14 11 8 5,354 Heat Pumps 9 - 15 12 8 1,260 Furnaces Electric 10 - 20 15 11 N.A. Gas-Fired 12 - 17 15 11 2,601 Oil-Fired 15 - 19 17 N.A. 149 Gas-Fired Boilers (1) 17 - 24 20 17 204 Note(s): Source(s): Lifetimes based on use by the first owner of the product, and do not necessarily indicate that the product stops working after this period. A replaced unit may be discarded or used

  4. Analysis of Heat Rate Improvement Potential at Coal-Fired Power...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Heat Rate Improvement Potential at Coal-Fired Power Plants Release date: May 19, ... can vary depending in part on the type of equipment installed at a generating plant. ...

  5. Troubleshooting rotating equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports that equipment problems in a Peruvian refinery illustrate the process engineer's role as a troubleshooter. Examples show that rotating equipment problems can stem from mechanical or process factors and involve both inspection/maintenance specialists and process engineers.

  6. Model Baseline Fire Department/Fire Protection Engineering Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the document is to comprehensively delineate and rationalize the roles and responsibilities of the Fire Department and Fire Protection (Engineering).

  7. Fire Protection Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Fire Protection Training courses developed that provide needed information and a method to train fire departments and other emergency responders who may be called upon to respond to accidents involving radioactive materials along DOE transportation corridors and routes and to assist emergency responders located at or near a Department of Energy (DOE) site radiological transportation route.

  8. Fossil-Fired Boilers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-09-23

    Boiler Performance Model (BPM 3.0S) is a set of computer programs developed to analyze the performance of fossil-fired utility boilers. The programs can model a wide variety of boiler designs, and can model coal, oil, or natural gas firing. The programs are intended for use by engineers performing analyses of alternative fuels, alternative operating modes, or boiler modifications.

  9. Fire Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fire Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFireResources&oldid612392" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs...

  10. Fire science at LLNL: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasegawa, H.K.

    1990-03-01

    This fire sciences report from LLNL includes topics on: fire spread in trailer complexes, properties of welding blankets, validation of sprinkler systems, fire and smoke detectors, fire modeling, and other fire engineering and safety issues. (JEF)

  11. Solar Equipment Certification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Solar Energy Standards Act of 1976, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is responsible for certifying all solar equipment sold in Florida. A manufacturer who wishes to have their solar...

  12. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  13. Appliance and Equipment Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standards April 22, 2014 John Cymbalsky Program Manager 1 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Appliance & Equipment Standards Mission The Appliance and Equipment Standards Program's Mission to Fulfill its Statutory Obligation to: * Develop and amend energy conservation standards that achieve the maximum energy efficiency that is technologically feasible and economically justified. * Develop and amend test procedures that are repeatable, reproducible, representative,

  14. Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment Certification Guide U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office December 10 th , 2015 Presenter: Nick Barilo Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrogen Safety Program Manager DOE Host: Will James - DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Question and Answer * Please type your questions into the question box 2 / / Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide: Introduction and Kickoff for the Stakeholder Review Nick Barilo PNNL

  15. Electronic firing systems and methods for firing a device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frickey, Steven J.; Svoboda, John M.

    2012-04-24

    An electronic firing system comprising a control system, a charging system, an electrical energy storage device, a shock tube firing circuit, a shock tube connector, a blasting cap firing circuit, and a blasting cap connector. The control system controls the charging system, which charges the electrical energy storage device. The control system also controls the shock tube firing circuit and the blasting cap firing circuit. When desired, the control system signals the shock tube firing circuit or blasting cap firing circuit to electrically connect the electrical energy storage device to the shock tube connector or the blasting cap connector respectively.

  16. Ways to Improve Russian Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumanovskii, A. G. Olkhovsky, G. G.

    2015-07-15

    Coal is an important fuel for the electric power industry of Russia, especially in Ural and the eastern part of the country. It is fired in boilers of large (200 – 800 MW) condensing power units and in many cogeneration power plants with units rated at 50 – 180 MW. Many coal-fired power plants have been operated for more than 40 – 50 years. Though serviceable, their equipment is obsolete and does not comply with the current efficiency, environmental, staffing, and availability standards. It is urgent to retrofit and upgrade such power plants using advanced equipment, engineering and business ideas. Russian power-plant engineering companies have designed such advanced power units and their equipment such as boilers, turbines, auxiliaries, process and environmental control systems similar to those produced by the world’s leading manufacturers. Their performance and ways of implementation are discussed.

  17. Health Care Buildings: Equipment Table

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Equipment Table Buildings, Size and Age Data by Equipment Types for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million square feet)...

  18. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Guidelines

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... What equipment is available under the LEDP program? Examples of typical items of educational training apparatus or equipment that may be requested are listed below. It should be ...

  19. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  20. Risk of large-scale fires in boreal forests of Finland under changing climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lehtonen, I.; Venäläinen, A.; Kamarainen, M.; Peltola, H.; Gregow, H.

    2016-01-21

    Here, the target of this work was to assess the impact of projected climate change on forest-fire activity in Finland with special emphasis on large-scale fires. In addition, we were particularly interested to examine the inter-model variability of the projected change of fire danger. For this purpose, we utilized fire statistics covering the period 1996-2014 and consisting of almost 20,000 forest fires, as well as daily meteorological data from five global climate models under representative concentration pathway RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios. The model data were statistically downscaled onto a high-resolution grid using the quantile-mapping method before performing the analysis. Inmore » examining the relationship between weather and fire danger, we applied the Canadian fire weather index (FWI) system. Our results suggest that the number of large forest fires may double or even triple during the present century. This would increase the risk that some of the fires could develop into real conflagrations which have become almost extinct in Finland due to active and efficient fire suppression. However, the results reveal substantial inter-model variability in the rate of the projected increase of forest-fire danger, emphasizing the large uncertainty related to the climate change signal in fire activity. We moreover showed that the majority of large fires in Finland occur within a relatively short period in May and June due to human activities and that FWI correlates poorer with the fire activity during this time of year than later in summer when lightning is a more important cause of fires.« less

  1. Hanford Site Fire June 2000 AM

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    The Hanford Site Fire on the morning of June 29, 2000. Fire crews working to contain a fire on the Hanford Site in June 2000.

  2. Fire Protection Engineering Functional Area Qualification Standard...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Fire Safety Program" + + + + DOE-STD-1066-99, "Fire Protection Design Criteria" + + + + ... Identify the applicable National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Code or Standard. c. ...

  3. Emergency Facilities and Equipment

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Supported Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supported Equipment Alt text This list of PSL supported equipment identifies the electrical Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) for which the Primary Standards Laboratory has either developed a calibration procedure or identified a commercial calibration source. Calibration of equipment that is not listed may take additional time and resources. Please contact the PSL at 845-8855 for additional information.

  5. Maintaining gas cooling equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, J.D.

    1997-05-01

    An often overlooked key to satisfactory operation and longevity of any mechanical device is proper operation and maintenance in accordance with the manufacturer`s written instructions. Absorption chillers, although they use a different technology than the more familiar vapor compression cycle to produce chilled water, operate successfully in a variety of applications if operated and maintained properly. Maintenance procedures may be more frequent than those required for vapor compression chillers, but they are also typically less complex. The goal of this article is to describe the basic operation of an absorption chiller to provide an understanding of the relatively simple tasks required to keep the machine operating at maximum efficiency for its design life and beyond. A good starting point is definitions. Gas cooling equipment is generally defined as alternative energy, non-electric cooling products. This includes absorption chillers, engine-drive chillers and packaged desiccant units, among others. Natural gas combustion drives the equipment.

  6. Fire Protection Account Request Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fire Protection System Account Request Form To obtain a user id and password to access the Fire Protection system, please complete the form, save the file and email it to...

  7. Secure authenticated video equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doren, N.E.

    1993-07-01

    In the verification technology arena, there is a pressing need for surveillance and monitoring equipment that produces authentic, verifiable records of observed activities. Such a record provides the inspecting party with confidence that observed activities occurred as recorded, without undetected tampering or spoofing having taken place. The secure authenticated video equipment (SAVE) system provides an authenticated series of video images of an observed activity. Being self-contained and portable, it can be installed as a stand-alone surveillance system or used in conjunction with existing monitoring equipment in a non-invasive manner. Security is provided by a tamper-proof camera enclosure containing a private, electronic authentication key. Video data is transferred communication link consisting of a coaxial cable, fiber-optic link or other similar media. A video review station, located remotely from the camera, receives, validates, displays and stores the incoming data. Video data is validated within the review station using a public key, a copy of which is held by authorized panics. This scheme allows the holder of the public key to verify the authenticity of the recorded video data but precludes undetectable modification of the data generated by the tamper-protected private authentication key.

  8. Fire extinguishant for fissionable material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon microspheres impregnated with a neutron poison are used as an extinguishant for radioactive and fissionable metal fires.

  9. Fire Protection Engineering Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical ... by applied engineering fundamentals, research, fire hazard ...

  10. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 84-484-1754, Detroit Fire Fighters, Detroit, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.E.; Melius, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters on behalf of the Detroit Fire Fighters Association, Detroit, Michigan, a health hazard evaluation was made of respiratory symptoms and skin irritation in fire fighters involved in a large fire and explosion at a warehouse. Over 200 fire fighters from fire-fighting organizations in three communities were involved in the incident. Site runoff water contained chlordane and malathion in low parts per million; other samples were negative. Nose and throat irritation, cough, and shortness of breath were experienced by a large proportion of fire fighters following the fire, and in 14, 15, and 17 percent, respectively, symptoms persisted over 2 months. Symptoms were significantly associated with time spent at the scene and time spent in heavy smoke. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 14 cases, ten due to obstructive lung disease, three to restrictive lung disease, and one to a combination. The authors conclude that better protective equipment is needed for fire fighters at chemical fires. Recommendations include development of a hazardous-materials response team, and implementation of a routine medical surveillance program.

  12. Explosion suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sapko, Michael J. (Finleyville, PA); Cortese, Robert A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  13. Agricultural Equipment Technology Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 20th Agricultural Equipment Technology Conference will be held Feb. 8–10, 2016, in Louisville, Kentucky. The conference will bring together professionals and experts in the agricultural and biological engineering fields. Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Terrestrial Feedstocks Technology Manager Sam Tagore will be in attendance. Mr. Tagore will moderate a technical session titled “Ash Reduction Strategies for Improving Biomass Feedstock Quality.” The session will include presentations by researchers from Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory supporting BETO, as well as from university and industry.

  14. Equipment Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment Specialist Equipment Specialist Submitted by admin on Sat, 2016-01-16 00:16 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency SubElement Bonneville Power...

  15. Hanford fire department FY 99 annual work plan WBS 6.5.7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOOD, D.E.

    1999-02-24

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing a full range of services at the lowest possible cost to customers. These services include fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, the general public, or interest of the U. S. Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education.

  16. FIRE & RESCUE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSS Firefighters PLA (10/01/12 - 09/30/17) Page 1 of 63 FIRE & RESCUE PROJECT LABOR AGREEMENT FOR THE NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE (NNSS) between NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES LLC. (NSTec) and INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS, CHAUFFEURS, WAREHOUSEMEN AND HELPERS OF AMERICA, LOCAL UNION NO. 631 October 1, 2012 - September 30, 2017 NNSS Firefighters PLA (10/01/12 - 09/30/17) Page 2 of 63 TABLE OF CONTENTS (BY ARTICLE) ARTICLE PAGE 1. PREAMBLE

  17. Equipment Pool | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pool What is the Equipment Pool? Property that is no longer required or being used by a research group or administrative office is sent to the Ames Laboratory's warehouse Equipment Pool area for reuitilization within the Laboratory. What property is in the Equipment Pool? 1. Visit the Equipment Pool Listing page, or 2. Visit our Ames Laboratory warehouse between the hours of 7:30-4 p.m. to view the items in the equipment pool. How do I request property from the Pool? Contact Brian Aspengren,

  18. Microsoft Word - 2013 Annual Fire Protection Program Summary...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... and Facility Fire Loss Amounts since 1993 Figure 2: Major Fire Loss Events Figure 3: ... For comparison, the National Fire Protection Association's (NFPA) Fire Loss in the United ...

  19. Fire Safety Committee Membership List | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fire Safety Committee Membership List Fire Safety Committee Membership List List of members representing DOE, NNSA and Contractors on the Fire Safety Committee. PDF icon Fire ...

  20. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  1. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  2. Firefighting and fire prevention: Facilities instructions, standards and techniques. Volume 5-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, H.E.

    1992-02-01

    The operation and maintenance personnel around a powerplant, pumping plant, or other Reclamation establishment are not presumed to be firefighters, but occasionally their duties may make it necessary for them to fight fires. The purpose of this volume is to supply them with fundamental facts which may prove valuable in such an emergency and acquaint them with the use, care, and testing of firefighting equipment. It is assumed that operation and maintenance personnel are familiar with the common safety practices in connection with fire prevention and general safety around electrical equipment. This volume is designed to help improve the work along these lines.

  3. Puerto Rico - Renewable Energy Equipment Certification | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Puerto Rico Program Type Equipment Certification Summary Certification of Photovoltaic Equipment EAA specifies that PV equipment must meet UL 1703 requirements, and...

  4. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  5. Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (accessegress) Hazard Trees (falling, fire hazard) Utilities (Lab employees: use Form 1821 (pdf) to report utility...

  6. Hanford Fire Department - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The other services provided to Hanford Site contractors include functional testing and preventive and corrective maintenance of installed, automatic life safety fire detection and ...

  7. Thinking beyond the fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pircon, R.

    2006-07-15

    Assuring optimal performance, adaptability and overall coal yard competitiveness means more than just avoiding catastrophe. Increasing use of subbituminous coal requires better understanding of coal transfers, storage and Powder River Basin/bituminous coal blends. Introducing PRB coal increases susceptibility to spontaneous combustion so spillage and dust become larger issues. Coal yard risk overviews, such as Benetech's Risk Index, are emerging. Benetech's steps for evaluating fire and efficiency requires: identifying variables; establishing 'best-in-class' remedies; implementing performance standards; and monitoring progress with reevaluation techniques. The article explains these steps. 2 photos.

  8. Equipment Loans | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loans Requirements to Loan Property: Ames Laboratory may loan Government Property provided the equipment is not excess to the Laboratory's needs. In order to loan equipment, the following criteria must be met: 1) Equipment shall be used in performing research, studies, and other efforts that result in benefits to both the U.S. Government, the borrower, and provided that the DOE mission is not affected. 2) Used by another DOE organization, contractor, Government agency, or organization that has a

  9. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Ancillary Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancillary Equipment For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Sample Environments responsible: Victor Fanelli | vfanelli@lanl.gov | 505.667.8755 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact the Lujan Center Experiment Coordinator: TBA Low Temperature Equipment Specifications Flight Path/Instrument Compatibility Responsible Displex closed-cycle refrigerators Tmin= 4 K to 12 K Tmax= 300 K to 340 K 11 - Asterix 04 - HIPPO 03 - HIPD 10

  10. Information technology equipment cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  11. Commercial Kitchen Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiency Vermont offers rebates for ENERGY STAR certified fryers, griddles, convection ovens, and steam cookers. Custom rebates for other types of commercial cooking equipment may be available...

  12. Webinar: Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar titled "Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide" on Thursday, December 10, from 1 to 2 p.m. EST.

  13. Equipment Certification | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Hydroelectric (Small) Natural Gas Nuclear Solar Photovoltaics Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes Madison - Equipment...

  14. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2008-01-01

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. INL '@work' heavy equipment mechanic

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Christensen, Cad

    2013-05-28

    INL's Cad Christensen is a heavy equipment mechanic. For more information about INL careers, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Fire Safety Committee Meeting Minutes- May 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Fire Safety Committee Meeting Minutes, May, 2014 Topics included discussions on Fire modeling, revisions to DOE regulations and other important items relating to DOE and Fire Safety Community.

  17. Forwardly-placed firearm fire control assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frickey, Steven J.

    2001-12-22

    A firearm fire control assembly for disposition in a forwardly placed support-hand operative relationship within a firearm having a combination of a firing pin and a firearm hammer adapted to engage and fire a cartridge, a sear assembly to alternately engage and disengage the combination of the firearm hammer and firing pin, and a trigger assembly including a movable trigger mechanism that is operable to engage the sear assembly to cause the firearm hammer firing pin combination to fire the firearm, a fire control assembly including a fire control depression member and a fire control rod operably connected to the depression member, and being positioned in a forward disposition disposed within a forestock of the firearm, and the depression member adapted to be operably engaged and depressed by the user's conventional forwardly placed support hand to maneuver the fire control rod to provide firing control of the firing of the firearm.

  18. Proceedings: Substation equipment diagnostics conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, K.L.

    1994-07-01

    This Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference held November 3--5, 1993, in New Orleans, Louisiana, reviewed the status of EPRI research on transmission substation diagnostics as well as that of universities, manufacturers, testing organizations, and other researchers. The papers presented were organized under four categories of diagnostics: Transformers, Circuit Breakers, Other Substation Equipment, and Diagnostic Systems.

  19. Nationwide: National Fire Protection Association Provides Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Fire Protection Association Provides Training to First Responders on EVsPEVs Nationwide: National Fire Protection Association Provides Training to First Responders on...

  20. Nationwide: National Fire Protection Association Provides Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nationwide: National Fire Protection Association Provides Training to First Responders on EVsPEVs Nationwide: National Fire Protection Association Provides Training to First...

  1. BlueFire Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BlueFire Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: BlueFire Ethanol Place: Irvine, California Zip: 92618 Sector: Hydro Product: US biofuel producer that utilises a patented...

  2. Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, R.M.

    1996-05-30

    This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

  3. BlueFire Ethanol | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BlueFire Ethanol BlueFire Ethanol Construct and operate a facility that converts green waste and lignocellulosic fractions diverted from landfills or Southern California Materials ...

  4. Fire Protection Related Sites | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Web Sites EFCOG - Fire Protection Working Group Headquarter's Office of Science Brookhaven National Laboratory Hanford Fire Department Non-DOE Government-Related Web Sites Consumer ...

  5. Information technology equipment cooling method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-10-20

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools air utilized by the rack of information technology equipment to cool the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat generated by the rack of information technology equipment.

  6. From fire to ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adcock, P.W.

    1995-06-01

    Absorption chillers are heat-operate refrigeration without harmful environmental emissions (CFCs, HCFCS, and HFCS). The machine uses either steam or a gas-fired burner as the energy source and utilizes endothermic evaporation to provide refrigeration to an external process fluid, usually chilled water. In the United States, absorption chillers are used in regions where the cost of electricity is high relative to natural gas. Absorption chillers are also used in applications where steam is readily available or in areas where seasonal load peaks cause utilities to subsidize gas cooling. This paper will describe the history of absorption, the basic absorption refrigeration cycle and some advanced high efficiency cycles. Practical applications of absorption refrigeration to commercial end uses will also be discussed.

  7. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 85-375-1861, International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF), Los Angeles, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.E.; Melius, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    In response to a request from the International Association of Fire Fighters, a study was made of possible toxic exposures experienced by fire fighters from the Los Angeles Fire Department, paramedics, and police officers during a chemical warehouse fire at Research Organic, Inorganic Chemical Corporation, Sun Valley, California. Numerous flammable, corrosive, and reactive compounds were stored at the warehouse at the time of the fire. Dermatological problems with rashes lasting more than 1 day after the fire were reported by 18 fire fighters and nine police officers. Neurotoxic symptoms of fatigue, forgetfulness, irritability, headaches, and difficulty sleeping were also reported. The neurotoxic symptoms lasted from a month to over a year. The authors conclude that the symptoms experienced by those working at the fire site are associated with exposures during the fire. Recommendations arising from the fire include the establishment of a response team with comprehensive training, state of the art protective equipment, protocols for addressing medical evaluation and decontamination issues, environmental sampling capability, and coordination with other emergency disaster responders.

  8. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  9. Pressure suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  10. Pressure suppression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  11. Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-01

    ; and, (2) A substantial portion of the uncorrected deficiencies, 86 (49 percent) were considered by the walk-down teams to be significant enough to warrant compensatory actions until the deficiency was corrected or was tracked to closure through implementation of corrective actions. Further, we found that 32 of the significant deficiencies had been closed by the previous Los Alamos contractor, prior to LANS assuming responsibility for operation of the Laboratory, even though the deficiencies had not been corrected. A fire protection expert provided technical support during the audit. As an example of uncorrected problems, LANS had not resolved, by performing periodic tests, a deficiency identified in 2006 regarding a kitchen hood fire suppression system in a facility located within the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Such systems are required to be tested twice a year by the National Fire Protection Association standard, a standard that had been adopted by Department of Energy under DOE Order 420.1B. Yet, in 2006, the LANS walk-down team recognized that this system had not been inspected since May 2004 and noted that deficient suppression systems could result in significantly high levels of property damage and loss. After we brought this issue to management's attention on February 6, 2009, LANS officials stated that the Laboratory would correct this deficiency. As with the problems involving the fire suppression system, we observed that LANS had not always corrected life safety deficiencies involving building exits at one of its primary facilities. This included providing a secondary emergency exit for a building with occupants on multiple floor levels. LANS had removed personnel from the third floor and improved the sprinkler system of the facility, but it had still not provided a secondary exit for personnel on the second floor by the time we completed our review. NNSA has since stated that this fire protection issue will be completely addressed by relocating

  12. Pala Fire Station Solar Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pala Fire Station Solar Project Pala Band of Mission Indians Pala Environmental Department Pala Fire Departme nt The Pala Reservation  Located in San Diego County, California  Approximately 13,000 acres  Over 1,000 tribal members  Home to approximately 1,350 people The Pala Reservation  Over 800 houses and buildings  New houses all have PV solar  Main energy users:  Pala Casino Resort & Spa  Pala Fire Station  Pala Administration complex Long-term goal:

  13. Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Arizona’s Appliance and Equipment Efficiency Standards (Arizona Revised Statutes, Title 44, Section 1375) set minimum energy efficiency standards for twelve products, all of which have since been...

  14. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  15. Water-Using Equipment: Domestic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solana, Amy E.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2006-01-24

    Water management is an important aspect of energy engineering. This article addresses water-using equipment primarily used for household purposes, including faucets, showers, toilets, urinals, dishwashers, and clothes washers, and focuses on how the equipment can be optimized to save both water and energy. Technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes are the primary methods discussed for water and energy conservation. Auditing to determine current consumption rates is also described for each technology.

  16. MPC Equipment | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPC Equipment The MPC utilizes a wide range of equipment designed for metallurgical or materials research. With capabilities from simple arc casting techniques, single crystal preparation, and VIM casting, to plasma spraying and high-pressure gas atomization the MPC can assist research groups in many areas. We house complete metallography, analytical, and characterization resources to complement our fabrication capabilities. All of our services are provided on a cost recovery basis. MPC

  17. Fire in a contaminated area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-28

    This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Fire in Contaminated Area. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

  18. Fire protection for relocatable structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This standard supersedes DOE/EV-0043, ``Standard on Fire Protection for Portable Structures.`` It was revised to address the numerous types of relocatable structures, such as trailers, tension-supported structures, and tents being used by DOE and contractors.

  19. Model Fire Protection Assessment Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This Assessment guide covers the implementation of the DOE's responsibility of assuring that DOE and the DOE Contractors have established Fire Protection Programs that are at the level required for the area being assessed.

  20. CRAD, NNSA- Fire Protection (FP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CRAD for Fire Protection (FR). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  1. Coal/D-RDF (densified refuse-derived fuel) co-firing project, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecklinger, R.S.; Rehm, F.R.

    1985-11-01

    A Research and Development Project was carried out to mix a densified refuse-derived fuel with coal at the fuel-receiving point and to co-fire the mixture in a spreader-stoker fired boiler. Two basic series of test runs were conducted. For the first series, coal was fired to establish a base line condition. For the second series, a mixture of coal and densified refuse-derived fuel was fired. The report describes the equipment used to densify refuse derived fuel, procedures used to prepare and handle the coal and densified refuse derived fuel mixture and the test results. The results include the effect of the coal and densified refuse derived fuel mixture on plant operations, boiler efficiency, stack emissions and EP toxicity.

  2. Repowering a small coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miell, R.

    2007-11-15

    The Arkansas River Power Authority (ARPA) Lamar Repowering Project is moving forward. The new generator, capable of producing 18 MW of electricity, is scheduled to be online in June 2008 bringing the total generation to 43 MW. New coal handling equipment, with infrared fire detectors, is almost complete. The new 18 MW steam turbine will be cooled by an air-cooled condenser. Coal will be delivered in a railroad spur to an unloading site then be unloaded onto a conveyor under the tracks and conveyed to two storage domes each holding 6000 tons of coal. It will be drawn out of these through an underground conveyor system, brought into a crusher, conveyed through overhead conveyors and fed into the new coal- fired fluidized bed boilers. 1 photo.

  3. Webinar December 10: Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar titled "Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide" on Thursday, December 10, from 1 to 2 p.m. EST. The webinar will introduce the Hydrogen Equipment Certification Guide, a document intended to aid in equipment approval until listed equipment are available for the entirety of equipment and components.

  4. Incipient fire detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, Jr., William K.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for an incipient fire detection system that receives gaseous samples and measures the light absorption spectrum of the mixture of gases evolving from heated combustibles includes a detector for receiving gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy and determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples. The wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples are compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. The method includes receiving gaseous samples, subjecting the samples to light spectroscopy, determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples, comparing the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples to predetermined absorption wavelengths and generating a warning signal whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. In an alternate embodiment, the apparatus includes a series of channels fluidically connected to a plurality of remote locations. A pump is connected to the channels for drawing gaseous samples into the channels. A detector is connected to the channels for receiving the drawn gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy. The wavelengths of absorption are determined and compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths is provided. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths correspond.

  5. Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2011-09-01

    Cyber friendly fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, a fundamental need in avoiding cyber FF is to maintain situation awareness (SA). We suggest that cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system (and that populate the nodes), the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive (and offensive) countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. A training implication is to raise awareness and understanding of these critical knowledge units; an approach to decision aids and/or visualizations is to focus on supporting these critical knowledge units. To study cyber FF, we developed an unclassified security test range comprising a combination of virtual and physical devices that present a closed network for testing, simulation, and evaluation. This network offers services found on a production network without the associated costs of a real production network. Containing enough detail to appear realistic, this virtual and physical environment can be customized to represent different configurations. For our purposes, the test range was configured to appear as an Internet-connected Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering specialized web applications to the general public. The

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Equipment Options to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment Options on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel

  7. Thermal energy storage for coal-fired power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drost, M.K.; Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Antoniak, Z.I.

    1990-11-01

    This paper presents an engineering and economic evaluation of using thermal energy storage (TES) with coal-fired conventional and combined cycle power plants. In the first case, conventional pulverized coal combustion equipment was assumed to continuously operate to heat molten nitrate salt which was then stored in a tank. During intermediate-load demand periods, hot salt was withdrawn from storage and used to generate steam for a Rankine steam power cycle. This allowed the coal-fired salt heater to be approximately one-third the size of a coal-fired boiler in a conventional cycling plant. The use of nitrate salt TES also reduced the levelized cost of power by between 5% and 24% depends on the operating schedule. The second case evaluate the use of thermal energy storage with an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. In this concept, the nitrate salt was heated by a combination of the gas turbine exhaust and the hot fuel gas. The IGCC plant also contained a low-temperature storage unit that uses a mixture of oil and rock as the thermal storage medium. Thermal energy stored in the low-temperature TES was used to preheat the feedwater after it leaves the condenser and to produce process steam for other applications in the IGCC plant. This concept study also predicted a 5% to 20% reduction in levelized cost of power compared to other coal-fired alternatives. If significant escalation rates in the price of fuel were assumed, the concept could be competitive with natural-gas-fired intermediate-load power generation. A sensitivity analysis of using a direct-contact heat exchanger instead of the conventional finned-tube design showed a significant reduction in the installed capital cost. 3 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Personal Computing Equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Computing Equipment Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Personal Computing Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titlePersona...

  9. China Shandong Penglai Electric Power Equipment Manufacturing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Penglai Electric Power Equipment Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Shandong Penglai Electric Power Equipment Manufacturing Place: Penglai, Shandong Province,...

  10. Moncada Solar Equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Moncada Solar Equipment Place: Italy Product: Developer and manufacturer of thin-film modules. References: Moncada Solar Equipment1 This article is a stub. You can...

  11. CVD Equipment Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Place: Ronkonkoma, New York Zip: 11779 Sector: Solar Product: New York-based maker of chemical vapour deposition process equipment. This equipment is used in the manufacture of...

  12. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale ...

  13. Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Equipment Program Advanced Battery Manufacturing Facilities and Equipment Program AVTA: 2010 Honda Civic HEV with Experimental Ultra Lead Acid Battery Testing Results

  14. DMSE Equipment Scheduling | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scheduling Equipment ownercustodian reserves the right to override the schedule for maintenance andor other justified reasons. Abuse of the scheduling system or equipment may...

  15. Processing and Manufacturing Equipment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Processing and Manufacturing Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:...

  16. Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: ...

  17. Cruising Equipment Company CECO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equipment Company (CECO) Place: Seattle, Washington Zip: 98107 Product: Maker of pollution control equipment - bought by Xantrex in 2000. Coordinates: 47.60356,...

  18. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Guidelines/FAQ

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eligible to participate in the Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP) program. ... physically attached to an energy-related laboratory equipment system); General supplies. ...

  19. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - About Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About LEDP The Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), formerly the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) Grant Program, was established by the United States Department ...

  20. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy (DOE), in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment. equipment

  1. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - LEDP Widget

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LEDP Widget You can access key features of the Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP) website by downloading the LEDP widget. Use the widget to search, view the equipment ...

  2. Residential Gas-Fired Adsorption HPWH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Gas-Fired Adsorption HPWH Gas-fired adsorption heat pump water heater prototype. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Gas-fired adsorption heat pump water ...

  3. CRAD, Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 CRAD, Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 October 12, 2012 Fire Protection Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-34,...

  4. Trends in powder processing equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, L.M.

    1993-05-01

    Spray drying is the most widely used process for producing particles. It is used in industries other than ceramics including food, chemicals, and pharmaceutical. The process involves the atomization of a liquid feed stock into a spray of droplets and contacting the droplets with hot air in a drying chamber. The sprays are produced by either rotary or nozzle atomizers. Evaporation of moisture from the droplets and formation of dry particles proceed under controlled temperature and airflow conditions. Powder is then discharged continuously from the drying chamber. Spray drying equipment is being improved to handle an ever-increasing number of applications. Several developments in particle-size reduction equipment are also described.

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Major Commercial HVAC Equipment Lifetimes and Ages Median Equipment Type Lifetime Air Conditioners Through-the-Wall 15 Water-CooledPackage 24 (1) Roof-Top 15 Chillers Reciprocating 20 Centrifugal 25 (1) Absorption 23 Heat Pumps Air-to-Air 15 Water-to-Air 24 (1) Furnaces (gas or oil) 18 Boilers (gas or oil) Hot-Water 24 - 35 Steam 25 - 30 Unit Heaters Gas-Fired or Electric 13 Hot-Water or Steam 20 Cooling Towers (metal or wood) Metal 22 (1) Wood 20 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Data from 2005. All

  6. Strategy Guideline. HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, Arlan

    2012-02-01

    This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, FL. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  7. Fire resistant PV shingle assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2012-10-02

    A fire resistant PV shingle assembly includes a PV assembly, including PV body, a fire shield and a connection member connecting the fire shield below the PV body, and a support and inter-engagement assembly. The support and inter-engagement assembly is mounted to the PV assembly and comprises a vertical support element, supporting the PV assembly above a support surface, an upper interlock element, positioned towards the upper PV edge, and a lower interlock element, positioned towards the lower PV edge. The upper interlock element of one PV shingle assembly is inter-engageable with the lower interlock element of an adjacent PV shingle assembly. In some embodiments the PV shingle assembly may comprise a ventilation path below the PV body. The PV body may be slidably mounted to the connection member to facilitate removal of the PV body.

  8. Don`t overlook natural gas cooling equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzel, J.

    1997-03-01

    If one thought the confusion surrounding chiller specification and operation ended with the availability of CFC-free refrigerant alternatives, think again. Plant engineers involved in the selection and installation of cooling equipment are facing yet another complicated task, this time thanks to deregulation of the electric utility industry. Still in its early stages, deregulation is a process that could take up to a decade. However, deregulation is also bringing about changing pricing structures. Electric power costs may not always be low for everyone. For plants paying $0.02/kwh for electricity, an electric-powered chiller is a must. But those paying $0.35 or $0.40/kwh, even for a few hours, cannot afford NOT to consider something besides an electric-motor-driven chiller. Among the most viable, yet often overlooked, options available is natural gas cooling. Gas cooling equipment gives industrial users the flexibility to choose either gas or electricity to drive their cooling systems. Natural gas cooling is defined here as the use of absorption cooling systems and engine-driven chillers, as alternatives to electric-driven equipment, to deliver chilled water in a conventional manner. Desiccant systems can also be gas fired and are used primarily for providing dry air for process control. Because of their specialized applications, desiccant cooling is not covered in this article.

  9. Preventing the self-destruction of the indirect coal firing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, C.W.; Rayner, C.C.

    1983-07-01

    The most widely used fuel in the cement industry is pulverized coal. The current trend is to burn coal through the use of an indirect firing system, as opposed to direct firing which was formerly standard for cement kilns. Indirect firing is favored for precalciners and to improve thermal efficiency, but the benefits are sometimes overshadowed by increased hazard potential. Thoughtful design and careful operating practices are essential for safe operation. The hazards are primarily a result of the explosive mixture of coal and air which can be formed in various parts of the system and the tendency for coal to self-heat and undergo spontaneous combustion. The systems for indirect coal firing are reviewed, with emphasis on the potential fire and explosion hazards. The effectiveness of various methods to extinguish a fire or suppress an explosion is discussed, together with their applicability and related operating problems. The available alarm systems are evaluated according to their ability to signal impending danger in time for corrective action. Some parameters of safe design and operating practices are outlined as a guide to avoiding the types of problems that have been experienced at some existing installations.

  10. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie; /Vrije U., Amsterdam

    2011-11-28

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays and the non-resonant B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} {eta}{pi}{sup +} decays in approximately 230 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10{sup -6}. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle {gamma}, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle {gamma} can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay is sensitive to the angle {gamma} and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly enhance the

  11. Energy-related laboratory equipment (ERLE) guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the Used Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment grants, and eligibility and procedures for participation. The document contains tables identifying typical equipment that may be requested, where to review ERLE equipment lists, and where to mail applications, a description of the eligible equipment grants access data system, and a copy of the ERLE grant application and instructions for its completion and submission.

  12. Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industrial Power Efficient Simple Clean Today Industrial Power Efficient Simple Clean Today Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Specialty Vehicles and Material Handling Equipment Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient F Matching

  13. Development of a Fiber Laser Welding Capability for the W76, MC4702 Firing Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samayoa, Jose

    2010-05-12

    Development work to implement a new welding system for a Firing Set is presented. The new system is significant because it represents the first use of fiber laser welding technology at the KCP. The work used Six-Sigma tools for weld characterization and to define process performance. Determinations of workable weld parameters and comparison to existing equipment were completed. Replication of existing waveforms was done utilizing an Arbitrary Pulse Generator (APG), which was used to modulate the fiber lasers exclusive continuous wave (CW) output. Fiber laser weld process capability for a Firing Set is demonstrated.

  14. Permit for Charging Equipment Installation: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Compliance with the following permit will allow the installation and operation of electric vehicle charging equipment at a residence in the City, State jurisdiction. This permit addresses one of the following situations: Only an additional branch circuit would be added at the residence A hard-wired charging station would be installed at the residence. The attached requirements for wiring the charging station are taken directly out of the 2011 edition of the National Electrical Code (NEC) NFPA

  15. Fire and Life Safety Information - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - U.S Fire Administration Website PDF, 182 Kb Fire Extinguishers - Flash Presentation Smoke Detectors Smoke Detector Icon PDF, 182 Kb Smoke Alarms - What You Need to Know (PDF)...

  16. Nuclear Criticality Safety Guide for Fire Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This guide is intended to provide information for use by fire protection professionals in the application of reasonable methods of fire protection in those facilities where there is a potential for nuclear criticality.

  17. Solid waste drum array fire performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, R.L.; Haecker, C.F.; Beitel, J.J.; Gottuck, D.T.; Rhodes, B.T.; Bayier, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    Fire hazards associated with drum storage of radioactively contaminated waste are a major concern in DOE waste storage facilities. This report is the second of two reports on fire testing designed to provide data relative to the propagation of a fire among storage drum arrays. The first report covers testing of individual drums subjected to an initiating fire and the development of the analytical methodology to predict fire propagation among storage drum arrays. This report is the second report, which documents the results of drum array fire tests. The purpose of the array tests was to confirm the analytical methodology developed by Phase I fire testing. These tests provide conclusive evidence that fire will not propagate from drum to drum unless an continuous fuel source other than drum contents is provided.

  18. Fire Protection Program Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... "Fire Protection for Relocatable Structures" Oct 17,2002 NFPA 1710 Technical Position Sept 30, 1995 Implementation Guide for use with DOE Orders 420.1 and 440.1, Fire ...

  19. Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 12132010) January 14, 2011 b National ... generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. ...

  20. A Factsheet on Home Fire Prevention

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For cHildrEn Children under five are naturally curious about fire. Many play with matches and lighters. Tragically, children set over 20,000 house fires every year. Take the...

  1. Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment Sector (NAICS 336) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Transportation Equipment (125.57 KB) More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment Cement (2010 MECS) Glass and Glass Products (2010

  2. NOx CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR US COAL FIRED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Marc Cremer; Kevin Davis; Bob Hurt; Eric Eddings

    2001-07-27

    This is the third Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-00NT40753. The goal of the project is to develop cost effective analysis tools and techniques for demonstrating and evaluating low NOx control strategies and their possible impact on boiler performance for firing US coals. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing cofunding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. A Rich Reagent Injection (RRI) design has been developed for a cyclone fired utility boiler in which a field test of RRI will be performed later this year. Initial evaluations of RRI for PC fired boilers have been performed. Calibration tests have been developed for a corrosion probe to monitor waterwall wastage. Preliminary tests have been performed for a soot model within a boiler simulation program. Shakedown tests have been completed for test equipment and procedures that will be used to measure soot generation in a pilot scale test furnace. In addition, an initial set of controlled experiments for ammonia adsorption onto fly ash in the presence of sulfur have been performed that indicates the sulfur does enhance ammonia uptake.

  3. Fire Protection for Underground Research Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presenter: James Priest, Ph.D., Senior Fire Protection Engineer ES&H, Universities Research Associates ‐ FNAL

  4. Fire Modeling Examples in a Nuclear World

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Mark Schairer, P.E.,Technical Manager, Fire Protection Engineering Division - Engineering Planning and Management (EPM), Inc.

  5. Fire Safety Tests for Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Peterson, Reid A.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-07-30

    A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping, which may be overly bounding based on the fire performance data from the manufacturer of the ion exchange resin selected for use at the WTP. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), following the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedures, through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). For some tests, the ASTM standard procedures were not entirely appropriate or practical for the SRF resin material, so the procedures were modified and deviations from the ASTM standard procedures were noted. This report summarizes the results of fire safety tests performed and reported by SwRI. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. All as-received SwRI reports are attached to this report in the Appendix. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each ASTM standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the SRF resin.

  6. Coal-fired MHD test progress at the Component Development and Integration Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, A.T.; Filius, K.D.; Micheletti, D.A.; Cashell, P.V.

    1993-12-31

    The Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) is a Department of Energy test facility operated by MSE, Inc. MSE personnel are responsible for integrated testing of topping cycle components for the national coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) development program. Initial facility checkout and baseline data generation testing at the CDIF used a 50-MW{sub t}, oil-fired combustor (with ash injection to simulate coal slag carryover) coupled to the 1A{sub 1} supersonic workhorse channel. In the fall of 1984, a 50-MW{sub t}, pressurized, slag rejecting coal-fired workhorse combustor replaced the oil-fired combustor in the test train. In the spring of 1989, a coal-fired precombustor was added to the test hardware, and current controls were installed in the spring of 1990. In the fall of 1990, the slag rejector was installed. In the spring of 1992, a 50-MW{sub t} pressurized, slag rejecting coal-fired prototypical combustor replaced the workhorse combustor in the test train. A 1A{sub 4} supersonic prototypical channel replaced the 1A{sub 1} workhorse channel in the fall of 1993. This prototypical hardware is slated to be used for the proof-of-concept (POC) testing. Improved facility systems targeting longer duration testing and more reliable operation will be discussed, including the air emissions control and monitoring hardware, oxygen and nitrogen expansion, coal and seed system upgrades, A-Bay modifications, and new solid suspension injection equipment.

  7. Fire resistant nuclear fuel cask

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heckman, Richard C.; Moss, Marvin

    1979-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a fire resistant nuclear fuel cask employing reversibly thermally expansible bands between adjacent cooling fins such that normal outward flow of heat is not interfered with, but abnormal inward flow of heat is impeded or blocked.

  8. Equipment Listing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment Listing Crystal Preparation and Characterization Resistance Heated Bridgman Crystal Growth Systems Back-Reflection Laue X-ray System Electro-Discharge Machining High and Low speed Diamond Saws Arc Zone Melting Crystal Growth System Lapping Fixtures for Precise Orientation of Crystals (0.1°) Physical Properties Measurement Facilities - Hardness Testing Vickers and Rockwell Hardness Testing Brinell Hardness Instrument Wilson Tukon Micro Hardness Tester Forming and Characterization

  9. Strategy Guideline: HVAC Equipment Sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2012-02-01

    The heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is arguably the most complex system installed in a house and is a substantial component of the total house energy use. A right-sized HVAC system will provide the desired occupant comfort and will run efficiently. This Strategy Guideline discusses the information needed to initially select the equipment for a properly designed HVAC system. Right-sizing of an HVAC system involves the selection of equipment and the design of the air distribution system to meet the accurate predicted heating and cooling loads of the house. Right-sizing the HVAC system begins with an accurate understanding of the heating and cooling loads on a space; however, a full HVAC design involves more than just the load estimate calculation - the load calculation is the first step of the iterative HVAC design procedure. This guide describes the equipment selection of a split system air conditioner and furnace for an example house in Chicago, IL as well as a heat pump system for an example house in Orlando, Florida. The required heating and cooling load information for the two example houses was developed in the Department of Energy Building America Strategy Guideline: Accurate Heating and Cooling Load Calculations.

  10. Toward more testable security equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, D.D.; Murray, D.W. )

    1991-01-01

    An important functional aspect of most security related equipment is the need for periodic performance testing. Sensors, entry-control devices, and other such security equipment usually have some sort or reliability or testing requirements. Unfortunately, testing requirements are seldom considered during equipment design, and testing becomes a prohibitively expensive or inconvenient afterthought. In this paper work at Sandia National Laboratories to address this concern is presented, focusing on metal detectors as a test case. Field testing of metal detectors is usually done by passing a test object through the opening to see whether an alarm is generated or not. Such alarm/no-alarm data are poor for making reliability estimates, and thus, a large quantity of such data is required to make good reliability statements. The detector itself uses much better internal information. Experiments tapping into some of this internal data will be discussed, and conclusions will be drawn about the possibility of redesign of metal detectors for enhanced testability. Such conclusions have implications for other types of security-related devices, as well.

  11. Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2007-03-31

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology

  12. Used energy-related laboratory equipment grant program for institutions of higher learning. Eligible equipment catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This is a listing of energy related equipment available through the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment Grant Program which grants used equipment to institutions of higher education for energy-related research. Information included is an overview of the program, how to apply for a grant of equipment, eligibility requirements, types of equipment available, and the costs for the institution.

  13. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  14. Using fire tests for quantitative risk analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, W.C.T.; Williamson, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Fires can be considered a causal chain-of-events in which the growth and spread of fire may cause damage and injury if it is rapid enough to overcome the barriers placed in its way. Fire tests for fire resistance of the barriers can be used in a quantitative risk assessment. The fire growth and spread is modelled in a State Transition Model (STM). The fire barriers are presented as part of the Fire Protection Model (FPM) which is based on a portion of the NFPA Decision Tree. An Emergency Equivalent Network is introduced to couple the Fire Growth Model (FGM) and the FPM so that the spread of fire beyond the room-of-origin can be computed. An example is presented in which a specific building floor plan is analyzed to obtain the shortest expected time for fire to spread between two points. To obtain the probability and time for each link in the network, data from the results of fire tests were used. These results were found to be lacking and new standards giving better data are advocated.

  15. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

  16. Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1998-09-22

    Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

  17. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard C. Logan

    2002-03-28

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  18. Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Kubicek

    2001-09-07

    The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment. (3) Vital US. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  19. A methodology for analyzing precursors to earthquake-initiated and fire-initiated accident sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Lambert, H.E.; Apostolakis, G. and others

    1998-04-01

    This report covers work to develop a methodology for analyzing precursors to both earthquake-initiated and fire-initiated accidents at commercial nuclear power plants. Currently, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsors a large ongoing project, the Accident Sequence Precursor project, to analyze the safety significance of other types of accident precursors, such as those arising from internally-initiated transients and pipe breaks, but earthquakes and fires are not within the current scope. The results of this project are that: (1) an overall step-by-step methodology has been developed for precursors to both fire-initiated and seismic-initiated potential accidents; (2) some stylized case-study examples are provided to demonstrate how the fully-developed methodology works in practice, and (3) a generic seismic-fragility date base for equipment is provided for use in seismic-precursors analyses. 44 refs., 23 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Bulk Hauling Equipment for CHG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BULK HAULING EQUIPMENT FOR CHG Don Baldwin Director of Product Development - Hexagon Lincoln HEXAGON LINCOLN TITAN(tm) Module System Compressed Hydrogen Gas * Capacity 250 bar - 616 kg 350 bar - 809 kg 540 bar - 1155 kg * Gross Vehicle Weight (with prime mover) 250 bar - 28 450 kg 350 bar - 30 820 kg 540 bar - 39 440 kg * Purchase Cost 250 bar - $510,000 350 bar - $633,750 540 bar - $1,100,000 Compressed Natural Gas * Capacity (250 bar at 15 C) - 7412 kg * GVW (With prime mover) - 35 250 kg *

  1. HAND TRUCK FOR HANDLING EQUIPMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, D.W.

    1959-02-24

    A truck is described for the handling of large and relatively heavy pieces of equipment and particularly for the handling of ion source units for use in calutrons. The truck includes a chassis and a frame pivoted to the chassis so as to be operable to swing in the manner of a boom. The frame has spaced members so arranged that the device to be handled can be suspended between or passed between these spaced members and also rotated with respect to the frame when the device is secured to the spaced members.

  2. Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves and Improved Stove Emission Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HATFIELD, MICHAEL; Still, Dean

    2013-04-15

    In developing countries, there is an urgent need for access to safe, efficient, and more affordable cooking technologies. Nearly 2.5 billion people currently use an open fire or traditional cookstove to prepare their meals, and recent models predict that use of biomass for cooking will continue to be the dominant energy use in rural, resource-poor households through 2030. For these families, cooking poses serious risks to health, safety, and income. An alarming 4 million people, primarily women and children, die prematurely each year from indoor and outdoor exposure to the harmful emissions released by solid fuel combustion. Use of traditional stoves can also have a significant impact on deforestation and climate change. This dire situation creates a critical need for cookstoves that significantly and verifiably reduce fuel use and emissions in order to reach protective levels for human health and the environment. Additionally, advances in the scientific equipment needed to measure and monitor stove fuel use and emissions have not kept pace with the significant need within the industry. While several testing centers in the developed world may have hundred thousand-dollar emissions testing systems, organizations in the field have had little more than a thermometer, a scale, and subjective observations to quantify the performance of stove designs. There is an urgent need for easy-to-use, inexpensive, accurate, and robust stove testing equipment for use by laboratory and field researchers around the world. ASAT and their research partner, Aprovecho Research Center (ARC), have over thirty years of experience addressing these two needs, improved cookstoves and emissions monitoring equipment, with expertise spanning the full spectrum of development from conceptual design to product manufacturing and dissemination. This includes: 1) research, design, and verification of clean biomass cookstove technology and emissions monitoring equipment; 2) mass production of quality

  3. FireHose Streaming Benchmarks

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-01-27

    The FireHose Streaming Benchmarks are a suite of stream-processing benchmarks defined to enable comparison of streaming software and hardware, both quantitatively vis-a-vis the rate at which they can process data, and qualitatively by judging the effort involved to implement and run the benchmarks. Each benchmark has two parts. The first is a generator which produces and outputs datums at a high rate in a specific format. The second is an analytic which reads the streammore » of datums and is required to perform a well-defined calculation on the collection of datums, typically to find anomalous datums that have been created in the stream by the generator. The FireHose suite provides code for the generators, sample code for the analytics (which users are free to re-implement in their own custom frameworks), and a precise definition of each benchmark calculation.« less

  4. FireHose Streaming Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl Anderson, Steve Plimpton

    2015-01-27

    The FireHose Streaming Benchmarks are a suite of stream-processing benchmarks defined to enable comparison of streaming software and hardware, both quantitatively vis-a-vis the rate at which they can process data, and qualitatively by judging the effort involved to implement and run the benchmarks. Each benchmark has two parts. The first is a generator which produces and outputs datums at a high rate in a specific format. The second is an analytic which reads the stream of datums and is required to perform a well-defined calculation on the collection of datums, typically to find anomalous datums that have been created in the stream by the generator. The FireHose suite provides code for the generators, sample code for the analytics (which users are free to re-implement in their own custom frameworks), and a precise definition of each benchmark calculation.

  5. BCM 1 Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Equipment Inventory Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Title Equipment Type Description Corning 430 pH Meter pH Meter The Corning 430 pH meter is designed to ...

  6. BCM 2 Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Equipment Inventory Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 2 Title Equipment Type Description Accumet Basic AB15 pH meter pH Meter pH meters with combination AgAgCl ...

  7. Best Management Practice #11: Commercial Kitchen Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial kitchen equipment can be a significant water use in the non-residential sector. Water efficiency for commercial kitchen equipment is especially important because high-volume applications...

  8. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Application Process

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equipment listings on the LEDP web site are obtained from the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Energy Asset Disposal System (EADS). Once equipment is listed, EADS allows ...

  9. High capacity fossil fuel fired plant operator training program. Student handbook. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, S.; Gardner, M.; Nguyen, Q.

    1994-09-30

    The operator of fossil fuel-fired boilers has a significant responsibility in assuring that the unit is continuously operated in a manner which complies with the various state and federal regulations. The course will emphasize the operating principles for all types of boilers and for all types of control equipment used for controlling air emissions from boilers. The course will emphasize the significant operating parameters that directly influence air emissions.

  10. Appliance and Equipment Standards Program Logic Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    standards, resulting in energy savings in the buildings sector The Appliance & Equipment ... incentives, Legislation Regulation Objectives Activities ...

  11. Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - About Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    About LEDP The Laboratory Equipment Donation Program (LEDP), formerly the Energy-Related Laboratory Equipment (ERLE) Grant Program, was established by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to grant surplus and available used energy-related laboratory equipment to universities and colleges in the United States for use in energy oriented educational programs. This grant program is sponsored by the Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS). The listing of equipment

  12. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-12-01

    Solvent extraction processing has demonstrated the ability to achieve high decontamination factors for uranium and plutonium while operating at high throughputs. Historical application of solvent extraction contacting equipment implies that for the HA cycle (primary separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products) the equipment of choice is pulse columns. This is likely due to relatively short residence times (as compared to mixer-settlers) and the ability of the columns to tolerate solids in the feed. Savannah River successfully operated the F-Canyon with centrifugal contactors in the HA cycle (which have shorter residence times than columns). All three contactors have been successfully deployed in uranium and plutonium purification cycles. Over the past 20 years, there has been significant development of centrifugal contactor designs and they have become very common for research and development applications. New reprocessing plants are being planned in Russia and China and the United States has done preliminary design studies on future reprocessing plants. The choice of contactors for all of these facilities is yet to be determined.

  13. Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Eric

    2015-12-23

    During Project DE-FE0007528, CARE (Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment), Neumann Systems Group (NSG) designed, installed and tested a 0.5MW NeuStream® carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using the patented NeuStream® absorber equipment and concentrated (6 molal) piperazine (PZ) as the solvent at Colorado Springs Utilities’ (CSU’s) Martin Drake pulverized coal (PC) power plant. The 36 month project included design, build and test phases. The 0.5MW NeuStream® CO2 capture system was successfully tested on flue gas from both coal and natural gas combustion sources and was shown to meet project objectives. Ninety percent CO2 removal was achieved with greater than 95% CO2product purity. The absorbers tested support a 90% reduction in absorber volume compared to packed towers and with an absorber parasitic power of less than 1% when configured for operation with a 550MW coal plant. The preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) performed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) predicted an over-the-fence cost of $25.73/tonne of CO2 captured from a sub-critical PC plant.

  14. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference IX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-09-01

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The ninth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  15. Proceedings: Tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-06-01

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The tenth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  16. Proceedings: Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference VIII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-06-01

    Advanced monitoring and diagnostic sensors and systems are needed to provide reliable and accurate information for determining the condition of major transmission substation equipment. The eighth EPRI Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference highlighted the work of researchers, universities, manufacturers, and utilities in producing advanced monitoring and diagnostic equipment for substations.

  17. Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REMAIZE, J.A.

    2000-09-27

    The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

  18. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

    1997-06-01

    For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

  20. Enhancements in Glovebox Design Resulting from Laboratory-Conducted FIre Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Wunderlich, Gregory M.; Mcentire, James R.; Richmond, William G.

    2013-06-14

    The primary mission of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project was to disassemble nuclear weapons pits and convert the resulting special nuclear materials to a form suitable for further disposition. Because of the nature of materials involved, the fundamental system which allowed PDCF to perform its mission was a series of integrated and interconnected gloveboxes which provided confinement and containment of the radioactive materials being processed. The high throughput planned for PDCF and the relatively high neutron and gamma radiation levels of the pits required that gloveboxes be shielded to meet worker dose limits. The glovebox shielding material was required to contain high hydrogen concentrations which typically result in these materials being combustible. High combustible loadings created design challenges for the facility fire suppression and ventilation system design. Combustible loading estimates for the PDCF Plutonium (Pu) Processing Building increased significantly due to these shielding requirements. As a result, the estimates of combustible loading substantially exceeded values used to support fire and facility safety analyses. To ensure a valid basis for combustible loading contributed by the glovebox system, the PDCF Project funded a series of fire tests conducted by the Southwest Research Institute on door panels and a representative glovebox containing Water Extended Polyester (WEP) radiological shielding to observe their behavior during a fire event. Improvements to PDCF glovebox designs were implemented based on lessons learned during the fire test. In particular, methods were developed to provide high levels of neutron shielding while maintaining combustible loading in the glovebox shells at low levels. Additionally, the fire test results led to design modifications to mitigate pressure increases observed during the fire test in order to maintain the integrity of the WEP cladding. These changes resulted in significantly

  1. Proceedings: Substation equipment diagnostics conference 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traub, T.P.

    1998-09-01

    Substation Equipment Diagnostics Conference 6 was held to assemble, assess and communicate information on the latest diagnostic techniques, test devices, and systems for substation equipment. It focused on the latest in diagnostic equipment and techniques being developed by EPRI and others in research programs, as well as the equipment and programs now available and in service by electric utilities. The conference brought together the views of researchers, manufacturers and users. The papers presented were organized under three categories: Transformers, Circuit Breakers and Other Substation Equipment, and Communications/Data Management/System Integration. Exhibit booths were provided for attendees to obtain detailed information about vendor products or services.

  2. On the fluid mechanics of fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-29

    Fluid mechanics research related to fire is reviewed with focus on canonical flows, multiphysics coupling aspects, experimental and numerical techniques. Fire is a low-speed, chemically-reacting, flow in which buoyancy plans an important role. Fire research has focused on two canonical flows, the reacting boundary-layer and the reacting free plume. There is rich, multi-lateral, bi-directional, coupling among fluid mechanics and scalar transport, combustion, and radiation. There is only a limited experimental fluid-mechanics database for fire due to measurement difficulties in the harsh environment, and the focus within the fire community on thermal/chemical consequences. Increasingly, computational fluid dynamics techniques are being used to provide engineering guidance on thermal/chemical consequences and to study fire phenomenology.

  3. Fire water systems in composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundt, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    Due to corrosion problems in fire water systems offshore there is a need for a corrosion resistant material to improve the reliability of onboard fire fighting systems. Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) pipe is seen as a cost effective and light weight alternative to metals. Through a test program run by AMAT, Advanced Materials a/s in collaboration with the Norwegian Fire and Research Laboratory (NBL, SINTEF), GRE pipes have proved to be viable materials for offshore fire water systems. The test program included furnace testing, jetfire testing and simulated explosion testing. GRE pipes (2--12 inches) from two suppliers were fire tested and evaluated. Both adhesively bonded joints and flange connections were tested. During the course of the project, application methods of passive fire protection and nozzle attachments were improved.

  4. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  5. Fire Safety Tests for Cesium-Loaded Spherical Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin: Data Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2012-09-01

    A draft safety evaluation of the scenario for spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (SRF) resin fire inside the ion exchange column was performed by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Fire Safety organization. The result of this draft evaluation suggested a potential change of the fire safety classification for the Cesium Ion Exchange Process System (CXP) emergency elution vessels, equipment, and piping. To resolve this question, the fire properties of the SRF resin were measured by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) through a subcontract managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The results of initial fire safety tests on the SRF resin were documented in a previous report (WTP-RPT-218). The present report summarizes the results of additional tests performed by SwRI on the cesium-loaded SRF resin. The efforts by PNNL were limited to summarizing the test results provided by SwRI into one consolidated data report. The as-received SwRI report is attached to this report in the Appendix A. Where applicable, the precision and bias of each test method, as given by each American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard procedure, are included and compared with the SwRI test results of the cesium-loaded SRF resin.

  6. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Commercial Equipment Efficiencies Equipment Type Chiller Screw COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.02 / 4.45 Scroll COP 2.80 / 3.06 2.96 / 4.40 N.A. Reciprocating COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.52 / 4.40 Centrifugal COP(full-load / IPLV) 5.0 / 5.2 6.1 / 6.4 7.3 / 9.0 Gas-Fired Absorption COP 1.0 1.1 N.A. Gas-Fired Engine Driven COP 1.5 1.8 N.A. Rooftop A/C EER 10.1 11.2 13.9 Rooftop Heat Pump EER (cooling) 9.8 11.0 12.0 COP (heating) 3.2 3.3 3.4 Boilers Gas-Fired

  8. Fire Protection Database | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fire Protection Database Fire Protection Database DOE O 231.1, Environment, Safety, And Health Reporting, requires the submission of an Annual Fire Protection Summary. The previous process used to collect the required data utilizes a Microsoft Access database that was downloaded, completed by the field and then sent to Headquarters for summation and analysis by engineers in Office of Sustainability Support. Data collection for the CY2013 Summary will begin Jan. 1, 2014, and a commitment has been

  9. QUANTITATIVE EVALUATION OF FIRE SEPARATION AND BARRIERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Fire barriers, and physical separation are key components in managing the fire risk in Nuclear Facilities. The expected performance of these features have often been predicted using rules-of-thumb or expert judgment. These approaches often lack the convincing technical bases that exist when addressing other Nuclear Facility accident events. This paper presents science-based approaches to demonstrate the effectiveness of fire separation methods.

  10. Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, B.H.

    1999-08-19

    This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.