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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN MONTAGUE PLAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR MONTAGUE PLAIN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA #12;Fire Management Plan for Montague Plain Wildlife Management Area prepared for Massachusetts Dept. of Fisheries, Wildlife. 2003. Fire Management Plan for Montague Plain Wildlife Management Area. Department of Natural Resources

Schweik, Charles M.

2

Wildland Fire Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook Predictive Services National Interagency Fire Center Issued: June 1, 2013 Next Issuance: July 1, 2013 Outlook Period - June, July and August through September Executive Summary The June, July and August through September 2013 significant wildland fire potential forecasts included in this outlook represent the cumulative forecasts of the eleven Geographic Area Predictive Services Units and the National Predictive Services Unit. June - Significant fire potential will be above normal for much of the interior mountains and foothills of California, the Sacramento Valley, and adjacent lower foothills as well as the coastal areas. - Significant fire potential will increase to above normal in Arizona, western New Mexico, and far

3

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet recommends installing waste heat recovery systems for fuel-fired furnaces to increase the energy efficiency of process heating systems.

4

Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act to Recovery Act to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Energy Incentive Programs Recovery Act Technical Assistance Projects Project Stories Recovery Act The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included funding for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to facilitate the Federal

5

Managing Imported Fire Ants in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The imported fire ant is found in much of Texas and across the southeastern U.S. This publication describes options for managing the pest in specific locations such as home lawns, gardens and buildings. Other topics include fire ant treatment...

Drees, Bastiaan M.

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

Management of Imported Fire Ants in Cattle Production Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication can help ranch managers develop integrated pest management plans for managing fire ant problems in cattle operations. It covers the specifics of managing fire ants in hay pastures and rangelands, around farm ponds, and near...

Fuchs, Thomas W.; Drees, Bastiaan M.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

Interagency Panel: Agency Fire Management Chair: Philip N. Omi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Forestry and Fire Protection: Fire Management Summary1 Wayne Mitchell2 Abstract The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF) is a full service wildland, rural, and urban fire department. CDF acres. About 55 percent of CDF's $452 million annual budget is used for wildland fire protection

Standiford, Richard B.

8

A Spatial Planning and Analysis System for Wildland Fire Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STARFIRE 11/29/2011 A Spatial Planning and Analysis System for Wildland Fire Management Welcome is an advanced and powerful spatial fire management planning and analysis system which is designed to provide visual and analytic support for fire management planning, decisions and communication. The system

9

Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Recovery Act The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included funding for the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to facilitate the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. FEMP completed nearly 120 technical assistance projects through this effort. FEMP national laboratory teams and contractor service providers visited more than 80 Federal sites located throughout the U.S. The site visits were a key component of FEMP Recovery Act funded technical assistance activity, which provided more than $13.2 million in funding for direct technical assistance to energy managers across the Federal Government. This service helped agencies accelerate their Recovery Act projects and make internal management decisions for investment in energy efficiency and deployment of renewable energy.

10

Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel. The BNL Fire Department is the lead on wildfire suppression. However, the BNL Natural Resource Manager will be assigned to all wildland fires as technical resource advisor.

Green,T.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

11

WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.  

SciTech Connect

This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and implementing prescribed burns and fuel reduction projects in the Upton Reserve. Prescribed fire and fuel reduction in locations outside the Upton Reserve will be coordinated through the Natural Resource Management Program at BNL, and done in consultation with FWS. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by FWS, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enters the waste stream with the charge intact (e.g., motor vehicle air conditioners, refrigeratorsAsset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have

Sin, Peter

13

High resolution weather modeling for improved fire management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A critical element to the accurate prediction of fire/weather behaviour is the knowledge of near-surface weather. Weather variables, such as wind, temperature, humidity and precipitation, make direct impacts on the practice of managing prescribed burns ... Keywords: fire behavior, numerical weather prediction, parallel computing

Kevin Roe; Duane Stevens; Carol McCord

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Design criteria document, Fire Protection Task, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, Project W-405  

SciTech Connect

The K Basin were constructed in the early 1950`s with a 20 year design life. The K Basins are currently in their third design life and are serving as a near term storage facility for irradiated N Reactor fuel until an interim fuel storage solution can be implemented. In April 1994, Project W-405, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, was established to address (among other things) the immediate fire protection needs of the 100K Area. A Fire Barrier Evaluation was performed for the wall between the active and inactive areas of the 105KE and 105KW buildings. This evaluation concludes that the wall is capable of being upgraded to provide an equivalent level of fire resistance as a qualified barrier having a fire resistance rating of 2 hours. The Fire Protection Task is one of four separate Tasks included within the scope of Project W405, K Basin Essential systems Recovery. The other three Tasks are the Water Distribution System Task, the Electrical System Task, and the Maintenance Shop/Support Facility Task. The purpose of Project W-405`s Fire Protection Task is to correct Life Safety Code (NFPA 101) non-compliances and to provide fire protection features in Buildings 105KE, 105KW and 190KE that are essential for assuring the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel at the 100K Area Facilities` Irradiated Fuel Storage Basins (K Basins).

Johnson, B.H.

1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

15

Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act Project Stories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Stories to someone by E-mail Project Stories to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act Project Stories on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act Project Stories on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act Project Stories on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act Project Stories on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act Project Stories on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Recovery Act Project Stories on AddThis.com... Energy Savings Performance Contracts ENABLE Utility Energy Service Contracts On-Site Renewable Power Purchase Agreements Energy Incentive Programs Recovery Act Technical Assistance Projects Project Stories Recovery Act Project Stories

16

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

17

Simulating Historic Landscape Patterns of Fire in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Implications for Fire History and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire suppression policies implemented in the early 20th century led to a decrease in fire-associated species and ecosystems in the southern Appalachian Mountains. As managers work towards restoration, a greater understanding of the pre...

Gass, Ellen R

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

18

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

fire & fuels management Spruce Beetle-Induced Changes to Engelmann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: crown fire, bark beetles, heat of combustion, fire behavior, time to ignition E ngelmann spruce

20

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Resource Recovery and Management Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Protection administers the state solid and hazardous waste management programs. The programs aim to:...

22

Managing Manure with Biogas Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as natural gas, propane, and fuel oil. Biogas can also be flared to control odor if energy recovery: a digester, a gas-handling system, a gas-use device, and a manure storage tank or pond to hold the treat- ed.g., storage tanks, storage ponds, lagoons). These benefits include odor control, improved air and water

Mukhtar, Saqib

23

An integrated approach to fire penetration seal program management  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the utilization of a P.C. based program to facilitate the management of Entergy Operations Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO) fire barrier penetration seal program. The computer program was developed as part of a streamlining process to consolidate all aspects of the ANO Penetration Seal Program under one system. The program tracks historical information related to each seal such as maintenance activities, design modifications and evaluations. The program is integrated with approved penetration seal design details which have been substantiated by full scale fire tests. This control feature is intended to prevent the inadvertent utilization of an unacceptable penetration detail in a field application which may exceed the parameters tested. The system is also capable of controlling the scope of the periodic surveillance of penetration seals by randomly selecting the inspection population and generating associated inspection forms. Inputs to the data base are required throughout the modification and maintenance process to ensure configuration control and maintain accurate data base information. These inputs are verified and procedurally controlled by Fire Protection Engineering (FPE) personnel. The implementation of this system has resulted in significant cost savings and has minimized the allocation of resources necessary to ensure long term program viability.

Rispoli, R.D. [Entergy Operations, Russellville, AR (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Fire Economics, Planning, and Policy: A Global View Fire Management Plan at Regional Scale in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protection (L.353/2000) is presented. In particular the main features of the recent regional fire management of the fire management plan are reported, together with the criteria followed to define the protection at regional scale are based on the wildland fire protection national law L. 353/2000. This regulation

Standiford, Richard B.

25

A Management Tool for Analyzing CHP Natural Gas Liquids Recovery System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a management tool for analyzing combined heat and power (CHP) natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery systems. The methodology is developed around the central ideas of product recovery, possible recovery...

Olsen, C.; Kozman, T. A.; Lee, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fire and Emergency Management Group SLAC-I-730-0A12A-001-R000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire and Emergency Management Group SLAC-I-730-0A12A-001-R000 Fire Protection System Impairment NFPA National Fire Protection Association SLAC Stanford Linear Accelerator Center SSO DOE Stanford Site000 iii #12;#12;1 Introduction This document describes the fire protection system impairment program

Wechsler, Risa H.

27

Fire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Fire Nature Bulletin No. 51 Febraury 1, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRE Most people firmly believe the ancient notion that the prairies and vacant lots should be burnt off "to make better grass." Many are doing so now. Boys who have seen their parents and neighbors kindling fires on vacant property frequently do likewise on the prairies. Recently there have been four fires in the forest preserves which spread from adjoining land. Burning does more harm than good. True, it gets rid of the old weed stalks and dried grass of last year, so that new grass shows green more quickly. But repeated burnings kill the good, nutritious grasses such as bluegrass, timothy and clover. The wildflowers disappear. All food and nesting cover for birds, rabbits and other wildlife is destroyed, just when they need it most. Thistles thrive. Only tough grasses of little value for pasture or hay, such as crabgrass and quackgrass, and the weeds survive.

28

Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Wildland Fire Management Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72 72 April 2003 IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT iii CONTENTS ACRONYMS.................................................................................................................................. v 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 1 1.1. Purpose and Need ......................................................................................................................... 1 1.2. Background................................................................................................................................... 1 1.3. Related Actions ............................................................................................................................

29

Wildland fire management and air quality in the southern Sierra Nevada: Using the Lion Fire as a case study with a multi-year perspective on PM2.5 impacts and fire policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Management of fire is an important and controversial policy issue. Active fire suppression has led to a backlog of fuels, limited the ecological benefits of fire, and reduced short-term smoke impacts likely delaying these emissions to future generations over a larger spatial extent. Smoke impacts can be expected to increase as fire size and intensity increase and the fuel backlog is consumed; whether through reintroduction of fire under desirable conditions or through stand replacing fire. Land Management Agencies would like to increase the use of naturally ignited fires to burn during favorable conditions as a way to reduce catastrophic fires. This study provides information about the levels of air quality impacts expected from these types of fires and discusses some of the policy controversies of managed fire that propagate inconsistencies between agencies and enter the public discourse. The Lion Fire, a primarily low intensity 8,370ha fire that was extensively monitored for Particulate Matter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5), is used to quantify impacts to air quality. PM2.5 monitoring sites are used to assess exposure, public health impacts, and subsequently quantify annual air quality during a year with a fire that is within the historic normal fire size and intensity for this area. Ground level PM2.5 impacts were found to be localized with 99% of the hourly Air Quality Index readings in the moderate or good category for the sites impacted by the fire. PM2.5 concentrations at sites nearest the fire were below annual federal air quality standards for PM2.5 with annual 98th percentile at the most impacted sites (Johnsondale, Kernville, and Camp Nelson) of 35.0, 34.0, and 28.0?gm3 respectively. Smoke impacts to PM2.5 concentrations were not found to reach the populated Central Valley. The findings suggest that this type of fire can be implemented with minimal public health impacts thus allowing an opportunity for air and fire managers to alter policy to allow additional burning in an area with severe anthropogenic air pollution and where frequent widespread fire is both beneficial and inevitable. The more extensive air quality impacts documented with large high intensity fire may be averted by embracing the use of fire to prevent unwanted high intensity burns. A widespread increase in the use of fire for ecological benefit may provide the resiliency needed in Sierra Nevada forests as well as be the most beneficial to public health through the reduction of single dose exposure to smoke and limiting impacts spatially.

Don Schweizer; Ricardo Cisneros

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

WILDLAND FIRE SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Warner College of Natural Resources within Colorado State University, we also have access to world class greater than on most public lands. CEMML is a leader in munitions ignition mitigation. #12;WILDLAND FIRE

31

PANEL DISCUSSION: Barriers to Fuel Management One of the traditional roles that prescribed fire has played in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

must complement protection needs and provide a smooth transition to sustained ecosystem managementPANEL DISCUSSION: Barriers to Fuel Management One of the traditional roles that prescribed fire has played in the fire management arena is reduction of hazardous fuel buildups under controlled, well

Standiford, Richard B.

32

Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant Medium-Term Risk Management for a Gas-Fired Power Plant Speaker(s): Afzal Siddiqui Date: October 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-1099 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Chris Marnay Electricity sectors in many countries have been deregulated with the aim of introducing competition. However, as a result, electricity prices have become highly volatile. Stochastic programming provides an appropriate method to characterise the uncertainty and to derive decisions while taking risk management into account. We consider the medium-term risk management problem of a UK gas-fired power plant that faces stochastic electricity and gas prices. In particular, the power plant makes daily decisions about electricity sales to and gas purchases from spot markets over a monthly

33

Proceedings of the Second Conference on the Human Dimensions of Wildland Fire GTR-NRS-P-84 14 CHANGE AS A FACTOR IN ADVANCING FIRE-MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth, advanced capability, and organizational efficiency. In most situations, change is seldom well opportunities to improve the organizational performance and effectiveness of fire management. The Wildland Fire changed business processes and improved organizational effectiveness to keep pace. The case for change has

34

Landowners' perceptions on the use of prescribed fire as a management tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to determine landownersâ?? perceptions on the use of prescribed fire as a management tool. The majority of Texas rangelands are privately owned, and the sustainable management of almost all of the state...

Woodard, Justin Bradley

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

A PC-Based Information System for the Management and Modelling of Subsurface Coal Fires in Mining Areas (Coalman)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

COALMAN is a coal-fire monitoring and management software, which was... http://www.itc.nl/ILWIS for the GIS and remote sensing functions. It comprises of... ...

Zoltn Vekerdy

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ecosystem management? What is Ecosystem Management? Ecosystem management emphasizes an ecological approach to resource stewardship. It is a holistic approach to natural resource management that attempts to manage139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1

Standiford, Richard B.

37

Fighting Fire with Fire: Modeling the Datacenter-Scale Effects of Targeted Superlattice Thermal Management  

SciTech Connect

Local thermal hot-spots in microprocessors lead to worst case provisioning of global cooling resources, especially in large-scale systems. However, efficiency of cooling solutions degrade non-linearly with supply temperature, resulting in high power consumption and cost in cooling - 50 {approx} 100% of IT power. Recent advances in active cooling techniques have shown on-chip thermoelectric coolers (TECs) to be very efficient at selectively eliminating small hot-spots, where applying current to a superlattice film deposited between silicon and the heat spreader results in a Peltier effect that spreads the heat and lowers the temperature of the hot-spot significantly to improve chip reliability. In this paper, we propose that hot-spot mitigation using thermoelectric coolers can be used as a power management mechanism to allow global coolers to be provisioned for a better worst case temperature leading to substantial savings in cooling power. In order to quantify the potential power savings from using TECs in data center servers, we present a detailed power model that integrates on-chip dynamic and leakage power sources, heat diffusion through the entire chip, TEC and global cooler efficiencies, and all their mutual interactions. Our multiscale analysis shows that, for a typical data center, TECs allow global coolers to operate at higher temperatures without degrading chip lifetime, and thus save {approx}27% cooling power on average while providing the same processor reliability as a data center running at 288K.

Biswas, S; Tiwari, M; Theogarajan, L; Sherwood, T P; Chong, F T

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

38

Thermodynamic analysis of a low-pressure economizer based waste heat recovery system for a coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An LPE (low-pressure economizer) based waste heat recovery system for a CFPP (coal-fired power plant) is investigated thermodynamically. With the installation of LPE in the flue before the FGD (flue gas desulfurizer), the heat contained in the exhaust flue gas can be recovered effectively and the water consumption can be reduced in the FGD resulted from the temperature dropped flue gas. The impacts on the related apparatuses after installing LPE in a CFPP are analyzed and the internal relationships among correlated parameters are presented. The efficiencies of LPE installed in a CFPP evaluated by the first law, the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are also compared and analyzed. A detailed case study based on a 350MW CFPP unit is presented and the variations of the thermal performance after the installation of LPE are investigated. The results show that the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are increased which can be indicators to evaluate the performance of the LPE system while the first law efficiency is decreased after installing LPE. Results also show that the saving of SCE (standard coal equivalent) is 3.85g/(kWh) for this CFPP unit under full load after installing LPE.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei; Shinan Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Management Activities Funded by the Recovery Act, OAS-RA-11-15  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Management Activities Funded by the Recovery Act OAS-RA-11-15 August 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 25, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, LOS ALAMOS SITE OFFICE, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Management Activities Funded by the Recovery Act" BACKGROUND In February 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) was enacted. The Department of Energy's (Department) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) received approximately $212 million in Recovery Act funds from the Office of

40

Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities, OAS-M-06-09 Follow-up on the Management of Plutonium-239 Sealed Sources Recovery Activities, OAS-M-06-09 The mission of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Off-site Recovery Project (OSRP) is to recover unwanted radioactive sealed sources (sources) held in the piblic sector. thereby reducing the threat of the sources being used in radiological dispersal de\iices or a "dirty bomb." Plutonium-239 (Pu-239), one of the rildioactive sealed sources recovered by OSRP, requires additional safeguards because ~t is a special nuclear material. These sources were manufactured in the United States (Li S.) and loaned or leased to colleges and universilies, commercial

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

State Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Plan (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The State supports the "good management of solid waste and the conservation of natural resources through the promotion or development of systems to collect, separate, reclaim, recycle, and dispose...

42

Sound Project Management, Safe and Efficient Work Lead to Savings for More Recovery Act Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - Sound management practices and safe, efficient IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - Sound management practices and safe, efficient work have led to cost savings and rapid progress in the Idaho site's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act projects. The efficiencies have freed up $12 million for additional Cold War cleanup. That $12 million from the Recovery Act is being used to exhume targeted buried waste from a quarter-acre portion of a landfill called Pit 9 so it can be disposed permanently and safely. The additional cleanup, scheduled for completion in spring 2012, is part of the Idaho site's broader work to accelerate legacy waste removal in 5.69 acres of a disposal area, a cleanup project that protects the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Recovery Act workers with CH2M-WG Idaho, the Idaho site's main cleanup

43

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers biomass-firedboilers.pd...

44

Resouce recovery option in solid-waste management: a review guide for public officials  

SciTech Connect

The purposes of this document are to: serve as a guide for public-works directors and others interested in implementing resource-recovery systems; and (2) provide background material that can be used in presenting information on resource-recovery systems to city managers, mayors, legislative bodies, and citizen advisory groups. It raises some issues of which local communities must be aware before developing resource-recovery systems. Additionally, the document: (1) focuses on possible institutional problems that may arise in planning waste-to-energy systems and presents some solutions and alternatives, and (2) serve public-works officials as a reference for other publications on resource-recovery systems. It will aid public-works officials in the decision-making process concerning the implementation of waste-to-energy systems. Members of the public works profession who are fully aware of all the implementation procedures involved with resource-recovery systems can best decide if this is a feasible solid-waste-management option for their community.

Nemeth, D M

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Painterly fire  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This sketch describes how to construct a painterly 'wall' of fire, one which exhibits realistic motion while managing to maintain an artistic look. Keywords: effects animation, natural phenomena, rendering

Saty Raghavachary; Fernando Benitez

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Simulation study on lignite-fired power system integrated with flue gas drying and waste heat recovery Performances under variable power loads coupled with off-design parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignite is a kind of low rank coal with high moisture content and low net heating value, which is mainly used for electric power generation. However, the thermal efficiency of power plants firing lignite directly is very low. Pre-drying is a proactive option, dehydrating raw lignite to raise its heating value, to improve the power plant thermal efficiency. A pre-dried lignite-fired power system integrated with boiler flue gas drying and waste heat recovery was proposed in this paper. The plant thermal efficiency could be improved by 1.51% at benchmark condition due to pre-drying and waste heat recovery. The main system performances under variable power loads were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results show that the improvement of plant thermal efficiency reduced to 1.36% at 50% full load. Moreover, the influences of drying system off-design parameters were simulated coupled with power loads. The variation tendencies of main system parameters were obtained. The influence of pre-drying degree (including moisture content of pre-dried lignite and raw lignite) on the plant thermal efficiency diminishes gradually with the decreasing power load. The dryer thermal efficiency and dryer exhaust temperature are also main factors and the influences on system parameters have been quantitatively analyzed.

Xiaoqu Han; Ming Liu; Jinshi Wang; Junjie Yan; Jiping Liu; Feng Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2013 Ithaca, NY Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related services including programs in: · Fire Protection, Emergency Services, Emergency Management o Fire Protection Systems and Equipment o University Fire Marshal o Emergency Management o Events Management oANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2013 Ithaca, NY Campus http

Chen, Tsuhan

48

Material control and accountability (MC&A) recovery from the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

During the week of May 10-14, 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire scorched over 40,000 acres of prime forestland and destroyed over 400 homes in the Los Alamos community and several structures at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Of the land affected by the fire, nearly one quarter of it was Laboratory property. All of LANL's 64 material balance areas (MBAs) were affected to some degree, but one Category I technical area and several Category I11 and IV areas sustained heavy damage. When the MC&A personnel were allowed to return to work on May 23, they addressed the following problems: How do we assure both ourselves and the Department of Energy (DOE) that no nuclear materials had been compromised? How do we assist the nuclear material (NM) custodians and their operating groups so that they can resume normal MC&A operations? Immediately after the return to work, the Laboratory issued emergency MC&A assurance actions for Category I through Category IV facilities. We conducted special inventories, area walkthroughs, and other forms of evaluation so that within a month after the fire, we were able to release the last MBA to resume work and assure that all nuclear material had been accounted for. This paper discusses the measures LANL adopted to ensure that none of its nuclear material had been compromised.

Haag, William Earl

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Post-fire hydrologic behavior and recovery: Advancing spatial and temporal prediction with an emphasis on remote sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management 178:61-74. Fairbrother, A. and Turnley, J.G. ,Management 178:61-74. Fairbrother, A. and Turnley, J.G. ,and Kauffman, 2003; Fairbrother and Turnley, 2005; Kumagai

Kinoshita, Alicia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Building waste management core indicators through Spatial Material Flow Analysis: Net recovery and transport intensity indexes  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sustainability and proximity principles have a key role in waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Core indicators are needed in order to quantify and evaluate them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic, step-by-step approach is developed in this study for their development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport may play a significant role in terms of environmental and economic costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Policy action is required in order to advance in the consecution of these principles. - Abstract: In this paper, the material and spatial characterization of the flows within a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system are combined through a Network-Based Spatial Material Flow Analysis. Using this information, two core indicators are developed for the bio-waste fraction, the Net Recovery Index (NRI) and the Transport Intensity Index (TII), which are aimed at assessing progress towards policy-related sustainable MSW management strategies and objectives. The NRI approaches the capacity of a MSW management system for converting waste into resources through a systematic metabolic approach, whereas the TII addresses efficiency in terms of the transport requirements to manage a specific waste flow throughout the entire MSW management life cycle. Therefore, both indicators could be useful in assessing key MSW management policy strategies, such as the consecution of higher recycling levels (sustainability principle) or the minimization of transport by locating treatment facilities closer to generation sources (proximity principle). To apply this methodological approach, the bio-waste management system of the region of Catalonia (Spain) has been chosen as a case study. Results show the adequacy of both indicators for identifying those points within the system with higher capacity to compromise its environmental, economic and social performance and therefore establishing clear targets for policy prioritization. Moreover, this methodological approach permits scenario building, which could be useful in assessing the outcomes of hypothetical scenarios, thus proving its adequacy for strategic planning.

Font Vivanco, David, E-mail: font@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Puig Ventosa, Ignasi [ENT Environment and Management, Carrer Sant Joan 39, First Floor, 08800 Vilanova i la Geltru, Barcelona (Spain); Gabarrell Durany, Xavier [Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambientals (ICTA), Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

A new conceptual cold-end design of boilers for coal-fired power plants with waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract After conducting an in-depth analysis of the conventional boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery, this work proposed a new conceptual boiler cold-end design integrated with the steam cycle in a 1000MW CFPP, in which the preheating of air was divided into high-temperature air preheater (HTAP), main air preheater (MAP) and low-temperature air preheater (LTAP). The HTAP and an economizer were installed in separate flue ducts, and the low temperature economizer (LTE) was situated between the MAP and the LTAP in the main flue duct to heat the condensed water. In the proposed boiler cold-end design, the flue gas waste heat was not only used to heat condensed water, but also to further preheat the combustion air. The air temperature at the air-preheater outlet increases and part of the steam bleeds with high exergy can be saved, resulting in greater energy-savings and better economics. Results showed that, for a typical 1000MW CFPP in China, using the proposed boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery could produce 13.3MWe additional net power output with a heat rate reduction of approximately 112.0kJ/kWh and could yield a net benefit of up to $85.8M per year, which is much greater than those of the conventional cases. Exergy destruction is also reduced from 49.9MWth in the conventional boiler cold-end design to 39.6MWth in the proposed design.

Yongping Yang; Cheng Xu; Gang Xu; Yu Han; Yaxiong Fang; Dongke Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

An environment friendly and efficient lignite-fired power generation process based on a boiler with an open pulverizing system and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper advances a novel lignite-fired power generation process based on a OPSB (boiler with an open pulverizing system) and the recovery of water from mill-exhaust after the comprehensive analysis of the open pulverizing system used for high-moisture coals and heat/water recovery from boiler exhaust. Then, the thermal calculation method that applies to OPSB is presented based on heat and mass balance analyses of the boiler. Finally, an efficient unit applying the OPSB process is compared with a conventional 600MW lignite-fired power unit, and the performance of the efficient unit is calculated and discussed in detail. The results show that the efficient unit not only yields a notable increase in the boiler's (2.6%) and the power plant's (1.3%) thermal efficiency but also provides a remarkable advantage in water recovery due to the mass of water vapor concentrated in mill-exhaust. In the efficient unit, the volume fraction of water vapor in mill-exhaust reaches 34%, the water reclaimed from mill-exhaust is so much that a lignite-fired power plant with zero water consumption can be expected, while the pollutant emissions can be reduced in proportion to the increase in boiler thermal efficiency.

Youfu Ma; Yichao Yuan; Jing Jin; Hua Zhang; Xiaohong Hu; Dengyu Shi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Creating a fuels baseline and establishing fire frequency relationships to develop a landscape management strategy at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-41. pp 351-366. AbstractThe Savannah River Site is a Department of Energy Nuclear Defense Facility and a National Environmental Research Park located in the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Prescribed burning is conducted on 15,000 to 20,000 ac annually. We modifi ed standard forest inventory methods to incorporate a complete assessment of fuel components on 622 plots, assessing coarse woody debris, ladder fuels, and the litter and duff layers. Because of deficiencies in south-wide data on litter-duff bulk densities, which are the fuels most often consumed in prescribed fires, we developed new bulk density relationships. Total surface fuel loading across the landscape ranged from 0.8 to 48.7 tons/ac. The variables basal area, stand age, and site index were important in accounting for variability in ladder fuel, coarse woody debris, and litter-duff for pine types. For a given pine stand condition, litter-duff loading decreased in direct proportion to the number of burns in the preceding thirty years. Ladder fuels for loblolly and longleaf increased in direct proportion to the years since the last prescribed burn. The pattern of fuel loading on the SRS reflects stand dynamics, stand management and fire management. It is suggested that the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program can easily modify sampling protocols to incorporate collection of fuels data.

Parresol, Bernard R.; Shea, Dan; Ottmar, Roger.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2012 Ithaca, NY Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: · Fire Protection, Emergency Services, Emergency Management o Fire Protection Systems and Equipment oANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2012 Ithaca, NY Campus http Annual Fire Safety Report 2012 Page 2 From the Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH

Chen, Tsuhan

55

Unified Fire Recovery Command Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Ash Pits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. If you find that the roots have been burned you should consider this tree very unstable; it could easily

56

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

57

Implementation Guide, Wildland Fire Management Program for Use with DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Guide provides a full range of activities and functions to plan, prepare, and respond to potential fires and rehabilitate undeveloped lands following a fire. Canceled by DOE N 251.82.

2004-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

58

Emergency Management Program, Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Management Homepage Emergency Management Mike Venegoni, Manager Brookhaven National Laboratory Bldg. 860 - P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 (631) 344-7280 E-mail: mvenegoni@bnl.gov Emergency Management Program Brookhaven National Laboratory :: Fire Danger Index - LOW The Fire Danger Index level takes into account current and antecedent weather, fuel types, and both live and dead fuel moisture. ▪ Index Description (pdf) ▪ NWS Fire Weather Forecast :: Important Information EMERGENCY Numbers Offsite: 631-344-2222 ▪ Emergency Services ▪ Hurricane Awareness :: Be Alert, Be Aware! Watch out for unattended bags/packages and report any unusual or suspicious incidents immediately to Police Headquarters by calling: 631-344-2222 The mission of the Emergency Management Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory is provide the framework for development, coordination, control, and direction of all emergency planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, response, and recovery actions.

59

MARGINAL VALUATION OF FIRE EFFECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the planning unit's land, resource and fire management plans. These goals and objectives can assist you with identifying the resources that are important to protect or improve through fire management activities. As you and cultural attributes of the landscape that have value. Defining the resource considered for value change 2

60

Waste management plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This waste management plan defines the procedures for control and management of waste generated as a result of the removal action of the YS-86O Firing Ranges site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This document includes plan objectives; remediation activities; key personnel; waste generation activities; and waste treatment, storage, transportation, and disposal. Methods of control and characterization of waste generated as a result of remediation activities will be within the guidelines and procedures outlined herein. ENTECH personnel will make every effort when conducting remediation and decontamination activities to minimize the amount of generated waste.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recovery Act Project Stories  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, these Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) projects exemplify the range of technical assistance provided to federal agencies.

62

An evaluation of the conservation of New Zealand's threatened biodiversity : management, species recovery and legislation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??It is only recently that New Zealand wildlife managers have become aware of both the taxonomic range of New Zealand indigenous biodiversity and the number (more)

Seabrook-Davison, Mark Nicholas Hawdon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2011 Ithaca, NY Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plan ____________________________________________________ 14 Cornell University Fire Safety Plan including programs in: Fire Protection, Emergency Services, Emergency Management o Fire Protection Services o Research and Laboratory Safety o Chemical Safety o Radiation Safety o Biological Safe

Chen, Tsuhan

64

The Department of Energy's Management of the Award of a $150 Million Recovery Act Grant to LG Chem Michigan Inc., OAS-RA-13-10  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of the Award of a $150 Management of the Award of a $150 Million Recovery Act Grant to LG Chem Michigan Inc. OAS-RA-13-10 February 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 8, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE UNDER SECRETARY OF ENERGY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Special Report on "The Department of Energy's Management of the Award of a $150 Million Recovery Act Grant to LG Chem Michigan Inc." BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program was established to develop and deploy efficient and environmentally friendly highway transportation technologies to reduce the Nation's dependence on foreign oil and provide greater energy security. The Vehicle Technologies Program received $2.4 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

65

Managing fire risk onboard offshore platforms: Lessons from Piper Alpha and probabilistic assessment of risk reduction measures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The offshore oil platform Piper Alpha was destroyed in July 1988 ... a catastrophic fire. The causes of the accident included a combination of technical and organizational ... factors. In this paper, I describe t...

Elisabeth Pat-Cornell

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

2012 SG Peer Review - Recovery Act: Enhanced Demand and Distribution Management Regional Demonstration - Craig Miller, NRECA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Enhanced Distribution and Demand Management Regional Demonstration Craig Miller Cooperative Research Network National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 8 June 2012 December 2008 Project Title Objective Life-cycle Funding ($K) $68 million with match Hardware: $43 million Research: $11.6 Co-op Labor: $13.4 Technical Scope * 23 Co-ops, Distributed Nationally * 275,000 components deployed * Meters & DR * Distribution Automation * Infrastructure * In home displays and web portals * Demand response over AMI * Prepaid metering * Interactive thermal storage * Electrical storage (20x10kWh, 1MWh 0.5MWh) * Renewable energy * Smart feeder switching * Conservation voltage reduction * Advanced metering infrastructure * Meter data management * Communications infrastructure * SCADA To advance the deployment of the smart grid

67

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 14, 2010 May 14, 2010 Club's Chairman Leading by Example Why the Sierra Club Oregon Chairman is helping his organization live up to its legacy. May 14, 2010 Cincinnati Non-profits Getting Help Saving Energy How one church is saving money and saving energy. May 14, 2010 Charlevoix, MI is using Recovery Act funds for energy upgrades | Photo courtesy Charlevoix, Michigan, City Manager | Michigan Town Committed to Sustainable Future Charlevoix, Mich. residents are taking steps to become a more environmentally-conscious community, and a $50,000 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant will help that cause. The funding will be used to launch projects aimed at energy efficiency and sustainability, such as retrofitting the city's fire and emergency vehicles with new,

68

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 7, Appendix E -- Material recovery/material recycling technologies  

SciTech Connect

The enthusiasm for and commitment to recycling of municipal solid wastes is based on several intuitive benefits: Conservation of landfill capacity; Conservation of non-renewable natural resources and energy sources; Minimization of the perceived potential environmental impacts of MSW combustion and landfilling; Minimization of disposal costs, both directly and through material resale credits. In this discussion, ``recycling`` refers to materials recovered from the waste stream. It excludes scrap materials that are recovered and reused during industrial manufacturing processes and prompt industrial scrap. Materials recycling is an integral part of several solid waste management options. For example, in the preparation of refuse-derived fuel (RDF), ferrous metals are typically removed from the waste stream both before and after shredding. Similarly, composting facilities, often include processes for recovering inert recyclable materials such as ferrous and nonferrous metals, glass, Plastics, and paper. While these two technologies have as their primary objectives the production of RDF and compost, respectively, the demonstrated recovery of recyclables emphasizes the inherent compatibility of recycling with these MSW management strategies. This appendix discusses several technology options with regard to separating recyclables at the source of generation, the methods available for collecting and transporting these materials to a MRF, the market requirements for post-consumer recycled materials, and the process unit operations. Mixed waste MRFs associated with mass bum plants are also presented.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

FIRE WATCH FORM University Fire Marshal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Fire Code of New York State that pertain to the impairment of a fire protection system to the impairment of a fire protection system Fire Code of New York State Chapter-9 "Fire Protection Systems" 901.7 Systems out of service. Where a required fire protection system is out of service, the fire department

Pawlowski, Wojtek

70

ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Improved Heat Recovery in Biomass-Fired Boilers Reducing Superheater Corrosion to Enable Maximum Energy Effi ciency This project will develop...

71

Synthesis and Summary: Land Use Decisions and Fire Risk1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was spent in fire suppres- sion. The bill for all costs and damages amounted to more than $1 billion. Given of fuel management and fire protection. The complexity of watershed manage- ment was defined growth on fuel management and fire protection, concerns stated or implied in all presentations. Jim Davis

Standiford, Richard B.

72

Resin Liner Recovery and Over-Packing at Ontario Power Generation's Western Waste Management Facility  

SciTech Connect

Spent resins generated from Ontario Power Generation (OPG)'s and Bruce Power's Candu reactor operations are stored at OPG's Western Waste Management Facility in Kincardine, Ontario, Canada. The older resins are contained in 3 m{sup 3} epoxy-coated cylindrical carbon steel containers known as resin liners. The liners are stored in a stacked configuration within cylindrical in-ground containers. Previous studies indicated evidence of unacceptable liner wall corrosion and the potential for eventual leakage of resin from the liners. Based on this, OPG elected to re-package the majority of the resin liners into stainless steel over-packs. A contract for this work was awarded to a project team consisting of Duratek of Canada, Kinectrics, Inc. and E.S. Fox. This paper provides an overall summary of project activities focusing on the effectiveness of the equipment utilized and the soundness of the developed programs, plans and procedures. Specific information is provided on key aspects of the project and the overall achievement of project goals. (authors)

Pearson, S.D. [EnergySolutions, Columbia, SC (Colombia); Husain, A. [Kinectrics, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fire Protection  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Standard was developed to provide acceptable methods and approaches for meeting DOE fire protection program and design requirements and to address special or unique fire protection issues at DOE facilities that are not comprehensively or adequately addressed in national consensus standards or other design criteria.

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fire Egress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHAX.org - OSHAX.org - The Unofficial Guide To the OSHA 1 Introduction  Fires and explosions kill more than 200 and injure more than 5,000 workers each year  There is a long and tragic history of workplace fires in this country caused by problems with fire exits and extinguishing systems  OSHA requires employers to provide proper exits, fire fighting equipment, and employee training to prevent fire deaths and injuries in the workplace OSHAX.org - The Unofficial Guide To the OSHA 2 Exit Route  A continuous and unobstructed path of exit travel from any point within a workplace to a place of safety (including refuge areas)  Consists of three parts:  Exit access  Exit  Exit discharge OSHAX.org - The Unofficial Guide To the OSHA 3 Exit Routes Basic Requirements

75

Page 1 of 3 Policy: Fire Protection Equipment Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 of 3 Policy: Fire Protection Equipment Policy Responsible Party: Director, Safety and Risk The Office of Safety and Risk Management (SRM) has developed, and implemented the Fire Protection Equipment of Fire Protection Equipment throughout MSU to maintain its working order. Fire Protection Equipment

Dyer, Bill

76

Recovery Newsletters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

newsletters Office of Environmental newsletters Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en 2011 ARRA Newsletters http://energy.gov/em/downloads/2011-arra-newsletters 2011 ARRA Newsletters

77

An algorithm for recovery of distributed applications with directed dependencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recovery. The thesis proposes a distributed algorithm which coordinates management entities, called agents, to monitor the managed resources (which have directed failure and recovery dependencies among them) and perform recovery actions once failures have...

Yang, Jiantian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fires - 1946  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fires - 1946 Fires - 1946 Nature Bulletin No. 85 September 28, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRES - 1946 It happens every fall. Thousands of acres of vacant land are being burned-off: some of them because of matches, cigarettes or pipe dottle carelessly tossed aside along the highways and along the trails; some of them set afire by thoughtless boys; most of them deliberately burned by people who believe they will improve the crop of grass next year. That is stupid. And if you start a fire which burns over another person's property you are liable to arrest and heavy penalty, under the Illinois law, unless you have given that person proper notice of your intention. Fires harm -- they never help. The tough seeds and roots of the worthless grasses and weeds survive a fire but the good nutritious grasses and most wildflowers are killed. Further, all the winter food and cover for birds and other wildlife are destroyed.

79

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology ETR Report Date: July 2007 ETR-7 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Caustic Recovery Technology Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (EM-21) has been developing caustic recovery technology for application to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to reduce the amount of Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrified. Recycle of sodium hydroxide with an efficient caustic recovery process could reduce the amount of waste glass produced by greater than 30%. The Ceramatec Sodium (Na), Super fast Ionic CONductors (NaSICON) membrane has shown promise for directly producing 50% caustic with high sodium selectivity. The external review

80

Preliminary Audit Report on "Management Controls over the Commonwealth of Virginia's Efforts to Implement the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Weatherization Assistance Program"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (Department) Weatherization Assistance Program received $5 billion under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to improve the energy efficiency of homes, multi-family rental units and mobile homes owned or occupied by low-income persons. Subsequently, the Department awarded a three-year Weatherization Assistance Program grant for $94 million to the Commonwealth of Virginia (Virginia). This grant provided more than a ten-fold increase in funds available to Virginia for weatherization over that authorized in Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. Corresponding to the increase in funding, the Recovery Act increased the limit on the average amount spent to weatherize a home (unit) from $2,500 to $6,500. Virginia's Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) administers the Recovery Act grant through 22 local community action agencies. These agencies (sub-grantees) are responsible for determining applicant eligibility, weatherizing homes, and conducting home assessments and inspections. Typical weatherization services include installing insulation; sealing ducts; tuning and repairing furnaces; and, mitigating heat loss through windows, doors and other infiltration points. Virginia plans to use its Recovery Act Weatherization funding to weatherize about 9,193 units over the life of the grant - a significant increase over the 1,475 housing units that were planned to be completed in FY 2009. Given the significant increase in funding and the demands associated with weatherizing thousands of homes, we initiated this audit to determine if Virginia had adequate safeguards in place to ensure that the Weatherization Program was managed efficiently and effectively. The State of Virginia's DHCD had not implemented financial and reporting controls needed to ensure Weatherization Program funds are spent effectively and efficiently. Specifically, DHCD had not: (1) Performed on-site financial monitoring of any of its sub-grantees under the Recovery Act; (2) Reviewed documentation supporting sub-grantee requests for reimbursements to verify the accuracy of amounts charged; (3) Periodically reconciled amounts paid to sub-grantees to the actual cost to weatherize units; (4) Maintained vehicle and equipment inventories as required by Federal regulations and state and Federal program directives; and (5) Accurately reported Weatherization Program results to the Department. Exacerbating weaknesses in DHCD's financial controls, the Department's most recent program monitoring visit to Virginia, made in 2008 before passage of the Recovery Act, did not include a required financial review. Hence, the financial control weaknesses discussed above were not detected and had not been addressed. As described in this report, these control and reporting weaknesses increase the risk that Recovery Act objectives may not be achieved and that fraud, waste or abuse can occur and not be detected in this critically important program.

None

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier  

SciTech Connect

Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

82

FIRE PROTECTION IMPAIRMENTS University Fire Marshal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE PROTECTION IMPAIRMENTS University Fire Marshal Guidance Document Approved by: R. Flynn Last revised by: R. Flynn Revision date: 08/18/2012 Fire Protection Impairments Page 1 of 1 This document contains excerpts from the Fire Code of New York State that pertain to the impairment of a fire protection

Pawlowski, Wojtek

83

Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agencys Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14: Alternate Water Sources, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

drought in the southeastern United States caused drought in the southeastern United States caused the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to address the need for water conservation and develop a water management plan for their Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD). The water management plan aimed to reduce SESD's potable water usage (more than 2.4 million gallons in fiscal year 2008) through an air handler condensate recovery project. The EPA SESD encompasses 12 acres in Athens, Georgia. A single laboratory building was constructed in 1996 consisting of 66,200 square feet configured for a mix use of laboratory and office activities. In May 2008, SESD completed an air handler condensate recovery system. The system routes condensate from rooftop air handler units to the facility's cooling tower,

84

Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Contained Firing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Contained Firing Facility Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development > Facilities > Contained Firing Facility

85

FAQS Qualification Card - Fire Protection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection Fire Protection FAQS Qualification Card - Fire Protection A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-FireProtection-2007.docx Description Fire Protection Qualification Card - 2007 FAQC-FireProtection-2000.docx Description Fire Protection Qualification Card - 2000

86

Using Satellite Fire Detection to Calibrate Components of the Fire Weather Index System in Malaysia and Indonesia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vegetation fires have become an increasing problem in tropical environments as a consequence of socioeconomic pressures and subsequent land-use change. In response, fire management systems are being developed. Th...

Caren C. Dymond; Robert D. Field; Orbita Roswintiarti; Guswanto

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fire Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1066-2012 December 2012 _______________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 DOE STANDARD FIRE PROTECTION U.S. Department of Energy AREA FIRP Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1066-2012 FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 1 and is approved for use by DOE and its contractors. The following fire protection standard is canceled with the issuance of this Standard and appropriate technical content was incorporated into this Standard:  DOE-STD-1088-95, Fire Protection for Relocatable Structures

88

Session I--Community Participation in Fire Management Planning--Everett USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 217  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that had burned 14 homes on 1,680 ac in nearby Weaverville, the Hyampom Fire started just west of Hayfork

Standiford, Richard B.

89

Fire hazard analysis of the radioactive mixed waste trenchs  

SciTech Connect

This Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) is intended to assess comprehensively the risk from fire associated with the disposal of low level radioactive mixed waste in trenches within the lined landfills, provided by Project W-025, designated Trench 31 and 34 of the Burial Ground 218-W-5. Elements within the FHA make recommendations for minimizing risk to workers, the public, and the environment from fire during the course of the operation`s activity. Transient flammables and combustibles present that support the operation`s activity are considered and included in the analysis. The graded FHA contains the following elements: description of construction, protection of essential safety class equipment, fire protection features, description of fire hazards, life safety considerations, critical process equipment, high value property, damage potential--maximum credible fire loss (MCFL) and maximum possible fire loss (MPFL), fire department/brigade response, recovery potential, potential for a toxic, biological and/or radiation incident due to a fire, emergency planning, security considerations related to fire protection, natural hazards (earthquake, flood, wind) impact on fire safety, and exposure fire potential, including the potential for fire spread between fire areas. Recommendations for limiting risk are made in the text of this report and printed in bold type. All recommendations are repeated in a list in Section 18.0.

McDonald, K.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Low Light Imaging for Power Outage and Fire Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boats. Fires in Africa Gas flares ­ Persian Gulf Fishing boats & city lights - Japan #12;Sorting The Recovery of Lighting? Gulf Coast USA Radiance Calibrated Lights 2006=red 2003=green 2000=blue #12;New

91

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) In 1965 the Solid Waste Disposal Act [Public Law (Pub. L.) 89-72] was enacted to improve solid waste disposal methods. It was amended in 1970 by the Resource Recovery Act (Pub. L. 91-512), which provided the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with funding for resource recovery programs. However, that Act had little impact on the management and ultimate disposal of hazardous waste. In 1976 Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Pub. L. 94-580). RCRA established a system for managing non-hazardous and hazardous solid wastes in an environmentally sound manner. Specifically, it provides for the management of hazardous wastes from the point of origin to the point of final disposal (i.e., "cradle to grave"). RCRA also promotes resource recovery and waste minimization.

92

Trottier BuildingTrottier Building Fire SafetyFire Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building 1.1. Fire SafetyFire Safety 2.2. Fire Protection equipmentFire Protection equipment 3 OfficersFire Prevention Officers #12;Trottier BuildingTrottier Building Fire ProtectionFire Protection#12;Trottier BuildingTrottier Building Fire SafetyFire Safety in Trottier buildingin Trottier

Pientka, Brigitte

93

WASTE HANDLING BUILDING FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System provides the capability to detect, control, and extinguish fires and/or mitigate explosions throughout the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Fire protection includes appropriate water-based and non-water-based suppression, as appropriate, and includes the distribution and delivery systems for the fire suppression agents. The Waste Handling Building Fire Protection System includes fire or explosion detection panel(s) controlling various detectors, system actuation, annunciators, equipment controls, and signal outputs. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for mounting of fire protection equipment and components, location of fire suppression equipment, suppression agent runoff, and locating fire rated barriers. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System for adequate drainage and removal capabilities of liquid runoff resulting from fire protection discharges. The system interfaces with the Waste Handling Building Electrical Distribution System for power to operate, and with the Site Fire Protection System for fire protection water supply to automatic sprinklers, standpipes, and hose stations. The system interfaces with the Site Fire Protection System for fire signal transmission outside the WHB as needed to respond to a fire emergency, and with the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System to detect smoke and fire in specific areas, to protect building high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and to control portions of the Waste Handling Building Ventilation System for smoke management and manual override capability. The system interfaces with the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Operations Monitoring and Control System for annunciation, and condition status.

J. D. Bigbee

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 244 US Coast Guard Eastern Region  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the activities of a resource efficiency manager that served the US Coast Guard Eastern Region from November 23, 2009 through August 3, 2010.

Sandusky, William F.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) presents opportunities with potential for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Signed into law by President Obama on February 17,...

96

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Tanks NFPA National Fire Protection Association OFI Opportunity for Improvement OREM Oak Ridge Environmental Management ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory PB Process Building...

97

Annual Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Annual Fire Safety Report University of California, Irvine HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY to the Fire Safety in Student Housing Buildings of current or perspective students and employees be reported publish an annual fire safety report, keep a fire log, and report fire statistics to the Secretary

Loudon, Catherine

98

Fire Safety January 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Fire Safety PROCEDURES January 2011 firesafety@uwo.ca Campus Phones ­ EMERGENCY ­ Dial 911 Fire Safety Service is the focal point for the coordinated administration of the University Fire Safety Prevention and Fire Safety to minimize the risk of injury or loss of life or property due to fire

Lennard, William N.

99

Fire Protection Program: Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Summary Since May 1950, an Annual Fire Protection Program Summary has been submitted by DOE's fire protection community. Currently, this report is required by section 5a.(8) of DOE Order 231.1. "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." In 1999, an automation initiative was undertaken to streamline data collection and provide a more through review of DOE Reporting Element activities. This action resulted in the delayed publications of the CY 1999 and 2000 reports until 2002. It is now possible however to view all Annual Summary Reporting Element responses since 1991 at the Site, Operations, Lead Program Secretarial Office and Headquarters levels. Additionally, a build-in reference to other DOE reporting activities (CAIRS and ORPS) is available that allows Reporting Elements and managers the opportunity to review all fire protection events along previously mentioned categories. Reports listed below were generated from this application. To obtain a copy of the Annual Summary Application please contact Jim Bisker in the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy (EH-53) at (301)903-6542 or Jim Bisker.

100

Thanks to Our Neighbors in Fighting Fire on INL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thanks to Our Neighbors in Fighting Fire on INL Thanks to Our Neighbors in Fighting Fire on INL Idaho Bureau of Homeland Security view of the Twin Buttes Wildland fire aftermath atop the East Twin Butte. As the Department of Energy's manager at the Idaho National Laboratory, I want to commend the outstanding efforts of More than 50 firefighters and equipment battled the fire that was contained at 9:10 p.m. Mountain Standard Time July 19, 2007 An aerial scan of the area indicated the fire burned more than 9,000 acres. INL employees, and firefighting and law enforcement staff from our regional neighbors for the outstanding team-work they exhibited in controlling the Twin Buttes Fire on the INL from July 18-20. The INL Firefighters and support workers joined together with the Blackfoot Fire Department, Idaho Falls Fire Department, Shelley Fire

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Suitability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to Predict the June 2005 Fire Weather for Interior Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature, and daily accumulated shortwave radiation well. Daily minimum (maximum) temperature and relative to local fire management authorities on the potential for wild- fires to plan prescribed burns, alert of fire control into fire indices that reflect protection require- ments. The National Fire Danger Rating

Moelders, Nicole

102

Initial Joint Review of Wildland Fire Safety at DOE Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December December 2000 A Report to the Secretary of Energy Initial Joint Review of Wildland Fire Safety at DOE Sites OVERSIGHT Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................... 1 1.0 Introduction ......................................................................................... 5 2.0 Summary of Review Results .............................................................. 8 2.1 Wildland Fire Management Policy ............................................. 8 2.2 Fire/Emergency Hazards Assessments ....................................... 9 2.3 Wildland Fire Prevention and Response .................................. 11 2.4 Offsite Interfaces and Agreements ........................................... 13 2.5 Feedback and Continuous Improvement

103

Preventing Laboratory FiresPreventing Laboratory Fires AgendaAgenda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.contents. #12;Laboratory Fire CodeLaboratory Fire Code RegulationsRegulations #12;National Fire ProtectionNational Fire Protection Association (NFPA)Association (NFPA) NFPA 1NFPA 1 ­­ General Protection against FireGeneral Protection against Fire NFPA 10NFPA 10 ­­ Fire ExtinguishersFire Extinguishers NFPA 30NFPA 30 ­­ Flammable

Farritor, Shane

104

Recovery News Flashes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news-flashes Office of Environmental news-flashes Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP http://energy.gov/em/downloads/tru-success-srs-recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear recovery-act-prepares-complete-shipment-more-5000-cubic-meters-nuclear" class="title-link">"TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP

105

Fire Safety Training: Fire Modeling- NUREG 1934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presenter: Frederick W. Mowrer, Ph.D., P.E. Director Fire Protection Engineering Programs - Cal Poly SLO

106

Protecting Oregon Old-Growth Forests from Fires: How Much Is It Worth?1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protecting Oregon Old-Growth Forests from Fires: How Much Is It Worth?1 Armando González-Cabán John and will be protected from fire for current and future generations. The methodology was applied to old-growth forests into fire management decision making is a growing concern of Federal agencies with wildland fire protection

Standiford, Richard B.

107

Stone Fire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Change in Cookstove Types on Visibility - Case Study of the Berkeley-Darfur Stove and Three- Stone Fire Extended Abstract #1 Yungang Wang, Ashok J. Gadgil, Thomas W. Kirchstetter Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA September 2012 This publication was made possible by grant number 500-99-013 from the California Energy Commission (CEC). This work was also supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE- AC02- 05CH11231. LBNL-6291E LBNL-6291E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

108

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING FPE College of Engineering California Polytechnic State University San problems and develop fire safety design solutions in a variety of professional settings. Fire Protection Engineering Science � Apply concepts associated with the thermal sciences, to the analysis of fire protection

Sze, Lawrence

109

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING FPE College of Engineering California Polytechnic State University San and develop fire safety design solutions in a variety of professional settings. Fire Protection Engineering Science · Apply concepts associated with the thermal sciences, to the analysis of fire protection

Sze, Lawrence

110

Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration Recovery | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Recovery Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Planning for Emergencies > Recovery Recovery NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond to any NNSA and Department of Energy facility emergency. It is also the nation's premier

111

Re-examining fire severity relations in pre-management era mixed conifer forests: inferences from landscape patterns of forest structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For some time, ecologists have known that spatial patterns of forest structure reflected disturbance and recovery history, disturbance ... gradients. In spite of this awareness, historical forest structure has be...

Paul F. Hessburg; R. Brion Salter; Kevin M. James

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

210 FireinEasternOakForests:DeliveringSciencetoLandManagers.ProceedingsofaConference GTR-NRS-P-1 RESISTANCE OF EASTERN HARDWOOD STEMS TO FIRE INJURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of fire on surviving overstory trees. may be readily understood in terms of energy budgets available for other categories. As green plants, trees capture and convert solar energy into chemical energy that is then dynamically allocated to meet the changing needs of the tree, including that of stored energy for future needs

113

Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Award Number: DE-FE0007395 DOE Project Manager: José D. Figueroa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Heat Integrated Post- a Heat Integrated Post- combustion CO 2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant University of Kentucky Research Foundation Partnered with U.S. Department of Energy NETL Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities Electric Power Research Institute (with WorleyParsons) Hitachi Power Systems America Smith Management Group July 9, 2013 Goals and Objectives * Objectives 1) To demonstrate a heat-integrated post-combustion CO 2 capture system with an advanced solvent; 2) To collect information/data on material corrosion and identify appropriate materials of construction for a 550 MWe commercial-scale carbon capture plant.  To gather data on solvent degradation kinetics, water management, system dynamic control as well as other information during the long-term

114

Department of Energy Releases WIPP Recovery Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Washington, D.C. Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) released the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Recovery Plan, outlining the necessary steps to resume operations at the transuranic waste disposal site outside of Carlsbad, N.M. WIPP operations were suspended following an underground truck fire and a radiological release earlier this year.

115

Fire Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Fire Protection Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is multi-faceted. It includes published fire safety directives (Orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary, and a directory of fire safety professionals. DOE also sponsors fire safety conferences, various training initiatives, and a spectrum of technical assistance activities. This Home Page is intended to bring together in one location as much of the Program's resources as possible to facilitate greater understanding, communication, and efficiency of operations. Guidelines -- NFPA Codes and standards, CFRs, and DOE Directives (policy statements, Orders, Standards, and Guidance Documents)

116

Stochastic Representation of Fire Behavior in a Wildland Fire Protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic Representation of Fire Behavior in a Wildland Fire Protection Planning Model on wildland fire used by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Fire rate of spread (ROS. S IMULATIONMODELSOFINITIALATTACKonwildland fireare important tools for wildland fire protection planning, and several new models have been

Fried, Jeremy S.

117

Fire Classifications Fires involving the ordinary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, plastics, etc. Fires involving combustible or flammable liquids such as gasoline, kerosene, oils, grease is protected by various devices such as smoke detectors, sprinkler systems, and manual fire alarm pull stations. Manual pull stations are strategically located throughout the University. Usually located by each exit

Jia, Songtao

118

Fire Protection Related Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fire Protection related sites for Department of Energy, Non-DOE Government and Non-Government information.

119

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2011 July 13, 2011 Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly," said Project Director Al Chaloupka. The largest wildfire in New Mexico history forced the Lab to close for more than a week. While firefighters battled the fire, Recovery Act project officials were making plans to re-start the Recovery Act excavation of MDA-B when it was safe to return to

120

Approval Memorandum, Additional Qualification Courses of Fire - December  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Approval Memorandum, Additional Qualification Courses of Fire - Approval Memorandum, Additional Qualification Courses of Fire - December 13, 2011 Approval Memorandum, Additional Qualification Courses of Fire - December 13, 2011 December 13, 2011 Request approval of revised courses of fire. As indicated in the background section of the memorandum, subjects: Newly Developed SECURITY Policy Officer/Special Response Team Qualification Courses of Fire, dated October 12,2011, members of the Department of Energy (DOE) Firearms Policy Panel, DOE Training Managers Working Group, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the DOE National Training Center have devloped , reviewed and revised the following courses of fire (attached) for inclusion in the Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses Manual. The courses of fire pertain to the incubent Security Police

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recovery Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Recovery Act Buy American Requirements for Information Needed from Financial Assistance Applicants/Recipients for Waiver Requests Based on Unreasonable Cost or Nonavailability Applicants for and recipients of financial assistance funded by the Recovery Act must comply with the requirement that all of the iron, steel, and manufactured goods used for a project for the construction, alteration, maintenance, or repair of a public building or public work be produced in the United States, unless the head of the agency makes a waiver, or determination of inapplicability of the Buy American Recovery Act provisions, based on one of the authorized exceptions. The authorized exceptions are unreasonable cost, nonavailability, and in furtherance of the public interest. This

122

Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by natural circulation to the waterwalls and divisional wall panels. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) without over-fire air and (2) with 20% over-fire air. The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from carbon steel to T91. The total heat transfer surface required in the oxygen-fired heat recovery area (HRA) is 25% less than the air-fired HRA due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are practically the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are very similar.

Andrew Seltzer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Interest of the Theory of Uncertain in the Dynamic LCA- Fire Methodology to Assess Fire Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is the third phase of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) described in ISO 14042. The purpose of LCIA is to assess a product system's life cycle inventory analysis (LCI) in order to better understand its environmental significance. However, LCIA typically excludes spatial, temporal, threshold and dose-response information, and combines emissions or activities over space and/or time. This may diminish the environmental relevance of the indicator result. The methodology, Dynamic LCA -Fire proposed in this paper to complete the International Standard ISO 14042 in the fire field, combines the LCA - Fire method with the Dispersion Numerical Model. It is based on the use of the plume model used to assess pollutant concentrations and thermal effects from fire accident scenarios. In this study, The Dynamic LCA - Fire methodology is applied to a case study for petroleum production process management.

Samia Chettouh; Rachida Hamzi; Fares Innal; Djamel Haddad

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Saving Energy and Money at 24/7 Fire Stations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy and Money at 24/7 Fire Stations Saving Energy and Money at 24/7 Fire Stations Saving Energy and Money at 24/7 Fire Stations June 28, 2010 - 11:11am Addthis Coal Creek Fire and Rescue's fire station in New Richmond, Ind. where a new furnace and air conditioner will save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of New Richmond Coal Creek Fire and Rescue's fire station in New Richmond, Ind. where a new furnace and air conditioner will save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of New Richmond What are the key facts? The Indiana Office of Energy Development received $14.1 million in EECBG grants from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act "The fire station is a building that is in use 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, so naturally it consumes a significant amount of energy," says Molly Whitehead, grants specialist for the Indiana Office of Energy Development.

125

Substation fire protection features  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes Commonwealth Edison`s (ComEd) approach to substation fire protection. Substation fires can have a major operational, financial, as well as political impact on a utility. The overall Company philosophy encompasses both active and passive fire protection features to provide prompt detection, notification, and confinement of fire and its by-products. Conservatively designed smoke detection systems and floor and wall penetration seals form the backbone of this strategy. The Company has implemented a program to install these features in new and existing substations. Thus far these measures have been successful in mitigating the consequences of substation fires.

Hausheer, T.G. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, IL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Microsoft Word - Appendix G - Wildland Fire Mgmt Plan.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

G G Wildland Fire Management Plan for the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFS/S04638-5.0 Wildland Fire Management Plan for the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site July 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Wildland Fire Management Plan for the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site July 2013 Doc. No. S04638-5.0 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction and Purpose ...................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Plan Purpose............................................................................................................... 1

127

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 15, 2010 March 15, 2010 A woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will be built in Montpelier, Vt. | File photo Jobs, sustainable heating coming to Vermont city Their new woodchip-fired combined heat and power system will heat the Capitol Complex, the city's schools, City Hall and as many as 156 other buildings in the downtown area. March 12, 2010 Reginald Speight, CEO of Martin County Community Action | Photo courtesy of Martin County Community Action N.C. Agency Growing, Helping Citizens Save Money MCCA runs a hybrid program in the state that has expanded energy efficiency services to municipalities and made advanced-income households eligible for weatherization, and this work helped prepare the agency for the workload it is seeing now under the Recovery Act.

128

Microsoft Word - Recovery Act Cover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspector General Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Decommissioning and Demolition Activities at Office of Science Sites OAS-RA-L-10-05 August 2010 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: August 12, 2010 Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-10-05 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-32 (A10RA005) SUBJECT: Audit Report on "Decommissioning and Demolition Activities at Office of Science Sites" TO: Deputy Director for Field Operations, SC-3 Manager, Brookhaven Site Office Manager, Argonne Site Office INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In February 2009, the President signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) into law. The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Environmental Management (EM) allocated $140 million of Recovery Act funds to

129

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV March 10, 2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past $4 Billion U.S. Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS * More than $4 BILLION in Recovery Act payments are accelerating environmental cleanup * 67% of EM Recovery Act funds have been paid Financial data are based on reporting as of March 9, 2011, and are subject to change. EM has made more than $4 billion in Recovery Act payments, or 32 percent of the DOE's $12.4 billion in Recovery Act payments. DOE received $35.2 billion

130

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire Effective safety procedures in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory would have provided protections in the event that the raging Las Conchas fire had spread to the site of an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project. "Our procedures not only placed the waste excavation site, Materials Disposal Area B (MDA-B), into a safe posture so it was well protected during the fire, but also allowed us to resume work quickly," said Project Director Al Chaloupka. Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire More Documents & Publications Los Alamos Lab Completes Excavation of Waste Disposal Site Used in the 1940s

131

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program and Fire Protection Systems at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center, December 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Fire Protection Systems and Fire Protection Systems at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center December 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology .......................................................................................................................................... 2

132

RECOVERY ACT: DYNAMIC ENERGY CONSUMPTION MANAGEMENT OF ROUTING TELECOM AND DATA CENTERS THROUGH REAL-TIME OPTIMAL CONTROL (RTOC): Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This final scientific report documents the Industrial Technology Program (ITP) Stage 2 Concept Development effort on Data Center Energy Reduction and Management Through Real-Time Optimal Control (RTOC). Society is becoming increasingly dependent on information technology systems, driving exponential growth in demand for data center processing and an insatiable appetite for energy. David Raths noted, 'A 50,000-square-foot data center uses approximately 4 megawatts of power, or the equivalent of 57 barrels of oil a day1.' The problem has become so severe that in some cases, users are giving up raw performance for a better balance between performance and energy efficiency. Historically, power systems for data centers were crudely sized to meet maximum demand. Since many servers operate at 60%-90% of maximum power while only utilizing an average of 5% to 15% of their capability, there are huge inefficiencies in the consumption and delivery of power in these data centers. The goal of the 'Recovery Act: Decreasing Data Center Energy Use through Network and Infrastructure Control' is to develop a state of the art approach for autonomously and intelligently reducing and managing data center power through real-time optimal control. Advances in microelectronics and software are enabling the opportunity to realize significant data center power savings through the implementation of autonomous power management control algorithms. The first step to realizing these savings was addressed in this study through the successful creation of a flexible and scalable mathematical model (equation) for data center behavior and the formulation of an acceptable low technical risk market introduction strategy leveraging commercial hardware and software familiar to the data center market. Follow-on Stage 3 Concept Development efforts include predictive modeling and simulation of algorithm performance, prototype demonstrations with representative data center equipment to verify requisite performance and continued commercial partnering agreement formation to ensure uninterrupted development, and deployment of the real-time optimal control algorithm. As a software implementable technique for reducing power consumption, the RTOC has two very desirable traits supporting rapid prototyping and ultimately widespread dissemination. First, very little capital is required for implementation. No major infrastructure modifications are required and there is no need to purchase expensive capital equipment. Second, the RTOC can be rolled out incrementally. Therefore, the effectiveness can be proven without a large scale initial roll out. Through the use of the Impact Projections Model provided by the DOE, monetary savings in excess of $100M in 2020 and billions by 2040 are predicted. In terms of energy savings, the model predicts a primary energy displacement of 260 trillion BTUs (33 trillion kWh), or a 50% reduction in server power consumption. The model also predicts a corresponding reduction of pollutants such as SO2 and NOx in excess of 100,000 metric tonnes assuming the RTOC is fully deployed. While additional development and prototyping is required to validate these predictions, the relative low cost and ease of implementation compared to large capital projects makes it an ideal candidate for further investigation.

Ron Moon

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. 2012 157 Effects of Fire on Intangible Cultural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. 2012 Fire Policy and Standard Practice in Cultural Resource Management on Intangible Cultural Resources: Moving Toward a Landscape Approach John R. Welch Long before the Secretaries-level fire effects assessments as well as fire management planning (see Burns and others 2003), there are few

134

Caustic Recovery Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

366, REVISON 0 366, REVISON 0 Key Words: Waste Treatment Plant Sodium Recovery Electrochemical Retention: Permanent Review of Ceramatec's Caustic Recovery Technology W. R. Wilmarth D. T. Hobbs W. A. Averill E. B. Fox R. A. Peterson UNCLASSIFIED DOES NOT CONTAIN UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION ADC & Reviewing Official:_______________________________________ (E. Stevens, Manager, Solid Waste and Special Programs) Date:______________________________________ JULY 20, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U. S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-96SR18500 Page 1 of 28 WSRC-STI-2007-00366, REVISON 0 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under

135

Environmental Management System Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management Water conservation LBNLs approach to sustainable environmentalWater Discharges) of Introduction Environmental Managementenvironmental compliance programs, such as air and water quality, as well as less traditional programs, such as wildland fire management,

Fox, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fire and aquatic ecosystems of the western USA: current knowledge and key questions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding of the effects of wildland fire and fire management on aquatic and riparian ecosystems is an evolving field, with many questions still to be resolved. Limitations of current knowledge, and the certainty that fire management will continue, underscore the need to summarize available information. Integrating fire and fuels management with aquatic ecosystem conservation begins with recognizing that terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are linked and dynamic, and that fire can play a critical role in maintaining aquatic ecological diversity. To protect aquatic ecosystems we argue that it will be important to: (1) accommodate fire-related and other ecological processes that maintain aquatic habitats and biodiversity, and not simply control fires or fuels; (2) prioritize projects according to risks and opportunities for fire control and the protection of aquatic ecosystems; and (3) develop new consistency in the management and regulatory process. Ultimately, all natural resource management is uncertain; the role of science is to apply experimental design and hypothesis testing to management applications that affect fire and aquatic ecosystems. Policy-makers and the public will benefit from an expanded appreciation of fire ecology that enables them to implement watershed management projects as experiments with hypothesized outcomes, adequate controls, and replication.

Peter A. Bisson; Bruce E. Rieman; Charlie Luce; Paul F. Hessburg; Danny C. Lee; Jeffrey L. Kershner; Gordon H. Reeves; Robert E. Gresswell

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Two years in the planning, the symposium on Wildland Fire 2000 was held  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Research of the Forest Service, at the Conference on Fire Management--Challenge of Protection of the Interior; California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection; International Union of Forestry developed by Delmer L. Albright of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (see his

Standiford, Richard B.

138

Six Sigma process improvements and sourcing strategies following factory fire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses Six Sigma process improvements and the supplier management issues resulting from the shift to external suppliers in the aftermath of a fire. Originally, this thesis was to address a lean implementation ...

Egan, Sarah (Sarah J.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fire alarm system improvement  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the Fire Alarm System Test Procedure for Building 234-5Z, 200-West Area on the Hanford Reservation, Richland, Washington. This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the modifications to the Fire Protection systems function as required by project criteria. The ATP will test the Fire Alarm Control Panels, Flow Alarm Pressure Switch, Heat Detectors, Smoke Detectors, Flow Switches, Manual Pull Stations, and Gong/Door by Pass Switches.

Hodge, S.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Related Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions related to the the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD January 19, 2011 CX-005047: Categorical Exclusion Determination Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 01/19/2011 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory January 19, 2011 CX-005039: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/19/2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

EM Recovery Act Performance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Recovery Act » EM Recovery Act Performance Mission » Recovery Act » EM Recovery Act Performance EM Recovery Act Performance Footprint Reduction The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 690 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 241 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve

142

Recovery News Flashes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery News Flashes Recovery News Flashes Recovery News Flashes RSS January 29, 2013 "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery Act Prepares to Complete Shipment of More Than 5,000 Cubic Meters of Nuclear Waste to WIPP With the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, Savannah River Site (SRS) continues to safely treat and dispose of radioactive waste created while producing materials for nuclear weapons throughout the Cold War. The DOE site in Aiken, S.C., is safely, steadily, and cost-effectively making progress to analyze, measure, and then carefully cleanup or dispose of legacy transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at SRS after the lengthy nuclear arms race. November 2, 2012 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and

143

NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'greens' firing range | National Nuclear 'greens' firing range | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex 'greens' firing range Posted By Greg Cunningham, Pantex The lead that flies at the Pantex Firing Range has to land somewhere, and

144

Three centuries of fire in montane pine-oak stands on a temperate forest Serena R. Aldrich; Charles W. Lafon; Henri D. Grissino-Mayer; Georgina G. DeWeese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining, logging, and US Forest Service acquisition and fire protection. Results: Fires occurred and 1940s. Conclusions: Except for fire protection, changes in land use had no discernible influence such as prescribed fires are often incorporated into ecosystem management, particu- larly where fire protection

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

145

Power Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) - 2,870,000 x 0.8 6 W - 3414 = 70 kw (or 900 hp). When recovering power from an expanding gas, consideration should be given to the final gas temperature. This tem;:>f'rature can be estimated by the formula: T 2 Final temperature, oR. Other... with the requirements make generation fqr more useful. Presently a recovery level of around 500 kw (or 657 hp) appears to be the minimum level which will support an in stallation. In order to achieve reasonable effi ciency, quality equipment with good control...

Murray, F.

146

H:\\Transfer\\My Documents\\Cleary Fire Report\\Annual Fire Safety Report 2013.doc Annual Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) responds to the State Response Area of campus, including the outlyingH:\\Transfer\\My Documents\\Cleary Fire Report\\Annual Fire Safety Report 2013.doc Annual Fire Safety #12;H:\\Transfer\\My Documents\\Cleary Fire Report\\Annual Fire Safety Report 2013.doc Fire and Life

Sze, Lawrence

147

H:\\Transfer\\My Documents\\Cleary Fire Report\\Annual Fire Safety Report 2012.doc Annual Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) responds to the State Response Area of campus, including the outlyingH:\\Transfer\\My Documents\\Cleary Fire Report\\Annual Fire Safety Report 2012.doc Annual Fire Safety #12;H:\\Transfer\\My Documents\\Cleary Fire Report\\Annual Fire Safety Report 2012.doc Fire and Life

Sze, Lawrence

148

ENERGY MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................4 Appendix A ­ Normal Heating Hours .........................................................10 Appendix E - Electric Fires. Responsibilities Estates Services: are responsible for the provision of Energy and Water Management systems

Harman, Neal.A.

149

Managing Insect and Mite Pests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fire ant ....................................................10 White grubs SUGGESITONS ...................................................................28 WORKER PROTECTION STANDARD and crop protection specialists: * Extension agent-pest management; Extension ento- mologists

Mukhtar, Saqib

150

Recovery Act Funded Environmental Cleanup Begins at Y-12 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration site can safely continue," said Gerald Boyd, Manager of DOE's Oak Ridge Office. A significant portion of the Recovery Act funding...

151

Fire science at LLNL: A review  

SciTech Connect

This fire sciences report from LLNL includes topics on: fire spread in trailer complexes, properties of welding blankets, validation of sprinkler systems, fire and smoke detectors, fire modeling, and other fire engineering and safety issues. (JEF)

Hasegawa, H.K. (ed.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

EPRI/NRC-RES fire human reliability analysis guidelines.  

SciTech Connect

During the 1990s, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed methods for fire risk analysis to support its utility members in the preparation of responses to Generic Letter 88-20, Supplement 4, 'Individual Plant Examination - External Events' (IPEEE). This effort produced a Fire Risk Assessment methodology for operations at power that was used by the majority of U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs) in support of the IPEEE program and several NPPs overseas. Although these methods were acceptable for accomplishing the objectives of the IPEEE, EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recognized that they required upgrades to support current requirements for risk-informed, performance-based (RI/PB) applications. In 2001, EPRI and the USNRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) embarked on a cooperative project to improve the state-of-the-art in fire risk assessment to support a new risk-informed environment in fire protection. This project produced a consensus document, NUREG/CR-6850 (EPRI 1011989), entitled 'Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities' which addressed fire risk for at power operations. NUREG/CR-6850 developed high level guidance on the process for identification and inclusion of human failure events (HFEs) into the fire PRA (FPRA), and a methodology for assigning quantitative screening values to these HFEs. It outlined the initial considerations of performance shaping factors (PSFs) and related fire effects that may need to be addressed in developing best-estimate human error probabilities (HEPs). However, NUREG/CR-6850 did not describe a methodology to develop best-estimate HEPs given the PSFs and the fire-related effects. In 2007, EPRI and RES embarked on another cooperative project to develop explicit guidance for estimating HEPs for human failure events under fire generated conditions, building upon existing human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. This document provides a methodology and guidance for conducting a fire HRA. This process includes identification and definition of post-fire human failure events, qualitative analysis, quantification, recovery, dependency, and uncertainty. This document provides three approaches to quantification: screening, scoping, and detailed HRA. Screening is based on the guidance in NUREG/CR-6850, with some additional guidance for scenarios with long time windows. Scoping is a new approach to quantification developed specifically to support the iterative nature of fire PRA quantification. Scoping is intended to provide less conservative HEPs than screening, but requires fewer resources than a detailed HRA analysis. For detailed HRA quantification, guidance has been developed on how to apply existing methods to assess post-fire fire HEPs.

Lewis, Stuart R. (Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, NC); Cooper, Susan E. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD); Najafi, Bijan (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Collins, Erin (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Hannaman, Bill (SAIC, Campbell, CA); Kohlhepp, Kaydee (Scientech, Tukwila, WA); Grobbelaar, Jan (Scientech, Tukwila, WA); Hill, Kendra (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD); Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt; Forester, John Alan; Julius, Jeff (Scientech, Tukwila, WA)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ARM - Recovery Act Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActRecovery Act Instruments ActRecovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Recovery Act Instruments These pages provide a breakdown of the new instruments planned for installation among the permanent and mobile ARM sites. In addition, several instruments will be purchased for use throughout the facility and deployed as needed. These are considered "facility spares" and are included in the table below. View All | Hide All ARM Aerial Facility Instrument Title Instrument Mentor Measurement Group Measurements

154

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium  

SciTech Connect

On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 22, 2012 February 22, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-RA-12-06 The Management of Post-Recovery Act Workforce Transition at Office of Environmental Management Sites February 9, 2012 Inspection Report: INS-RA-12-01 Alleged Misuse of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Grant Funds by the Western Arizona Council of Governments January 26, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-12-03 The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Arizona State Energy Program January 20, 2012 Examination Report: OAS-RA-12-05 Saratoga County Economic Opportunity Council, Inc. -Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 January 20, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-RA-12-04 The Department's Management of the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program

157

Flooding and Fire Ants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire ants can be a serious problem during and after a flood. This publication explains how to protect yourself when you must return to flooded structures or deal with storm debris....

Nester, Paul

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

Safety, Security & Fire Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013 Safety, Security & Fire Report Stanford University #12;Table of Contents Public Safety About the Stanford University Department of Public Safety Community Outreach & Education Programs Emergency Access Transportation Safety Bicycle Safety The Jeanne Clery and Higher Education Act Timely Warning

Straight, Aaron

159

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications

160

CRAD, Fire Protection - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Fire Protection - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Fire Protection - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Fire Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CRAD, Fire Protection - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase Fire Protection - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Fire Protection - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Fire Protection - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

162

Memorandum, Additional Approved Qualification Courses of Fire - September  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum, Additional Approved Qualification Courses of Fire - Memorandum, Additional Approved Qualification Courses of Fire - September 23, 2011 Memorandum, Additional Approved Qualification Courses of Fire - September 23, 2011 September 23, 2011 Newly developed Security Police Officer/Special Response Team Qualification Courses of Fire In accordance with DOE Order 473.2 Protection Program Operations , Section E , paragraph 2 and Section K, Paragraph 2, members of the Department of Energy (DOE) Firearms Policy Panel, DOE Protective Forces Safety Committee, DOE Trainin Managers Working Group, the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the DOE National Training Center have developed, reviewed and revised the following courses of fire (attached) for inclusion in the Protective Force Firearms Qualification Courses Manual. The courses

163

Alternate Materials for Recovery Boiler Superheater Tubes  

SciTech Connect

The ever escalating demands for increased efficiency of all types of boilers would most sensibly be realized by an increase in the steam parameters of temperature and pressure. However, materials and corrosion limitations in the steam generating components, particularly the superheater tubes, present major obstacles to boiler designers in achieving systems that can operate under the more severe conditions. This paper will address the issues associated with superheater tube selection for many types of boilers; particularly chemical recovery boilers, but also addressing the similarities in issues for biomass and coal fired boilers. It will also review our recent study of materials for recovery boiler superheaters. Additional, more extensive studies, both laboratory and field, are needed to gain a better understanding of the variables that affect superheater tube corrosion and to better determine the best means to control this corrosion to ultimately permit operation of recovery boilers at higher temperatures and pressures.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Heat recovery and seed recovery development project: preliminary design report (PDR)  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary design and performance characteristics are described of the 20 MWt heat recovery and seed recovery (HRSR) system to be fabricated, installed, and evaluated to provide a technological basis for the design of commercial size HRSR systems for coal-fired open-cycle MHD power plants. The system description and heat and material balances, equipment description and functional requirements, controls, interfacing systems, and operation and maintenance are detailed. Appendices include: (1) recommended environmental requirements for compliance with federal and state of Tennessee regulations, (2) channel and diffuser simulator, (3) equipment arrangement drawings, and (4) channel and diffuser simulator barrel drawings. (WHK)

Arkett, A. H.; Alexander, K. C.; Bolek, A. D.; Blackman, B. K.; Kurrle, P. E.; Tram, S. V.; Warren, A. M.; Ziobrowski, A. J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hanford Site Fire June 2000 AM  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Fire on the morning of June 29, 2000. Fire crews working to contain a fire on the Hanford Site in June 2000.

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ignition and spread of electrical wire fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airplane fires; (b) Nuclear power plant fires; (c) Chemicalignition sources in nuclear power plants: statistical,number of fire cases in nuclear power plants (NPP) [2]. Most

Huang, Xinyan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Fire Simulation, Evacuation Analysis and Proposal of Fire Protection Systems Inside an Underground Cavern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire Simulation, Evacuation Analysis and Proposal of Fire Protection Systems Inside an Underground Cavern

Stella, Carlo

168

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 17, 2010 March 17, 2010 Solar panels at Terry Sandstrom's home in Wheatland, Wyo. | Photo courtesy of Terry Sandstrom Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home Terry Sandstrom never thought he would run his house entirely on renewable energy, but when faced with a $100,000 price tag to get connected to the grid, he had to look at alternative options. March 17, 2010 DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy today released a new report highlighting the benefits of the Recovery Act to small businesses throughout the clean, renewable energy industry and environmental management sector. The report found that as of early March 2010, small businesses have been selected to receive nearly $5.4 billion in funding

169

Dendrochronology-based fire history of mixed-conifer forests in the San Jacinto Mountains, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growing public awareness of the increasing number of large wildfires across forested landscapes, coupled with needs of resource base management has accelerated research into forest reference conditions and the historical role of fire in coniferous ecosystems. This work investigates historical fire regimes of mixed-conifer forests in the San Jacinto Mountains of southern California using fire-scar dendrochronology. As such this is the first reconstruction of fire history in the mixed-conifer forests of southern California using landscape-scale systematic-based fire-scar dendrochronology. The pre-historical fire size, seasonality, and frequency within these forests are reconstructed and demonstrated graphically, employing systematic sampling and Geographical Information System (GIS) reconstruction. A 250m grid system was overlaid upon a 270ha sample location, and fire-scar samples were collected from each of the grid intersection points. Fire-scar dendrochronology resulted in a 653 years long chronology, indicating a point mean fire return interval of 5.2 years, and an area wide grand mean fire interval of 32.2 years. The majority of fires occurred within latewood or at the ring boundary. Graphic modelling of fire events indicate three-quarters of all fires sampled were less than 6.25ha in size, but burned over 50% of the area sampled during the period; only a small portion of fires were larger than 18ha within the sample area. Use of systematic sampling is an important step in modeling long-term frequency and effects of fire on a landscape level, and is invaluable to the long-term management planning.

Richard G. Everett

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fire Test of Profile Plank for Transformer Pit Fire Protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In general it is recommended to fill a transformer pit with rock ballast to extinguish the fire if there is a leakage of burning transformer oil. There is a lack of ... design of solutions for fire extinguishment...

Johan Lindstrm; Michael Frsth

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Management and Budget http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

P...

172

Emergency, Fire Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency, Fire Information Emergency, Fire Information Emergency, Fire Information Protecting our people, emergency personnel, national security information, facilities, lands, and neighboring communities. Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Email LANL Update (505) 667-6622 or (877) 723-4101 toll-free Emergency Public Information In the event of an emergency, Los Alamos National Laboratory will provide you with needed information here as it becomes available. The Los Alamos Site Office/Los Alamos National Laboratory Emergency Public Information Plan provides a framework for coordinated, accurate, and timely release of information to Laboratory employees, the news media, potentially affected members of the public, and other stakeholders. Want emergency news emailed to you? Subscribe here.

173

Increase of unit efficiency by improved waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

For coal-fired power plants with flue gas desulfurization by wet scrubbing and desulfurized exhaust gas discharge via cooling tower, a further improvement of new power plant efficiency is possible by exhaust gas heat recovery. The waste heat of exhaust gas is extracted in a flue gas cooler before the wet scrubber and recovered for combustion air and/or feedwater heating by either direct or indirect coupling of heat transfer. Different process configurations for heat recovery system are described and evaluated with regard to net unit improvement. For unite firing bituminous coal an increase of net unit efficiency of 0.25 to 0.7 percentage points and for lignite 0.7 to 1.6 percentage points can be realized depending on the process configurations of the heat recovery systems.

Bauer, G.; Lankes, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Proceedings of the Second Conference on the Human Dimensions of Wildland Fire GTR-NRS-P-84 67 INVOLVING THE PUBLIC IN RESTORING THE ROLE OF FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of the Second Conference on the Human Dimensions of Wildland Fire GTR-NRS-P-84 67, and the wilderness resource itself. The USFS recently developed a fire management plan and conducted an environmental, restoration of these degraded longleaf pine- dominated ecosystems is a regional priority (Gilliam and Platt

175

Recovery and Resilience After a Nuclear Power Plant Disaster: A Medical Decision model for Managing an Effective, Timely, and Balanced Response  

SciTech Connect

Based on experiences in Tokyo responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant crisis, a real-time, medical decision model is presented by which to make key health-related decisions given the central role of health and medical issues in such disasters. Focus is on response and recovery activities that are safe, timely, effective, and well-organized. This approach empowers on-site decision makers to make interim decisions without undue delay using readily available and high-level scientific, medical, communication, and policy expertise. Key features of this approach include ongoing assessment, consultation, information, and adaption to the changing conditions. This medical decision model presented is compatible with the existing US National Response Framework structure.

Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, NIH; Blumenthal, Daniel J. [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Department of Energy

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

FIREPLUME model for plume dispersion from fires: Application to uranium hexafluoride cylinder fires  

SciTech Connect

This report provides basic documentation of the FIREPLUME model and discusses its application to the prediction of health impacts resulting from releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in fires. The model application outlined in this report was conducted for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted UF{sub 6}. The FIREPLUME model is an advanced stochastic model for atmospheric plume dispersion that predicts the downwind consequences of a release of toxic materials from an explosion or a fire. The model is based on the nonbuoyant atmospheric dispersion model MCLDM (Monte Carlo Lagrangian Dispersion Model), which has been shown to be consistent with available laboratory and field data. The inclusion of buoyancy and the addition of a postprocessor to evaluate time-varying concentrations lead to the current model. The FIREPLUME model, as applied to fire-related UF{sub 6} cylinder releases, accounts for three phases of release and dispersion. The first phase of release involves the hydraulic rupture of the cylinder due to heating of the UF{sub 6} in the fire. The second phase involves the emission of material into the burning fire, and the third phase involves the emission of material after the fire has died during the cool-down period. The model predicts the downwind concentration of the material as a function of time at any point downwind at or above the ground. All together, five fire-related release scenarios are examined in this report. For each scenario, downwind concentrations of the UF{sub 6} reaction products, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride, are provided for two meteorological conditions: (1) D stability with a 4-m/s wind speed, and (2) F stability with a 1-m/s wind speed.

Brown, D.F.; Dunn, W.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Policastro, A.J.; Maloney, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Avestar® - Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator Syngas-Fired Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulator The AVESTAR® center offers courses using the Combined Cycle Simulator, focusing on the power generation process after gasification. This simulator is well-suited for concentrated training on operation and control of the gas and steam turbines; condensate, feed water, and circulating water systems; heat recovery steam generator; and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit. Combined cycle simulator startup operations include bringing up the gas turbine to rated speed on natural gas and then switching over to the firing of synthesis gas. Key capabilities of the Combined Cycle Simulator include: Combined Cycle Simulator Operator training station HMI display for overview of Gas Turbine - Train A Normal base load operation

178

EHSO TRAINING CLASSES Fire Safety Program Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EHSO TRAINING CLASSES Fire Safety Program Training 1. Fire Safety (60 minutes) Instruction includes an actual fire eperience. 2. Fire Extinguisher Training (30 minutes) A practical demonstration on actual burnable liquid fires. This practical extinguisher training is a critical portion of the fire

179

ANNUAL FIRE SAFETY RESIDENCE HALLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protection systems. Documents in the following websites are referenced in the report: · www.fau.edu/facilities/EH&S/safety/fire evacuation procedures. · Inspecting, testing and maintaining fire protection systems in accordance with National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards. · Performing plan reviews and code consultation

Fernandez, Eduardo

180

Fire-Immune Cable  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A FACTORY, opened by Lord Ridley on October 12, for making fire-resist ing cable called 'Pyrotenax', marks a new development which promises to be of far-reaching ... -plate elements, which are made of resistance wire embedded in the oxide. 'Pyrotenax' cable has a copper conductor, magnesia insulation, and copper sheath. The new technique enables ...

1937-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Recovery Act Milestones  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

Rogers, Matt

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (904-113G)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment (RFI/RI/BRA) for the Fire Department Hose Training Facility (FDTF) (904-113G).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

After a Disaster: Recovery Safety Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Natural gas leaks are the top cause of fires after a disaster. That is why you never turn gas back on by yourself. Contact your local utility company for a trained professional to restore your gas service. ? Prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon... Disaster: Recovery Safety Tips enclosed area ? even if the area has ventilation. Opening doors and windows or using fans will not prevent carbon monoxide from building up in the home. If you start to feel sick, dizzy, or weak while using a generator...

FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Information Services American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

185

Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

187

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, September 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection Program at Fire Protection Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope ....................................................................................................................................................... 2

188

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, September 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Protection Program at Fire Protection Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope ....................................................................................................................................................... 2

189

Fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions. 1982 Asilomar Conference  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the proceedings of a Federal Emergency Management Agency-sponsored Conference on fire and the related effects of nuclear explosions (with passing attention to earthquakes and other nonnuclear mishaps). This conference, the fifth of an annual series (formally called Blast/Fire Interaction Conferences), was held during the week of April 25, 1982, again at Asilomar, California.

Martin, S.B.; Alger, R.S. (eds.)

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 22, 2010 April 22, 2010 Weatherization Subgrantees Reach More N.Y. Homes Why weatherization is booming in the South Bronx. April 21, 2010 Vice President Biden Kicks Off Five Days of Earth Day Activities with Announcement of Major New Energy Efficiency Effort 25 Communities Selected for Recovery Act "Retrofit Ramp-Up" Awards April 15, 2010 Arkansas Preparing for Wind Power Arkansas energy leaders are working to get the best data for potential wind energy decisions. April 1, 2010 Wisconsin LED Plant Benefits from Recovery Act "It's a win for everyone: the environment, the cities, buildings, for us," says Gianna O'Keefe, marketing manager for Ruud Lighting, which is producing LED lights that emit more light, have a longer life and provide anywhere from 50 to 70 percent in energy savings.

191

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 11, 2013 July 11, 2013 Analysis of Customer Enrollment Patterns in TIme-Based Rate Programs: Initial Results from the SGIG Consumer Behavior Studies (July 2013) The Smart Grid Investment Grant program's consumer behavior study effort presents an opportunity to advance the electric power industry's understanding of consumer behaviors in terms of customer acceptance and retention, and energy and peak demand impacts. July 10, 2013 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through June 30, 2013. July 7, 2013 Voices of Experience: Insights on Smart Grid Customer Engagement (July 2013) The success of the Smart Grid will depend in part on consumers taking a more proactive role in managing their energy use. This document is the

192

M E Environmental Management Environmental Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

safety  performance  cleanup  closure safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration, EM-10 Office of D&D and Facility Engineering, EM-13 Facility Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) D&D Program Map Addendum: Impact of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on EM's D&D Program 2013 Edition U.S. Department Of Energy safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 3/13/2013 The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

193

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 19, 2013 February 19, 2013 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-09 North Carolina State Energy Office - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 February 8, 2013 Special Report: OAS-RA-13-10 The Department of Energy's Management of the Award of a $150 Million Recovery Act Grant to LG Chem Michigan Inc January 17, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-07 The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for the State of Maryland January 17, 2013 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-06 Montgomery County Department of Housing and Community Affairs - Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

194

EM American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Program Recovery Act Program www.em.doe.gov 1 Thomas Johnson, Jr. Recovery Act Program Director PRESENTED TO: Environmental Management Advisory Board (EMAB) December 5, 2011 EM's Mission "Complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy brought about from five decades of nuclear weapons www.em.doe.gov 2 nuclear weapons development, production, and Government- sponsored nuclear energy research." EM's Recovery Act Program $6 Billion at 17 sites (12 states) Accelerated existing scope › Soil and groundwater remediation › Radioactive solid waste disposition › Facility decontamination & decommissioning www.em.doe.gov 3 Selected projects were "shovel-ready" › Fully-defined cost, scope, and schedule › Established regulatory framework › Proven technology

195

Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149 Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149 Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149. This statement provides additional informaton regarding the DOE request for processing of the renewal of the proposed information collection, OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants. Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149 More Documents & Publications Notice of OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants Notice of Office of Management and Budget Action to Approve with Change the

196

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

197

Date ______________________ New York City Fire Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

familiar with the fire protection and fire suppression systems in the premises where heDate ______________________ New York City Fire Department Bureau of Fire Prevention 9 Metro received training in 3RCNY §10-01, Fire Code Sections 2701 - 2703 & 2706, the New C-14 study material

Jia, Songtao

198

ANNUAL SECURITY FIRE SAFETY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNUAL SECURITY AND FIRE SAFETY REPORT OCTOBER 1, 2013 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE http................................................................................................................................................................... 7 ANNUAL SECURITY REPORT........................................................................................................................9 PREPARATION OF THE REPORT AND DISCLOSURE OF CRIME STATISTICS

199

Fire and Ice Issue 9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s FIRE AND ICE # 9 IB FIRE ICE #9 A Blake/Avon slash fanzine r Available from: Kathleen Resch POBox 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 Kathleener@aol.com FIRE AND ICE # 9copyright May, 2005 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints... or reproduction without the written permission ofthe author/artist This is an amateur publication and is not p intended to infringe upon the rights ofany holders of"Blake's 7" copyrights. FIRE AND ICE 9 TABLE OF CONTENTS LEAVING ROOM 101 by Nova 2 TOO MANY...

Multiple Contributors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) maintains some of the Nation's most important national security assets, including nuclear materials. Many of Los Alamos' facilities are located in close proximity to one another, are occupied by large numbers of contract and Federal employees, and support activities ranging from nuclear weapons design to science-related activities. Safeguarding against fires, regardless of origin, is essential to protecting employees, surrounding communities, and national security assets. On June 1, 2006, Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), became the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos, under contract with the Department's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In preparation for assuming its management responsibilities at Los Alamos, LANS conducted walk-downs of the Laboratory's facilities to identify pre-existing deficiencies that could give rise to liability, obligation, loss or damage. The walk-downs, which identified 812 pre-existing fire protection deficiencies, were conducted by subject matter professionals, including fire protection experts. While the Los Alamos Site Office has overall responsibility for the effectiveness of the fire protection program, LANS, as the Laboratory's operating contractor, has a major, day-to-day role in minimizing fire-related risks. The issue of fire protection at Los Alamos is more than theoretical. In May 2000, the 'Cerro Grande' fire burned about 43,000 acres, including 7,700 acres of Laboratory property. Due to the risk posed by fire to the Laboratory's facilities, workforce, and surrounding communities, we initiated this audit to determine whether pre-existing fire protection deficiencies had been addressed. Our review disclosed that LANS had not resolved many of the fire protection deficiencies that had been identified in early 2006: (1) Of the 296 pre-existing deficiencies we selected for audit, 174 (59 percent) had not been corrected; and, (2) A substantial portion of the uncorrected deficiencies, 86 (49 percent) were considered by the walk-down teams to be significant enough to warrant compensatory actions until the deficiency was corrected or was tracked to closure through implementation of corrective actions. Further, we found that 32 of the significant deficiencies had been closed by the previous Los Alamos contractor, prior to LANS assuming responsibility for operation of the Laboratory, even though the deficiencies had not been corrected. A fire protection expert provided technical support during the audit. As an example of uncorrected problems, LANS had not resolved, by performing periodic tests, a deficiency identified in 2006 regarding a kitchen hood fire suppression system in a facility located within the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Such systems are required to be tested twice a year by the National Fire Protection Association standard, a standard that had been adopted by Department of Energy under DOE Order 420.1B. Yet, in 2006, the LANS walk-down team recognized that this system had not been inspected since May 2004 and noted that deficient suppression systems could result in significantly high levels of property damage and loss. After we brought this issue to management's attention on February 6, 2009, LANS officials stated that the Laboratory would correct this deficiency. As with the problems involving the fire suppression system, we observed that LANS had not always corrected life safety deficiencies involving building exits at one of its primary facilities. This included providing a secondary emergency exit for a building with occupants on multiple floor levels. LANS had removed personnel from the third floor and improved the sprinkler system of the facility, but it had still not provided a secondary exit for personnel on the second floor by the time we completed our review. NNSA has since stated that this fire protection issue will be completely addressed by relocating personnel from the second floor. Perhaps most serious, our testing revealed that a number of deficien

None

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Design and implementation of a dedicated prototype GIS for coal fire investigations in North China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the design architecture and functioning of CoalMan, a tailor made Geographic Information System (GIS) for managing surface and underground fires in coal mining areas. CoalMan is specially designed for and installed in the Rujigou coal field in north-west China. It uses ILWIS as the supporting GIS package. It functions through its database and management tools, processing and analysis tools and featured display tools. The processing and analysis tools are uniquely designed to detect, map, and monitor coal mine fires in time. These tools also help to generate maps showing fire depth, fire risk and priority for fire fighting. The display tools help to generate cross-sectional views along any selected profile line in the study area. CoalMan has a bilingual interface and has a potential to be adapted to other coal mining areas facing similar problems.

Anupma Prakash; Zoltn Vekerdy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

DOE Completes Five Recovery Act Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Projects DOE Completes Five Recovery Act Projects August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program...

203

Work Begins On First Recovery Act Funded Demolition Project at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

step in reducing the legacy cleanup footprint at Oak Ridge National Lab," said Gerald Boyd, Manager of DOE's Oak Ridge Office. "Because of this Recovery Act funding, we are able...

204

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

205

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013 April 25, 2013 Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid Report Now Available A report on the Economic Impact of Recovery Act Investments in the Smart Grid is now available. This study analyzes the economy-wide impacts of the Recovery Act funding for smart grid project deployment in the United States, administered by Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. Key findings include: April 25, 2013 Smart Grid: Powering Our Way to a Greener Future Learning how to be smarter and more efficient about reducing our energy consumption is on the minds of everyone this week. The smart grid, with its improved efficiency and performance, is helping consumers conserve energy and save money every day. April 9, 2013 The Notrees Wind Storage Demonstration Project is a 36-megawatt energy storage and power management system, which completed testing and became fully operational in December. It shows how energy storage can moderate the intermittent nature of wind by storing excess energy when the wind is blowing and making it available later to the electric grid to meet customer demand.

206

Fire Lane must Fire Lane must be kept clear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12; Fire Lane must Fire Lane must be kept clear at all timesa a es #12; Emergency Egress Keep Safety Data Sheets #12; Safety glasses Safety goggles Face shield #12; Eye protection Skin protection Spectators protection from the light energygy #12; Safety glasses are required when any machinery

Asaithambi, Asai

207

Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Recovery Act State Summaries Alabama Recovery Act State Memo Alaska Recovery Act State Memo American Samoa Recovery Act State Memo Arizona Recovery Act State Memo Arkansas Recovery Act State Memo California Recovery Act State Memo Colorado Recovery Act State Memo Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo Delaware Recovery Act State Memo District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo Florida Recovery Act State Memo Georgia Recovery Act State Memo Guam Recovery Act State Memo Hawaii Recovery Act State Memo Idaho Recovery Act State Memo Illinois Recovery Act State Memo Indiana Recovery Act State Memo Iowa Recovery Act State Memo Kansas Recovery Act State Memo Kentucky Recovery Act State Memo Louisiana Recovery Act State Memo Maine Recovery Act State Memo

208

Fire Safety Committee Meeting Minutes- May 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Fire Safety Committee Meeting Minutes, May, 2014 Topics included discussions on Fire modeling, revisions to DOE regulations and other important items relating to DOE and Fire Safety Community.

209

Department of Energy Completes Five Recovery Act Projects- Moves Closer to Completing Recovery Act Funded Work at Oak Ridge Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program recently completed five projects at the Oak Ridge site funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

210

WHC fire hazards analysis policy  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to establish the fire protection policy for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) relative to US Department of Energy (DOE) directives for Fire Hazards Analyses (FHAs) and their relationship to facility Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) as promulgated by the DOE Richland Operations Office.

Evans, C.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANNUAL SECURITY & FIRE SAFETY REPORT 2014 A guide to policies, procedures, practices, and programs implemented to keep students, faculty, and staff safe and facilities secure. www.montana.edu/reports/security.pdf #12;Inside this Report 2014 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for Reporting Year 2013

Maxwell, Bruce D.

212

Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Natural Resources This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource recovery from solid waste. The statute also notes that research, development and innovation in the design, management and operation of solid waste reduction, reuse, recycling,

213

LNG facilities Engineered fire protection systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry chemical fire extinguishers used in conjunction with high expansion foam have been used successfully in tests to extinguish LNG spill fires.

Kenneth Zuber

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

BlueFire Ethanol | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol BlueFire Ethanol Construct and operate a facility that converts green waste and lignocellulosic fractions diverted from landfills or Southern California Materials...

215

Fire hazards analysis of central waste complex  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes the fire hazards associated with operational the Central Waste Complex. It provides the analysis and recommendations necessary to ensure compliance with applicable fire codes.

Irwin, R.M.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

New Buildings at the Fire Research Station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE new buildings of the Fire Research Station A of the Joint Fire Research Organization of the Department ... chemicals will be studied in the new chemical engineering laboratory.

D. I. LAWSON

1961-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11/13/2014 1 Recovery Boiler Corrosion Chemistry Sandy Sharp and Honghi Tran Symposium on Corrosion of a recovery boiler each cause their own forms of corrosion and cracking Understanding the origin of the corrosive conditions enables us to operate a boiler so as to minimize corrosion and cracking select

Das, Suman

218

Jobs Creation Economic Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission (Energy Commission) collects the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) jobs creation and retention data (jobs data) from its subrecipients through the Energy Commission's ARRAJobs Creation and Economic Recovery Prompt, Fair, and Reasonable Use of ARRA Funds Subrecipient

219

American Reinvestment Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

American Reinvestment Recovery Act American Reinvestment Recovery Act Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Loan Program American Reinvestment Recovery Act More Documents &...

220

Recovery Act Recipient Reporting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients Smart Grid Investment Grant Recipients November 19, 2009 1 Outline of Presentation * OMB Reporting Requirements * Jobs Guidance * FR.gov 2 Section 1512 of American Reinvestment and Recovery Act Outlines Recipient Reporting Requirements "Recipient reports required by Section 1512 of the Recovery Act will answer important questions, such as: ▪ Who is receiving Recovery Act dollars and in what amounts? ▪ What projects or activities are being funded with Recovery Act dollars? ▪ What is the completion status of such projects or activities and what impact have they had on job creation and retention?" "When published on www.Recovery.gov, these reports will provide the public with an unprecedented level of transparency into how Federal dollars are being spent and will help drive accountability for the timely,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Implemntation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Recovery Act Implementation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site OAS-RA-L-11-12 September 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 29, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Daniel M. Weeber, Director Environment, Technology, and Corporate Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Implementation of the Recovery Act at the Savannah River Site" Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-12 BACKGROUND The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) provided the Department of Energy (Department) $5.1 billion for Defense Environmental Cleanup. These funds have afforded the Department's Office of Environmental Management (EM) the opportunity to reduce

222

Caustic Recovery Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Caustic Recovery Technology Summary - Caustic Recovery...

223

South Carolina Solid Waste Policy and Management Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The state of South Carolina supports a regional approach to solid waste management and encourages the development and implementation of alternative waste management practices and resource recovery....

224

Effects of tree cutting and fire on understory vegetation in mixed conifer forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mixed conifer forests of western North America are challenging for fire management, as historical fire regimes were highly variable in severity, timing, and spatial extent. Complex fire histories combined with site factors and other disturbances, such insect outbreaks, led to great variation in understory plant communities, and management activities influence future dynamics of both overstory and understory communities. This variation needs to be considered as part of ecosystem-scale efforts to influence future fires and restore the composition and structure of mixed conifer forests. We undertook a systematic review of published studies evaluating effects of tree cutting and fire on understory vegetation in western North American mixed conifer forests. Forty-one studies, published in 50 articles, met inclusion criteria and encompassed projects in seven states in the USA and British Columbia in Canada. Total understory plant abundance (cover, biomass, or density) commonly declined in the short term within 4years after treatment. This may result from damage to plants during tree cutting operations or fire, heavy loadings of slash, little change or even expansion of tree canopies after low-intensity treatments, herbivory, or drought. In contrast, all 7 studies measuring understories longer than 5years since treatment reported increases in understory metrics. Treatments in these long-term studies also persistently decreased tree canopy cover. Most or all native species endured (even if reduced in abundance) through cutting operations or fire. A model of understory response has emerged that treatments generally do not eliminate species, and often benefit species absent or uncommon in untreated forest. Groups of native species (e.g., Epilobium spp.) appear fire-dependent, because they are uncommon or absent in unburned mixed conifer forests and after tree cutting alone. Cutting and prescribed fire applied together resulted in the greatest invasion of non-native plants, but non-native cover was minimal compared to native cover. Few studies examined influences of intensity of tree cutting or severity of prescribed fire, but overstoryunderstory relationships suggest that treatments must substantially reduce overstory density from maximum values (which can exceed 3000stemsha?1 and 80m2ha?1 basal area) and tree canopy cover to forest understory. Few studies examined understory dynamics after wildfire relative to unburned forest, and further work is warranted because wildfire is a likely eventual outcome of passive management in these forests. Across a broad region from the southwestern United States into Canada, prescribed fire and tree cutting consistently increased disturbance-promoted native species in the short term and total understory abundance in the long term. Active management using tree cutting and fire will likely benefit both biodiversity conservation and fire management in current mixed conifer forests.

Scott R. Abella; Judith D. Springer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress Secretary Chu Highlights Recovery Act Cleanup Progress March 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis OAK RIDGE, TENN. - Energy Secretary Steven Chu announced today that the Department's Environmental Management program has spent more than $1.5 billion in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds on cleanup projects around the country - 25 percent of the program's total - creating an estimated 14,400 jobs since the start of the Recovery Act. "Because of the Recovery Act, programs around the country have been able to expand, hire and continue our important cleanup work," said Secretary Chu. "These investments have played a key role in helping local economies recover, creating jobs and supporting small businesses in dozens of

226

Recovery Act Federal Register Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center » Recovery Act » Recovery Act Federal Register Information Center » Recovery Act » Recovery Act Federal Register Notices Recovery Act Federal Register Notices October 12, 2011 Federal Register Notice (PDF Version) on the DOE's invitation for public comment on its request to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to extend for three years the Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants, OMB Control No. 1910-5149 that DOE is developing for submission to OMB pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Comments due on or before November 7, 2011. OMB Form 83-I. ICR Supporting Statement. SGIG Reporting Guidance. Notice of OMB Action (January 10, 2012): OMB has approved DOE's request to extend information collection for three years. August 10, 2011 Federal Register Notice (PDF Version ) on the DOE's invitation for

227

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 18  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASHINGTON, D.C. - DOE Office WASHINGTON, D.C. - DOE Office of Environmental Manage- ment (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program Director Cynthia Anderson was quick to credit about 10,500 workers for making the EM Recovery Act Program a success. "The Recovery Act didn't work because of me," she said to a crowd of more than 150 EM Recovery Act team members. "It worked because of you: the contractors, the people in the field." However, nearly a year of Recovery Act work still remains, and Anderson encouraged the Recovery Act team members from across the nation to continue striving for success. "Progress has been very, very good," she said. "We have to keep on track. We have to maintain momentum. We need to get the work done." Anderson spoke to participants in the third installment of

228

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

229

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

230

Coal fires in China over the last decade: A comprehensive review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal fires pose great threats to valuable energy resources, the environment, and human health and safety. They occur in numerous countries in the world. It is well-known that China, the largest coal producer and user globally, is one of the countries that have badly suffered from coal fires. Thus, over the course of the last decade, a lot of local research studies on coal fires in China have been published in international and Chinese scientific journals. The goal of this paper is to set the scene on past and current coal fire research in China. In this review we explore multidisciplinary investigations undertaken during the last decade associated with coal fires in China including fire detection, modeling, the assessment of environmental and human health impacts as well as fire-fighting engineering. We outline a systematic framework of research on coal fires and address inter-relations of sub-topics within this systematic framework. Additionally, the scientific and technical studies and their advantages, shortcomings and challenges for coal mine administrations are discussed. It is hoped that this comprehensive overview provides scientific guidance for management and coordination of coal fire projects.

Zeyang Song; Claudia Kuenzer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 29  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy | Offi ce of Environmental Management American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter October 2011 | Issue 29 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management http://www.em.doe.gov 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 2 | EM Recovery Act Newsletter October Issue 29 2011 EM Recovery News Highlights Accomplishments in $6 Billion Environmental Cleanup In 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $6 billion in 91 projects across U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) sites in 12 states. In the 30 months since then, the funding has benefited more than 35,800 workers, many of whom were unemployed or underemployed in a recession. During the execution of the original 91 projects, unrealized risks and

232

Solvent recycle/recovery  

SciTech Connect

This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fire Protection Account Request Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection System Account Request Form Fire Protection System Account Request Form To obtain a user id and password to access the Fire Protection system, please complete the form, save the file and email it to hssUserSupport@hq.doe.gov or print and fax it to 301-903-9823. We will provide a username and password to new account holders. Please allow several business days to process your account request. When your request is approved, you will be contacted with your

234

Fire and Ice Issue 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

       ' FIRE and ICE # 7 -p! jP) FIRE AND ICE VII Available from: Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 Kathleener@aol.com May 2002by Kathleen Reschfor the contributors. No reprints or reproduction without the written... permission of the author/artist. Thisis an amateur publication and is not in tended to infringe upon the rights ofTerryNation, BBC-TV or any others. i - J FIRE AND ICE VI Table of Contents HALF A LOAF by Linda Norman 1 GROUNDHOG LAY by Predatrlx 5 PLAYTIME...

Multiple Contributors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fire and Ice Issue 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,fpl ^1 FIRE AND ICE Available from: Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City,CA 91780 III May, 1995 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints or reproduction without the written permission of the author/artist. This is an amateur... publication and is not intended to infringe upon the rightsof "Blake's 7" copyright holders.. FIRE AND ICE TABLE OF CONTENTS THE GIFT by Pat Terra 1 "innerspace" by Pat Terra 24 WILD, BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED by Gemini 25 SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE by Riley Cannon 40...

Multiple Contributors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fire Behavior at the Landscape Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire Behavior at the Landscape Scale Scott Stephens, ESPMScott Stephens, ESPM DepartmentStrategies for Landscape Fuel TreatmentsLandscape Fuel Treatments Fire Containment · Fuelbreaks Fire Modification · Area (WUI) ·· Maintenance? Must maintain into futureMaintenance? Must maintain into future #12;Tyee Fire

Stephens, Scott L.

237

Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE HOW NEBRASKANS BENEFIT: · improved protection of life and property from wildland fires · improved firefighting capability in rural fire districts · increased firefighter knowledge of wildland fire suppression and prevention · reduced forest

Farritor, Shane

238

FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION Table Of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 9 FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION Table Of Contents Section: Page 09 and Melting Kettles.............................9-25 09.F First response Fire Protection FIRE PREVENTION AND PROTECTION 09.A GENERAL 09.A.01 A fire prevention plan shall be written for all

US Army Corps of Engineers

239

Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

Derbidge, T. Craig (Sunnyvale, CA); Mulholland, James A. (Chapel Hill, NC); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Safety & Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F.A.Q.s F.A.Q.s Conference Center and APS Site Activity Coordination Management and/or Coordination of APS Site Work/Services Safety & Emergency Management Database Maintenance Personnel Safety & Emergency Management Area Emergency Supervision Drills/Training Page Bob Whitman with any questions or concerns. Area Emergency Supervisors and Building Monitors in your location can be found online. ESH 108 Building Orientation Page Bob Whitman with any questions regarding the newly designed ESH 108 Building Orientation course. Fire Alarm System Testing Through Argonne Fire Protection Services, the fire alarm system is tested visually and audibly annually. Life Safety Inspections Page Carl Nelson at 4-1892 with any questions. Life Safety Inspections are collected by Carl via fax at 2-9729 or delivery to office B0149

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The effects of early season and late season prescribed fires on small mammals in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prescribed fire is an important management tool used in the restoration of Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests where fire has been suppressed over the last century. It is not well known, however, how the timing of prescribed fire affects wildlife populations. We used model selection and multi-model inference methods to compare the effects of early (spring and early summer) and late (late summer and fall) season prescribed fires on small mammal populations, based on 4 years of mark-recapture data collected in Sequoia National Park, California. The effects of prescribed fires on four small mammal metrics were evaluated: deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) densities, deer mouse age ratios, lodgepole chipmunk (Neotamias speciosus) densities, and total small mammal biomass. For each of these four metrics, the top ranked model in the evaluation of prescribed fire treatment effects contained no prescribed fire effects, but did contain effects of strong year-to-year variation in populations. Models which predicted that fire effects differed depending on the season of fire received only limited support for each of the four metrics. Our results suggest that initial prescribed fires set during the early season will have similar impacts as late season fires on deer mouse populations, lodgepole chipmunk populations, and total small mammal biomass in Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forests.

Michelle E. Monroe; Sarah J. Converse

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Development of custom fire behavior fuel models from FCCS fuelbeds for the Savannah River fuel assessment project.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to create fire behavior fuel models that replicate the fire behavior characteristics (spread rate and fireline intensity) produced by 23 candidate FCCS fuelbeds developed for the Savannah River National Wildlife Refuge. These 23 fuelbeds were created by FERA staff in consultation with local fuel managers. The FCCS produces simulations of surface fire spread rate and flame length (and therefore fireline intensity) for each of these fuelbeds, but it does not produce maps of those fire behavior characteristics or simulate fire growththose tasks currently require the use of the FARSITE and/or FlamMap software systems. FARSITE and FlamMap do not directly use FCCS fuelbeds, but instead use standard or custom fire behavior fuel models to describe surface fuel characteristics for fire modeling. Therefore, replicating fire growth and fire behavior potential calculations using FCCS?simulated fire characteristics requires the development of custom fuel models that mimic, as closely as possible, the fire behavior characteristics produced by the FCCS for each fuelbed, over a range of fuel moisture and wind speeds.

Scott, Joe, H.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Environmental Management American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

project reviews to track and monitor project performance and foresee any challenges. Info-Exch 2012 - Thomas Johnson Presentation Info-Exch 2012 - Shirley Olinger Presentation...

244

No material is "fire proof;" however, proper use and assembly of fire-rated building materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C has the least resistance. However, Class A materials generally need an underlayment of additional-Defensible Zones 6.303, Fire-Resistant Landscaping 6.304, Forest Home Fire Safety 6.305, FireWise Plant Materials 6General No material is "fire proof;" however, proper use and assembly of fire-rated building

245

fire Protection The Fire Protection Technology associate degree is awarded by UNL's College of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fire Protection DeGreeS offereD A.S. The Fire Protection Technology associate degree is awarded Protection courses are taught by UNL College of Engineering faculty, as well as fire service and industry fire protection specialists. These fire protection specialists teach students not only from textbooks

Farritor, Shane

246

Exhaust Energy Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Exhaust energy recovery proposed to achieve 10% fuel efficiency improvement and reduce or eliminate the need for increased heat rejectioncapacity for future heavy duty engines in Class 8 Tractors

247

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Imbibition assisted oil recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analyzed in detail to investigate oil recovery during spontaneous imbibition with different types of boundary conditions. The results of these studies have been upscaled to the field dimensions. The validity of the new definition of characteristic length...

Pashayev, Orkhan H.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

On Partially Sparse Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 14, 2011 ... I ? P projects (orthogonally) onto the column space of A2 there must .... In Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Approximation Theory, 2011. ... Foundations and Numerical Methods for Sparse Recovery, Radon...

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fire in a contaminated area  

SciTech Connect

This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Fire in Contaminated Area. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

251

New Canadian Fire Research Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... which follows the time - temperature curve designated in the current U.S. Standard (ASTM E119-57, Standard Methods of Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials).

R. F. LEGGET

1959-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Model Fire Protection Assessment Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Assessment guide covers the implementation of the DOE's responsibility of assuring that DOE and the DOE Contractors have established Fire Protection Programs that are at the level required for the area being assessed.

253

A system dynamics view of project management firefighting at a startup company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire fighting in project management is the unplanned allocation of resources to either fix problems or speed completion of a project. In a startup company environment, fire fighting oftentimes becomes the norm rather than ...

Chiang, Melvin H. (Melvin Hsiang)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

WIPP Recovery Effort  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Marcinowski Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Office of Environmental Management EMSSAB Chairs Meeting, April 23, 2014 - Pasco, WA www.energy.govEM 2 Waste...

255

Shell And Statoil Plan To Use CO For Enhanced Offshore Oil Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shell and the Norwegian oil company Statoil have announced the world's first project to use carbon dioxide sequestered from a power plant to boost oil recovery offshore. In the $1.4 billion project, Statoil will build an 860-MW gas-fired power plant and ...

BETTE HILEMAN

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fire protection research for energy technology projects; FY 79 year-end report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed in fiscal year 1979, on a DOE funded study entitled Fire Protection Research for Energy Technology Projects. The primary goal of this program is to ensure that fire protection measures for Fusion Energy Experiments (FEE) evolve concurrently with the complexity of FEE. Ultimately, it is planned that the detailed study of fusion experiments will provide an analytical methodology which can be applied to the full range of energy technology projects. We attempt to achieve this objective by coordinately advancing 3 (three) major task areas; (a) determine the fire hazards of current FEE facilities (b) assess the ability of accepted fire management strategies to meet and negate the hazard, (c) perform unique research into problem areas we have identified to provide input into analytical fire growth and damage assessment models.

Hasegawa, H.K.; Alvares, N.J.; Lipska, A.E.; Ford, H.; Beason, D.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Incipient fire detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for an incipient fire detection system that receives gaseous samples and measures the light absorption spectrum of the mixture of gases evolving from heated combustibles includes a detector for receiving gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy and determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples. The wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples are compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. The method includes receiving gaseous samples, subjecting the samples to light spectroscopy, determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples, comparing the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples to predetermined absorption wavelengths and generating a warning signal whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. In an alternate embodiment, the apparatus includes a series of channels fluidically connected to a plurality of remote locations. A pump is connected to the channels for drawing gaseous samples into the channels. A detector is connected to the channels for receiving the drawn gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy. The wavelengths of absorption are determined and compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths is provided. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths correspond.

Brooks, Jr., William K. (Newport News, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Recovery Act Project Stories | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Stories Project Stories Recovery Act Project Stories October 7, 2013 - 3:43pm Addthis Funded by the American Recovery and Reinvested Act, these Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) projects exemplify the range of technical assistance provided to Federal agencies. U.S. Pacific Command The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) is collaborated with FEMP and six DOE national laboratories to solve some of USPACOM's most pressing energy needs. The USPACOM energy goal was to develop an integrated, expanded approach for all Oahu, Hawaii, military installations. The Oahu work developed a template to be applied next in Guam, Alaska, Japan, and Korea. This work advanced USPACOM's energy efficiency, renewable energy, energy manager training, and micro grid

259

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Pilot-Scale Condensing Heat Exchanger Tubing Lehigh University will conduct pilot-scale testing of a condensing heat exchanger to recover water from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Testing will include using a slipstream of flue gas from a natural gas-fired boiler with sulfur trioxide injection and slipstreams of flue gas from two coal-fired boilers. The project continues the development of condensing heat exchanger technology for coal-fired boilers initially started under the U.S. Department of Energy's Project DE-FC26-06NT42727 (Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas). In particular, Lehigh researchers will: (1) expand the database on water

260

Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget | High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed ... Press Release Pantex High Pressure Fire Loop Project Completed On Time, Under Budget

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods- can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, M.B.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

FireWxNet: a multi-tiered portable wireless system for monitoring weather conditions in wildland fire environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present FireWxNet, a multi-tiered portable wireless system for monitoring weather conditions in rugged wildland fire environments. FireWxNet provides the fire fighting community the ability to safely and easily measure and view fire ... Keywords: applications, deployments, fire, forest fires, wireless sensor networks

Carl Hartung; Richard Han; Carl Seielstad; Saxon Holbrook

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CRAD, Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 CRAD, Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 October 12, 2012 Fire Protection Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry HSS CRAD 45-34, Rev. 1) Review fire protection system design and defense in-depth strategies. Interviews shall be conducted of personnel including fire engineers, fire coordinators, fire system technicians, facility operations personnel, and fire department personnel. Review policies, procedures, fire hazards analyses, and safety basis documentation. Additionally, perform facility building walk downs and inspections, and observe selected work activities, such as hot work, fire system impairments, combustible storage practices, dispensing flammable liquids, maintenance and testing of fire protection

266

Untrained Forward Observer (UFO) translator for call for fire .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many observers need indirect fire but are not proficient in Call for Fire, the procedure used to request indirect fire. To alleviate this, we propose (more)

King, Regan R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Evaluating fuel complexes for fire hazard mitigation planning in the southeastern United States.  

SciTech Connect

Fire hazard mitigation planning requires an accurate accounting of fuel complexes to predict potential fire behavior and effects of treatment alternatives. In the southeastern United States, rapid vegetation growth coupled with complex land use history and forest management options requires a dynamic approach to fuel characterization. In this study we assessed potential surface fire behavior with the Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS), a tool which uses inventoried fuelbed inputs to predict fire behavior. Using inventory data from 629 plots established in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain, South Carolina, we constructed FCCS fuelbeds representing median fuel characteristics by major forest type and age class. With a dry fuel moisture scenario and 6.4 km h{sub 1} midflame wind speed, the FCCS predicted moderate to high potential fire hazard for the majority of the fuelbeds under study. To explore fire hazard under potential future fuel conditions, we developed fuelbeds representing the range of quantitative inventorydata for fuelbed components that drive surface fire behavior algorithms and adjusted shrub species composition to represent 30% and 60% relative cover of highly flammable shrub species. Results indicate that the primary drivers of surface fire behavior vary by forest type, age and surface fire behavior rating. Litter tends to be a primary or secondary driver in most forest types. In comparison to other surface fire contributors, reducing shrub loading results in reduced flame lengths most consistently across forest types. FCCS fuelbeds and the results from this project can be used for fire hazard mitigation planning throughout the southern Atlantic Coastal Plain where similar forest types occur. The approach of building simulated fuelbeds across the range of available surface fuel data produces sets of incrementally different fuel characteristics that can be applied to any dynamic forest types in which surface fuel conditions change rapidly.

Andreu, Anne G.; Shea, Dan; Parresol, Bernard, R.; Ottmar, Roger, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Shale oil recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing within a subterranean oil shale deposit a retort chamber containing permeable fragmented material wherein a series of explosive charges are emplaced in the deposit in a particular configuration comprising an initiating round which functions to produce an upward flexure of the overburden and to initiate fragmentation of the oil shale within the area of the retort chamber to be formed, the initiating round being followed in a predetermined time sequence by retreating lines of emplaced charges developing further fragmentation within the retort zone and continued lateral upward flexure of the overburden. The initiating round is characterized by a plurality of 5-spot patterns and the retreating lines of charges are positioned and fired along zigzag lines generally forming retreating rows of W's. Particular time delays in the firing of successive charges are disclosed.

Zerga, Daniel P. (Concord, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermal Recovery Methods  

SciTech Connect

Thermal Recovery Methods describes the basic concepts of thermal recovery and explains the injection patterns used to exploit reservoir conditions. Basic reservoir engineering is reviewed with an emphasis on changes in flow characteristics caused by temperature. The authors discuss an energy balance for steam and combustion drive, and they explain in situ reactions. Heat loss, combustion drive, and steam displacement also are examined in detail, as well as cyclic steam injection, downhole ignition, well heating, and low-temperature oxidation. Contents: Thermal processes; Formation and reservoir evaluations; Well patterns and spacing; Flow and process equations; Laboratory simulation of thermal recovery; Heat loss and transmission; Displacement and production; Equipment; Basic data for field selection; Laboratory evaluation of combustion characteristics; Thermal properties of reservoirs and fluids.

White, P.D.; Moss, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Enhanced coalbed methane recovery  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of coalbed methane can be enhanced by injecting CO{sub 2} in the coal seam at supercritical conditions. Through an in situ adsorption/desorption process the displaced methane is produced and the adsorbed CO{sub 2} is permanently stored. This is called enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) and it is a technique under investigation as a possible approach to the geological storage of CO{sub 2} in a carbon dioxide capture and storage system. This work reviews the state of the art on fundamental and practical aspects of the technology and summarizes the results of ECBM field tests. These prove the feasibility of ECBM recovery and highlight substantial opportunities for interdisciplinary research at the interface between earth sciences and chemical engineering.

Mazzotti, M.; Pini, R.; Storti, G. [ETH, Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Process Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

SRS upgrades helium recovery system | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

upgrades helium recovery system | National Nuclear Security upgrades helium recovery system | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > SRS upgrades helium recovery system SRS upgrades helium recovery system Posted By Office of Public Affairs Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Programs recently completed a project to design, build and relocate a new system for separating and capturing

272

Subcontractors complete recovery act-funded demolition under budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery act-funded demolition complete Recovery act-funded demolition complete Small business subcontractors complete recovery act-funded demolition under budget Demolition completed $16 million under budget and six months ahead of schedule. April 3, 2012 Recovery Act-funded demolitions complete The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management allocated $212 million in Recovery Act funding to Los Alamos. Some $73 million was slated for demolition. Through cost efficiencies, the Lab added two buildings to the demolition list and still finished $16 million under budget and six months ahead of schedule. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "Their outstanding performance has provided a great service to the environment and the community, resulting in a successful project under the

273

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 22  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers set out to clean up contamination and demol- Before American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers set out to clean up contamination and demol- ish facilities that supported the Cold War and the Manhattan Project, Oak Ridge called on its budget analysts and financial personnel to ensure that the $755 million Recovery Act investment would be used effectively and expeditiously. The planners for Oak Ridge's Environmental Management (EM) program quickly compiled a list of shovel-ready projects that would accomplish key DOE missions and create jobs in the region, allowing Oak Ridge to begin much work just weeks after the Recovery Act was signed into law in 2009. Oak Ridge's Recovery Act plan focused on accelerating 36 projects, from remediat- ing contaminated soil and groundwater to demolishing 49 facilities.

274

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) in 2001 to carry out a project entitled ''Greenhouse Gas Emissions Control by Oxygen Firing in Circulating Fluidized Bed Boilers.'' This two-phased project is in effect from September 28, 2001, to October 27, 2004. (U.S. DOE NETL Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41146). Phase I consisted of an evaluation of the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants, and supporting bench-scale testing. And Phase II consists of pilot-scale testing, supporting a refined performance and economic evaluation of the oxygen-fired AFC concept. Phase I, detailed in this report, entails a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen separate but related cases (listed below), representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated as described herein. The first seven cases represent coal combustion cases in CFB type equipment. The next four cases represent Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The last two cases represent advanced Chemical Looping systems, which were completely paid for by ALSTOM and included herein for completeness.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Upgraded recovery boiler meets low air emissions standards  

SciTech Connect

In the fall of 1990, the Boise Cascade mill in International Falls, MN, carried out a millwide modernization project. One critical element of the project was the upgrade of their recovery boiler. As a result of the recovery boiler upgrade, the mill was required to obtain a prevention of significant deterioration (PSD) air permit. A best available control technology (BACT) assessment was performed as a requirement of the PSD regulations. Ultimately, a number of more stringent air pollution emission limits were established for the boiler, and a continuous emissions monitoring system (CEMS) was purchased and installed to report daily results to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. This paper describes efforts to achieve increased firing capacity in the mill's recovery boiler while meeting more severe air emissions regulations. The authors will show that each of the emissions limits, including CO, SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], TRS, and opacity, are met by the upgraded boiler, while achieving an increase in firing capacity over pre-upgrade levels of up to 40%.

La Fond, J.F.; Jansen, J.H. (Jansen Combustion and Boiler Technologies, Inc., Woodinville, WA (United States)); Eide, P. (Boise Cascade Corp., International Falls, MN (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EXHAUST GAS BOILER FIRE PERVENTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today's demands for better overall usability of fuel oil in large two-stroke low speed marine diesel engines greatly influenced their development, and the purity of their exhaust gases. With this paper we would like to indicate on to factors which directly influence on soot forming, deposition and cause of occurance of fire in exhaust gas boiler (EGB). Due the fact that a fire in the EGB can result in complete destruction of the boiler, and a longer interruption of the vessel commercial operations, crew must be familiar with the main reasons of soot deposition on the boiler tubes and elements and origination of fire, and to have taken proper and timely protection measures 1.

Branko Lali? Dipl. Ing; Mr. Ivan Komar; Dipl. Ing

277

Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects...

278

Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control  

SciTech Connect

Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O{sub 2} fired MTF pilot testing and a subsequent retrofit design study of oxygen firing and CO{s

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Initial Joint Review of Wildland Fire Safety at DOE Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wildland Fire" November 2000 2. U.S. Fish & Wildlife, "24 Command Fire, A National Level Review by the Interagency Fire Team," September 2000 INEEL Site (Tea Kettle Fire, etc.) In...

280

Landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas recovery ... However, by referring to landfills as dumps, the article creates a misimpression. ... The answers revolve around the relative emissions from composting facilities and landfills and the degree to which either finished compost or landfill gas is used beneficially. ...

Morton A. Barlaz

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fire suppression and detection equipment  

SciTech Connect

Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

E.E. Bates [HSB Professional Loss Control, Lexington, KY (United States)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fire and Ice Issue 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9#HDIQNV3>IM ".: FIRE AND ICE VI Available from: Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 October, 2000 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints or reproduction without the written permission of the author.../artist. This is an amateur publication and is not intended to infringe upon the rights ofTerry Nation, BBC-TV or any others. FIRE AND ICE VI 1 Table of Contents A DANGEROUS CONCEPT by Nova 1 A FRIEND IN NEED... by Julia Stamford 14 ...IS A FRIEND INDEED by Julia Stamford 19...

Multiple Contributors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fire and Ice Issue 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. fipl cpn r FLASHPOINT A flame that can't be seen, cloaked in black and silver and disdain, born of anger and of love no longer dared. An ice-encrusted soul, dormant in the aftermath of accusations piled like snow against the heated passions of a man who...^ $$% i&l /P^ \\0 rffej FIRE AND ICE AVAILABLE FROM Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 FIRE AND ICE II TABLE OF CONTENTS COVER by Phoenix FRONTISPIECE by Gayle Feyrer "Flashpoint" by Rachel Duncan 1 PEDESTAL by Thomas 2 "A Damn Fine...

Multiple Contributors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fire Protection Engineering Qualification Standard Reference Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection Fire Protection Engineering Qualification Standard Reference Guide SEPTEMBER 2009 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. ii PURPOSE.......................................................................................................................................1 SCOPE ............................................................................................................................................1 PREFACE.......................................................................................................................................1 TECHNICAL COMPETENCIES................................................................................................3

286

Fire performance of gable frame structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire protection engineering and structural engineering are two relevant but separated fields of study. Many experiments conducted by fire protection engineers are under certain ideal boundary conditions, which may not be ...

Qian, Congyi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solid waste drum array fire performance  

SciTech Connect

Fire hazards associated with drum storage of radioactively contaminated waste are a major concern in DOE waste storage facilities. This report is the second of two reports on fire testing designed to provide data relative to the propagation of a fire among storage drum arrays. The first report covers testing of individual drums subjected to an initiating fire and the development of the analytical methodology to predict fire propagation among storage drum arrays. This report is the second report, which documents the results of drum array fire tests. The purpose of the array tests was to confirm the analytical methodology developed by Phase I fire testing. These tests provide conclusive evidence that fire will not propagate from drum to drum unless an continuous fuel source other than drum contents is provided.

Louie, R.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Haecker, C.F. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States); Beitel, J.J.; Gottuck, D.T.; Rhodes, B.T.; Bayier, C.L. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals Lab demolition projects under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act have...

289

Recovery Act Recipient Data | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Recovery Act Recipient Data Recovery Act Recipient Data A listing of all Recovery Act recipients and their allocations. Updated weekly. recoveryactfunding.xls More Documents &...

290

Annual Fire Report Page 1 of 4 Residence Hall/Historic Houses Fire Protection Equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Fire Report Page 1 of 4 Residence Hall/Historic Houses Fire Protection Equipment 2012 Residence Hall/Historic Houses Fire Protection Equipment 2012 Calendar Year 24 Bull Street Annex-House X X X Calendar Year College of Charleston Residence Halls and Historic Housing Facilities Fire alarm monitoring

Kasman, Alex

291

FireStream: Sensor Stream Processing for Monitoring Fire Spread Venkatesh Raghavan1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute, Worcester, MA 01609 2 Department of Fire Protection Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute. In this demonstration, we present FireStream, a collabo- rative effort between Computer Science and Fire Protection experiments conducted at lab- oratories such as NIST/BFRL and the Department of Fire Protection Engineering

292

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United Wildland fires can be an important source of greenhouse gases as well as black carbon emissions that have of climate response to fire emissions compared to other emission sources of GHG, aerosols, and black carbon

293

Planning Rural Fire Protection for Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IOC rA24S.7 73 ).1196 (Blank Pa.ge InOdgiuat Bulletinl ~ ; ''; . : .. . ~. " PLANNING RURAL FIRE PROTECTION FOR TEXAS JACK L. JONES, EXTENSION COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE INTRODUCTION A home fire... is one of the most feared accidents a homeowner can? have, especially in rural areas where extended distances, inadequate water supplies or lack of any community fire fighting services limit fire fighting capability. Unless a rural resident makes prior...

Jones, Jack L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

NETL: Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (Oxy-PFBC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (Oxy-PFBC) Oxy-Fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor (Oxy-PFBC) Project No.: DE-FE0009448 Oxy-PFBC Layout. Oxy-PFBC Layout. Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) is developing an oxy-fired pressurized fluidized bed combustor (Oxy-PFBC). Pressurized combustion with oxygen enables high efficiency through staged combustion, which results in reduced oxygen use, as well as through recovery of high quality heat from exhaust water vapor. In addition, the process can result in reduced costs for utilization or storage of CO2 because the CO2 is available at increased pressure, reducing compression requirements. Overall, pressurized fluidized bed combustion can result in electricity production from coal with near-zero emissions. PWR will be testing a novel process for pressurized oxy-combustion in a

295

Using Hydro-Cutting to Aid in Remediation of a Firing Range Contaminated with Depleted Uranium  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the challenges encountered in decommissioning a firing range that had been used to test fire depleted uranium rounds in the late 1950's and early 1960's. The paper details the operational challenges and innovative solutions involved in remediating and decommissioning a firing range bullet catcher once unexploded ordnance was discovered. It also discusses how the Army dealt with an intertwining web of regulatory and permit issues that arose in treating and disposing of multiple waste streams. The paper will show how the use of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Temporary Authorization allowed the Army to deal with the treatment of a variety of waste streams and how hydro-cutting process was used to demilitarize the potentially unexploded rounds.

Styvaert, Michael S.; Conley, Richard D.; Watters, David J.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Recovery Act Recovery Act Center Map PERFORMANCE The Department estimates the $6 billion Recovery Act investment will allow us to complete work now that would cost approximately $13 billion in future years, saving $7 billion. As Recovery Act work is completed through the cleanup of contaminated sites, facilities, and material disposition, these areas will becoming available for potential reuse by other entities. Recovery Act funding is helping the Department reach our cleanup goals faster. Through the end of December 2012, EM achieved a total footprint reduction of 74%, or 690 of 931 square miles. EM achieved its goal of 40% footprint reduction in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule. Recovery Act payments exceeded $5.9 billion in December 2012. Recovery Act

297

Recovery Act | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recovery Act Recovery Act Dataset Summary Description This dataset, updated quarterly by Recovery.org, contains a breakdown of state-by-state recovery act funds awarded and received, as well as the number of jobs created and saved. The shows two periods, February 17, 2009 to December 31, 2010, and January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2011. The jobs created and saved are displayed just for January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2011. The document was downloaded from Recovery.org. It is a simple document displaying 50 states, as well as American territories. Source Recovery.org Date Released June 08th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords award funding jobs Recovery Act Recovery.org Data text/csv icon recipientfundingawardedbystate.csv (csv, 5.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

298

Can You Afford Heat Recovery?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

many companies to venture into heat recovery projects without due consideration of the many factors involved. Many of these efforts have rendered less desirable results than expected. Heat recovery in the form of recuperation should be considered...

Foust, L. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Condensing economizers for small coal-fired boilers and furnaces  

SciTech Connect

Condensing economizers increase the thermal efficiency of boilers by recovering sensible and latent heat from exhaust gas. These economizers are currently being used commercially for this purpose in a wide range of applications. Performance is dependent upon application-specific factors affecting the utility of recovered heat. With the addition of a condensing economizer boiler efficiency improvements up to 10% are possible. Condensing economizers can also capture flue gas particulates. In this work, the potential use of condensing economizers for both efficiency improvement and control of particulate emissions from small, coal water slurry-fired boilers was evaluated. Analysis was done to predict heat transfer and particulate capture by mechanisms including: inertial impaction, interception, diffusion, thermophoretic forces, and condensation growth. Shell-and-tube geometries were considered with flue gas on the outside of Teflon-covered tubes. Experimental studies were done with both air- and water-cooled economizers refit to a small boiler. Two experimental arrangements were used including oil-firing with injection of flyash upstream of the economizer and direct coal water slurry firing. Firing rates ranged from 27 to 82 kW (92,000 to 280,000 Btu/hr). Inertial impaction was found to be the most important particulate capture mechanism and removal efficiencies to 95% were achieved. With the addition of water sprays directly on the first row of tubes, removal efficiencies increased to 98%. Use of these sprays adversely affects heat recovery. Primary benefits of the sprays are seen to be the addition of small impaction sites and future design improvements are suggested in which such small impactors are permanently added to the highest velocity regions of the economizer. Predicted effects of these added impactors on particulate removal and pressure drop are presented.

Butcher, T.A.; Litzke, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS FIRE DEPARTMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of lives, and the protection of property endangered by fires and other disasters, and to promote the teaching and practice of fire prevention and protection. ARTICLE II Section 1. The OfficersSAMPLE CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT WHEREAS, Certain laws and regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fire Protection Systems Program Program Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire Protection Systems Program Program Manual Approved by: (name) Last revised by: (name) Revision/FPS_Program_Manual_Template.docx 1. Introduction The Fire Protection Systems Program is designed to make sure the annual compliance ................................................................................................................. 3 7.1.1 Job Plan: Fire Pump Testing

Pawlowski, Wojtek

302

Research Overview Department of Fire Protection Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Overview Department of Fire Protection Engineering University of Maryland College Park, MD, detection M.J. Gollner wildfires, flammability, structures A.W. Marshall fire flows, combustion, suppression J.A. Milke structures, detection, egress S.I. Stoliarov pyrolysis, flammability, fire growth P

Shapiro, Benjamin

303

[Waste water heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

The production capabilities for and field testing of the heat recovery system are described briefly. Drawings are included.

Not Available

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Imperial College London FIRE SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to minimise the hazard the following precautions are recommended: Christmas tree lights, fibre optic trees hazards. Avoid leaving Christmas lights on unattended for long periods. Lighted candles are generally at Christmas During the lead up to Christmas the risk of fire can be increased with the introduction

305

HOURGLASS FIRE Pingree Park Vicinity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needles). Fuel moistures were extremely low throughout Colorado during spring/early summer of 1994 firefighters in a blowup near Glenwood Springs. Table 1 indicates dead fuel moistures in the Pingree Park). Spotting was occurring 1/2 mile in advance of the fire. By this time personnel/engines from Colorado State

306

Applications of Living Fire PRA models to Fire Protection Significance Determination Process in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

The living fire probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models for all three operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Taiwan had been established in December 2000. In that study, a scenario-based PRA approach was adopted to systematically evaluate the fire and smoke hazards and associated risks. Using these fire PRA models developed, a risk-informed application project had also been completed in December 2002 for the evaluation of cable-tray fire-barrier wrapping exemption. This paper presents a new application of the fire PRA models to fire protection issues using the fire protection significance determination process (FP SDP). The fire protection issues studied may involve the selection of appropriate compensatory measures during the period when an automatic fire detection or suppression system in a safety-related fire zone becomes inoperable. The compensatory measure can either be a 24-hour fire watch or an hourly fire patrol. The living fire PRA models were used to estimate the increase in risk associated with the fire protection issue in terms of changes in core damage frequency (CDF) and large early release frequency (LERF). In compliance with SDP at-power and the acceptance guidelines specified in RG 1.174, the fire protection issues in question can be grouped into four categories; red, yellow, white and green, in accordance with the guidelines developed for FD SDP. A 24-hour fire watch is suggested only required for the yellow condition, while an hourly fire patrol may be adopted for the white condition. More limiting requirement is suggested for the red condition, but no special consideration is needed for the green condition. For the calculation of risk measures, risk impacts from any additional fire scenarios that may have been introduced, as well as more severe initiating events and fire damages that may accompany the fire protection issue should be considered carefully. Examples are presented in this paper to illustrate the evaluation process. (authors)

De-Cheng, Chen; Chung-Kung, Lo; Tsu-Jen, Lin; Ching-Hui, Wu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, P. O. Box 3-3, Lung-Tan, Tao-Yuan Taiwan (China); Lin, James C. [ABSG Consulting Inc., 300 Commerce Drive, Suite 200, Irvine, CA 92602 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/ F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/ F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

Kamath, K.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/F at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/F it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products. 1 table.

Kamath, K.

1983-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

309

Fermilab | Recovery Act | Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Videos Videos Watch videos documenting progress on Fermilab projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. NOvA - Community Voices - September 2009 Residents of northern Minnesota and construction workers building the NOvA detector facility discuss the benefits the high-energy physics research project has brought their communities. Congressman Bill Foster at Fermilab Congressman Bill Foster speaks to Fermilab Technical Division employees and members of the media at a press conference on Wednesday, August 5 to announce an additional $60.2 million in Recovery Act funds for the lab. NOvA first blast On July 20, construction crews began blasting into the rock at the future site of the NOvA detector facility in northern Minnesota. NOvA groundbreaking ceremony

310

Fermilab | Recovery Act | Features  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Features - Archive Features - Archive photo Industrial Building 3 addition Fermilab Today-November 5, 2010 IB3 addition nears completion The future site of Fermilab’s new materials laboratory space has evolved from a steel outline to a fully enclosed building over the past five months. Read full column photo Fermilab Today-October 22, 2010 Recovery Act gives LBNE team chance to grow Thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the collaboration for the Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment, LBNE, has expanded its project team. Read full column photo cooling units Fermilab Today-October 15, 2010 Local company completes FCC roof construction A local construction company recently completed work on the roof of the Feynman Computing Center, an important step in an ongoing project funded by

311

Elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides combined high activity and selectivity for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over certain catalyst formulations based on cerium oxide. The process is a single-stage, catalytic sulfur recovery process in conjunction with regenerators, such as those used in dry, regenerative flue gas desulfurization or other processes, involving direct reduction of the SO[sub 2] in the regenerator off gas stream to elemental sulfur in the presence of a catalyst. 4 figures.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Zhicheng Hu.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

312

Livingston Parish Landfill Methane Recovery Project (Feasibility Study)  

SciTech Connect

The Woodside Landfill is owned by Livingston Parish, Louisiana and is operated under contract by Waste Management of Louisiana LLC. This public owner/private operator partnership is commonplace in the solid waste industry today. The landfill has been in operation since approximately 1988 and has a permitted capacity of approximately 41 million cubic yards. Based on an assumed in-place waste density of 0.94 ton per cubic yard, the landfill could have an expected design capacity of 39.3 million tons. The landfill does have an active landfill gas collection and control system (LFGCCS) in place because it meets the minimum thresholds for the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). The initial LFGCS was installed prior to 2006 and subsequent phases were installed in 2007 and 2010. The Parish received a grant from the United States Department of Energy in 2009 to evaluate the potential for landfill gas recovery and utilization at the Woodside Landfill. This includes a technical and economic feasibility study of a project to install a landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) plant and to compare alternative technologies. The LFGTE plant can take the form of on-site electrical generation, a direct use/medium Btu option, or a high-Btu upgrade technology. The technical evaluation in Section 2 of this report concludes that landfill gas from the Woodside landfill is suitable for recovery and utilization. The financial evaluations in sections 3, 4, and 5 of this report provide financial estimates of the returns for various utilization technologies. The report concludes that the most economically viable project is the Electricity Generation option, subject to the Parishs ability and willingness to allocate adequate cash for initial capital and/or to obtain debt financing. However, even this option does not present a solid return: by our estimates, there is a 19 year simple payback on the electricity generation option. All of the energy recovery options discussed in this report economically stressed. The primary reason for this is the recent fundamental shift in the US energy landscape. Abundant supplies of natural gas have put downward pressure on any project that displaces natural gas or natural gas substitutes. Moreover, this shift appears long-term as domestic supplies for natural gas may have been increased for several hundred years. While electricity prices are less affected by natural gas prices than other thermal projects, they are still significantly affected since much of the power in the Entergy cost structure is driven by natural gas-fired generation. Consequently, rates reimbursed by the power company based on their avoided cost structure also face downward pressure over the near and intermediate term. In addition, there has been decreasing emphasis on environmental concerns regarding the production of thermal energy, and as a result both the voluntary and mandatory markets that drive green attribute prices have softened significantly over the past couple of years. Please note that energy markets are constantly changing due to fundamental supply and demand forces, as well as from external forces such as regulations and environmental concerns. At any point in the future, the outlook for energy prices may change and could deem either the electricity generation or pipeline injection project more feasible. This report is intended to serve as the primary background document for subsequent decisions made at Parish staff and governing board levels.

White, Steven

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Recovery Act Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 21, 2009 October 21, 2009 Special Report: OAS-RA-10-01 The Department of Energy's Quality Assurance Process for Prime Recipients' Reporting for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 October 14, 2009 Audit Report: IG-0827 The Department's Management of the ENERGY STAR Program September 30, 2009 Auit Report: IG-0825 The Department of Energy's Management of Contractor Fines, Penalties and Legal Costs September 29, 2009 Audit Report: IG-0824 Bonneville Power Administration's Acquisition of Transmission-Related Materials and Equipment September 10, 2009 Audit Report: IG-0822 Management of Energy Savings Performance Contract Delivery Orders at the Department of Energy September 4, 2009 Audit Report: OAS-RA-09-04 Department of Energy's Efforts to Meet Accountability and Performance

314

Recovery Boiler Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, east, e, west, w, bot tom, b, and top, t, neighbors. The neighboring cou pling coefficients (an, a., .. , etc) express the magnitudes of the convection and diffusion which occur across the control volume boundaries. The variable b p represents... represents a model of one half of the recovery boiler. The boiler has three air levels. The North, South and East boundaries of the computational domain represent the water walls of the boiler. The West boundary represents a symmetry plane. It should...

Abdullah, Z.; Salcudean, M.; Nowak, P.

315

Aging assessment for active fire protection systems  

SciTech Connect

This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

Ross, S.B. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (United States); Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Selective olefin recovery  

SciTech Connect

This interim report has been prepared as a followup to the January 1996 JDAG meeting. The report presents the results of various studies which evaluate the impact of process design changes on the overall SOR economics for cracked gas olefin recovery. The changes were made to either complete portions of the design that were missing or overlooked, or to improve and/or optimize the SOR process. A grass-roots propane-feed 350,000 MTA plant with a conventional recovery system was adopted as the study basis, and was compared with SOR systems of various sizes up to 350,000 MTA. This approach was taken to determine if SOR plants could be competitive with larger plants utilizing conventional recovery systems. Second phase KG expansion by 50,000-150,000 MTA ethylene was reexamined in view of the SOR process optimization. As was done in Stone & Webster`s December 1995 study, an SOR system was compared with an ARS expansion.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect

Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The reservoir characterization, geologic modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

Murphy, M.B.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 CX-002885: Categorical Exclusion Determination Abandonment and Closure of Domestic Wells 905-89G and 905-56G CX(s) Applied: B1.27 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office May 27, 2010 CX-002536: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Green Industry Business Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Chicago, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office May 27, 2010 CX-002538: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tangent Grant Application for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Business Development Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/27/2010 Location(s): Aurora, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

319

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

320

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer (.mu.m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 .mu.m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 .mu.m to about 16 .mu.m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 .mu.m to about 2 .mu.m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments.

Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Pigments which reflect infrared radiation from fire  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Conventional paints transmit or absorb most of the intense infrared (IR) radiation emitted by fire, causing them to contribute to the spread of fire. The present invention comprises a fire retardant paint additive that reflects the thermal IR radiation emitted by fire in the 1 to 20 micrometer ({micro}m) wavelength range. The important spectral ranges for fire control are typically about 1 to about 8 {micro}m or, for cool smoky fires, about 2 {micro}m to about 16 {micro}m. The improved inventive coatings reflect adverse electromagnetic energy and slow the spread of fire. Specific IR reflective pigments include titanium dioxide (rutile) and red iron oxide pigments with diameters of about 1 {micro}m to about 2 {micro}m and thin leafing aluminum flake pigments. 4 figs.

Berdahl, P.H.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology Prestigious Coal-Fired Project of the Year Award Goes to Plant Demonstrating Innovative DOE-Funded Technology December 16, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative project demonstrating DryFining™ technology, a more cost-effective way to control coal-based power plant emissions while improving fuel quality, has been named the 2010 Coal-Fired Project of the Year by the editors of Power Engineering magazine. The project, managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was developed with funding from the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Power Initiative and was originally implemented at Great River Energy's Coal Creek Station in Underwood, ND, in 2009. The

324

Fire protection program fiscal year 1997 site support program plan - Hanford fire department  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Hanford Fires Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford Site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. this includes response to surrounding fire department districts under mutual aids agreements and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site. the fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing, and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention and education.

Good, D.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fire Protection Program fiscal year 1996, site support program plan Hanford Fire Department. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under a mutual aid agreement and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System). The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, self-contained breathing apparatus maintenance, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This report gives a program overview, technical program baselines, and cost and schedule baseline.

Good, D.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fire protection program fiscal year 1995 site support program plan, Hanford Fire Department  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the US Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under a mutual aid agreement and contractual fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System). The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, self-contained breathing apparatus maintenance, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This report describes the specific responsibilities and programs that the HFD must support and the estimated cost of this support for FY1995.

Good, D.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin Governor's Task Force on Waste Materials Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin on Waste Materials Recovery and Disposal who have invited me to address you today on landfill disamenities in New York State in the 1960's. We had many problems with polluting solid waste dumps, landfill fires

Columbia University

328

Energy Management and Information Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?infrastructure energy?audits,?HVAC?upgrades,? heat?recovery,?etc. Improve?operations processes?and?day?to?day? operations,?retro? commissioning ENERGY?MANAGEMENT?INFORMATION?SYSTEM the?project Hardware ? $3.0?million?investment ? 400+?meters...

Conraud, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Challenges and a checklist for biodiversity conservation in fire-prone forests: Perspectives from the Pacific Northwest of USA and Southeastern Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review Challenges and a checklist for biodiversity conservation in fire-prone forests: Perspectives a b s t r a c t Conserving biodiversity in fire-prone forest ecosystems is challenging for several biodiversity conservation is conceptualized and applied. Important research and management challenges include

Stephens, Scott L.

330

DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors March 17, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy today released a new report highlighting the benefits of the Recovery Act to small businesses throughout the clean, renewable energy industry and environmental management sector. The report found that as of early March 2010, small businesses have been selected to receive nearly $5.4 billion in funding across a number of Recovery Act and related programs, including loans, loan guarantees, grants, contracts and tax incentives, in partnership with the

331

DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small Businesses in Clean Energy, Environmental Management Sectors March 17, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy today released a new report highlighting the benefits of the Recovery Act to small businesses throughout the clean, renewable energy industry and environmental management sector. The report found that as of early March 2010, small businesses have been selected to receive nearly $5.4 billion in funding across a number of Recovery Act and related programs, including loans, loan guarantees, grants, contracts and tax incentives, in partnership with the

332

Department of Energy Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Funding to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Funding to FutureGen 2.0 Department of Energy Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Funding to FutureGen 2.0 September 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy has signed final cooperative agreements with the FutureGen Industrial Alliance and Ameren Energy Resources that formally commit $1 billion in Recovery Act funding to build FutureGen 2.0. The FutureGen 2.0 project will help to position the United States as a leader in innovative technologies for reducing carbon emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. As part of this new initiative, the Department of Energy will partner with the FutureGen Industrial Alliance to select an

333

Department of Energy Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Funding to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Funding to FutureGen 2.0 Department of Energy Formally Commits $1 Billion in Recovery Act Funding to FutureGen 2.0 September 28, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department of Energy has signed final cooperative agreements with the FutureGen Industrial Alliance and Ameren Energy Resources that formally commit $1 billion in Recovery Act funding to build FutureGen 2.0. The FutureGen 2.0 project will help to position the United States as a leader in innovative technologies for reducing carbon emissions from existing coal-fired power plants. As part of this new initiative, the Department of Energy will partner with the FutureGen Industrial Alliance to select an

334

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Hanford Site recently used explosives to demolish industrial structures that supported plutonium processing for national defense. The explosive demolitions took down two 250-foot-tall exhaust chimneys, two 90-foot-fall air filter structures, and a 140-foot-tall water tower. The water tower was marked by a "Work Safely" motto that greeted workers. "Given the sheer height of the structures, explosive demolition was selected as the safer method of demolition," said Kurt Kehler, vice president and decommissioning and demolition project manager of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, DOE's contractor at the

335

Recovery Act Funded Projects at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lawrence Berkeley National Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory OAS-RA-L-12-02 January 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 12, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, BERKELEY SITE OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Director, Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Recovery Act Funded Projects at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory" Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-12-02 BACKGROUND In February 2009, the President signed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) into law. The goals of the Recovery Act were to retain and create jobs, increase economic efficiency, and invest in infrastructure that would provide long-term economic benefits. The Department of Energy's (Department) Office of Science received $1.6 billion

336

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions Recovery Act Changes Hanford Skyline with Explosive Demolitions American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers at the Hanford Site recently used explosives to demolish industrial structures that supported plutonium processing for national defense. The explosive demolitions took down two 250-foot-tall exhaust chimneys, two 90-foot-fall air filter structures, and a 140-foot-tall water tower. The water tower was marked by a "Work Safely" motto that greeted workers. "Given the sheer height of the structures, explosive demolition was selected as the safer method of demolition," said Kurt Kehler, vice president and decommissioning and demolition project manager of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, DOE's contractor at the

337

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 1 1 A A A p p p r r r i i i l l l 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 9 9 Overview of the Recovery Act The Recovery Act is an unprecedented effort to jumpstart the United States economy, create or retain millions of jobs, and put a down payment on addressing long-neglected challenges to allow the country to thrive in the 21st century. The Recovery Act, which was signed into law by the President on February 17, 2009 is an extraordinary response to a crisis unlike any since the Great Depression, and includes measures to modernize the nation's infrastructure, enhance energy independence, expand educational opportunities, preserve and improve affordable health care, provide tax relief, and protect those in greatest need. Implementing the Recovery Act within Office of Environmental Management (EM)

338

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

SHORT AND LONG-TERM FIRE IMPACTS ON HANFORD BARRIER PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

A critical unknown in long-term engineered barrier use is the post-fire hydrologic function where institutional controls are in-tact but there are no resources to implement maintenance activities such as re-planting. This objective of this study was to simulate wild fire on an engineered barrier at the Hanford Site and document the post-fire changes in barrier performance. Soil physical, chemical, and hydrologic conditions; plant floristics and density; and animal use were characterized pre- and post-burn. Fuel load on the surface ranged from 4.7 to 5.71 tons/acre. Fire was initiated by drip torch and measurements of flame height and temperature were made at nine locations on the barrier surface. Flame heights exceeded 30 ft and temperatures ranged from 250 C at 1.5 cm below the surface to over 700 C at 1 m above the surface. Soil organic matter, soil wettability, and hydraulic conductivity all decreased significantly relative to pre-fire conditions. Post-fire samples showed an increase in major soil nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity measured in 1:1 extracts whereas organic matter decreased. Decreases in wettabilty and organic matter are indicative of conditions more conducive to runoff and soil loss. The results of this study will contribute to a better understanding of post-fire recovery in a post-institutional control environment. This should lead to enhanced stakeholder acceptance regarding the long-term efficacy of ET barriers. This study will also support improvements in the design of ET barriers and performance monitoring systems. Such improvements are needed to best meet the long-term commitment to the safe in-place isolation of waste for hundreds if not thousands of years.

Ward, Anderson L.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Mandis, M. L.; Buelow, Laura C.

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

340

DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria  

SciTech Connect

The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Selective olefin recovery  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the outstanding studies on olefin product purities, pyridine recovery, and absorber offgas utilization. Other reports issued since the May 2 technical review meeting in Grangemouth evaluated the impact of the new VLE data on the solution stripping operation and the olefin loadings in the lean and rich solutions. This report completes the bulk of Stone & Webster`s engineering development of the absorber/stripper process for Phase I. The final feasibility study report (to be issued in August) will present an updated design and economics.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Pyrochemical recovery of actinides  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an important advantage of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which is its ability to recycle fuel in the process of power generation, extending fuel resources by a considerable amount and assuring the continued viability of nuclear power stations by reducing dependence on external fuel supplies. Pyroprocessing is the means whereby the recycle process is accomplished. It can also be applied to the recovery of fuel constituents from spent fuel generated in the process of operation of conventional light water reactor power plants, offering the means to recover the valuable fuel resources remaining in that material.

Laidler, J.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Pyrochemical recovery of actinides  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an important advantage of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which is its ability to recycle fuel in the process of power generation, extending fuel resources by a considerable amount and assuring the continued viability of nuclear power stations by reducing dependence on external fuel supplies. Pyroprocessing is the means whereby the recycle process is accomplished. It can also be applied to the recovery of fuel constituents from spent fuel generated in the process of operation of conventional light water reactor power plants, offering the means to recover the valuable fuel resources remaining in that material.

Laidler, J.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview of Recovery Act (ARRA) Funded  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview of Recovery Act (ARRA) Funded Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview of Recovery Act (ARRA) Funded Exploration in CA and NV and other Exploration Projects Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Navy's Geothermal Program Office: Overview of Recovery Act (ARRA) Funded Exploration in CA and NV and other Exploration Projects Details Activities (9) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: The Navy's Geothermal Program Office (GPO) manages, explores for and supports the development of geothermal resources on Department of Defense (DoD) -managed lands. We are currently conducting exploration in 13 sites or regions on 6 military installations in Nevada and California. We also have tentative plans to expand our activities late this year or early next year into Utah as well as Guam and the Republic of Djibouti, northeast

345

Recovery Act Progress at Idaho National Lab | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress at Idaho National Lab Progress at Idaho National Lab Recovery Act Progress at Idaho National Lab August 19, 2010 - 5:09pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a hot bed of activity with various Recovery Act projects funded through the Office of Environmental Management. For example, North Wind Services will be constructing several new structures at the INL Radioactive Waste Management Complex -- facilities that will provide important protection from the elements and minimize the spread of contamination during buried waste excavation, retrieval and packaging operations. Pictures of Recovery Act Projects at Idaho National Lab Down the road at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, TerranearPMC is working

346

Highly Available Intrusion-Tolerant Services with Proactive-Reactive Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a hybrid distributed system model and show, as a case study, how this service can effectively be used infrastructures. Index Terms--Intrusion tolerance, proactive recovery, reactive recovery, firewall. ? 1 that are employed in mission-critical applications such as the SCADA systems used to manage critical infrastructures

Neves, Nuno

347

Advanced Oil Spill Recovery in Marine Environments Victoria Broje and Arturo A. Keller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Oil Spill Recovery in Marine Environments Victoria Broje and Arturo A. Keller Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara Almost 14,000 oil spills research will help identifying parameters having major effect on oil adhesion to the recovery surface

Keller, Arturo A.

348

NNSA joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA joins other federal agencies to build ... NNSA joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New Mexico Posted By Office of Public Affairs

349

NNSA joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New Mexico | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA joins other federal agencies to build ... NNSA joins other federal agencies to build Interagency Fire Center in New Mexico Posted By Office of Public Affairs

350

Savannah River Site Retires Coal-Fired D-Area Powerhouse after Nearly 60  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Retires Coal-Fired D-Area Powerhouse after Savannah River Site Retires Coal-Fired D-Area Powerhouse after Nearly 60 Years of Service Savannah River Site Retires Coal-Fired D-Area Powerhouse after Nearly 60 Years of Service May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis SRNS Maintenance Supervisor Steve Cooper, left to right, Control Room Operator Robert Dicks, and Deputy Operations Manager Ren Hatfield stand near a boiler unit of the DArea powerhouse. The three workers have a combined experience of 83 years at the facility. SRNS Maintenance Supervisor Steve Cooper, left to right, Control Room Operator Robert Dicks, and Deputy Operations Manager Ren Hatfield stand near a boiler unit of the DArea powerhouse. The three workers have a combined experience of 83 years at the facility. AIKEN, S.C. - The Savannah River Site (SRS) has shut down the massive,

351

Recovery Act Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

these tanks," said Project Manager Christopher Watson. As part of the RA investment in upgrading tank farm infrastructure, a 20-year-old control platform used in the tank farms...

352

Recovery Act State Memos Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20 20 For total Recovery Act jobs numbers in Ohio go to www.recovery.gov DOE Recovery Act projects in Ohio: 83 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OHIO RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Ohio are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from the smart grid and energy efficiency to advanced battery manufacturing, biofuels, carbon capture and storage, and cleanup of the state's Cold War legacy nuclear sites Through these investments, Ohio's businesses, universities, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Ohio to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. EXAMPLES OF OHIO FORMULA GRANTS Program

353

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Economy » Recovery Act Energy Economy » Recovery Act Recovery Act December 18, 2013 BPA Wins Platts Global Energy Award for Grid Optimization Platts awarded the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) a Global Energy Award for grid optimization on December 12 in New York City for its development of a synchrophasor network. BPA is part of the Recovery Act-funded Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Program. December 13, 2013 Cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through November 30, 2013 Graph of cumulative Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients, through November 30, 2013. December 12, 2013 Energy Department Announces $150 Million in Tax Credits to Invest in U.S. Clean Energy Manufacturing Domestic Manufacturing Projects to Support Renewable Energy Generation as

354

Recovery Act State Memos Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Georgia For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

355

Recovery Act State Memos Minnesota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minnesota Minnesota For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

356

Recovery Act State Memos Idaho  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Idaho For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

357

Recovery Act State Memos Illinois  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Illinois For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 7

358

Recovery Act State Memos Pennsylvania  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Pennsylvania For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................ 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ......................................................................................... 7

359

Recovery Act State Memos Wisconsin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Wisconsin For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 6

360

Recovery Act State Memos Montana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Montana For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Recovery Act State Memos Arizona  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona Arizona For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

362

Recovery Act State Memos Kansas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas Kansas For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

363

Recovery Act State Memos California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California California For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY .............................................................................................. 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................ 12

364

Recovery Act State Memos Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Washington For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 6

365

Recovery Act State Memos Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Nevada For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ................................................................................................ 1 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

366

Recovery Act State Memos Virginia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Virginia For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

367

Recovery Act State Memos Maine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maine Maine For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

368

Recovery Act State Memos Missouri  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Missouri Missouri For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

369

Recovery Act State Memos Maryland  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maryland Maryland For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ....................................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ..................................................................................................... 4

370

Recovery Act State Memos Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Colorado Colorado For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 6

371

Recovery Act State Memos Louisiana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Louisiana For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

372

Recovery Act State Memos Alabama  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alabama Alabama For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

373

Recovery Act State Memos Oklahoma  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Oklahoma For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

374

Recovery Act State Memos Massachusetts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Massachusetts For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

375

Recovery Act State Memos Mississippi  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Mississippi For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

376

Recovery Act State Memos Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming Wyoming For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 4

377

Recovery Act State Memos Connecticut  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut Connecticut For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

378

Recovery Act State Memos Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oregon Oregon For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 4 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

379

Recovery Act State Memos Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah Utah For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

380

Recovery Act State Memos Nebraska  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nebraska For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Recovery Act State Memos Alaska  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Alaska For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

382

Recovery Act State Memos Arkansas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arkansas Arkansas For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

383

Recovery Act State Memos Indiana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indiana Indiana For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

384

Recovery Act State Memos Guam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guam Guam For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 4

385

Recovery Act State Memos Iowa  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Iowa For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

386

Recovery Act State Memos Texas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Texas For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 7

387

Recovery Act State Memos Vermont  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vermont Vermont For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................ 4

388

Recovery Act State Memos Michigan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan Michigan For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

389

Recovery Act State Memos Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tennessee Tennessee For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5

390

Recovery Act State Memos Hawaii  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hawaii Hawaii For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 4

391

How to Choose and Use Fire Extinguishers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Choose and Use Fire Extinguishers How to Choose and Use Fire Extinguishers By: John Kelsey, This Old House magazine A fire extinguisher can be a lifesaver. Placed near an exit, in an easy-to-grab spot, it can put out a small fire before the firefighters arrive, or at least suppress the flames while you escape. All household extinguishers are classified A, B, or C (or a combination of these) on the label to indicate which types of fires - ordinary combustibles, flammable liquids, or electrical-you can use them on. Many of the ones sold at home stores are classified A:B:C and fight all three types of fires. The main distinction among home extinguishers is size. In most cases bigger is better, but sometimes the biggest extinguishers are too heavy to maneuver. (The weight on an extinguisher refers to

392

FAQS Job Task Analyses - Fire Protection Engineering  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Job Task Analysis and Competency Review Job Task Analysis and Competency Review for All Level Competencies Fire Protection Engineering FAQS Initially conducted (expert competencies): August 2010 Updated (includes ALL Competencies): April 2011 Updated (includes ALL Competencies): October 2012 STEP 1: Job Task Analysis for Tasks Task (and Number) Source Importance Frequency Serve as the subject matter expert in the area of fire protection, life safety, and fire department emergency related services. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph A 5 4 Review fire hazard analyses, assessments, and other fire safety documentation for compliance with applicable requirements. FAQS Duties and Responsibilities Paragraph B 5 3 Evaluate the adequacy of site emergency services. This includes all facets of the fire

393

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

394

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Recovery Act Investment Moves EM Past Milestone of 100 Project Completions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently paused to observe a notable achievement: completion of more than 100 projects in its $6 billion...

396

Economic Recovery Loan Program (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Economic Recovery Loan Program provides subordinate financing to help businesses remain viable and improve productivity. Eligibility criteria are based on ability to repay, and the loan is...

397

Recovery Act State Memos Delaware  

Energy Savers (EERE)

go to energyempowers.govDelaware Recovery Act Success Stories ENERGYEMPOWERS.GOV less heat and cooling loss so our facility is more efficient." Buying domestically For the...

398

Identifying Socio-ecological Factors Influencing the Use of Prescribed Fire to Maintain and Restore Ecosystem Health in Texas, USA and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a critical need for more studies to identify socio-ecological drivers that affect conservation and management of fire adapted ecosystems, yet studies that identify such variables and explore their interaction in specific systems...

Toledo, David

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility  

SciTech Connect

This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

JOHNSON, B.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

400

University of Vermont 2012 Student Housing Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

awards from FM Global (insurance) for fire protection programs. All on-campus residence halls by automatic cooking fire suppression systems. All fire protection systems are inspected regularly by UVM staff Marcus, Certified Fire Protection Specialist, University Fire Marshal 284 East Avenue, Burlington, VT

Hayden, Nancy J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 12: Fire and Life Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 12: Fire and Life Safety Fire Protection Equipment The purpose of these requirements is to ensure the adequate provision and operability of fire protection Requirements Fire protection equipment includes Automatic fire suppression systems (such as sprinkler, clean

Wechsler, Risa H.

402

TU Vienna Fire Protection Regulations 1 General provisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TU Vienna Fire Protection Regulations § 1 General provisions § 2 Scope § 3 Responsibility for preventive fire protection § 7 Conduct in the event of fire § 8 Assembly point § 9 Measures following a fire § 1 General provisions (1) Purpose and relationship to other legal regulations a) The fire protection

Szmolyan, Peter

403

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 12: Fire and Life Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION Chapter 12: Fire and Life Safety Fire Protection SystemProcedImpair.pdf The purpose of these procedures is to minimize the downtime of active fire protection systems by closely controlling their impairment (any condition in which a fire protection system cannot perform its designed fire

Wechsler, Risa H.

404

Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Sorbents as a Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO 2 Capture from Coal-fired Power Plants Background Retrofitting the current fleet of pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants for the separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is one of the most significant challenges for effective, long-term carbon management. Post-combustion CO 2 capture using solid-sorbent based technologies is a potential resolution to this challenge that could be appropriate for both new and existing PC-fired power plant

405

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 80. Quarterly report, July--September, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on petroleum enhanced recovery projects. In addition to project descriptions, contract numbers, principal investigators and project management information is included.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Long-term fire history in northern Quebec: implications for the northern limit of commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term fire history in northern Quebec: implications for the northern limit of commercial in Sustainable Forest Management, 445 boul. de l'Universite, Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec J9X 5E4, Canada; 2 Centre d'Etude de la For^et, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3P8, Canada; 3 Centre de Bio

Asselin, Hugo

407

Alternative community states maintained by fire in the Klamath Mountains, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA; 2 Environmental Science, Policy, and Management treatment. Areas where fire had proceeded to occur served as controls. 4. Our findings are consistent of alternative community states, and the concept has been broadened to include ecosystem degradation (van de

Moritz, Max A.

408

CRAD, Fire Protection- Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Fire Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility.

409

EM Takes on Next Environmental Cleanup Challenge at SRS: Coal-Fired Ash  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AIKEN, S.C. A large, 1950s-era, coal-fired power plant sits cold and dark at the Savannah River Site (SRS), but employees with EM and its management and operations contractor are preparing to clean up the facilitys substantial quantities of ash generated over the decades.

410

CRAD, Fire Protection- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

411

Fire Effects in Blue Oak Woodland1 Patricia K. Haggerty2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relationship between fire dates and new establishment on two Yuba County sites. Mensing (1988) reported Sierra Nevada, Tulare County, California. Land ownership included Bureau of Land Management, National Forestry Technician, Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, Three Rivers, California, and Graduate

Standiford, Richard B.

412

The Use of Fire and Grazing to Improve Grassland Habitats for Species of Greatest Conservation Need  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with local farmers to extend what is learned on experimental pastures. All treatment variables remain pastures, four of each treatment type, serve as study sites in our efforts to assess the effectiveness workshops to explain the use of fire and grazing for grassland management. We also conduct in

Koford, Rolf R.

413

Gas reburning in tangentially-fired, wall-fired and cyclone-fired boilers  

SciTech Connect

Gas Reburning has been successfully demonstrated for over 4,428 hours on three coal fired utility boilers as of March 31, 1994. Typically, NO{sub x} reductions have been above 60% in long-term, load-following operation. The thermal performance of the boilers has been virtually unaffected by Gas Reburning. At Illinois Power`s Hennepin Station, Gas Reburning in a 71 MWe tangentially-fired boiler achieved an average NO{sub x} reduction of 67% from the original baseline NO{sub x} level of 0.75 lb NO{sub x}/10{sup 6} Btu over a one year period. The nominal natural gas input was 18% of total heat input. Even at 10% gas heat input, NO{sub x} reduction of 55% was achieved. At Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station, a Gas Reburning-Low NO{sub x} Burner system on a 172 MWe wall-fired boiler has achieved overall NO{sub x} reductions of 60--73% in parametric and long-term testing, based on the original baseline NO{sub x} level of 0.73 lb/10{sup 6} Btu. NO{sub x} reduction is as high as 60--65% even at relatively low natural gas usage (5--10% of total heat input). The NO{sub x} reduction by Low NO{sub x} Burners alone is typically 30--40%. NO{sub x} reduction has been found to be insensitive to changes in recirculated flue gas (2--7% of total flue gas) injected with natural gas. At City Water, Light and Power Company`s Lakeside Station in Springfield, Illinois, Gas Reburning in a 33 MWe cyclone-fired boiler has achieved an average NO{sub x} reduction of 66% (range 52--77%) at gas heat inputs of 20--26% in long-term testing, based on a baseline NO{sub x} level of 1.0 lb/10{sup 6} Btu (430 mg/MJ). This paper presents a summary of the operating experience at each site and discusses the long term impacts of applying this technology to units with tangential, cyclone and wall-fired (with Low NO{sub x} Burner) configurations.

May, T.J. [Illinois Power Co., Decatur, IL (United States); Rindahl, E.G. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States); Booker, T. [City Water Light and Power, Springfield, IL (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Cryogenic slurry for extinguishing underground fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic slurry comprising a mixture of solid carbon dioxide particles suspended in liquid nitrogen is provided which is useful in extinguishing underground fires.

Chaiken, Robert F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kim, Ann G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kociban, Andrew M. (Wheeling, WV); Slivon, Jr., Joseph P. (Tarentum, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sandia National Laboratories: National Fire Protection Association  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Protection Association More California Gas Stations Can Provide Hydrogen than Previously Thought, Sandia Study Says On July 29, 2014, in Center for Infrastructure Research and...

416

LNG fire and vapor control system technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 8, 2010 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to...

418

Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies $44 Million for State Public Utility Commissions State public utility commissions (PUCs), which regulate and oversee electricity projects in their states, will be receiving more than $44.2 million in Recovery Act funding to hire new staff and retrain existing employees to ensure they have the capacity to quickly and effectively review proposed electricity projects. The funds will help the individual state PUCs accelerate reviews of the large number of electric utility requests that are expected under the Recovery Act. State PUCs will be reviewing electric utility investments in projects such as energy efficiency, renewable energy, carbon capture and storage, transmission

419

(BSET) FIRE SAFETY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM FOUR YEAR FIRE SAFETY CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. ETFS 4323 3 Intro to Performance-based Fire Safety8 ETFS 32338 3 Ethical Issues and Cultural Critique3(BSET) FIRE SAFETY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM FOUR YEAR FIRE SAFETY CONCENTRATION CURRICULUM 3 Technical Drawing I ETGR 1103 2 Western Culture and Hist. Awareness LBST 2101 3 Total Hours 16

Raja, Anita

420

What is prescribed fire? Prescribed fire is the controlled application of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is prescribed fire? Prescribed fire is the controlled application of fire to the land an uncontrolled wildfire occur. What is a burn prescription? A burn prescription helps ensure that the objectives species to naturally regenerate. (Lodgepole pine is one such example.) What about the smoke? Controlling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety and death resulting from each fire. #12;Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards) -- HVAC fan motor burned up -- Alpha Chi Omega -- 3/13/10 $1,500 (Greek) -- Futon mattress caught fire

Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

422

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety Right-to-Know  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards and Measures 1 Campus Fire Safety and death resulting from each fire. #12;Housing & Residence Education Disclosure of Fire Safety Standards) -- Grease Fire -- Beaty Towers -- 9/10/10 $100 (Greek) -- HVAC fan motor burned up -- Alpha Chi Omega -- 3

Slatton, Clint

423

Sample Lesson Plan Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, Fire Prevention Plans, and Fire Protection 1 Sample Lesson Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Emergency Action Plans, Fire Prevention Plans, and Fire Protection Overview of the OSHA Standard Subpart E problems finding and using it. Subpart L, Fire Protection, contains requirements for fire brigades, and all installed to meet the fire protection requirements of 29 CFR Part 1910. Step 1: Planning the Lesson

Homes, Christopher C.

424

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Manager to Take Over WIPP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

take on the role of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Senior Recovery Manager under an IPA (Intergovernmental Personnel Act) arrangement between the DOE and Sandia. Sean...

425

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems...

426

Fermilab | Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOvA NOvA In April 2010, workers set up two cranes at the construction site for the NOvA detector facility in Ash River, Minnesota. In 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, provided DOE's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory with $114.2 million. Fermilab invested the funds in critical scientific infrastructure to strengthen the nation's global scientific leadership as well as to provide immediate economic relief to local communities. This Web site provided citizens with clear and accurate information about how Fermilab used the new funding and its immediate benefits for our neighbors and our nation. Features photo Industrial Building 3 addition Fermilab Today-November 5, 2010 IB3 addition nears completion

427

Water recovery from dew  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recovery of clean water from dew has remained a longstanding challenge in many places all around the world. It is currently believed that the ancient Greeks succeeded in recovering atmospheric water vapour on a scale large enough to supply water to the city of Theodosia (presently Feodosia, Crimea, Ukraine). Several attempts were made in the early 20th century to build artificial dew-catching constructions which were subsequently abandoned because of their low yield. The idea of dew collection is revised in the fight of recent investigations of the basic physical phenomena involved in the formation of dew. A model for calculating condensation rates on real dew condensers is proposed. Some suggestions for the ideal condenser are formulated.

V.S. Nikolayev; D. Beysens; A. Gioda; I. Milimouka; E. Katiushin; J.-P. Morel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to an improved wet air oxidation system and method for reducing the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of waste water used from scrubbers of coal gasification plants, with this COD reduction being sufficient to effectively eliminate waste water as an environmental pollutant. The improvement of the present invention is provided by heating the air used in the oxidation process to a temperature substantially equal to the temperature in the oxidation reactor before compressing or pressurizing the air. The compression of the already hot air further heats the air which is then passed in heat exchange with gaseous products of the oxidation reaction for "superheating" the gaseous products prior to the use thereof in turbines as the driving fluid. The superheating of the gaseous products significantly minimizes condensation of gaseous products in the turbine so as to provide a substantially greater recovery of mechanical energy from the process than heretofore achieved.

Moore, Albert S. (Morgantown, WV); Verhoff, Francis H. (Morgantown, WV)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Chapter 11 - Sulfur Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sulfur is present in many raw industrial gases and in natural gas in the form of hydrogen sulfide. Sulfur removal facilities are located at the majority of oil and gas processing facilities throughout the world. The sulfur recovery unit does not make a profit for the operator but it is an essential processing step to allow the overall facility to operate, as the discharge of sulfur compounds to the atmosphere is severely restricted by environmental regulations. Concentration levels of H2S vary significantly depending upon their source. H2S produced from absorption processes, such as amine treating of natural gas or refinery gas, can contain 5075% H2S by volume or higher. This chapter provides information about fundamentals of sulfur removal facilities in the natural gas industry.

Alireza Bahadori

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

ARM - ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ActARM Recovery Act Project FAQs ActARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act Instruments Recovery Act Fact Sheet March 2010 Poster (PDF, 10MB) External Resources Recovery Act - Federal Recovery Act - DOE Recovery Act - ANL Recovery Act - BNL Recovery Act - LANL Recovery Act - PNNL Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Why is ARM buying new instruments and equipment? The ARM Climate Research Facility (ARM) is receiving $60 million dollars in Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science to build the next generation facility for climate change research. Using input from past ARM user workshops and ARM working group discussion, ARM has planned for the purchase and deployment of an expansive array of new

431

H:\\Transfer\\My Documents\\Cleary Fire Report\\Annual Fire Safety Report 2010.doc Annual Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Building Sprinkler System? % Sprinkler Monitored Fire Alarm? Smoke Detection Extinguisher Devices Placards of vehicle parts, fuel and oil is prohibited. l. Hallways must remain clear at all times for safety in case Safety Systems The following table describes each on-campus residential facility fire safety system

Sze, Lawrence

432

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Sturcken, E.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A new natural gas-fired steam plant will replace an older coal-fired steam plant shown here. The...

434

Fire Ecology Special Issue Vol. 5, No. 1, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fire rainfall events. Soil losses in the high end of that range definitely exceed soil loss tolerances, humankind transformed fire into one of its oldest tools. Human and lightning ignited fires altered

435

Old Dominion University Annual Security and Fire Safety Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protection Features in Residence Halls____________________ 21 Residential Facilities Fire Safety AmenitiesOld Dominion University 2012 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report All statements and policies _________________________________________ 17 Fire Safety ______________________________________________________________ 19 Residence Halls

436

FSEP-Rev.02 Fire Safety Evacuation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................... 1 3.2 Fire Protection Authority ............................................................................................... 2 3.5 Fire Protection EquipmentFSEP-Rev.02 Fire Safety Evacuation Plan Henrietta Harvey Building Prepared By: Graham Mowbray Date

Oyet, Alwell

437

Fire Protection Engineering Four Year Academic Plan Name:_______________________________________________ UID:___________________________  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire Protection Engineering Four Year Academic Plan Name;FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEERING NAME: _____________________________________ Major Requirements Requirements Dev Seminar 1 ENFP 405 - Structural Fire Protection 3 Requirements Course Credits Grade ENFP 410

Shapiro, Benjamin

438

FSEP-Rev.02 Fire Safety Evacuation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................... 4 3.2 Fire Protection Authority ............................................................................................... 5 3.5 Fire Protection EquipmentFSEP-Rev.02 Fire Safety Evacuation Plan Ocean Sciences Centre Prepared By: Connie Short Date: April

Oyet, Alwell

439

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Underground Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant February 5, 2014 March 2014 Salt Haul Truck Fire at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Haul Truck Fire at the...

440

DOE Recovery Act Field Projects | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Recovery Act Field Projects DOE Recovery Act Field Projects DOE Recovery Act Field Projects View All Maps Addthis...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act Act Recovery Act Total Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients by Month, through November 30, 2013 Total Federal Payments to OE Recovery Act Recipients by Month, through November 30, 2013 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Overview PROJECTS TOTAL OBLIGATIONS AWARD RECIPIENTS Smart Grid Investment Grant $3,482,831,000 99 Smart Grid Regional and Energy Storage Demonstration Projects $684,829,000 42 Workforce Development Program $100,000,000 52 Interconnection Transmission Planning $80,000,000 6 State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies $48,619,000 49 Enhancing State Energy Assurance $43,500,000 50 Enhancing Local Government Energy Assurance $8,024,000 43 Interoperability Standards and Framework $12,000,000 1 Program Direction1 $27,812,000 --

442

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Recovery Act Recovery Act The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 -- commonly called the "stimulus" -- was designed to spur economic growth while creating new jobs and saving existing ones. Through the Recovery Act, the Energy Department invested more than $31 billion to support a wide range of clean energy projects across the nation -- from investing in the smart grid and developing alternative fuel vehicles to helping homeowners and businesses reduce their energy costs with energy efficiency upgrades and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The Department's programs helped create new power sources, conserve resources and aligned the nation to lead the global energy economy. Featured Leaders of the Fuel Cell Pack Fuel cell forklifts like the one shown here are used by leading companies across the U.S. as part of their daily business operations. | Energy Department file photo.

443

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26, 2010 26, 2010 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act -- Video from Cathy Zoi Vice President Biden announced that 200,000 homes have been Weatherized under the Recovery Act. Hear what Cathy Zoi, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, has to say on Weatherization. August 26, 2010 200,000 homes weatherized under the Recovery Act August 25, 2010 The Recovery Act: Cutting Costs and Upping Capacity Secretary Chu joined Vice President Joe Biden at the White House to help unveil a new report on how investments made through the Recovery Act have been impacting innovation. While the report analyzed several major sectors, its most striking findings centered on energy. August 25, 2010 Eco Technologies, Inc., hired eleven workers to install these solar panels at the Hillsborough County judicial center. | Photo courtesy of Hillsborough County

444

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31, 2009 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $755 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Tennessee New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $1.615 Billion in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in South Carolina New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $138 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in Ohio New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $148 million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New York New Funding Will Create Jobs and Accelerate Cleanup Efforts March 31, 2009 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for

445

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, Michael B.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

446

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, Mark B.

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

447

Live Fire Range Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Central Training Academy (CTA) is a DOE Headquarters Organization located in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with the mission to effectively and efficiently educate and train personnel involved in the protection of vital national security interests of DOE. The CTA Live Fire Range (LFR), where most of the firearms and tactical training occurs, is a complex separate from the main campus. The purpose of the proposed action is to expand the LFR to allow more options of implementing required training. The Department of Energy has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction and operation of an expanded Live Fire Range Facility at the Central Training Academy in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

None

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Coal-fired diesel generator  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Safety & Emergency Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

designed ESH 108 Building Orientation course. Fire Alarm System Testing Through Argonne Fire Protection Services, the fire alarm system is tested visually and audibly annually....

450

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

HSL Fire Evacuation Plan HSL Appendix 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the assembly point ( in the car park opposite the side entrance of the library). All tag holders need to give should 7. Staff should remain at the Assembly point (by the wooden fence in the car park opposite/alarm, staff should report any shortcomings in the fire safety provision (e.g. defective fire alarm sounders

Anderson, Jim

452

The Fire Walk Ceremony in Tahiti  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... all essential particulars with those in the accounts already cited. According to these, a pit was dug in which large stones were heated red hot by a fire which had ... dug in which large stones were heated red hot by a fire which had been burning many hours. The upper stones were pushed away just before the ceremony, so as ...

S. P. LANGLEY

1901-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

453

Modeling long-term fire regimes of southern California shrublands1 (Suggested running head: "Modeling fire regimes with HFire")3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of three fire regime metrics (fire size24 distributions, fire return interval maps, cumulative total area pattern of ignitions, fuels, weather,38 and topography, and describes the size, spatial pattern

Carlson, Jean

454

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry. This is the twenty-eighth quarterly progress report on the project. Results obtained to date are summarized.

Mark B. Murphy

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

EM Recovery Act Performance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act program. Milestones The EM Recovery Act Program set a goal of achieving accelerated completion of 46 regulatory milestones by the end of FY 2011 using Recovery Act...

456

CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Fire Protection - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2006 A section of...

457

The Simulation Analysis of Fire Feature on Underground Substation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Underground transformer substations constructed with non-dwelling buildings have a ... out simulation analysis of fire feature on underground substation. The corresponding fire protection strategy is also...

Xin Han; Xie He; Beihua Cong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Suspension-fired biomass boilers. Three case studies  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of the conversion of oil-or gas-fired boilers to fire pulverized bark and wood wastes in suspension.

Robinson, L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Study Shows Large LNG Fires...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECInfrastructure SecurityAnalysisSandia Study Shows Large LNG Fires Hotter but Smaller Than Expected Sandia Study Shows Large LNG Fires Hotter but Smaller Than Expected...

460

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

462

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

Initial tree regeneration responses to fire and thinning treatments in a Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer forest, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fire is a driver of ecosystem patterns and processes in forests globally, but natural fire regimes have often been altered by decades of active fire management. Following almost a century of fire suppression, many western U.S. forests have greater fuel levels, higher tree densities, and are now dominated by fire-sensitive, shade-tolerant species. These fuel-loaded conditions can often result in high-intensity crown fires replacing historic low- to moderate-intensity fire regimes. In the mixed-conifer forests of the California Sierra Nevada, thinning and prescribed fire are widely used to reduce fuels and shift future stand composition from shade-tolerant species to more fire-resistant pines (Pinus lambertiana and Pinus jeffreyi) that were historically more abundant. The impacts of these treatments, however, on forest regeneration composition and abundance are unclear. We examined the effects of prescribed fire and common thinning treatments (understory and overstory thinning) on microsite conditions, seed rain, and tree regeneration in an old-growth, mixed-conifer forest in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA. Treatments significantly altered environmental conditions, but there was substantial variation and overlap in conditions among treatments. Seed rain of shade-tolerant Abies concolor and Calocedrus decurrens was 526 times greater than P. jeffreyi and P. lambertiana, creating inertia in efforts to shift stands towards increased pine abundance. Survival of Pinus germinants was greatest in burned microsites. The burn-overstory thin treatment had both the highest mortality of advanced A. concolor and C. decurrens regeneration and the greatest increase in pine regeneration. Species occupied microsites gradating from low light/high moisture to high light/low moisture in the order: C. decurrens, A. concolor, P. lambertiana, and P. jeffreyi. Results suggest prescriptions may need to thin mature A. concolor and C. decurrens to significantly reduce their seed rain, create an abundance of burned open microsites, or plant Pinus seedlings to shift regeneration composition in treated stands.

Harold S.J. Zald; Andrew N. Gray; Malcolm North; Ruth A. Kern

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system is described with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature. 6 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Wastewater heat recovery apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat recovery system with a heat exchanger and a mixing valve. A drain trap includes a heat exchanger with an inner coiled tube, baffle plate, wastewater inlet, wastewater outlet, cold water inlet, and preheated water outlet. Wastewater enters the drain trap through the wastewater inlet, is slowed and spread by the baffle plate, and passes downward to the wastewater outlet. Cold water enters the inner tube through the cold water inlet and flows generally upward, taking on heat from the wastewater. This preheated water is fed to the mixing valve, which includes a flexible yoke to which are attached an adjustable steel rod, two stationary zinc rods, and a pivoting arm. The free end of the arm forms a pad which rests against a valve seat. The rods and pivoting arm expand or contract as the temperature of the incoming preheated water changes. The zinc rods expand more than the steel rod, flexing the yoke and rotating the pivoting arm. The pad moves towards the valve seat as the temperature of the preheated water rises, and away as the temperature falls, admitting a variable amount of hot water to maintain a nearly constant average process water temperature.

Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Fire-flooding technologies in post-steam-injected heavy oil reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanism and problems associated with development engineering of fire-flooding in post-steam-injected heavy oil reservoirs was studied using 1D & 3D physical simulation experiments and reservoir numerical simulation. The temperature of combustion zone decreased and high-temperature zone enlarged because there existed secondary water formed during steam injection, which could absorb and carry heat towards producers out of the combustion front during fire flooding, but high saturation of water in layers caused by secondary water had less influence on the quantity of fuel deposit and air consumption. In the process of 3D fire flooding experiment, air override was observed during the combustion front moving forward and resulted in a coke zone in the bottom of the layer, and the ultimate recovery factor reached 65% on fact that the remaining oil saturation within the coke zone was no more than 20%. The flooding model, well pattern, well spacing, and air injection rate were optimized according to the specific property and the existed well pattern in the post-steam-injected heavy oil reservoir, and the key techniques of ignition, lifting, and anticorrosion was also selected at the same time. The pilot of fire flooding in the H1 block in the Xinjiang Oilfield was carried out from 2009 based on these research works, and now begins to show better performance.

Wenlong Guan; Changfeng Xi; Yaping Chen; Xia Zhang; Muhetar; Jinzhong Liang; Jihong Huang; Jian Wu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery Act Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery Act Microsoft Word - PSRP May 15 2009 WAPA...

468

Recovery Act?Transportation Electrification Education Partnership...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Recovery ActTransportation Electrification Education Partnership for Green Jobs and Sustainable Mobility Recovery ActTransportation Electrification Education Partnership for...

469

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Cross-section illustrating how carbon dioxide and water can be used to flush residual oil from a subsurface rock formation between...

470

Enhanced Oil Recovery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Thanks in part to innovations supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory over the past 30 years,...

471

Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

State public utility commissions (PUCs), which regulate and oversee electricity projects in their states, will be receiving more than $44.2 million in Recovery Act funding to hire new staff and retrain existing employees to ensure they have the capacity to quickly and effectively review proposed electricity projects. The funds will help the individual state PUCs accelerate reviews of the large number of electric utility requests that are expected under the Recovery Act.

472

t_fired.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-MWE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED -MWE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED TANGENTIALLY FIRED COMBUSTION TECHNIQUES FOR THE REDUCTION OF NO X EMISSIONS SOUTHERN COMPANY SERVICES, INC. PROJECT PERFORMANCE SUMMARY CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM JUNE 1999 DOE/FE-0397 Disclaimer This report was prepared using publically available information, including the Final Technical Report and other reports prepared pursuant to a cooperative agreement partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Neither the United States Government nor any agency, employee, contractor, or representative thereof, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe upon privately

473

Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of TMDLs on Impacts of TMDLs on Coal-Fired Power Plants April 2010 DOE/NETL-2010/1408 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

474

A novel Electricity Marketing Model Integrating Intelligent Disaster-Recovery System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Considering the unexpected events, such as floods, fires, hurricanes, and even terrorist attacks, this paper discusses an integration model of electricity marketing system. The novel system consists of the wireless communication mode, computer networks, GPRS satellite positioning system and GIS power distribution system. This model aims at the intelligent disaster recovery system and the overall recovery plan for disaster recovery. Moreover, the marketing information systems are aiming at enhancing the ability to resist disasters and major incidents and reducing the disaster which is caused by combat and the loss of accidents. Finally, the paper suggests how this system could reduce the adverse effects on electricity customers and the whole society, to ensure that information systems provide critical business functions in the disaster time after resumption and continuation of operation.

Shi Li; Zeng Ming; Li Lingyun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Recovery of Plutonium from Refractory Residues Using a Sodium Peroxide Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect

The recycle of plutonium from refractory residues is a necessary activity for the nuclear weapon production complex. Traditionally, high-fired plutonium oxide (PuO2) was leached from the residue matrix using a nitric acid/fluoride dissolving flowsheet. The recovery operations were time consuming and often required multiple contacts with fresh dissolving solution to reduce the plutonium concentration to levels where residual solids could be discarded. Due to these drawbacks, the development of an efficient process for the recovery of plutonium from refractory materials is desirable. To address this need, a pretreatment process was developed. The development program utilized a series of small-scale experiments to optimize processing conditions for the fusion process and demonstrate the plutonium recovery efficiency using ceramic materials developed as potential long-term storage forms for PuO2 and an incinerator ash from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) as te st materials.

Rudisill, T.S.

2003-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

476

Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UPTON, N.Y. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act UPTON, N.Y. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb neutrons produced for research. The Brookhaven National Laboratory is using $39 million from the Recovery Act to decommission the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, the world's first reactor built solely for peaceful research purposes. The decommissioning is slated for completion later this year and will end Office of Environmental Management legacy cleanup activities at the Lab. The neutron shields were located on the north and south sides of a 700-ton graphite pile. The three-inch-thick shields absorbed neutrons that escaped from the graphite pile. The shields also limited movement of the pile when the reactor was in opera-

477

ORISE: Completion of environmental characterization at ORNL a Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORISE's completion of environmental characterization at ORNL is a ORISE's completion of environmental characterization at ORNL is a Recovery Act success Exterior of K-33 superstructure at ORNL This 2.8 million-square-foot facility known as K-33 was formerly used to house a uranium-enrichment operation during the Manhattan Project. The superstructure was one of three dozen facilities ORISE characterized under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-an effort that proved to be challenging due to the complexity of the facilities and the project's accelerated timeline. Photo courtesy of DOE. Over the past year and a half, funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has made its way into Oak Ridge, Tenn. That has meant that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), which is managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities, has been very busy

478

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 27  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Continued on page 4 Continued on page 4 Oak Ridge Uses Savings to Begin Additional Recovery Act Projects OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - In 2009, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act invested $755 million into 24 environmen- tal cleanup projects across the 34,000-acre Oak Ridge Res- ervation. As the Oak Ridge Environmental Management (EM) pro- gram's Recovery Act work progressed, projects performed under original cost estimates, resulting in savings of more than $90 million. Those savings are now being used to fund 12 additional projects at Oak Ridge's three major sites- the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). Most of the projects are scheduled for completion in 2012, with the remaining projects on track to finish

479

EMSL: Capabilities: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMSL Procurements under Recovery Act EMSL Procurements under Recovery Act Additional Information Investing in Innovation: EMSL and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Recovery Act and Systems Biology at EMSL Recovery Act Instruments coming to EMSL In the News EMSL ARRA Capability Features News: Recovery Act and PNNL Recovery Act in the Tri-City Herald Related Links Recovery.gov DOE and the Recovery Act Message from Energy Secretary Chu Recovery Act at PNNL EMSL evolves with the needs of its scientific users, and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has helped to accelerate this evolution. Thirty-one instruments were acquired and installed at EMSL. These instruments are listed below, and each listing is accompanied by a brief overview. Each of these new and leading-edge instruments was chosen by design to

480

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire management recovery" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Recovery Act State Memos Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 1, 2010 June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 8 TRANSPORTATION ............................................................................................... 10 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE ...................................................................... 10

482

RMOTC - Testing - Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC will play a significant role in continued enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technology development and field demonstration. A scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) enhanced oil recovery

483

Recovery Act State Memos Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 1, 2010 October 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 RENEWABLE ENERGY ............................................................................................. 5 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 6 TRANSPORTATION ................................................................................................. 8 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE ........................................................................ 9

484

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as a private company or a state or local employing agency, who reports waste, fraud or abuse connected to the use of Recovery Act funds may not be discharged, demoted or...

485

Outlook for enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the potential for enhanced oil recovery, the evolutionary nature of the recovery processes being applied in oilfields today, key parameters that describe the technology state-of-the-art for each of the major oil recovery processes, and the nature and key outputs from the current Department of Energy research program on enhanced oil recovery. From this overview, it will be seen that the DOE program is focused on the analysis of ongoing tests and on long-range, basic research to support a more thorough understanding of process performance. Data from the program will be made available through reports, symposia, and on-line computer access; the outputs are designed to allow an independent producer to evaluate his own project as an effort to transfer rapidly the technology now being developed.

Johnson, H.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

Jackson, H. Z.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs...

Ganapathy, V.

488

LANL exceeds Early Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

exceeds Early Recovery Act recycling goals March 8, 2010 More than 136 tons of metal saved from demolished buildings LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 9, 2009-Los Alamos National...

489

Olefin recovery via chemical absorption  

SciTech Connect

The recovery of fight olefins in petrochemical plants has generally been accomplished through cryogenic distillation, a process which is very capital and energy intensive. In an effort to simplify the recovery process and reduce its cost, BP Chemicals has developed a chemical absorption technology based on an aqueous silver nitrate solution. Stone & Webster is now marketing, licensing, and engineering the technology. The process is commercially ready for recovering olefins from olefin derivative plant vent gases, such as vents from polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene oxide, and synthetic ethanol units. The process can also be used to debottleneck C{sub 2} or C{sub 3} splinters, or to improve olefin product purity. This paper presents the olefin recovery imp technology, discusses its applications, and presents economics for the recovery of ethylene and propylene.

Barchas, R. [Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, Houston, TX (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Recovery Act Funding Opportunities Webcast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As a result of the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, the Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) has four open Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) totaling $484 million for cost-shared...

491

Low Level Heat Recovery Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

O'Brien, W. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Western Area Power Administration's Control and Administration of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Borrowing Authority, OAS-RA-12-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Alert Management Alert Western Area Power Administration's Control and Administration of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Borrowing Authority OAS-RA-12-01 November 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 4, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert on "The Western Area Power Administration's Control and Administration of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Borrowing Authority" IMMEDIATE CONCERN Despite internal control and administration issues with its first project authorized under its $3.25 billion American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) borrowing authority, the Department of Energy's (Department) Western Area Power Administration

493

Kuwaiti oil fires: Composition of source smoke  

SciTech Connect

While the Kuwaiti oil-fire smoke plumes manifested a pronounced impact on solar radiation in the Gulf region (visibility, surface temperatures, etc.), smoke plume concentrations of combustion-generated pollutants suggest that the overall chemical impact on the atmosphere of the smoke from these fires was probably much less than anticipated. Combustion in the Kuwaiti oil fires was surprisingly efficient, releasing on average more than 93% of the combusted hydrocarbon fuels as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Correspondingly, combustion-produced quantities of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbonaceous particles were low, each {approximately} 2% by weight. The fraction of methane (CH{sub 4}) produced by the fires was also relatively low ({approximately} 0.2%), but source emissions of nonmethane hydrocarbons were high ({approximately} 2%). Processes other than combustion (e.g., volatilization) probably contributed significantly to the measured in-plume hydrocarbon concentrations. Substantially, different elemental to organic carbon ratios were obtained for aerosol particles from several different types of fires/smokes. Sulfur emissions (particulate and gaseous) measured at the source fires were lower ({approximately} 0.5%) than predicted based on average sulfur contents in the crude. Sulfur dioxide measurements (SO{sub 2}) reported herein, however, were both limited in actual number and in the number of well fires sampled. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from the Kuwaiti oil fires were very low and often could not be distinguished from background concentrations. About 25-30% of the fires produced white smoke plumes that were found to be highly enriched in sodium and calcium chlorides. 18 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Cofer, W.R. III; Cahoon, D.R. [Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States); Stevens, R.K.; Pinto, J.P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Winstead, E.L.; Sebacher, D.I. [Hughes STX Corp., Hampton, VA (United States); Abdulraheem, M.Y. [Kuwait Environmental Protection Dept., Kuwait City (Kuwait); Al-Sahafi, M. [Ministry of Defense and Aviation, Eastern Province (Saudi Arabia); Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)] [and others

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

494

Material Analysis for a Fire Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

This report consolidates technical information on several materials and material classes for a fire assessment. The materials include three polymeric materials, wood, and hydraulic oil. The polymers are polystyrene, polyurethane, and melamine- formaldehyde foams. Samples of two of the specific materials were tested for their behavior in a fire - like environment. Test data and the methods used to test the materials are presented. Much of the remaining data are taken from a literature survey. This report serves as a reference source of properties necessary to predict the behavior of these materials in a fire.

Brown, Alexander; Nemer, Martin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

The Research about Fire Prevention of Vehicle Refuelling Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fuel oil and gas offered by vehicle refuelling stations have combustion and explosion characteristics, serious casualties and economic losses often caused by fire. The research about oil and gas fire risk, refuelling process and facilities, proposing appropriate fire prevention measures possess great significance for reducing refuelling stations fire losses, and ensuring the safety of the station and surrounding environment.

Hong-yu Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Fire Hazards Analysis for the Inactive Equipment Storage Sprung Structure  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the fire protection objective of DOE Order 5480.1A are met. The order acknowledges a graded approach commensurate with the hazards involved.

MYOTT, C.F.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

497

Justification to remove 333 Building fire suppression system  

SciTech Connect

Justification to remove the 333 Building fire suppression system is provided. The Maximum Possible Fire Loss (MPFL) is provided (approximately $800K), potential radiological and toxicological impacts from a postulated fire are discussed, Life Safety Code issues are addressed, and coordination with the Hanford Fire Department is assured.

Benecke, M.W.

1995-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

498

(BSET) -FIRE SAFETY ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM Effective Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disasters State and Local Government Active Fire Protection Fire Safety Engr. Prob. Analysis Sem. & Year.Apps Intro to Fire Protection* (3hrs) Hydraulics and Water Distribution* (3hrs) FSET Specific Life Education* (3hrs) Building Construction* (3hrs) (not offered at UNCC) ETFS 1252 -Fire Protection Law (not

Raja, Anita

499