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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

December 18, 2007 INTELLIGENT FIRE ALARM SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a capacity of 110 gallons or less. o Emergency spill or overflow containment UST system that is expeditiously permits may also contain site- specific requirements and references to other applicable NFPA codes and/or standards. Examples of commonly cited NFPA requirements include: o Availability of emergency shut-off valves

2

IMPEDANCE ALARM SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A description is given of electric protective systems and burglar alarm systems of the capacitance type in which the approach of an intruder at a place to be protected varies the capacitance in an electric circuit and the change is thereafter communicated to a remote point to actuate an alarm. According to the invention, an astable transitor multi-vibrator has the amplitude at its output voltage controlled by a change in the sensing capacitance. The sensing capacitance is effectively connected between collector and base of one stage of the multivibrator circuit through the detector-to-monitor line. The output of the detector is a small d-c voltage across the detector-to-monitor line. This d- c voltage is amplified and monitored at the other end of the line, where an appropriate alarm is actuated if a sudden change in the voltage occurs. The present system has a high degree of sensitivity and is very difficult to defeat by known techniques.

Cowen, R.G.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

3

SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

D.W. Markman

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

4

Functional relationship-based alarm processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A functional relationship-based alarm processing system and method analyzes each alarm as it is activated and determines its relative importance with other currently activated alarms and signals in accordance with the functional relationships that the newly activated alarm has with other currently activated alarms. Once the initial level of importance of the alarm has been determined, that alarm is again evaluated if another related alarm is activated or deactivated. Thus, each alarm's importance is continuously updated as the state of the process changes during a scenario. Four hierarchical relationships are defined by this alarm filtering methodology: (1) level precursor (usually occurs when there are two alarm settings on the same parameter); (2) direct precursor (based on causal factors between two alarms); (3) required action (system response or action expected within a specified time following activation of an alarm or combination of alarms and process signals); and (4) blocking condition (alarms that are normally expected and are not considered important). The alarm processing system and method is sensitive to the dynamic nature of the process being monitored and is capable of changing the relative importance of each alarm as necessary. 12 figs.

Corsberg, D.R.

1988-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

5

The Best Ever Alarm System Toolkit  

SciTech Connect

Learning from our experience with the standard Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) alarm handler (ALH) as well as a similar intermediate approach based on script-generated operator screens, we developed the Best Ever Alarm System Toolkit (BEAST). It is based on Java and Eclipse on the Control System Studio (CSS) platform, using a relational database (RDB) to store the configuration and log actions. It employs a Java Message Service (JMS) for communication between the modular pieces of the toolkit, which include an Alarm Server to maintain the current alarm state, an arbitrary number of Alarm Client user interfaces (GUI), and tools to annunciate alarms or log alarm related actions. Web reports allow us to monitor the alarm system performance and spot deficiencies in the alarm configuration. The Alarm Client GUI not only gives the end users various ways to view alarms in tree and table, but also makes it easy to access the guidance information, the related operator displays and other CSS tools. It also allows online configuration to be simply modified from the GUI. Coupled with a good "alarm philosophy" on how to provide useful alarms, we can finally improve the configuration to achieve an effective alarm system.

Kasemir, Kay [ORNL; Chen, Xihui [ORNL; Danilova, Katia [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Video systems for alarm assessment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing closed-circuit television systems for video alarm assessment. There is a section on each of the major components in a video system: camera, lens, lighting, transmission, synchronization, switcher, monitor, and recorder. Each section includes information on component selection, procurement, installation, test, and maintenance. Considerations for system integration of the components are contained in each section. System emphasis is focused on perimeter intrusion detection and assessment systems. A glossary of video terms is included. 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Greenwoll, D.A.; Matter, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Ebel, P.E. (BE, Inc., Barnwell, SC (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

HYBRID ALARM SYSTEMS: COMBINING SPATIAL ALARMS AND ALARM LISTS FOR OPTIMIZED CONTROL ROOM OPERATION  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research, development, and deployment on Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), in which the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe operational life extension of current nuclear power plants. One of the main areas of focus is control room modernization. Within control room modernization, alarm system upgrades present opportunities to meet the broader goals of the LWRS project in demonstrating the use and safety of the advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) technologies and the short-term and longer term objectives of the plant. In this paper, we review approaches for and human factors issues behind upgrading alarms in the main control room of nuclear power plants.

Ronald L. Boring; J.J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Alarm system for a nuclear control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Criticality accident alarm system at the Fernald Environmental Management Project  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to give a description of the Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) presently installed at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) for monitoring areas requiring criticality controls, and some of the concerns associated with the operation of this system. The system at the FEMP is known as the Radiation Detection Alarm (RDA) System.

Marble, R.C.; Brown, T.D.; Wooldridge, J.C.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Criticality alarm system design guide with accompanying alarm system development for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory in Richland, Washington.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy… (more)

Greenfield, Bryce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

Carver, D.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder`s making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed. 7 figures.

Carver, D.W.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

13

Pressurized security barrier and alarm system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A security barrier for placement across a passageway is made up of interconnected pressurized tubing made up in a grid pattern with openings too small to allow passage. The tubing is connected to a pressure switch, located away from the barrier site, which activates an alarm upon occurrence of a pressure drop. A reinforcing bar is located inside and along the length of the tubing so as to cause the tubing to rupture and set off the alarm upon an intruder's making an attempt to crimp and seal off a portion of the tubing by application of a hydraulic tool. Radial and rectangular grid patterns are disclosed.

Carver, Don W. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators’ alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

Jacques Hugo

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

ANALYSIS OF BUILDING AND FIRE CODES AND ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fire alarm systems • Manual initiation for occupant notification ... Pumps and piping Page 35. ... Fuel pipe-in-pipe draining to catch basin with alarm ...

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Integrated alarm annunciation and entry control systems -- Survey results  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results and analyses of a detailed survey undertaken in Summer 1993 to address integrated intrusion detection alarm annunciation and entry control system issues. This survey was undertaken as a first attempt toward beginning to answer questions about integrated systems and commercial capabilities to meet or partially meet US Department of Energy (DOE) site needs.

Clever, J.J.; Arakaki, L.H.; Monaco, F.M.; Juarros, L.E.; Quintana, G.R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Xcel Energy implements an alarm management strategy  

SciTech Connect

Not so long ago, Xcel Energy's Pawnee Station, a 505 MW coal-fired generating station in Brush, Colorado, USA was commonly generating 300 to 400 alarms per 8-hour shift. The article describes how the alarm system was revised and improved by tackling alarm dead-bands, and rationalising alarms for routine events. Operators are trained to understand the functions of alarm management components, their use and response, and obtain feedback. Today the power station reports about one alarm per hour. 3 photos.

Bass, J.; Abreu, G. [Xcel Energy (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Masters Thesis- Criticality Alarm System Design Guide with Accompanying Alarm System Development for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory in Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

A detailed instructional manual was created to guide criticality safety engineers through the process of designing a criticality alarm system (CAS) for Department of Energy (DOE) hazard class 1 and 2 facilities. Regulatory and technical requirements were both addressed. A list of design tasks and technical subtasks are thoroughly analyzed to provide concise direction for how to complete the analysis. An example of the application of the design methodology, the Criticality Alarm System developed for the Radioisotope Production Laboratory (RPL) of Richland, Washington is also included. The analysis for RPL utilizes the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 for establishing detector coverage in the facility. Significant improvements to the existing CAS were made that increase the reliability, transparency, and coverage of the system.

Greenfield, Bryce A.

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Alarm processing with model-based diagnosis of event discrete systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliable and informative alarm processing is important for improving the situational awareness of operators of electricity networks and other complex systems. Earlier approaches to alarm processing have been predominantly syntactic, based on text-level ...

Andreas Bauer; Adi Botea; Alban Grastien; Patrik Haslum; Jussi Rintanen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Real-time anaesthesia diagnosis display system with multi-modal alarms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatal errors during anaesthesia administration are usually preventable human mistakes. It is difficult for anaesthetists to keep monitoring every physiological change and to detect clinically critical events during anaesthesia. Intelligent patient monitoring ... Keywords: anaesthesia diagnosis system, auditory alarm, computerised diagnosis, multimodal alarm, speech alarm, visualisation

Ken Lee; Kyung Jean (Tyler) Yang; Beryl Plimmer; Michael Harrison

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Home Smoke Alarm Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... alarm technology responses to common residential fire scenarios and nuisance ... Analysis of noted inconsistencies has led to the identification of a ...

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Human factors engineering guidance for the review of advanced alarm systems  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance to support the review of the human factors aspects of advanced alarm system designs in nuclear power plants. The report is organized into three major sections. The first section describes the methodology and criteria that were used to develop the design review guidelines. Also included is a description of the scope, organization, and format of the guidelines. The second section provides a systematic review procedure in which important characteristics of the alarm system are identified, described, and evaluated. The third section provides the detailed review guidelines. The review guidelines are organized according to important characteristics of the alarm system including: alarm definition; alarm processing and reduction; alarm prioritization and availability; display; control; automated; dynamic, and modifiable characteristics; reliability, test, maintenance, and failure indication; alarm response procedures; and control-display integration and layout.

O`Hara, J.M.; Brown, W.S.; Higgins, J.C.; Stubler, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Proceedings. October 15-17, 2008, Poznan, Poland, 1-8 pp, 2008. Domanski, PA; Yashar, DA; Kaufman, K. Fire Alarm Systems. ...

24

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Proceedings. October 15-17, 2008, Poznan, Poland, 1-8 pp, 2008. Domanski, PA; Yashar, DA; Kaufman, K. Fire Alarm Signaling Systems. ...

25

A hybrid intelligent system for alarm processing in power distribution substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This application paper presents an intelligent system for alarm processing and fault location in power substations. A hybrid model is constructed using rule-based systems and an artificial neural network. Incoming alarms are initially handled by an input ... Keywords: Expert systems, fault location, neural networks

J. C. Stacchini de Souza; M. B. Do Coutto Filho; R. S. Freund

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Human Factors Perspective on Alarm System Research and Development 2000 to 2010  

SciTech Connect

By definition, alarms serve to notify human operators of out-of-parameter conditions that could threaten equipment, the environment, product quality and, of course, human life. Given the complexities of industrial systems, human machine interfaces, and the human operator, the understanding of how alarms and humans can best work together to prevent disaster is continually developing. This review examines advances in alarm research and development from 2000 to 2010 and includes the writings of trade professionals, engineering and human factors researchers, and standards organizations with the goal of documenting advances in alarms system design, research, and implementation.

Curt Braun; John Grimes; Eric Shaver; Ronald Boring (Principal Investigator)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Electronic firing systems and methods for firing a device ...  

An electronic firing system comprising a control system, a charging system, an electrical energy storage device, a shock tube firing circuit, a shock tube connector ...

28

A new shell for the development of alarm pattern recognition expert systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the first version of GENESIS, an expert system shell suitable for the development of alarm pattern recognition expert systems (APRES). GENESIS Includes a series of algorithms and procedures especially designed for a rapid and systematic ...

Juan Arellano; Yalu Galicia; Edgar C. Ramirez Dominguez

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cold Vacuum Drying facility fire protection system design description (SYS 24)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) fire protection system (FPS). The FPS provides fire detection, suppression, and loss limitation for the CVDF structure, personnel, and in-process spent nuclear fuel. The system provides, along with supporting interfacing systems, detection, alarm, and activation instrumentation and controls, distributive piping system, isolation valves, and materials and controls to limit combustibles and the associated fire loadings.

PITKOFF, C.C.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Integrated use of artificial neural networks and genetic algorithms for problems of alarm processing and fault diagnosis in power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work approaches relative aspects to the alarm processing problem and fault diagnosis in system level, having as purpose filter the alarms generated during a outage and identify the equipment under fault. A methodology was developed using Artificial ... Keywords: alarm processing, fault diagnosis, genetic algorithms, neural network, supervision and control of electrical systems

Paulo Cícero Fritzen; Ghendy Cardoso, Jr.; João Montagner Zauk; Adriano Peres De Morais; Ubiratan H. Bezerra; Joaquim A. P. M. Beck

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems  

SciTech Connect

In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

Miller, Thomas Martin [ORNL; Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Performance of Home Smoke Alarms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 72 Figure 86. Heating ignition source with cooking oil . ... Estimated particle size from cooking oil fire scenario . . ... Performance of Home Smoke Alarms ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Electronic firing systems and methods for firing a device  

SciTech Connect

An electronic firing system comprising a control system, a charging system, an electrical energy storage device, a shock tube firing circuit, a shock tube connector, a blasting cap firing circuit, and a blasting cap connector. The control system controls the charging system, which charges the electrical energy storage device. The control system also controls the shock tube firing circuit and the blasting cap firing circuit. When desired, the control system signals the shock tube firing circuit or blasting cap firing circuit to electrically connect the electrical energy storage device to the shock tube connector or the blasting cap connector respectively.

Frickey, Steven J. (Boise, ID); Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cold Vacuum Dryer (CVD) Facility Fire Protection System Design Description (SYS 24)  

SciTech Connect

This system design description (SDD) addresses the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility fire protection system (FPS). The primary features of the FPS for the CVD are a fire alarm and detection system, automatic sprinklers, and fire hydrants. The FPS also includes fire extinguishers located throughout the facility and fire hydrants to assist in manual firefighting efforts. In addition, a fire barrier separates the operations support (administrative) area from the process bays and process bay support areas. Administrative controls to limit combustible materials have been established and are a part of the overall fire protection program. The FPS is augmented by assistance from the Hanford Fire Department (HED) and by interface systems including service water, electrical power, drains, instrumentation and controls. This SDD, when used in conjunction with the other elements of the definitive design package, provides a complete picture of the FPS for the CVD Facility.

SINGH, G.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Criticality Alarm System Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Critical Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This document specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI) procured for PFP's criticality alarm system as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item. PFP's Criticality Alarm System includes the nine criticality alarm system panels and their associated hardware. This includes all parts up to the first breaker in the electrical distribution system. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-003, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Criticality Detectors and Alarms Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.''

WHITE, W.F.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Performance-based usability evaluation of a safety information and alarm system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the appropriateness of information technical systems for complex professional usage in safety-critical contexts poses significant methodical and practical challenges. In this study, the usability of a Safety Information and Alarm Panel ... Keywords: control room, information presentation, nuclear power plant, operators, practice, validation method

Leena Norros; Maaria Nuutinen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Chasing a Definition of "Alarm"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alarm management has been around for decades in telecom solutions. We have seen various efforts to define standardised alarm interfaces. The research community has focused on various alarms correlation strategies. Still, after years of effort in industry ... Keywords: Alarm management, Communication system operations and management, Network management standards

Stefan Wallin

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Functional relationship-based alarm processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A functional relationship-based alarm processing system and method analyzes each alarm as it is activated and determines its relative importance with other currently activated alarms and signals in accordance with the relationships that the newly activated alarm has with other currently activated alarms. Once the initial level of importance of the alarm has been determined, that alarm is again evaluated if another related alarm is activated. Thus, each alarm's importance is continuously updated as the state of the process changes during a scenario. Four hierarchical relationships are defined by this alarm filtering methodology: (1) level precursor (usually occurs when there are two alarm settings on the same parameter); (2) direct precursor (based on causal factors between two alarms); (3) required action (system response or action expected within a specified time following activation of an alarm or combination of alarms and process signals); and (4) blocking condition (alarms that are normally expected and are not considered important). 11 figs.

Corsberg, D.R.

1987-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

39

Abstract--With the growth of system complexity, dispatchers are often overwhelmed with system alarms. This situation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The proposed alarm processor is implemented both at the substation automation system (SAS) and the energy management system (EMS) level. The SAS level is able to obtain more accurate analysis of substation-wide events using extra substation measurement data that are not available at the EMS level. The EMS level

Kezunovic, Mladen

40

LNG fire and vapor control system technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a review of fire and vapor control practices used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry. Specific objectives of this effort were to summarize the state-of-the-art of LNG fire and vapor control; define representative LNG facilities and their associated fire and vapor control systems; and develop an approach for a quantitative effectiveness evaluation of LNG fire and vapor control systems. In this report a brief summary of LNG physical properties is given. This is followed by a discussion of basic fire and vapor control design philosophy and detailed reviews of fire and vapor control practices. The operating characteristics and typical applications and application limitations of leak detectors, fire detectors, dikes, coatings, closed circuit television, communication systems, dry chemicals, water, high expansion foam, carbon dioxide and halogenated hydrocarbons are described. Summary descriptions of a representative LNG peakshaving facility and import terminal are included in this report together with typical fire and vapor control systems and their locations in these types of facilities. This state-of-the-art review identifies large differences in the application of fire and vapor control systems throughout the LNG industry.

Konzek, G.J.; Yasutake, K.M.; Franklin, A.L.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Home Smoke Alarms A Technology Roadmap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

additional sensors into alarms. Besides aerosols, other primary products of combustion, including carbon and implemented with various proprietary modifications, depending upon the manufacturer. Virtually all ionization as improving fire recognition with minimal false alarms. With mass manufacturing and low-cost, solid

42

Computer Measurement and Automation System for Gas-fired Heating...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer Measurement and Automation System for Gas-fired Heating Furnace Title Computer Measurement and Automation System for Gas-fired Heating Furnace Publication Type Journal...

43

Evaluating the need for a criticality alarm system at ANL-E  

SciTech Connect

Under the current climate of increasing regulation and decreasing budgets, DOE nuclear facilities are forced to become more efficient in operations aimed at satisfying regulatory requirements. Efficiency necessitates increased cooperation between the regulator (DOE) and facility management, and often a mutually agreeable innovative solution. At Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E), one issue that required such an innovative solution and cooperation between contractor and regulator was the determination of whether the risk associated with an inadvertent criticality event justified the purchase and maintenance of a Criticality Alarm System (CAS) meeting ANSI/ANS-8.3-1986 requirements. According to DOE Order 420.1, the need for a CAS is based on the probability of occurrence of a criticality accident. If the probability is <10{sup {minus}6}/yr (i.e., incredible) as determined by {open_quotes}commonly accepted engineering judgement,{close_quotes} then a CAS is not necessary. Installation of a CAS after such a conclusion would be a conservative decision and an unnecessary expense. This paper discusses the use of {open_quotes}commonly accepted engineering judgement{close_quotes} to show that the probability of an inadvertent criticality at a nonreactor nuclear facility (e.g., the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility) is <10{sup {minus}6}/yr. and is therefore an incredible event.

Washburn, P. [Department of Energy, Argonne, IL (United States). Chicago Operations Office; Cohen, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

Putman, V.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System Steam Plant Replaces Outdated Coal-Fired System September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A new natural gas-fired steam plant will replace...

46

Methods for Detector Placement and Analysis of Criticality Accident Alarm Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining the optimum placement to minimize the number of detectors for a criticality accident alarm system (CAAS) in a large manufacturing facility is a complex problem. There is typically a target for the number of detectors that can be used over a given zone of the facility. A study to optimize detector placement typically begins with some initial guess at the placement of the detectors and is followed by either predictive calculations of accidents at specific locations or adjoint calculations based on preferred detector locations. Within an area of a facility, there may be a large number of potential criticality accident sites. For any given placement of the detectors, the list of accident sites can be reduced to a smaller number of locations at which accidents may be difficult for detectors to detect. Developing the initial detector placement and determining the list of difficult accident locations are both based on the practitioner's experience. Simulations following fission particles released from an accident location are called 'forward calculations.' These calculations can be used to answer the question 'where would an alarm be triggered?' by an accident at a specified location. Conversely, 'adjoint calculations' start at a detector site using the detector response function as a source and essentially run in reverse. These calculations can be used to answer the question 'where would an accident be detected?' by a specified detector location. If the number of accidents, P, is much less than the number of detectors, Q, then forward simulations may be more convenient and less time-consuming. If Q is large or the detectors are not placed yet, then a mesh tally of dose observed by a detector at any location must be computed over the entire zone. If Q is much less than P, then adjoint calculations may be more efficient. Adjoint calculations employing a mesh tally can be even more advantageous because they do not rely on a list of specific difficult-to-detect accident sites, which may not have included every possible accident location. Analog calculations (no biasing) simply follow particles naturally. For sparse buildings and line-of-sight calculations, analog Monte Carlo (MC) may be adequate. For buildings with internal walls or large amounts of heavy equipment (dense geometry), variance reduction may be required. Calculations employing the CADIS method use a deterministic calculation to create an importance map and a matching biased source distribution that optimize the final MC to quickly calculate one specific tally. Calculations employing the FW-CADIS method use two deterministic calculations (one forward and one adjoint) to create an importance map and a matching biased source distribution that are designed to make the MC calculate a mesh tally with more uniform uncertainties in both high-dose and low-dose areas. Depending on the geometry of the problem, the number of detectors, and the number of accident sites, different approaches to CAAS placement studies can be taken. These are summarized in Table I. SCALE 6.1 contains the MAVRIC sequence, which can be used to perform any of the forward-based approaches outlined in Table I. For analog calculations, MAVRIC simply calls the Monaco MC code. For CADIS and FW-CADIS, MAVRIC uses the Denovo discrete ordinates (SN) deterministic code to generate the importance map and biased source used by Monaco. An adjoint capability is currently being added to Monaco and should be available in the next release of SCALE. An adjoint-based approach could be performed with Denovo alone - although fine meshes, large amounts of memory, and long computation times may be required to obtain accurate solutions. Coarse-mesh SN simulations could be employed for adjoint-based scoping studies until the adjoint capability in Monaco is complete. CAAS placement studies, especially those dealing with mesh tallies, require some extra utilities to aid in the analysis. Detectors must receive a minimum dose rate in order to alarm; therefore, a simple yes/no plot could be more useful to the analyst t

Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Wetzel, Larry [Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advancements in low NOx tangential firing systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most cost effective method of reducing nitrogen oxide emissions when burning fossil fuels, such as coal, is through in-furnace NOx reduction processes. ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE), through its ABB Power Plant Laboratories has been involved in the development of such low NOx pulverized coal firing systems for many years. This development effort is most recently demonstrated through ABB CE`s involvement with the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quotes} (LEBS) project. The goal of the DOE LEBS project is to use {open_quotes}near term{close_quotes} technologies to produce a commercially viable, low emissions boiler. This paper addresses one of the key technologies within this project, the NOx control subsystem. The foundation for the work undertaken at ABB CE is the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system, which is currently offered on a commercial basis. This system encompasses sub-stoichiometric combustion in the main firing zone for reduced NOx formation. Potential enhancements to this firing system focus on optimizing the introduction of the air and fuel within the primary windbox to provide additional horizontal and vertical staging. As is the case with all in-furnace NOx control processes, it is necessary to operate the system in a manner which does not decrease NOx at the expense of reduced combustion efficiency.

Hein, R. von; Maney, C.; Borio, R. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4280 7/1/2011 12:02 Kentucky Hall Fire Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theatre Theft Copper Wiring Sheriff responded 4293 7/14/2011 16:59 Campus Vehicle Immobilized Unpaid Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded 4281 7/2/2011 9:30 James Hall Theft Glade Property Damage Hand rail FM notified 4285 7/6/2011 10:10 Draper Building Theft Sony DVD

Baltisberger, Jay H.

49

Fire protection countermeasures for containment ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to find countermeasures to protect High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, in exit ventilation ducts, from the heat and smoke generated by fire. Initially, methods were developed to cool fire-heated air by fine water spray upstream of the filters. It was recognized that smoke aerosol exposure to HEPA filters could also cause disruption of the containment system. Through testing and analysis, several methods to partially mitigate the smoke exposure to the HEPA filters were identified. A continuous, movable, high-efficiency prefilter using modified commercial equipment was designed. The technique is capable of protecting HEPA filters over the total time duration of the test fires. The reason for success involved the modification of the prefiltration media. Commercially available filter media has particle sorption efficiency that is inversely proportional to media strength. To achieve properties of both efficiency and strength, rolling filter media were laminated with the desired properties. The approach was Edisonian, but truncation in short order to a combination of prefilters was effective. The application of this technique was qualified, since it is of use only to protect HEPA filters from fire-generated smoke aerosols. It is not believed that this technique is cost effective in the total spectrum of containment systems, especially if standard fire protection systems are available in the space. But in areas of high-fire risk, where the potential fuel load is large and ignition sources are plentiful, the complication of a rolling prefilter in exit ventilation ducts to protect HEPA filters from smoke aerosols is definitely justified.

Alvares, N.; Beason, D.; Bergman, V.; Creighton, J.; Ford, H.; Lipska, A.

1980-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Geothermal system saving money at fire station | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal system saving money at fire station Geothermal system saving money at fire station April 9, 2010 - 3:45pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What will the project do? A geothermal...

51

Free Online Tool Aids Decisions on Fire Sprinkler Systems for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Free Online Tool Aids Decisions on Fire Sprinkler Systems for Homes. From NIST Tech Beat: April 12, 2011. ...

2011-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Home Smoke Alarm Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... alarm technologies in a controlled laboratory test ... arrangements and maximize the test instrumentation. ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ...

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

BARRIER SYSTEM FULL SCALE FIRE TESTING ADDRESSEES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All holders of operating licenses for nuclear power reactors, except those who have permanently ceased operations and have certified that fuel has been permanently removed from the reactor vessel, and fuel facilities licensees. PURPOSE The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is issuing this information notice (IN) to inform addressees of the results of Hemyc electrical raceway fire barrier system (ERFBS) full-scale fire tests. The Hemyc ERFBS did not perform for one hour as designed because shrinkage of the Hemyc ERFBS occurred during the testing. It is expected that recipients will review the information for applicability to their facilities and consider actions as appropriate to avoid similar problems. However, suggestions contained in this information notice are not NRC requirements; therefore, no specific action or written response is required. BACKGROUND The Hemyc ERFBS, manufactured by Promatec, Inc., has been installed at nuclear power plants (NPPs) to protect circuits in accordance with regulatory requirements (Reference 1) and plant-specific commitments. As a result of fire protection inspections, unresolved items (URIs) were opened at some nuclear power stations due to questions raised regarding the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 2). The Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR) performed a review of the Hemyc ERFBS (Reference 3) and requested the NRC’s Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to perform confirmatory testing of this ERFBS. RES performed the testing at the Omega Point Laboratories in Elmendorf, Texas. DISCUSSION This information notice describes the results of the investigation of the fire resistance capability of the Hemyc ERFBS (Attachment 1). The NRC performed two ASTM E 119 furnace tests on a number of cable raceway types that are protected by the Hemyc ERFBS (with and without air gaps) in accordance with the Hemyc ERFBS test plan (see ADAMS Accession No. ML043210141 for a preliminary version of the test plan). The test plan provides ML050890089 IN 2005-07

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Reduction of fire hazards on large mining equipment  

SciTech Connect

Although standards and regulations are in place to prevent large mining equipment fires, recent analyses of mine accident data show that mining equipment fires still occur with alarming frequency and grave consequences, particularly at all surface mines and in underground metal/nonmetal mines. Recently technological advances in fire protection, combined with the statistical data on equipment fires, led NIOSH to reinvestigate this and to improve operator safety. NIOSH demonstrated that newly developed technologies, such as dual cab fire inerting systems and engine compartment fire barriers, can greatly enhance operator safety and lessen the damage of property during large mobile equipment fires. 10 refs., 5 figs.

Maria I. De Rosa

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Understanding Corrosion Mechanisms in Oxy-Fired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Corrosion Mechanisms Understanding Corrosion Mechanisms in Oxy-Fired Systems Background In Oxy-fired Systems, oxygen is used for combustion of coal rather than air. It produces flue (exhaust) gas with concentrated carbon dioxide (CO2), thus facilitating its capture and sequestration. An added benefit of oxy-firing is that it reduces or eliminates nitrogen oxide (NO X ) emissions. Additional energy is required with oxy-firing and subsequent carbon sequestration

56

Gas fired Advanced Turbine System  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the first phase of the Advanced Gas Turbine System (ATS) program was the concept definition of an advanced engine system that meets efficiency and emission goals far exceeding those that can be provided with today`s equipment. The thermal efficiency goal for such an advanced industrial engine was set at 50% some 15 percentage points higher than current equipment levels. Exhaust emissions goals for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and unburned hydrocarbons (UH) were fixed at 8 parts per million by volume (ppmv), 20 ppmv, and 20 ppmv respectively, corrected to 15% oxygen (O{sub 2}) levels. Other goals had to be addressed; these involved reducing the cost of power produced by 10 percent and improving or maintaining the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) at current levels. This advanced gas turbine was to be fueled with natural gas, and it had to embody features that would allow it bum coal or coal derived fuels.

LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Fire Protection System Account Request Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection System Account Request Form Fire Protection System Account Request Form Fire Protection System Account Request Form December 2, 2010 Account request form used to obtain user credentials for the Fire Protection Database To obtain a user id and password to access the Fire Protection system, please complete the form, save the file and email it to HSSUserSupport@hq.doe.gov or print and fax it to 301-903-9823. We will provide a username and password to new account holders. Please allow several business days to process your account request. When your request is approved, you will be contacted with your account information. Fire Protection System Account Request Form More Documents & Publications CAIRS Registration Form Microsoft Word - PARS II User Acct Access Guide.rtf PARS Domain User Maintenance Function Support Team Guide (v

58

Geothermal system saving money at fire station | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal system saving money at fire station Geothermal system saving money at fire station Geothermal system saving money at fire station April 9, 2010 - 3:45pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What will the project do? A geothermal heating and cooling system has enabled the substation to save taxpayers $15,000 annually when compared to a traditional system. The high temperature of the treatment building's water helps reduce the amount of energy needed to heat water in the substation. An environmentally friendly geothermal heating and cooling system in Pennsylvania will save taxpayers $15,000 a year as part of a new fire substation that will decrease emergency response times. The Alpha Fire Co. celebrated the opening of substation on the ground floor of the College Township municipal building earlier this year in State

59

Fire Resistance Tests of Floor Truss Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Trade Center Disaster: The Con Ed Substation in World ... 4.1.1 Span of Test Assembly ... The Underwriters Laboratories of Canada fire testing facility in ...

60

Fire Resistance Testing of WTC Floor System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NYC Building Code Provisions (Fire Resistance in hours) ... [1] Letter dated October 30, 1969 from Robert J. Linn (Manager, Project Planning, The ...

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In February of 2011, wildland fires outside of Amarillo, Texas destroyed 70 homes, burned more than 25,000 acres of land, and caused nearly $6 ...

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System, October 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System August 2012 October 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Assessment Background ........................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

63

Review of the Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System, October 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Office of Science Assessment of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Radiochemical Processing Laboratory Criticality Alarm System August 2012 October 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Assessment Background ........................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

64

Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a review of fire protection system operating experiences from particle accelerator, fusion experiment, and other applications. Safety relevant operating experiences and accident information are discussed. Quantitative order-of-magnitude estimates of fire protection system component failure rates and fire accident initiating event frequencies are presented for use in risk assessment, reliability, and availability studies. Safety concerns with these systems are discussed, including spurious operation. This information should be useful to fusion system designers and safety analysts, such as the team working on the Engineering Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor.

Cadwallader, L.C.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Fire Nature Bulletin No. 51 Febraury 1, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRE Most people firmly believe the ancient notion that the prairies and vacant lots should be burnt off "to make better grass." Many are doing so now. Boys who have seen their parents and neighbors kindling fires on vacant property frequently do likewise on the prairies. Recently there have been four fires in the forest preserves which spread from adjoining land. Burning does more harm than good. True, it gets rid of the old weed stalks and dried grass of last year, so that new grass shows green more quickly. But repeated burnings kill the good, nutritious grasses such as bluegrass, timothy and clover. The wildflowers disappear. All food and nesting cover for birds, rabbits and other wildlife is destroyed, just when they need it most. Thistles thrive. Only tough grasses of little value for pasture or hay, such as crabgrass and quackgrass, and the weeds survive.

66

Brookhaven National Laboratory/ LIGHT SOURCES DIRECTORATE Subject: Building 729 Fire Hazard Assessment/ Fire Hazard Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alarm Code, NFPA 72, 2002 Life Safety Code, NFPA 101, 2006 Emergency and Standby Power Systems, NFPA 110 Code, NFPA 70, 2008. Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, NFPA 70E, 2004 National Fire in accordance with NFPA 780 and UL 96A. 10.4.6 Cathodic protection: Cathodic protection will not be provided. 10

Ohta, Shigemi

67

WTC1, 2, 7 Fire Alarm Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lobby 6 Cars Typically - 1 SSD 1 Car - Typically C LADIES FA 17 A Installed with Recall ... Ceiling mounted round speakers, 70 volt (SPK-9070) ...

68

A Next Generation Alarm Processing Algorithm Incorporating Recommendations and Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Fellow IEEE Abstract-- The number of alarms for a typical power system event may be overwhelming to power. Index Terms-- alarm processing, power system control, reac- tive power control, sensors, switched capacitors, transformer tap changing, wide area control systems, wide area measurement systems. I

69

FAULT DIAGNOSIS WITH MULTI-STATE ALARMS IN A NUCLEAR POWER CONTROL SIMULATOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research addresses how alarm systems can increase operator performance within nuclear power plant operations. The experiment examined the effect of two types of alarm systems (two-state and three-state alarms) on alarm compliance and diagnosis for two types of faults differing in complexity. We hypothesized three-state alarms would improve performance in alarm recognition and fault diagnoses over that of two-state alarms. We used sensitivity and criterion based on Signal Detection Theory to measure performance. We further hypothesized that operator trust would be highest when using three-state alarms. The findings from this research showed participants performed better and had more trust in three-state alarms compared to two-state alarms. Furthermore, these findings have significant theoretical implications and practical applications as they apply to improving the efficiency and effectiveness of nuclear power plant operations.

Austin Ragsdale; Roger Lew; Brian P. Dyre; Ronald L. Boring

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program and Fire Protection Systems at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center, December 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Fire Protection Systems and Fire Protection Systems at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center December 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U. S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2 4.0 Methodology .......................................................................................................................................... 2

71

An Unmanned Aircraft System for Automatic Forest Fire Monitoring and Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), consisting of several aerial vehicles and a central station, for forest fire monitoring. Fire monitoring is defined as the computation in real-time of the evolution of the fire front shape and potentially ... Keywords: Cooperative perception, Forest fire fighting, UAS

Luis Merino; Fernando Caballero; J. Ramiro Martínez-De-Dios; Iván Maza; Aníbal Ollero

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Feasibility and design of blast mitigation systems for naval applications using water mist fire suppression systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent trend of using fine water mist systems to replace the legacy HALON- 1301 fire suppression systems warrants further study into other applications of the water mist systems. Preliminary research and investigation ...

Kitchenka, Julie A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Applications of coatings in coal-fired energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion and erosion of metallic structural materials at elevated temperatures in complex multicomponent gas environments that include particulates are potential problems in many fossil energy systems, especially those using coal as a feedstock. The use of appropriate corrosion-resistant coatings on metallic components offers an avenue to minimize material degradation and extend component life. The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of coating performance in environments typical of pulverized-coal-fired boilers, coal gasification, fluidized-bed combustion, and gas turbines. The paper discusses the complexity of environments in different systems and the coating requirements for acceptable performance. Examples illustrate the morphology and corrosion/erosion performance of coating/structural alloy combinations exposed in some of these systems. La addition, future research and development needs are discussed for coating applications in several coal-fired systems.

Natesan, K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fire Suppression System Performance of Alternative Agents in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... development on nacelle fire protection followed, Klein (1950a) reported the results of the Jet Engine Fire Protection Program of the US Air Force. ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

PlantView Alarm Response Module 2.119.001 User Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PlantView's174Alarm Response Database provides on-line support of alarm knowledge in support of operations or as a source of training references. Searching a system from the navigation tree initiates a pop-up with the alarm data. Including cues for validation and corresponding control loop to ensure automatic operations. As a troubleshooting aid Alarm Response provides identification of probable causes, recommended corrective action procedures, possible overreaching effects to the system operation, and a...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

76

Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The systems include a primary combustion compartment coupled to an impact separator for removing molten slag from hot combustion gases. Quenching means are provided for solidifying the molten slag removed by the impact separator, and processing means are provided forming a slurry from the solidified slag for facilitating removal of the solidified slag from the system. The released hot combustion gases, substantially free of molten slag, are then ducted to a lean combustion compartment and then to an expander section of a gas turbine.

Pillsbury, Paul W. (Winter Springs, FL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Intelligent Economic Alarm Processor (IEAP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The advent of electricity market deregulation has placed great emphasis on the availability of information, the analysis of this information, and the subsequent decision-making to optimize system operation in a competitive environment. This creates a need for better ways of correlating the market activity with the physical grid operating states in real time and sharing such information among market participants. Choices of command and control actions may result in different financial consequences for market participants and severely impact their profits. This work provides a solution, the Intelligent Economic Alarm Processor to be implemented in a control center to assist the grid operator in rapidly identifying the faulted sections and market operation management. The task of fault section estimation is difficult when multiple faults, failures of protection devices, and false data are involved. A Fuzzy Reasoning Petri-nets approach has been proposed to tackle the complexities. In this approach, the fuzzy reasoning starting from protection system status data and ending with estimation of faulted power system section is formulated by Petri-nets. The reasoning process is implemented by matrix operations. Next, in order to better feed the FRPN model with more accurate inputs, the failure rates of the protections devices are analyzed. A new approach to assess the circuit breaker’s life cycle or deterioration stages using its control circuit data is introduced. Unlike the traditional “mean time” criteria, the deterioration stages have been mathematically defined by setting up the limits of various performance indices. The model can be automatically updated as the new real-time condition-based data become available to assess the CB’s operation performance using probability distributions. The economic alarm processor module is discussed in the end. This processor firstly analyzes the fault severity based on the information retrieved from the fault section estimation module, and gives the changes in the LMPs, total generation cost, congestion revenue etc. with electricity market schedules and trends. Then some suggested restorative actions are given to optimize the overall system benefit. When market participants receive such information in advance, they make estimation about the system operator's restorative action and their competitors' reaction to it.

Guan, Yufan

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method  

SciTech Connect

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a high driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1000{degrees}C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, T.F.; Parsons, E.J. Jr.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a high driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1000[degrees]C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, T.F.; Parsons, E.J. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Analysis of criticality alarm system response to an accidental criticality outside the cascade process buildings at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant  

SciTech Connect

Neutron dose rates at detector positions within the X-326, X-330, and X-333 buildings were evaluated for an accidental criticality outside of each building. As fissile material bearing equipment and containers are moved to and from each building, the possibility exists for a criticality accident to occur. This analysis demonstrates that a criticality accident which occurs at any position on the access roads alongside a process building can be detected. The detectable area includes all points within the access road boundary along each face of each building. This analysis also demonstrates that the criticality alarm systems of the process buildings will respond to criticality events occurring within the tie lines connecting the process buildings. This analysis was performed using the MCNP Monte Carlo neutron-proton transport code. The radiation source is the neutron leakage spectrum of a critical solution of 4.95 percent enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O at a power level corresponding to the ANSI ANS 8.3. Standard minimum accident of concern. The evaluated neutron fluxes were converted to neutron dose rates by use of the Henderson free-in-air response functions. Critical source positions correspond to the farthest source to detector distances on the access roads along each face of the three buildings, and the centerpoint of the building tie lines. This report contains the methodology used for this study, a background on the data used, and a section about the assumptions and limits to all conclusions.

Negron, S.B.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Heat pipe technology for coal-fired power systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of heat pipe R and D activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the 1977 to 1984 time period. The heat pipe development efforts were associated with a variety of DOE supported projects involving coal-fired prime movers for stationary power generation. The role of heat pipes for these power systems is in their potential application as thermal transport systems for integrating fluidized bed combustors (FBC) with prime movers ranging from Stirling engines in total energy systems (approx.10 MWe) to closed-cycle gas turbines in central power plants (approx.1000 MWe). The results of initial investigations at ANL demonstrated that high-temperature sodium heat pipes provided the best heat exchanger technology for integrating Stirling engines with coal-fired FBC systems. A major accomplishment included the development and validation of a computer code (ANL/HTP) which calculates heat pipe operating limits and other significant characteristics necessary for power plant design. A number of developmental and prototype heat pipes were designed and fabricated through a subcontract effort with Thermacore, Inc., and delivered to ANL for performance testing. Preliminary test results from ANL's Heat Pipe Test Facility, using induction heating and a gas-water calorimeter to establish energy balances, are given in the report. Test data obtained to date are consistent with ANL/HTP code predictions. 47 refs., 53 figs., 22 tabs.

Uherka, K.L.; Holtz, R.E.; McLennan, G.A.; Koehl, E.R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Performance control strategies for oil-fired residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported of a study of control system options which can be used to improve the combustion performance of residential, oil-fired heating equipment. Two basic control modes were considered in this program. The first is service required'' signals in which an indication is provided when the flame quality or heat exchanger cleanliness have degraded to the point that a service call is required. The second control mode is excess-air trim'' in which the burner would essentially tune itself continuously for maximum efficiency. 35 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

Butcher, T.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The gas turbine system includes a primary zone for burning coal in the presence of compressed air to produce hot combustion gases and debris, such as molten slag. The turbine system further includes a secondary combustion zone for the lean combustion of the hot combustion gases. The operation of the system is improved by the addition of a cyclone separator for removing debris from the hot combustion gases. The cyclone separator is disposed between the primary and secondary combustion zones and is in pressurized communication with these zones. In a novel aspect of the invention, the cyclone separator includes an integrally disposed impact separator for at least separating a portion of the molten slag from the hot combustion gases.

Pillsbury, Paul W. (Winter Springs, FL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Spray booth with energy saving and fire protection systems  

SciTech Connect

This invention teaches an improved exhaust system to be used with a paint spray booth and having a continuously operating power exhaust fan. The exhaust system has a damper that is opened when spraying actively is taking place in the spray booth and that is closed when there is no spraying actively taking place in the spray booth. A control switch is mounted in any of several locations to determine when the spray gun is in use or is not in use. Thus, the control switch is actuated when the spray gun is hung up thus indicating a nonuse condition of the spray system; whereupon use of the spray gun lifts the gun from the hook to indicate spraying activity. A motor drives the damper to the opened position; and a spring biases the damper to the closed position. A timer is also used to delay the closing of the damper until between twenty and possibly two hundred seconds have lapsed after spraying activity has terminated. This purges the spray booth while yet allows for automatic damper control under normal spraying sequences of use and nonuse. A fire sensing switch is used to deenergize the damper motor to allow the damper to be closed in the event of a fire.

Napadow, S.C.

1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

Fire hazards evaluation for light duty utility arm system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection, a Fire Hazards Analysis must be performed for all new facilities. LMHC Fire Protection has reviewed and approved the significant documentation leading up to the LDUA operation. This includes, but is not limited to, development criteria and drawings, Engineering Task Plan, Quality Assurance Program Plan, and Safety Program Plan. LMHC has provided an appropriate level of fire protection for this activity as documented.

HUCKFELDT, R.A.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

88

Guideline for the Evaluation and Treatment of Corrosion and Fouling in Fire Protection Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline document addresses the methods to control and mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in water-related fire protection systems (FPSs).

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Alarm Response to Nuisance Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... All tests were performed in the manufactured home used fire test series ... and ionization units were expressed as equivalent extinction values in the ...

2013-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

90

Priority coding for control room alarms  

SciTech Connect

Indicating the priority of a spatially fixed, activated alarm tile on an alarm tile array by a shape coding at the tile, and preferably using the same shape coding wherever the same alarm condition is indicated elsewhere in the control room. The status of an alarm tile can change automatically or by operator acknowledgement, but tones and/or flashing cues continue to provide status information to the operator.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

False Alarms, Tornado Warnings, and Tornado Casualties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends prior research on the societal value of tornado warnings to the impact of false alarms. Intuition and theory suggest that false alarms will reduce the response to warnings, yet little evidence of a “false alarm effect” has been ...

Kevin M. Simmons; Daniel Sutter

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

N.M. Ruonavaara

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

93

Lightning Direction-Finding Systems for Forest Fire Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive networks of magnetic direction-finding (DF) stations have been installed throughout the western United States and Alaska to facilitate early detection of lightning-caused fires. Each station contains a new wideband direction-finder that ...

E. P. Krider; R. C. Noggle; A. E. Pifer; D. L. Vance

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Posted CX Q14 Sprinkler System Upgrade.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (eX) (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (eX) Determination Summary Form Q14 Sprinkler System Upgrade Project REFERENCE J 10 CFR Part 1021 , Department of Energy National Environmental Policy Act Implementation Procedures, Subpart 0 , Typical Classes of Actions PROJECT SCOPE DISCUSSION The project scope will upgrade the Q14 sprinkler system to meet exposed plastic design basis requirements by installing a fire pump and performing modifications to the Q14 sprinkler piping. The fire pump will be a pre-assembled skid system with enclosure diesel powered pump and associated diesel storage tank. The fire pump assembly wi ll be located on a foundation pad in the grassy area ,;!orthwest of 014. Electrical work will include providing general power to the fire pump building and fire pump control/alarm wiring to a fire alarm panel in the 014

95

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or framework and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, J.A.; Stoddard, L.M.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Alarm sensor apparatus for closures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm sensor apparatus for closures such as doors and windows, and particularly for closures having loose tolerances such as overhead doors, garage doors or the like, the sensor apparatus comprising a pair of cooperating bracket members, one being attached to the door facing or frame work and the other to the door member, two magnetic sensor elements carried by said bracket members, the bracket members comprising a pair of cooperating orthogonal guide slots and plates and a stop member engageable with one of the sensors for aligning the sensors with respect to each other in all three orthogonal planes when the door is closed.

Carlson, James A. (Thornton, CO); Stoddard, Lawrence M. (Arvada, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

An evaluation of the fire barrier system thermo-lag 330-1  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of three fire endurance tests and one ampacity derating test set of the fire barrier system Thermo-Lag 330-1 Subliming Coating. Each test was performed using cable tray specimens protected by a nominal three-hour fire barrier envelope comprised of two layers of nominal 1/2 inch thick material. The fire barrier systems for two of the three fire endurance test articles and for the ampacity derating test article were installed in accordance with the manufacturer`s installations procedures. The barrier system for the third fire endurance test article was a full reproduction of one of the original manufacturer`s qualification test articles. This final test article included certain installation enhancements not considered typical of current nuclear power plant installations. The primary criteria for fire endurance performance evaluation was based on cable circuit integrity testing. Secondary consideration was also given to the temperature rise limits set forth in the ASTM E119 standard fire barrier test procedure. All three of the fire endurance specimens failed prematurely. Circuit integrity failures for the two fire endurance test articles with procedures-based installations were recorded at approximately 76 and 59 minutes into the exposures for a 6 inch wide and 12 inch wide cable tray respectively. Temperature excursion failures (single point) for these two test articles were noted at approximately 65 and 56 minutes respectively. The first circuit integrity failure for the full reproduction test article was recorded approximately 119 minutes into the exposure, and the first temperature excursion failure for this test article was recorded approximately 110 minutes into the exposure.

Nowlen, S.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Components and Structures Safety and Reliability; Ross, S. [Science and Engineering Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Coal-fired high performance power generating system  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO[sub x] SO [sub x] and Particulates < 25% NSPS; Cost of electricity 10% lower; coal > 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW[sub e] combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO[sub x] production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Design criteria document, Fire Protection Task, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, Project W-405  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The K Basin were constructed in the early 1950`s with a 20 year design life. The K Basins are currently in their third design life and are serving as a near term storage facility for irradiated N Reactor fuel until an interim fuel storage solution can be implemented. In April 1994, Project W-405, K Basin Essential Systems Recovery, was established to address (among other things) the immediate fire protection needs of the 100K Area. A Fire Barrier Evaluation was performed for the wall between the active and inactive areas of the 105KE and 105KW buildings. This evaluation concludes that the wall is capable of being upgraded to provide an equivalent level of fire resistance as a qualified barrier having a fire resistance rating of 2 hours. The Fire Protection Task is one of four separate Tasks included within the scope of Project W405, K Basin Essential systems Recovery. The other three Tasks are the Water Distribution System Task, the Electrical System Task, and the Maintenance Shop/Support Facility Task. The purpose of Project W-405`s Fire Protection Task is to correct Life Safety Code (NFPA 101) non-compliances and to provide fire protection features in Buildings 105KE, 105KW and 190KE that are essential for assuring the safe operation and storage of spent nuclear fuel at the 100K Area Facilities` Irradiated Fuel Storage Basins (K Basins).

Johnson, B.H.

1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

Alarm toe switch. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit in a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch.

Ganyard, F.P.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A Fire Risk Breakdown System for Electrical Power Lines in the North of Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic or spontaneous fires (hotspots) are the main causes of unexpected breakdowns of electrical power lines in the North of Brazil. This research has tested, adapted and implemented a pre-operational system aiming to prevent electrical ...

Gutemberg Borges França; Antonio Nascimento de Oliveira; Célia Maria Paiva; Leonardo de Faria Peres; Michael Bezerra da Silva; Luciana Maria Temponi de Oliveira

102

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Common Alarms and Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to identify a common set of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) electric meter alarms and events for standardization, it is important to determine which alarms and events are the most critical and valuable for detecting and responding to AMI security incidents. This document contains the results of the Common AMI Alarms and Events Task, which is a component of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) AMI Incident Response Project. The report provides information that can be ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Understanding Corrosion Mechanisms in Oxy-Fired Systems  

SciTech Connect

Replacing air with oxygen in coal-fired boilers (i.e. oxy-firing) combined with flue gas recirculation is a leading strategy to concentrate CO{sub 2} and assist in carbon capture and sequestration. A significant area of concern is the fireside corrosion with oxy-firing due to the higher CO{sub 2} levels in the combustion gas and potentially higher SO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O levels. In order to investigate this complicated issue, laboratory experiments are being conducted with and without synthetic ash to assess the potential effect of oxy-firing on fireside corrosion rates. The initial results of this project focus on commercial and model Fe-base alloys at 600 C. Without ash, a 50%H{sub 2}O-50%(CO{sub 2}-0.15O{sub 2}) environment was the most aggressive condition, requiring higher Cr contents than 100% H{sub 2}O or Ar-50%CO{sub 2}. With the specimens covered in ash, several gas compositions were examined, including different levels of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} to simulate various oxy-firing strategies. Results also are presented for several laser-clad coating compositions for protecting tubes. An additional task is examining the effect of environment on mechanical properties. Initial work studied Ni-base alloys in steam at 800 C and found little effect of steam on the creep rupture life of alloy 230 but a 35% decrease for alloy 740.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... information retrieval. Evolution of a United States Information System. National Fire Protection Association and International ...

105

Case history of industrial plant steam system layup for direct-fired gas operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the facts of an industrial plant steam system layup for direct fired gas operations. Fuel price savings indicated that gas firing a paper dryer, the largest steam user in the plant, would pay for itself in one year. Conversion work is detailed. Primary gas distribution was achieved by using one line of the steam loop. Machine water heating, power venting, space heating, and air makeup heating, among other conversions, are also specified.

Stacy, G.N.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Lighthouse Alarm and Locator trial - A pilot study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important factor for health is the possibility to be active and mobile. To make this possible various kinds of support are needed. Integrating geographical information systems technology and user experiences is important in the development of more ... Keywords: Home care, mobility, positioning, safety alarm

A. Melander-Wikman; M. Jansson; J. Hallberg; C. Mörtberg; G. Gard

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

RIS-M-2511 FUNCTIONAL ALARMING AND INFORMATION RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RISÃ?-M-2511 FUNCTIONAL ALARMING AND INFORMATION RETRIEVAL L . P . G o o d s t e i n A b s t r a c PLANTS; INFORMATION NEEDS; INFORMATION RETRIEVAL; MAN-MACHINE SYSTEMS; MONITORING; POWER PLANTS. August DISPLAY 11 INFORMATION RETRIEVAL 13 EVALUATION 14 CONCLUDING REMARKS 14 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 17 REFERENCES 17

108

Flame quality monitor system for fixed firing rate oil burners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining and indicating the flame quality, or efficiency of the air-fuel ratio, in a fixed firing rate heating unit, such as an oil burning furnace, is provided. When the flame brightness falls outside a preset range, the flame quality, or excess air, has changed to the point that the unit should be serviced. The flame quality indicator output is in the form of lights mounted on the front of the unit. A green light indicates that the flame is about in the same condition as when the burner was last serviced. A red light indicates a flame which is either too rich or too lean, and that servicing of the burner is required. At the end of each firing cycle, the flame quality indicator goes into a hold mode which is in effect during the period that the burner remains off. A yellow or amber light indicates that the burner is in the hold mode. In this mode, the flame quality lights indicate the flame condition immediately before the burner turned off. Thus the unit can be viewed when it is off, and the flame condition at the end of the previous firing cycle can be observed.

Butcher, T.A.; Cerniglia, P.

1990-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Flame quality monitor system for fixed firing rate oil burners  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for determining and indicating the flame quality, or efficiency of the air-fuel ratio, in a fixed firing rate heating unit, such as an oil burning furnace, is provided. When the flame brightness falls outside a preset range, the flame quality, or excess air, has changed to the point that the unit should be serviced. The flame quality indicator output is in the form of lights mounted on the front of the unit. A green light indicates that the flame is about in the same condition as when the burner was last serviced. A red light indicates a flame which is either too rich or too lean, and that servicing of the burner is required. At the end of each firing cycle, the flame quality indicator goes into a hold mode which is in effect during the period that the burner remains off. A yellow or amber light indicates that the burner is in the hold mode. In this mode, the flame quality lights indicate the flame condition immediately before the burner turned off. Thus the unit can be viewed when it is off, and the flame condition at the end of the previous firing cycle can be observed.

Butcher, Thomas A. (Pt. Jefferson, NY); Cerniglia, Philip (Moriches, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Fire science at LLNL: A review  

SciTech Connect

This fire sciences report from LLNL includes topics on: fire spread in trailer complexes, properties of welding blankets, validation of sprinkler systems, fire and smoke detectors, fire modeling, and other fire engineering and safety issues. (JEF)

Hasegawa, H.K. (ed.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

112

Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, September 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Fire Protection Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Fire Suppression System at the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory May 2011 February 2013 September 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose.................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope....................................................................................................................................................... 2

113

Bonneville Power Administration Communication Alarm Processor (CAP). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power systems operations and maintenance currently face an ever-increasing need for a high level of computerized support. This paper is the final report of a research and development effort undertaken by the Bonneville Power Administration to develop a computerized decision support system to aid operations and maintenance personnel isolate and diagnose faults on a microwave communication system used for centralized dispatch operations. The system, called CAP for Communication Alarm Processor, provides statistical analysis of microwave communication system alarms, as well as an expert system capability for fault isolation and diagnosis. CAP is implemented on a DEC VAX Station 3100 computer, utilizing both knowledge-based programming principles as well as conventional programming techniques.

MacGregor, D.G. [MacGregor-Bates, Inc., Eugene, OR (United States); Goeltz, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Probabilistic Forecasts of (Severe) Thunderstorms for the Purpose of Issuing a Weather Alarm in the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development and verification of a new model output statistics (MOS) system is described; this system is intended to help forecasters decide whether a weather alarm for severe thunderstorms, based on high total lightning intensity, should be ...

Maurice J. Schmeits; Kees J. Kok; Daan H. P. Vogelezang; Rudolf M. van Westrhenen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Carbon Emission Analysis System Design of Coal-Fired Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide is the main cause of global warming, that emission has been the world's attention. and the power industry is an important source of carbon dioxide emissions, this paper try to design the system of power plants for carbon emissions coal-fired ... Keywords: Analysis system, Carbon emissions, Energy saving

Han Jieping; Zhang Chengzhen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Fire Egress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OSHAX.org - OSHAX.org - The Unofficial Guide To the OSHA 1 Introduction  Fires and explosions kill more than 200 and injure more than 5,000 workers each year  There is a long and tragic history of workplace fires in this country caused by problems with fire exits and extinguishing systems  OSHA requires employers to provide proper exits, fire fighting equipment, and employee training to prevent fire deaths and injuries in the workplace OSHAX.org - The Unofficial Guide To the OSHA 2 Exit Route  A continuous and unobstructed path of exit travel from any point within a workplace to a place of safety (including refuge areas)  Consists of three parts:  Exit access  Exit  Exit discharge OSHAX.org - The Unofficial Guide To the OSHA 3 Exit Routes Basic Requirements

117

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems'' Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NO[sub x] emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SO[sub x] emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

Not Available

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of a Software System to Facilitate Implementation of Coal and Wood Co-Fired Bilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal and wood co-fired boiler technology has improved significantly over the years. The term "co-firing", when used by members of the biomass or utility communities, has come to mean mixing a modest amount of clean, dry sawdust with coal and burning the sawdust coal mixture in a large, coal-burning, utility boiler. This paper discusses the development of a computer software system that interacts with the user and allows coal-wood co-fired boilers to be sized, priced, implemented, and operated properly. Information about the equipment that is required for the boiler replacement project is provided. Along with these features, the software would allow the user to determine energy and cost savings that would be available upon installation as compared to other types of boilers. The paper outlines how these savings are realized, and the steps that must be taken to ensure the proper operation of the boiler to achieve these savings. A sensitivity analysis has also been performed on the implementation of coal-wood co-fired boilers in order to determine the key factors influencing the project payback period. The key factors that are considered in the analysis are the boiler size, the annual operating hours, and the current fuel cost. Additional analysis has been done on the boiler size and the annual operating hours. This analysis allows the users to determine if their current facility falls into the feasible range for implementing a coal-wood co-fired boiler system.

Gopalakrishnan, B.; Gump, C. D.; Gupta, D. P.; Chaudhari, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radio frequency security system, method for a building facility or the like, and apparatus and methods for remotely monitoring the status of fire extinguishers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for remotely monitoring the status of one or more fire extinguishers includes means for sensing at least one parameter of each of the fire extinguishers; means for selectively transmitting the sensed parameters along with information identifying the fire extinguishers from which the parameters were sensed; and means for receiving the sensed parameters and identifying information for the fire extinguisher or extinguishers at a common location. Other systems and methods for remotely monitoring the status of multiple fire extinguishers are also provided.

Runyon, Larry (Richland, WA); Gunter, Wayne M. (Richland, WA); Gilbert, Ronald W. (Gilroy, CA)

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Sensor System Based on Semi-Conductor Metal Oxide Technology for In Situ Detection of Coal Fired Combustion Gases  

SciTech Connect

Sensor Research and Development Corporation (SRD) proposed a two-phase program to develop a robust, autonomous prototype analyzer for in situ, real-time detection, identification, and measurement of coal-fired combustion gases and perform field-testing at an approved power generation facility. SRD developed and selected sensor materials showing selective responses to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and hydrogen chloride. Sensor support electronics were also developed to enable prototype to function in elevated temperatures without any issues. Field-testing at DOE approved facility showed the ability of the prototype to detect and estimate the concentration of combustion by-products accurately with relatively low false-alarm rates at very fast sampling intervals.

Brent Marquis

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

NETL: News Release - Novel Coal-Fired Heating System Proves Successful at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 20, 2005 December 20, 2005 Novel Coal-Fired Heating System Proves Successful at Ohio Greenhouse Cost Savings and State EPA Standards Achieved in First Commercial Demonstration WASHINGTON, DC - Using a Department of Energy - funded coal-fired technology, a greenhouse in northeast Ohio is saving more than $1,000 a day in heating costs. The efficient fluidized-bed combustion unit provides an alternative to natural gas systems and, using locally available coal and limestone, surpasses state EPA standards for sulfur capture and stack emissions. "The promise of the unit lies in its novel design," said Donald Bonk, a senior technical advisor for the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which manages the project for the Energy Department. "The fluidized-bed combustion system features flue-gas recirculation, replacing conventional, more expensive boiler tubes. By recycling the flue gas, the system better controls internal temperatures to burn fuel, reducing the formation of pollutants."

123

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Facility Representative  Safety System Oversight  Fire Safety Overall Workshop Agenda May 14-18, 2012  Alexis Park Hotel  Las Vegas, Nevada Monday, May 14, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 1) Zeus B Quality Assurance Overview for FR/SSO Personnel Zeus A 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Fire Safety Workshop Track Begins (see track agenda) Parthenon 4 SAF-271, SSO Assessments (Day 2) Zeus B . Safety Culture Workshop Zeus A Federal Technical Capability Panel Parthenon 2 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer Wednesday, May 16, 2012 6:30 a.m. - 7:45 a.m. Workshop Registration Zeus Foyer 8:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. FR/SSO Tracks Begin; Plenary session with Fire Safety Track Parthenon 2 & 4

124

Integration and operation of post-combustion capture system on coal-fired power generation: load following and peak power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants with post combustion capture and sequestration (CCS) systems have a variety of challenges to integrate the steam generation, air quality control, cooling water systems and steam turbine with the ...

Brasington, Robert David, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... diesel fuels; fire protection; sprinklers; fuel oils; inspection; storage tanks ... distribution systems (including all fuel oil tanks, pumps, generators, routing ...

126

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems; surface temperature; deflection; insulation; thermometers; structural ... effects of fires in buildings, for use ... the analysis of building response to ...

127

Development and design of an advanced pulverized coal-fired system  

SciTech Connect

Under the US Department of Energy (DOE) project `Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems` (LEBS) the ABB team developed the design of a 400 MWe advanced pulverized coal fired electric generating system. The work and the results are described in the paper. Early work included concept development and evaluation of several subsystems for controlling the emission of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, particulates and for reducing wastes. Candidate technologies were then evaluated in various combinations as part of complete advanced supercritical power generation systems. One system was selected for the design of the advanced generating system. Pilot scale testing is now being conducted to support the design of subsystems. The design meets the overall objective of the LEBS Project by dramatically improving environmental performance of pulverized coal fired power plants without adversely impacting efficiency or the cost of electricity. Advanced technologies will be used to reduce NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and particulate emissions to one-fifth to one-tenth of current NSPS limits. Air toxics will be in compliance, and wastes will be reduced and made more disposable. Net station (HHV) efficiency can be increased to 45 percent without increasing the cost of electricity.

Regan, J.W.; Borio, R.W.; Palkes, M. [ABB Power Plant Laboratories (United States); Mirolli, M.D. [ABB Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States); Wesnor, J.D. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J. [Raytheon Engineers & Constructors, Inc. (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reliability estimation for multiunit nuclear and fossil-fired industrial energy systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to report industrial experience with process energy system reliability, and to assess the reliability of multiunit nuclear and fossil-fired energy systems in an industrial setting. Reliability here refers to the percentage of clock time that sufficient amounts of steam energy were available to permit desired production quotas to be met at a particular plant. A nationwide survey was conducted to obtain data relative to energy system reliabilities during 1973--74, and these data for 29 plants from chemicals and allied products (S.I.C. 28), petroleum refining and related industries (S.I.C. 29) and primary metals industries (S.I.C. 33) are reported here. A simulation model in which various operating characteristics of the energy systems were taken into account was developed to obtain estimates of reliabilities of proposed multiunit nuclear and fossil-fired systems. Based on several example problems evaluated with the simulation model, study results indicated that multiple nuclear units or a combination of nuclear and fossil-fired units could provide adequate reliability to meet large-scale industrial requirements for continuity of service.

Sullivan, W.G.; Wilson, J.V.; Klepper, O.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH-PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolyzation process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2, which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. In order to prepare the CETF for the HIPPS char combustion test program, the following three subsystems were designed during this quarter: (1) Flue Gas Recycle System; (2) Pulverized Coal Feed System; and (3) Limestone Feed System The flue gas recycle system is added to simulate the performance of a commercial char burner fired with gas turbine exhaust. Since synthetically made char will be used for the tests at the CETF, the limestone injection system was added to produce a char more representative of that from an actual pyrolyzer. The pulverized coal system is included to provide a supplemental support fuel if a stable flame can not be maintained with char firing only.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ULTRA LOW NOx INTEGRATED SYSTEM FOR NOx EMISSION CONTROL FROM COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories, working in concert with ALSTOM Power's Performance Projects Group, has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to conduct a comprehensive study to develop/evaluate low-cost, efficient NOx control technologies for retrofit to pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The objective of this project was to develop retrofit NOx control technology to achieve less than 0.15 lb/MMBtu NOx (for bituminous coals) and 0.10 lb/MMBtu NOx (for subbituminous coals) from existing pulverized coal fired utility boilers at a cost which is at least 25% less than SCR technology. Efficient control of NOx is seen as an important, enabling step in keeping coal as a viable part of the national energy mix in this century, and beyond. Presently 57% of U.S. electrical generation is coal based, and the Energy Information Agency projects that coal will maintain a lead in U.S. power generation over all other fuel sources for decades (EIA 1998 Energy Forecast). Yet, coal-based power is being strongly challenged by society's ever-increasing desire for an improved environment and the resultant improvement in health and safety. The needs of the electric-utility industry are to improve environmental performance, while simultaneously improving overall plant economics. This means that emissions control technology is needed with very low capital and operating costs. This project has responded to the industry's need for low NOx emissions by evaluating ideas that can be adapted to present pulverized coal fired systems, be they conventional or low NOx firing systems. The TFS 2000{trademark} firing system has been the ALSTOM Power Inc. commercial offering producing the lowest NOx emission levels. In this project, the TFS 2000{trademark} firing system served as a basis for comparison to other low NOx systems evaluated and was the foundation upon which refinements were made to further improve NOx emissions and related combustion performance. Three coals were evaluated during the bench-scale and large pilot-scale testing tasks. The three coals ranged from a very reactive Powder River Basin coal (PRB) to a moderately reactive Midwestern bituminous coal (HVB) to a less reactive medium volatile Eastern bituminous coal (MVB). Bench-scale testing was comprised of standard ASTM properties evaluation, plus more detailed characterization of fuel properties through drop tube furnace testing and thermogravimetric analysis.

Galen H. Richards; Charles Q. Maney; Richard W. Borio; Robert D. Lewis

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dilution-based emissions sampling from stationary sources: part 2 - gas-fired combustors compared with other fuel-fired systems  

SciTech Connect

With the recent focus on fine particle matter (PM2.5), new, self- consistent data are needed to characterize emissions from combustion sources. Emissions data for gas-fired combustors are presented, using dilution sampling as the reference. The sampling and analysis of the collected particles in the presence of precursor gases, SO{sub 2}, nitrogen oxide, volatile organic compound, and NH{sub 3} is discussed; the results include data from eight gas fired units, including a dual- fuel institutional boiler and a diesel engine powered electricity generator. These data are compared with results in the literature for heavy-duty diesel vehicles and stationary sources using coal or wood as fuels. The results show that the gas-fired combustors have very low PM2.5 mass emission rates in the range of {approximately}10{sup -4} lb/million Btu (MMBTU) compared with the diesel backup generator with particle filter, with {approximately} 5 x 10{sup -3} lb/MMBTU. Even higher mass emission rates are found in coal-fired systems, with rates of {approximately} 0.07 lb/MMBTU for a bag-filter-controlled pilot unit burning eastern bituminous coal. The characterization of PM2.5 chemical composition from the gas-fired units indicates that much of the measured primary particle mass in PM2.5 samples is organic or elemental carbon and, to a much less extent, sulfate. Metal emissions are low compared with the diesel engines and the coal- or wood-fueled combustors. The metals found in the gas- fired combustor particles are low in concentration. The interpretation of the particulate carbon emissions is complicated by the fact that an approximately equal amount of particulate carbon is found on the particle collector and a backup filter. It is likely that measurement artifacts are positively biasing 'true' particulate carbon emissions results. 49 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

England, G.C.; Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C.; Zielinska, B.; Chang, M.C.O.; Loos, K.R.; Hidy. G.M. [GE Energy, Santa Ana, CA (United States)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Parameters affecting nitrogen oxides in a Coal-Fired Flow Facility system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unusually high temperature in the primary combustor of the Coal-Fired Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation system causes much higher nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) to be produced than in a conventional coal fired generation system. In order to lower the NO{sub x} concentration to an acceptable level, it is important to know how parameters of the MM power generation system affect the NO{sub x} concentration. This thesis investigates those effects in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute under the contract of US Department Of Energy (DOE). With thermodynamic and kinetic computer codes, the theoretical studies were carried out on the parameters of the CFFF system. The results gathered from the computer codes were analyzed and compared with the experimental data collected during the LMF5J test. The thermodynamic and kinetic codes together modeled the NO.{sub x} behavior with reasonable accuracy while some inconsistencies happened at the secondary combustor inlet.

Lu, Xiaoliang

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the test program were to obtain some preliminary information regarding the nature of particulate and vapor phase alkali compounds produced and to assess any deleterious impact they might have on materials of construction. Power Generating Incorporated (PGI) is developing a wood-fired gas turbine system for specialized cogeneration applications. The system is based on a patented pressurized combustor designed and tested by PGI in conjunction with McConnell Industries. The other components of the system are fuel receiving, preparation, storage and feeding system, gas clean-up equipment, and a gas turbine generator.

Smith, V.; Selzer, B.; Sethi, V.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Monitoring and alarm interpretation in industrial environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ‘ALARM’ research group has been running two years as a multi‐labs group within the French National Program on Artificial Intelligence PRC‐IA. The group’s objective was to bring together representatives of the academic ...

S. Cauvin; M.‐O. Cordier; C. Dousson; P. Laborie; F. Lévy; J. Montmain; M. Porcheron; I. Servet; L. Travé‐Massuyès

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

2012 Facility Representative/Safety System Oversight/Fire Safety Workshop - Registrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop Facility Representative / Safety System Oversight Workshop DOE Fire Safety Workshop Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting May 14 - 18, 2012, at the Alexis park Resort Hotel, Las Vegas, NV Registrants As of 5/15/2012 Total Number: 218 First Name Last Name Government /Contractor Agency Secretarial Office Site Position Training Course FTCP FS 5/15 FS 5/16 FR/SSO Plenary FR Track SSO Track Fire Safety Training Tour Ron Alderson Government Employee DOE NNSA Nevada SSO SAF-271 No No No Yes No Yes No No Josh Allen Government Employee DOE EM Richland FR No No No No Yes Yes No No No Mark Alsdorf Government Employee DOE HSS Headquarters NTC Safety Training Manager SAF-271 Yes No No Yes No No No No Xavier Aponte Government Employee

136

Development and demonstration of a solid fuel-fired gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) and Power Generating Incorporated (PGI) are developing a solid fuel-fired gas turbine system for specialized cogeneration applications. The system is based on a patented pressurized combustor designed and tested by PGI in conjunction with McConnell Industries. The other components of the system are (a) fuel receiving, preparation, storage and feeding system, (b) gas clean-up equipment, and (c) a gas turbine generator. An approximately 400 kW prototype system is under construction at the WRI facilities in Laramie, Wyoming. As a part of this demonstration the integrated system, following a short shakedown period, will be operated on white wood. White wood was selected as the fuel for early tests because of its low ash (0.5 - 1.0 %), silica, and sulfur contents. The system will then be operated on coal. It is expected that the design of the coal-based system will evolve as the wood testing proceeds. In previous similar wood-fired system development attempts, albeit at lower turbine inlet temperatures, a major technical hindrance to long-term operation of a gas turbine power system has been the degradation of the hot section of the gas turbine. Deposition, erosion, and corrosion are main issues that need to be addressed. In the wood-fired PGI system, erosion is not likely to be of concern because of the low silica and low overall ash content of the fuel and the fact that the wood ash particle size is expected to be in the range where little or no erosion would be expected. However, because of the high alkali content of the fuel, deposition and corrosion can become major issues. This paper will deal with the issues pertaining to the design of the prototype being constructed at the WRI premises. Preliminary thoughts on the design aspects of the plant modifications required for coal testing will also be presented.

Speight, J.G.; Sethi, V.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Gas fired advanced turbine system. Phase 1, System scoping and feasibility studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic concept thus derived from the Ericsson cycle is an intercooled, recuperated, and reheated gas turbine. Theoretical performance analyses, however, showed that reheat at high turbine rotor inlet temperatures (TRIT) did not provide significant efficiency gains and that the 50 percent efficiency goal could be met without reheat. Based upon these findings, the engine concept adopted as a starting point for the gas-fired advanced turbine system is an intercooled, recuperated (ICR) gas turbine. It was found that, at inlet temperatures greater than 2450{degrees}F, the thermal efficiency could be maintained above 50%, provided that the turbine cooling flows could be reduced to 7% of the main air flow or lower. This dual and conflicting requirement of increased temperatures and reduced cooling will probably force the abandonment of traditional air cooled turbine parts. Thus, the use of either ceramic materials or non-air cooling fluids has to be considered for the turbine nozzle guide vanes and turbine blades. The use of ceramic components for the proposed engine system is generally preferred because of the potential growth to higher temperatures that is available with such materials.

LeCren, R.T.; White, D.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Development and demonstration of a wood-fired gas turbine system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power Generating Inc. (PGI) has developed and patented a unique direct-fired gas turbine power system (PGI Power System) that operates on solid wood-based fuels. The PGI Power System is designed to generate from 500 kilowatts to 3.5 megawatts of electrical power and up to 30 million Btu per hour of thermal energy for various industrial and utility applications. The system is expected to operate at thermal efficiency levels greater than 70% through full utilization of both the electrical and thermal energy it generates at a specific host facility. PGI and WRI built a 450-kW prototype system at the Western Research Institute (WRI) facilities in Laramie, Wyoming, to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of the PGI Power System. The plant has undergone a brief shakedown, and is presently being operated on white wood. In previous attempts to develop similar systems, the major technical hindrance to long-term operation of a gas turbine power system has been degradation of the hot section in the gas turbine. This problem is overcome in the PGI Power System through its unique design, by closely controlling fuel specifications, and by developing specialized operating procedures. In wood-fired testing conducted to date, no degradation in the engine performance is obvious.

Sethi, V.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Construction program for a large superconducting MHD magnet system at the coal-fired flow facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Argonne National Laboratory has designed and is constructing a 6 T large aperture superconducting MHD magnet for use in the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) at Tullahoma, Tennessee. The magnet system consists of the superconducting magnet, a magnet power supply, an integrated instrumentation for operation, control and protection, and a complete cryogenic facility including a CTI Model 2800 helium refrigerator/liquefier with two compressors, helium gas handling system and a 7500 liter liquid helium dewar. The complete system will be tested at Argonne, IL in 1981. The magnet design is reviewed, and the coil fabrication programs are described in detail.

Wang, S.T.; Genens, L.; Gonczy, J.; Ludwig, H.; Lieberg, M.; Kraft, E.; Gacek, D.; Huang, Y.C.; Chen, C.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Continuous Ammonia Slip Measurements on a Lignite-Fired Unit with a Selective Catalytic Reduction System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ammonia slip measurements that were made by a tunable diode laser (TDL) were conducted on a lignite-fired unit with a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system using a newly developed adjustable flange assembly for dynamic alignment of cross-duct measurements. The single path optics were integrated with a fiber optic–coupled TDL system (Unisearch LasIR) and two shields to allow measurements over the 25-foot (7.62-meter) flue gas duct dimension. The nominal 4.5-foot (1.67-meter) shields were required to ...

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CENTER FOR FIRE RESEARCH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Expert System and Fire Protection Design Assessment System ... Tf - T ) is equivalent to a forced flow convection ... The local force balances in the z and ...

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

142

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

A major objective of the coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) program is to achieve significant increases in the thermodynamic efficiency of coal use for electric power generation. Through increased efficiency, all airborne emissions can be decreased, including emissions of carbon dioxide. High Performance power systems as defined for this program are coal-fired, high efficiency systems where the combustion products from coal do not contact the gas turbine. Typically, this type of a system will involve some indirect heating of gas turbine inlet air and then topping combustion with a cleaner fuel. The topping combustion fuel can be natural gas or another relatively clean fuel. Fuel gas derived from coal is an acceptable fuel for the topping combustion. The ultimate goal for HIPPS is to, have a system that has 95 percent of its heat input from coal. Interim systems that have at least 65 percent heat input from coal are acceptable, but these systems are required to have a clear development path to a system that is 95 percent coal-fired. A three phase program has been planned for the development of HIPPS. Phase 1, reported herein, includes the development of a conceptual design for a commercial plant. Technical and economic feasibility have been analysed for this plant. Preliminary R&D on some aspects of the system were also done in Phase 1, and a Research, Development and Test plan was developed for Phase 2. Work in Phase 2 include s the testing and analysis that is required to develop the technology base for a prototype plant. This work includes pilot plant testing at a scale of around 50 MMBtu/hr heat input. The culmination of the Phase 2 effort will be a site-specific design and test plan for a prototype plant. Phase 3 is the construction and testing of this plant.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of a numerical computer code and circuit element models for simulation of firing systems  

SciTech Connect

Numerical simulation of firing systems requires both the appropriate circuit analysis framework and the special element models required by the application. We have modified the SPICE circuit analysis code (version 2G.6), developed originally at the Electronic Research Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley, to allow it to be used on MSDOS-based, personal computers and to give it two additional circuit elements needed by firing systems--fuses and saturating inductances. An interactive editor and a batch driver have been written to ease the use of the SPICE program by system designers, and the interactive graphical post processor, NUTMEG, supplied by U. C. Berkeley with SPICE version 3B1, has been interfaced to the output from the modified SPICE. Documentation and installation aids have been provided to make the total software system accessible to PC users. Sample problems show that the resulting code is in agreement with the FIRESET code on which the fuse model was based (with some modifications to the dynamics of scaling fuse parameters). In order to allow for more complex simulations of firing systems, studies have been made of additional special circuit elements--switches and ferrite cored inductances. A simple switch model has been investigated which promises to give at least a first approximation to the physical effects of a non ideal switch, and which can be added to the existing SPICE circuits without changing the SPICE code itself. The effect of fast rise time pulses on ferrites has been studied experimentally in order to provide a base for future modeling and incorporation of the dynamic effects of changes in core magnetization into the SPICE code. This report contains detailed accounts of the work on these topics performed during the period it covers, and has appendices listing all source code written documentation produced.

Carpenter, K.H. (Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

Heat Transfer and Thermophotovoltaic Power Generation in Oil-fired Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this study is the production of electric power in an oil-fired, residential heatingsystem using thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion devices. This work uses experimental, computational, and analytical methods to investigate thermal mechanisms that drive electric power production in the TPV systems. An objective of this work is to produce results that will lead to the development of systems that generate enough electricity such that the boiler is self-powering. An important design constraint employed in this investigation is the use of conventional, yellow-flame oil burners, integrated with a typical boiler. The power production target for the systems developed here is 100 W - the power requirement for a boiler that uses low-power auxiliary components. The important heattransfer coupling mechanisms that drive power production in the systems studied are discussed. The results of this work may lead to the development of systems that export power to the home electric system.

Butcher, T.; Hammonds, J.S.; Horne, E.; Kamath, B.; Carpenter, J.; Woods, D.R.

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. The detail of syngas cooler design is given in this report. The final construction work of the CFB pyrolyzer pilot plant has started during this quarter. No experimental testing was performed during this quarter. The proposed test matrix for the future CFB pyrolyzer tests is given in this report. Besides testing various fuels, bed temperature will be the primary test parameter.

York Tsuo

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sequence and batch language programs and alarm related C Programs for the 242-A MCS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, 242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades. This control system, called the Monitor and Control system (MCS), was installed in the 242-A evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme.

Berger, J.F.

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Measurement of air toxic emissions from a coal-fired boiler equipped with a tangentially-fired low NOx combustion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of measurements of chemical emissions from a coal-burning, tangentially-fired, utility boiler equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a low NOx firing system. The tests were conducted in response to Title III of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which lists 189 chemicals to be evaluated as {open_quotes}Air Toxics.{close_quotes} The project was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the US Department of Energy under an existing Innovative Clean Coal Technology Cooperative Agreement managed by Southern Company Services. Field chemical emissions monitoring was conducted in two phases: a baseline {open_quotes}pre-low NOx burner{close_quotes} condition in September 1991 and in the LNCFS Level III low NOx firing condition in January 1992. In addition to stack emissions measurements of both organic and inorganic chemicals, plant material balance evaluations were performed to determine the efficiency of the hot-side ESP at controlling emissions of air toxics and to determine the fate of the target chemicals in various plant process streams.

Dismukes, E.B. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Clarkson, R.J.; Hardman, R.R. [Southern Company Services, Birmingham, AL (United States); Elia, G.G. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Assembly and Characterization of a Prototype Laser-Optical Firing System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, assembly and characterization of the latest generation of a small, ruggedized laser-optical firing system will be discussed. This work builds upon earlier results in an effort to continue the development of robust fiber-coupled laseroptical firing systems.[1][2] This newest prototype strives to improve on earlier designs, while continuing to utilize many of the environmentally proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies.[2][3] One area of improvement involves the implementation of a second optical safing and arming component. Several additional design improvements were also incorporated to address shortcomings uncovered during environmental testing.[4][5] These tests and the subsequent failure analysis were performed at the laser sub-system level. Four identical prototypes were assembled and characterized. The performance of the units were evaluated by comparing a number of parameters including laser output energy, slope efficiency, beam divergence, spatial intensity profile, fiber injection and splitter-coupler transmission efficiency. Other factors evaluated were the ease of alignment, repeatability of the alignment process and the fabrication of the fiberoptical cables. The experimentally obtained results will be compared and contrasted to the performance of earlier prototypes.

Morelli, Gregg L

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low emission boil systems. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first test run of the Toroidal Vortex Combustor (TVC) was completed on December 6. Riley was unable to witness or set up independent sampling equipment for NO{sub x} and precursor measurement for this run. A second run which we witnessed, but did not sample, was completed December 17. This was conducted almost entirely near SR = 1.0 while Textron investigated temperature-load relationships to address concerns from Run 1. A third run was completed over the December holiday break on Dorchester coal to address concerns Textron had about the Illinois test coal. All subsequent tests will use the Illinois coal. Boiler, firing system design. Elevation drawings were developed for dry wall-fired, conventional U-fired slagging, and TVC fired slagging units. We are investigating the feasibility of modifying a conventional U-fired design for low-NOx operation as an alternative to the TVC. The approach taken to I date for NOx reduction in existing U-fired units is to retrofit with delayed-mixing burners with staging air at various places, similar to the approach with dry fired units. The concept of staged fuel addition or reburning for the U-fired system is being examined as a potential combustion NOx control approach. This concept has high potential due to the high temperature and long residence time available in the stagger. Some field trials with coke oven gas reburn produced very low NOx results. Modeling of this concept was identified as a priority task. The model development will include matching field data for air staging on slagging units to the predictions. Emissions control. Selection of an SO2 control process continues to be a high priority task. Sargent & Lundy completed a cost comparison of several regenerable processes, most of which have NOx control potential as well: Active coke, NOXSO, copper oxide, SNOX, ammonia (for SO only, ammonium sulfate byproduct), and a limestone scrubber for comparison.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of a Data Management System for the Kuwait Oil Fire Atmospheric Measurement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the onset of the Kuwait oil fires in early 1991, numerous efforts to monitor and estimate the environmental effects of the fires were initiated. These efforts produced a diverse set of atmospheric data from airborne, surface-based, and ...

Julie A. Haggerty; Stephen P. Carley; David B. Johnson; Amy D. Michaelis

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Application of a Mini Unmanned Aircraft System for In Situ Monitoring of Fire Plume Thermodynamic Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct measurements of wildland fire plume properties are rare because of difficult access to regions near the fire front and plume. Moisture released from combustion, in addition to added heat, can enhance buoyancy and convection, influencing ...

Caroline M. Kiefer; Craig B. Clements; Brian E. Potter

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The low moisture eastern coal processing system at the UTSI-DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A low moisture, eastern coal processing system was constructed at the Department of Energy`s Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute in Tullahoma, Tennessee, to provide a metered and regulated supply of seeded, pulverized coal to support magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power generation research. The original system configuration is described as well as major modifications made in response to specific operational problems. Notable among these was the in-house development of the Moulder flow control valve which exhibited marked improvement in durability compared to previous valves used with pulverized coal. Coal processing system performance parameters are discussed. A summary of tests conducted and significant events are included.

Evans, B.R.; Washington, E.S.; Sanders, M.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

A High Performance Power System (HIPPS) is being developed. This system is a coal-fired, combined cycle plant with indirect heating of gas turbine air. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation and a team consisting of Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Bechtel Corporation, University of Tennessee Space Institute and Westinghouse Electric Corporation are developing this system. In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a commercial plant was developed. Technical and economic analyses indicated that the plant would meet the goals of the project which include a 47 percent efficiency (HHV) and a 10 percent lower cost of electricity than an equivalent size PC plant. The concept uses a pyrolysis process to convert coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a High Temperature Advanced Furnace (HITAF). The HITAF is a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater where steam is generated and gas turbine air is indirectly heated. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is then used to heat the gas turbine air further before it enters the gas turbine. The project is currently in Phase 2 which includes engineering analysis, laboratory testing and pilot plant testing. Research and development is being done on the HIPPS systems that are not commercial or being developed on other projects. Pilot plant testing of the pyrolyzer subsystem and the char combustion subsystem are being done separately, and after each experimental program has been completed, a larger scale pyrolyzer will be tested at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, AL. The facility is equipped with a gas turbine and a topping combustor, and as such, will provide an opportunity to evaluate integrated pyrolyzer and turbine operation. This report addresses the areas of technical progress for this quarter. Detailed design of the components to be used to for the circulating bed gasification tests is underway. The circulating fluidized bed will allow for easy scale-up to larger size plants. The existing pyrolyzer will be outfitted with a cyclone and a j-valve to capture and reinject char into the lower combustion zone. Additional development work has been performed to evaluate advanced cycles utilizing the HIPPS system concept.

York Tsuo

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a Residential Heat Pump Operating in the Cooling Mode With ... to Fire Protection and Life Safety Systems of the World Trade Center Towers. ...

156

Fire Suppression in Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Imperial Japanese Navy Dry Bay and Ullage Fire Suppression System Concept ... Calibration Plot of Average Normalized Peak-to-valley Signals vs. ...

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fire modeling programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... state pressures and flows throughout the building. ... environment, and fire energy release rates ... fan/duct forced ventilation systems between arbitrary ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the 1968 ASHRAE Annual Meeting in Lake Placid, New York, the symposium 'Fire Hazards in Buildings and Air-Handling Systems' was held. ...

159

Fire hazard analysis of Rocky Flats Building 776/777 duct systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this analysis is to determine if ventilation ductwork in Building 776/777 will maintain their structural integrity during expected fire conditions as well as standard design fires typically used to ascertain fire resistance ratings. If the analysis shows that ductwork will not maintain structural integrity, the impact of this failure will be determined and analyzed, and alternative solutions recommended. Associated with this analysis is the development of a computer fire model which can be used as an engineering tool in analyzing the effect of fires on ductwork in other areas and buildings.

DiNenno, P.J.; Scheffey, J.L.; Gewain, R.G.; Shanley, J.H. Jr. [Hughes Associates, Inc., Wheaton, MD (United States)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

CRAD, Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 CRAD, Fire Protection - October 12, 2012 October 12, 2012 Fire Protection Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry HSS CRAD 45-34, Rev. 1) Review fire protection system design and defense in-depth strategies. Interviews shall be conducted of personnel including fire engineers, fire coordinators, fire system technicians, facility operations personnel, and fire department personnel. Review policies, procedures, fire hazards analyses, and safety basis documentation. Additionally, perform facility building walk downs and inspections, and observe selected work activities, such as hot work, fire system impairments, combustible storage practices, dispensing flammable liquids, maintenance and testing of fire protection

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fire Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is the rate at which fire releases energy - this is also known as power. ... fuel) to enable the completion of the fire triangle and the generation of energy ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

FIRE HAZARDS ANALYSIS - BUSTED BUTTE  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas at the Busted Butte Test Facility and to ascertain whether the DOE fire safety objectives are met. The objective, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Section 4.2, is to establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire related event. (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees. (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards. (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE. Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

R. Longwell; J. Keifer; S. Goodin

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fire Fighting Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... prevention and control of fires to enhance fire fighting operations and equipment, fire suppression, fire investigations, and disaster response. ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fire Fighting Technology Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... prevention and control of fires to enhance fire fighting operations and equipment, fire suppression, fire investigations, and disaster response. ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sprinklers; egress; fire spread; fire models; polyurethane foams; pyrotechnics; smoke; insulation; death; fire fatalities; building codes; fire codes ...

166

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to conventional'' technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Modeling of integrated environmental control systems for coal-fired power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was designed to permit the systematic evaluation of environmental control options for pulverized coal-fired (PC) power plants. Of special interest was the ability to compare the performance and cost of advanced pollution control systems to ``conventional`` technologies for the control of particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Of importance also was the ability to consider pre-combustion, combustion and post-combustion control methods employed alone or in combination to meet tough air pollution emission standards. Finally, the ability to conduct probabilistic analyses is a unique capability of the IECM. Key results are characterized as distribution functions rather than as single deterministic values. (VC)

Rubin, E.S.; Salmento, J.S.; Frey, H.C.; Abu-Baker, A.; Berkenpas, M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

System design verification of a hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This hybrid plant utilizes geothermal fluid for feedwater heating. With respect to the extraction of available work from the geothermal fluids, this cycle is approximately two times as efficient as the all geothermal plant. The System Design Verification Study presented verifies the technical and economic feasibility of the hybrid plant. This report is comprised of a conceptual design, cost estimate, and economic analysis of a one-unit 715 MW hybrid geothermal/coal fired power plant. In addition to the use of geothermal fluid for feedwater heating, its use is also investigated for additional power generation, condensate and cooling tower makeup water, coal beneficiation, air preheating, flue gas reheating and plant space heating requirements. An engineering and construction schedule for the hybrid plant is also included.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high-temperature furnace (HITAF): Volume 4. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An outgrowth of our studies of the FWDC coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) concept was the development of a concept for the repowering of existing boilers. The initial analysis of this concept indicates that it will be both technically and economically viable. A unique feature of our greenfields HIPPS concept is that it integrates the operation of a pressurized pyrolyzer and a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater. Once this type of operation is achieved, there are a few different applications of this core technology. Two greenfields plant options are the base case plant and a plant where ceramic air heaters are used to extend the limit of air heating in the HITAF. The greenfields designs can be used for repowering in the conventional sense which involves replacing almost everything in the plant except the steam turbine and accessories. Another option is to keep the existing boiler and add a pyrolyzer and gas turbine to the plant. The study was done on an Eastern utility plant. The owner is currently considering replacing two units with atmospheric fluidized bed boilers, but is interested in a comparison with HIPPS technology. After repowering, the emissions levels need to be 0.25 lb SO{sub x}/MMBtu and 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/MMBtu.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Emergency Response Training Complex Brayton Fire Training ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 40 Communication Tower I - Cylinder Tanks 123 Breaching ... 45 API Storage Tank Fires 82 Marine Ship ... 52 Sprinkler Systems 88 LNG Fires / Auto ...

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

172

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility Fire Suppression System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

173

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System, January 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

174

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System, January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1

175

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Independent Oversight Review of the Technical Area 55 Safety Class Fire Suppression System at Los Alamos National Laboratory, December 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Area 55 Technical Area 55 Safety Class Fire Suppression System at Los Alamos National Laboratory December 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose .................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................. 1 3.0 Scope ....................................................................................................................................................... 2

177

Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3  

SciTech Connect

Coal Tech Corp's mission is to develop, license & sell innovative, lowest cost, solid fuel fired power systems & total emission control processes using proprietary and patented technology for domestic and international markets. The present project 'DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL SCALE, COAL FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEM, PHASE 3' on DOE Contract DE-AC22-91PC91162 was a key element in achieving this objective. The project consisted of five tasks that were divided into three phases. The first phase, 'Optimization of First Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor', consisted of three tasks, which are detailed in Appendix 'A' of this report. They were implemented in 1992 and 1993 at the first generation, 20 MMBtu/hour, combustor-boiler test site in Williamsport, PA. It consisted of substantial combustor modifications and coal-fired tests designed to improve the combustor's wall cooling, slag and ash management, automating of its operation, and correcting severe deficiencies in the coal feeding to the combustor. The need for these changes was indicated during the prior 900-hour test effort on this combustor that was conducted as part of the DOE Clean Coal Program. A combination of combustor changes, auxiliary equipment changes, sophisticated multi-dimensional combustion analysis, computer controlled automation, and series of single and double day shift tests totaling about 300 hours, either resolved these operational issues or indicated that further corrective changes were needed in the combustor design. The key result from both analyses and tests was that the combustor must be substantially lengthened to maximize combustion efficiency and sharply increase slag retention in the combustor. A measure of the success of these modifications was realized in the third phase of this project, consisting of task 5 entitled: 'Site Demonstration with the Second Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor'. The details of the task 5 effort are contained in Appendix 'C'. It was implemented between 1994 and 1998 after the entire 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility was relocated to Philadelphia, PA in 1994. A new test facility was designed and installed. A substantially longer combustor was fabricated. Although not in the project plan or cost plan, an entire steam turbine-electric power generating plant was designed and the appropriate new and used equipment for continuous operation was specified. Insufficient funds and the lack of a customer for any electric power that the test facility could have generated prevented the installation of the power generating equipment needed for continuous operation. All other task 5 project measures were met and exceeded. 107 days of testing in task 5, which exceeded the 63 days (about 500 hours) in the test plan, were implemented. Compared to the first generation 20 MMBtu/hr combustor in Williamsport, the 2nd generation combustor has a much higher combustion efficiency, the retention of slag inside the combustor doubled to about 75% of the coal ash, and the ash carryover into the boiler, a major problem in the Williamsport combustor was essentially eliminated. In addition, the project goals for coal-fired emissions were exceeded in task 5. SO{sub 2} was reduced by 80% to 0.2 lb/MMBtu in a combination of reagent injection in the combustion and post-combustion zones. NO{sub x} was reduced by 93% to 0.07 lb/MMBtu in a combination of staged combustion in the combustor and post-combustion reagent injection. A baghouse was installed that was rated to 0.03 lb/MMBtu stack particle emissions. The initial particle emission test by EPA Method 5 indicated substantially higher emissions far beyond that indicated by the clear emission plume. These emissions were attributed to steel particles released by wall corrosion in the baghouse, correction of which had no effect of emissions.

Bert Zauderer

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

The high moisture western coal processing system at the UTSI-DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original eastern coal processing system at the Department of Energy`s Coal Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at the University of Tennessee Space Institute in Tullahoma, Tennessee, was modified to pulverize and dry Montana Rosebud, a western coal. Significant modifications to the CFFF coal processing system were required and the equipment selection criteria are reviewed. Coal processing system performance parameters are discussed. A summary of tests conducted and significant events are included.

Sanders, M.E.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

System Modeling of ORNL s 20 MW(t) Wood-fired Gasifying Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an overview of the new 20 MW(t) wood-fired steam plant currently under construction by Johnson Controls, Inc. at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. The new plant will utilize a low-temperature air-blown gasifier system developed by the Nexterra Systems Corporation to generate low-heating value syngas (producer gas), which will then be burned in a staged combustion chamber to produce heat for the boiler. This is considered a showcase project for demonstrating the benefits of clean, bio-based energy, and thus there is considerable interest in monitoring and modeling the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of this technology relative to conventional steam generation with petroleum-based fuels. In preparation for system startup in 2012, we are developing steady-state and dynamic models of the major process components, including the gasifiers and combustor. These tools are intended to assist in tracking and optimizing system performance and for carrying out future conceptual studies of process changes that might improve the overall energy efficiency and sustainability. In this paper we describe the status of our steady-state gasifier and combustor models and illustrate preliminary results from limited parametric studies.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Wiggins, Gavin [ORNL; Hao, Ye [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

June 12, 2006 AUTOMATIC SPRINKLERS AND WATER BASED FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Actual FY Reconciled Cost* 2007 41 9 110 $30,351.46 $39,651.85 $162,515.63 2008 35 12 59 $44 of the Quarter Award 2010 state Fire Marshal's conference NFPA 101 life safety code course Corrected compliance drills EH&S fire extinguisher trainer Installation of building lay-out maps OSHA 10 Hour Training NFPA 70

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. This document, the second in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 330 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 1.0% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR system for NOx control and a spray dryer absorber for SO{sub 2} control followed by a baghouse unit for particulate emissions control. Four sampling tests were performed in March 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. Due to mechanical problems with the boiler feed water pumps, the actual gross output was between 195 and 221 MW during the tests. The results showed that the SCR/air heater combination oxidized nearly 95% of the elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a coal-to-stack basis, was 87%. The mercury material balance closures for the four tests conducted at the plant ranged from 89% to 114%, with an average of 100%. These results appear to show that the SCR had a positive effect on mercury removal. In earlier programs, CONSOL sampled mercury at six plants with wet FGDs for SO{sub 2} control without SCR catalysts. At those plants, an average of 61 {+-} 15% of the mercury was in the oxidized form at the air heater outlet. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential Hg removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NOx, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of Hg chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize Hg removal.

J. A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that these data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the ninth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on Unit 1 at Plant 7, a 566 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 3.6% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Four sampling tests were performed in August 2004 during ozone season with the SCR operating; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, SCR outlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Three sampling tests were also performed in November 2004 during non-ozone season with the SCR bypassed; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet). Process samples for material balances were collected during the flue gas measurements. The results show that, at the point where the flue gas enters the FGD, a greater percentage of the mercury was in the oxidized form when the SCR was operating compared to when the SCR was bypassed (97% vs 91%). This higher level of oxidation resulted in higher mercury removals in the FGD because the FGD removed 90-94% of the oxidized mercury in both cases. Total coal-to-stack mercury removal was 86% with the SCR operating, and 73% with the SCR bypassed. The average mercury mass balance closure was 81% during the ozone season tests and 87% during the non-ozone season tests.

J. A. Withum; S. C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dryer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the seventh in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 1,300 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing three percent sulfur. The unit was equipped with an ESP and a limestone-based wet FGD to control particulate and SO2 emissions, respectively. At the time of sampling an SCR was not installed on this unit. Four sampling tests were performed in September 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. The results show that the FGD inlet flue gas oxidized:elemental mercury ratio was roughly 2:1, with 66% oxidized mercury and 34% elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a coal-to-stack basis, was 53%. The average Hg concentration in the stack flue gas was 4.09 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. The average stack mercury emission was 3.47 Ib/TBtu. The mercury material balance closures ranged from 87% to 108%, with an average of 97%. A sampling program similar to this one was performed on a similar unit (at the same plant) that was equipped with an SCR for NOx control. Comparison of the results from the two units show that the SCR increases the percentage of mercury that is in the oxidized form, which, in turn, lends to more of the total mercury being removed in the wet scrubber. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NOx, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal.

J.A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J.E. Locke

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the tenth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on two 468 MW units burning bituminous coal containing 1.3-1.7% sulfur. Unit 2 is equipped with an SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Unit 1 is similar to Unit 2, except that Unit 1 has no SCR for NOx control. Four sampling tests were performed on both units in January 2005; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the economizer outlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process samples for material balances were collected with the flue gas measurements. The results show that the SCR increased the oxidation of the mercury at the air heater outlet. At the exit of the air heater, a greater percentage of the mercury was in the oxidized and particulate forms on the unit equipped with an SCR compared to the unit without an SCR (97.4% vs 91%). This higher level of oxidation resulted in higher mercury removals in the scrubber. Total mercury removal averaged 97% on the unit with the SCR, and 87% on the unit without the SCR. The average mercury mass balance closure was 84% on Unit 1 and 103% on Unit 2.

J. A. Withum; J. E. Locke

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Optically powered firing system for the Procyon high explosive pulse power system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An optically powered fireset has been developed for the Procyon high explosive pulsed-power generator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fireset was located inside this flux compression experiment where large magnetic fields are generated. No energy sources were allowed inside the experiment and no wire connections can penetrate through the wall, of the experiment because of the high magnetic fields. The flux compression was achieved with high explosives in the experiment. The fireset was used to remotely charge a 1.2 {micro}f capacitor to 6,500V and to provide a readout of the voltage on the capacitor at the control room. The capacitor was charged by using two 7W fiber coupled GaAlAs laser diodes to illuminate two fiber coupled 12V solar cells. The solar cell outputs were connected in parallel to the input of a DC-DC converter which step up a 12V to 6,500V. A voltmeter, powered by illuminating a third 12V solar cell with 1W laser diode, was used to monitor the charge on the capacitor. The voltage was measured with a divider circuit, then converted to frequency in a V-F converter and transmitted to the control room over a fiber optic link. A fiducial circuit measured the capacitor firing current and provided an optical output timing pulse.

Earley, L.; Paul, J.; Rohlev, L.; Goforth, J.; Hall, C.R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Development of a coal-fired gas turbine cogeneration system: Status report  

SciTech Connect

The Allison Advanced Coal-Fueled Turbine Program is now in the sixth year of a development effort that has led to a POC engine demonstration test on a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. Earlier forecasts by CWS suppliers that suitable CWS fuels would be commercially available at an economic price have not been realized. A program replan has, therefore, been executed that incorporates the use of readily available dry pulverized coal. To support this program, technology issues relating to combustor performance and emission control, hot gas cleanup, and turbine deposition, erosion and corrosion (DEC) have been addressed. In addition, system assessment studies have been performed to evaluate the commercial prospects for small (<8 MWe) coal-fired industrial cogeneration systems and the application of the rich-quench-lean (RQL) coal-combustion technology to larger (> 100 MWe) utility-sized gas turbines. These results are reported by Wenglarz (1992). Combustor and engine tests on dry coal are now planned in preparation for a commercial demonstration that will follow the completion of this program.

Wilkes, C.; Wenglarz, R.A.; Hart, P.J.; Thomas, W.H.; Rothrock, J.W.; Harris, C.N.; Bourke, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes technical progress on the program â??Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systemsâ? funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed jointly by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech. This three-year project started on October 1, 2008. In the project, a fiber optical sensing system based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) was developed for strain and temperature measurements for Ultra Supercritical boiler condition assessment. Investigations were focused on sensor design, fabrication, attachment techniques and novel materials for high temperature and strain measurements. At the start of the project, the technical requirements for the sensing technology were determined together with our industrial partner Alstom Power. As is demonstrated in Chapter 4, all the technical requirements are successfully met. The success of the technology extended beyond laboratory test; its capability was further validated through the field test at DOE NETL, in which the sensors yielded distributed temperature mapping of a testing coupon installed in the turbine test rig. The measurement results agreed well with prior results generated with thermocouples. In this project, significant improvements were made to the IFPI sensor technology by splicing condition optimization, transmission loss reduction, sensor signal demodulation and sensor system design.

Anbo Wang; Gary Pickrell

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Forest fire management in Portugal : developing system insights through models of social and physical dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing forest fires is a serious national problem in Portugal. Burned area has increased steadily over the past several decades, with particularly devastating years in 2003 and 2005. Ignitions also spike dramatically in ...

Collins, Ross D. (Ross Daniel)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Proceedings of the coal-fired power systems 94: Advances in IGCC and PFBC review meeting. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal-Fired Power Systems 94 -- Advances in IGCC and PFBC Review Meeting was held June 21--23, 1994, at the Morgantown Energy Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. This Meeting was sponsored and hosted by METC, the Office of Fossil Energy, and the US Department of Energy (DOE). METC annually sponsors this conference for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties to review the results of research and development projects; to discuss the status of advanced coal-fired power systems and future plans with the industrial contractors; and to discuss cooperative industrial-government research opportunities with METC`s in-house engineers and scientists. Presentations included industrial contractor and METC in-house technology developments related to the production of power via coal-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) systems, the summary status of clean coal technologies, and developments and advancements in advanced technology subsystems, such as hot gas cleanup. A keynote speaker and other representatives from the electric power industry also gave their assessment of advanced power systems. This meeting contained 11 formal sessions and one poster session, and included 52 presentations and 24 poster presentations. Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions: filter technology issues; hazardous air pollutants; sorbents and solid wastes; and membranes. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

McDaniel, H.M.; Staubly, R.K.; Venkataraman, V.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Draft quarterly progress report, January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary R and D, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, ``Engineering Development of a Coal-Fired High Performance Power Generation System`` between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge}65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign. A crucial aspect of the authors design is the integration of the gas turbine requirements with the HITAF output and steam cycle requirements. In order to take full advantage of modern highly efficient aeroderivative gas turbines they have carried out a large number of cycle calculations to optimize their commercial plant designs for both greenfield and repowering applications.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers work carried out under Task 3, Preliminary Research and Development, and Task 4, Commercial Generating Plant Design, under contract DE-AC22-92PC91155, {open_quotes}Engineering Development of a Coal Fired High Performance Power Generation System{close_quotes} between DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center and United Technologies Research Center. The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of >47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates {le} 25% NSPS; cost {ge} 65% of heat input; and all solid wastes benign. The report discusses progress in cycle analysis, chemical reactor modeling, ash deposition rate calculations for HITAF (high temperature advanced furnace) convective air heater, air heater materials, and deposit initiation and growth on ceramic substrates.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates < 25% NSPS; Cost of electricity 10% lower; coal > 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of > 47% thermal efficiency; NO{sub x} SO {sub x} and Particulates 65% of heat input and all solid wastes benign. In order to achieve these goals our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MW{sub e} combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. Most of this report discusses the details of work on these components, and the R&D Plan for future work. The discussion of the combustor designs illustrates how detailed modeling can be an effective tool to estimate NO{sub x} production, minimum burnout lengths, combustion temperatures and even particulate impact on the combustor walls. When our model is applied to the long flame concept it indicates that fuel bound nitrogen will limit the range of coals that can use this approach. For high nitrogen coals a rapid mixing, rich-lean, deep staging combustor will be necessary. The air heater design has evolved into two segments: a convective heat exchanger downstream of the combustion process; a radiant panel heat exchanger, located in the combustor walls; The relative amount of heat transferred either radiatively or convectively will depend on the combustor type and the ash properties.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Design of an expert system to aid in the selection of a wood fired boiler system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Currently most industrial and institutional facilities rely on fossil fuels to power their boiler systems. As the quantity of these non-renewable resources is depleted, and… (more)

Morris, Melissa L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Engineering development of coal-fired high-performance power systems. Progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

In Phase 1 of the project, a conceptual design of a coal-fired, high-performance power system (HIPPS) was developed, and small-scale R and D was done in critical areas of the design. The current phase of the project includes development through the pilot plant stage and design of a prototype plant that would be built in Phase 3. The power-generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. It is a combined-cycle plant. This arrangement is referred to as the All Coal HIPPS because it does not require any other fuels for normal operation. A fluidized bed, air-blown pyrolyzer converts coal into fuel gas and char. The char is fired in a high-temperature advanced furnace (HITAF) which heats both air for a gas turbine and steam for a steam turbine. The fuel gas from the pyrolyzer goes to a topping combustor where it is used to raise the air entering the gas turbine to 1288 C. In addition to the HITAF, steam duty is achieved with a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) in the gas turbine exhaust stream and economizers in the HITAF flue gas exhaust stream. Progress during the quarter is described.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 3, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R & D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fire Protection Handbook, 20th Edition. ... fire suppression; water distribution; fire tests; design applications; performance evaluation; pipes; water mist ...

198

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications: Summary ... pool fires; nuclear power plants; fire models; computational fluid dynamics ...

199

Using Extended Logic Programming for Alarm-Correlation in Cellular Phone Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alarm correlation is a necessity in large mobile phone networks, where the alarm bursts resulting from severe failures would otherwise overload the network operators. In this paper, we describe how to realize alarm-correlation in cellular phone networks ... Keywords: alarm-correlation, diagnosis, logic programming

C. V. Damásio; P. Fröhlich; W. Nejdl; L. M. Pereira; M. Schroeder

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fire models; nuclear power plants; fire hazard analysis; fire risk assessment ... to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications' (ICFMP). ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the Fire Resistance of Barriers for Nuclear Power Plant Applications. ... nuclear power plants; ASTM E119; cables; fire barriers; fire endurance; fire ...

202

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), evaluated the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)-wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber-fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL determined mercury speciation and removal at 10 bituminous coal-fired facilities; at four of these facilities, additional tests were performed on units without SCR, or with the existing SCR bypassed. This project final report summarizes the results and discusses the findings of the body of work as a whole. Eleven Topical Reports were issued (prior to this report) that describe in great detail the sampling results at each of the ten power plants individually. The results showed that the SCR-FGD combination removed a substantial fraction of mercury from flue gas. The coal-to-stack mercury removals ranged from 65% to 97% for the units with SCR and from 53% to 87% for the units without SCR. There was no indication that any type of FGD system was more effective at mercury removal than others. The coal-to-stack mercury removal and the removal in the wet scrubber were both negatively correlated with the elemental mercury content of the flue gas and positively correlated with the scrubber liquid chloride concentration. The coal chlorine content was not a statistically significant factor in either case. Mercury removal in the ESP was positively correlated with the fly ash carbon content and negatively correlated with the flue gas temperature. At most of the units, a substantial fraction (>35%) of the flue gas mercury was in the elemental form at the boiler economizer outlet. After passing through the SCR-air heater combination very little of the total mercury (<10%) remained in the elemental form in the flue gas; this was true for all SCR catalyst types and sources. Although chlorine has been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas, coal chlorine was not a statistically significant factor affecting mercury speciation at the economizer exit or at the air heater exit. The only statistically significant factors were the coal ash CaO content and the fly ash carbon content; the fraction of mercury in the elemental form at the economizer exit was positively correlated with both factors. In a direct comparison at four SCR-equipped units vs. similar units at the same sites without SCR (or with the SCR bypassed), the elemental mercury fractions (measured at the ESP outlet) were lower, and the coal-to-stack mercury removals were higher, when the SCR was present and operating. The average coal-to-stack mercury removal at the four units without an operating SCR was 72%, whereas the average removal at the same sites with operating SCRs was 88%. The unit mercury mass balance (a gauge of the overall quality of the tests) at all of the units ranged from 81% to 113%, which were within our QA/QC criterion of 80-120%.

J.A. Withum

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

Calculation of Fire Severity Factors and Fire Non-Suppression Probabilities For A DOE Facility Fire PRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a 12 month period, a fire PRA was developed for a DOE facility using the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology. The fire PRA modeling included calculation of fire severity factors (SFs) and fire non-suppression probabilities (PNS) for each safe shutdown (SSD) component considered in the fire PRA model. The SFs were developed by performing detailed fire modeling through a combination of CFAST fire zone model calculations and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). Component damage times and automatic fire suppression system actuation times calculated in the CFAST LHS analyses were then input to a time-dependent model of fire non-suppression probability. The fire non-suppression probability model is based on the modeling approach outlined in NUREG/CR-6850 and is supplemented with plant specific data. This paper presents the methodology used in the DOE facility fire PRA for modeling fire-induced SSD component failures and includes discussions of modeling techniques for: • Development of time-dependent fire heat release rate profiles (required as input to CFAST), • Calculation of fire severity factors based on CFAST detailed fire modeling, and • Calculation of fire non-suppression probabilities.

Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Jim Bouchard; Heather Lucek

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Arousal from Sleep by Emergency Alarms: Implications from the Scientific Literature. Final Report. Arousal from Sleep by ...

205

SIL rating fire protection equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SIL's (Safety Integrity Levels) are used by IEC 61508:1998 [1] to characterise the required functional safety of computer control systems. For example, SIL 4, the highest rating is for fly by wire aircraft and weapons systems and track circuited train ... Keywords: SIL, fire control panels, fire systems

Richard M. Robinson; Kevin J. Anderson

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Conceptual design of a coal-fired MHD retrofit plant. Topical report, Seed Regeneration System Study 2  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Advanced Energy Systems (WAES), through Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC79668 funded by US DOE/PETC, is conducting a conceptual design study to evaluate a coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) retrofit of a utility plant of sufficient size to demonstrate the technical and future economic viability of an MHD system operating within an electric utility environment. The objective of this topical report is to document continuing seed regeneration system application studies and the definition of will system integration requirements for the Scholz MHD retrofit plant design. MHD power plants require the addition of a seeding material in the form of potassium to enhance the ionization of the high temperature combustion gas in the MHD channel. This process has an added environmental advantage compared to other types of coal-fired power plants in that the potassium combines with the naturally occurring sulfur in the coal to form a potassium sulfate flyash (K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) which can be removed from the process by appropriate particulate control equipment. Up to 100% of the Sulfur in the coal can be removed by this process thereby providing environmentally clean power plant operation that is better than required by present and anticipated future New Source Performance Standards (NSPS).

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: protective clothing; fire fighters; heat transfer; turnout coats; thermal insulation; fire research; computer models Abstract: ...

208

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Progress report No. 12, September--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. There are two basic arrangements of our HIPPS cycle. Both are coal-fired combined cycles. One arrangement is the 35% natural gas HIPPS. Coal is converted to fuel gas and char in a pyrolysis process, and these fuels are fired in separate parts of a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The char-fired furnace produces flue gas that is used to heat gas turbine air up to 1400 F. Alloy tubes are used for these tube banks. After leaving the alloy tube banks, the gas turbine air goes through a ceramic air heater where it is heated from 1400 F to 1800 F. The flue gas that goes through the ceramic air heater comes from the combustion of the fuel gas that is produced in the pyrolysis process. This fuel gas is cleaned to remove particulates and alkalies that would corrode and plug a ceramic air heater. The air leaving the ceramic air heater needs to be heated further to achieve the efficiency goal of 47%, and this is done by firing natural gas in the gas turbine combustor. An alternative arrangement of the HIPPS cycle is called the All Coal HIPPS. With this arrangement, the char is used to heat the gas turbine air to 1400 F as before, but instead of then going to a ceramic air heater, the air goes directly to the gas turbine combustor. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is used as fuel in the gas turbine combustor. In both cycle arrangements, heat is transferred to the steam cycle in the HITAF and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG).

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Energy Systems Integration Environmentallyenergy use, combined with the capability of the BMS system, including alarms to identify anomalies. Integration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

DOE/Contractor Fire Safety Workshop Proceedings, May 14 - May...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Integrated Testing of Fire and Life Safety Systems: Charles Kilfoil NFPA 652 Fundamentals of Combustible Dusts: Robert F. Bitter Overview: Enterprise-Level Industrial Fire...

211

Study of the Heating Load of a Manufactured Space with a Gas-fired Radiant Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermal balance mathematics model of a manufactured space with a gas-fired radiant heating system is established to calculate the heating load. Computer programs are used to solve the model. Envelope internal surface temperatures under different outdoor temperatures are obtained, and the heating load of the manufactured space is analyzed. The relationship between the envelope internal surface temperature and the workspace temperature is also analyzed in this paper. CFD simulation software is used to simulate the temperature field and the envelope's internal surface temperature of the manufacture space with hot-air heating system. Comparison and analysis of heating loads are done between the manufactured spaces with convection heating and radiant heating systems.

Zheng, X.; Dong, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fuel supply system and method for coal-fired prime mover  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coal-fired gas turbine engine is provided with an on-site coal preparation and engine feeding arrangement. With this arrangement, relatively large dry particles of coal from an on-site coal supply are micro-pulverized and the resulting dry, micron-sized, coal particulates are conveyed by steam or air into the combustion chamber of the engine. Thermal energy introduced into the coal particulates during the micro-pulverizing step is substantially recovered since the so-heated coal particulates are fed directly from the micro-pulverizer into the combustion chamber.

Smith, William C. (Morgantown, WV); Paulson, Leland E. (Morgantown, WV)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Real-time fire detection in low quality video  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivation for a Robust Video-based Fire Detection SystemFigure 3.1: Screen shots of training videos with fire inshots of training videos with no fire in them. . . . . . .

True, Nicholas James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fire Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This is not a do-it-yourself job and should be left to a qualified contractor. Never paint sprinklers, it can prevent them from operating in a fire. ...

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

Evaluation of coverage of enriched UF{sub 6} cylinder storage lots by existing criticality accident alarms  

SciTech Connect

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is leased from the US Department of Energy (DOE) by the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government corporation formed in 1993. PORTS is in transition from regulation by DOE to regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). One regulation is 10 CFR Part 76.89, which requires that criticality alarm systems be provided for the site. PORTS originally installed criticality accident alarm systems in all building for which nuclear criticality accidents were credible. Currently, however, alarm systems are not installed in the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinder storage lots. This report analyzes and documents the extent to which enriched UF{sub 6} cylinder storage lots at PORTS are covered by criticality detectors and alarms currently installed in adjacent buildings. Monte Carlo calculations are performed on simplified models of the cylinder storage lots and adjacent buildings. The storage lots modelled are X-745B, X-745C, X745D, X-745E, and X-745F. The criticality detectors modelled are located in building X-343, the building X-344A/X-342A complex, and portions of building X-330. These criticality detectors are those located closest to the cylinder storage lots. Results of this analysis indicate that the existing criticality detectors currently installed at PORTS are largely ineffective in detecting neutron radiation from criticality accidents in most of the cylinder storage lots at PORTS, except sometimes along portions of their peripheries.

Lee, B.L. Jr.; Dobelbower, M.C.; Woollard, J.E.; Sutherland, P.J.; Tayloe, R.W. Jr.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fires - 1946  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fires - 1946 Fires - 1946 Nature Bulletin No. 85 September 28, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRES - 1946 It happens every fall. Thousands of acres of vacant land are being burned-off: some of them because of matches, cigarettes or pipe dottle carelessly tossed aside along the highways and along the trails; some of them set afire by thoughtless boys; most of them deliberately burned by people who believe they will improve the crop of grass next year. That is stupid. And if you start a fire which burns over another person's property you are liable to arrest and heavy penalty, under the Illinois law, unless you have given that person proper notice of your intention. Fires harm -- they never help. The tough seeds and roots of the worthless grasses and weeds survive a fire but the good nutritious grasses and most wildflowers are killed. Further, all the winter food and cover for birds and other wildlife are destroyed.

217

Oil-Well Fire Fighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Oil Well Fire Fighting. NIST fire Research NIST Fire Research 2 Oil Well Fire Fighting RoboCrane Model Oil Well Fire Fighting Working Model.

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

218

Gas-fired desiccant dehumidification system field evaluation in a quick-service restaurant. Final report, October 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a field evaluation of state-of-art desiccant dehumidification equipment in Houston, TX. The evaluation demonstrated that comfort control in a quick-service restaurant could be improved dramatically. However, available gas-fired desiccant dehumidification equipment is too expensive, inefficient, and unreliable to be considered for wide application in the restaurant industry. Results of a technical and economic analysis of four HVAC options in four U.S. cities indicated that improved comfort control could be achieved with only a modest increase in operating costs with an advanced system. This, coupled with the economic benefits achieved through lower indoor humidity such as improved crew performance and reduced maintenance costs, could justify the introduction of an advanced, integrated, HVAC system using desiccant technology which has an installed cost similar to current equipment.

Koopman, R.N.; Marciniak, T.J.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ionization-chamber smoke detector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

Roe, Robert F. (Jackson, OH)

1976-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

Direct fired heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

China's post-reform policy implementation gaps and governmental vs. non-governmental fire alarm solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representative to conduct investigations in Fenghua City andof Statistics conducts “statistical investigation” and “own resources to conduct watchdog investigations nationwide,

Hart, Melanie M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Guide for the Implementation of PL 102-522 for Fire Alarm and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Installation should be performed by a crew where the ratio of qualified “fitters” to apprentices is 1:1. A ... There are no requirements for an apprentice. ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

China's post-reform policy implementation gaps and governmental vs. non-governmental fire alarm solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journalism in Post- Deng China,” Journalism Studies, Vol. 1,Villagers and Popular Resistance in Contemporary China,”Modern China, Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 28-61. O?Brien, Kevin J. (

Hart, Melanie M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

China's post-reform policy implementation gaps and governmental vs. non-governmental fire alarm solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1979 and new local DICs over the following years. Gong, Ting (2008), “The Party Discipline Inspection

Hart, Melanie M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Limitations imposed on fire PRA methods as the result of incomplete and uncertain fire event data.  

SciTech Connect

Fire probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods utilize data and insights gained from actual fire events in a variety of ways. For example, fire occurrence frequencies, manual fire fighting effectiveness and timing, and the distribution of fire events by fire source and plant location are all based directly on the historical experience base. Other factors are either derived indirectly or supported qualitatively based on insights from the event data. These factors include the general nature and intensity of plant fires, insights into operator performance, and insights into fire growth and damage behaviors. This paper will discuss the potential methodology improvements that could be realized if more complete fire event reporting information were available. Areas that could benefit from more complete event reporting that will be discussed in the paper include fire event frequency analysis, analysis of fire detection and suppression system performance including incipient detection systems, analysis of manual fire fighting performance, treatment of fire growth from incipient stages to fully-involved fires, operator response to fire events, the impact of smoke on plant operations and equipment, and the impact of fire-induced cable failures on plant electrical circuits.

Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Hyslop, J. S. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evaluation of Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications: Cable Tray Fires ... cable trays; fire models; nuclear power plants; containment; ignition ...

227

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler system. Technical progress report No. 1, August--December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems`` Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

Not Available

1993-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fire Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1066-2012 December 2012 _______________ Supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 DOE STANDARD FIRE PROTECTION U.S. Department of Energy AREA FIRP Washington, DC 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web page at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1066-2012 FOREWORD This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) supersedes DOE-STD-1066-99 1 and is approved for use by DOE and its contractors. The following fire protection standard is canceled with the issuance of this Standard and appropriate technical content was incorporated into this Standard:  DOE-STD-1088-95, Fire Protection for Relocatable Structures

230

[Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems]. Technical progress report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emisssion boiler systems. The primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions, lb/million Btu; SO{sub 2} emissions, lb/million Btu; particulate emissions, lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency, not less than 42%. The secondary objectives are: improved ash disposability; reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. Accomplishments to date are summarized for the following tasks: task 1, project planning and management; task 7, component development and optimization; task 8, preliminary POC test facility design; task 9, subsystem test design and plan; task 10, subsystem test unit construction; and task 11, subsystem test operation and evaluation.

Wesnor, J.D.; Bakke, E. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J.; Kaminski, R.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Enhancing Carbon Reactivity in Mercury Control in Lignite-Fired Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was awarded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41718-01. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) led a consortium-based effort to resolve mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. The EERC team-the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the URS Corporation; the Babcock & Wilcox Company; ADA-ES; Apogee; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Otter Tail Power Company; Great River Energy; Texas Utilities; Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.; BNI Coal Ltd.; Dakota Westmoreland Corporation; the North American Coal Corporation; SaskPower; and the North Dakota Industrial Commission-demonstrated technologies that substantially enhanced the effectiveness of carbon sorbents to remove Hg from western fuel combustion gases and achieve a high level ({ge} 55% Hg removal) of cost-effective control. The results of this effort are applicable to virtually all utilities burning lignite and subbituminous coals in the United States and Canada. The enhancement processes were previously proven in pilot-scale and limited full-scale tests. Additional optimization testing continues on these enhancements. These four units included three lignite-fired units: Leland Olds Station Unit 1 (LOS1) and Stanton Station Unit 10 (SS10) near Stanton and Antelope Valley Station Unit 1 (AVS1) near Beulah and a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB)-fired unit: Stanton Station Unit 1 (SS1). This project was one of three conducted by the consortium under the DOE mercury program to systematically test Hg control technologies available for utilities burning lignite. The overall objective of the three projects was to field-test and verify options that may be applied cost-effectively by the lignite industry to reduce Hg emissions. The EERC, URS, and other team members tested sorbent injection technologies for plants equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and spray dryer absorbers combined with fabric filters (SDAs-FFs). The work focused on technology commercialization by involving industry and emphasizing the communication of results to vendors and utilities throughout the project.

Chad Wocken; Michael Holmes; John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Katie Brandt; Brandon Pavlish; Dennis Laudal; Kevin Galbreath; Michelle Olderbak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Engineered Fire Safety Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered Fire Safety Group. Welcome. ... Employment/Research Opportunities. Contact. Jason Averill, Leader. Engineered Fire Safety Group. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Comparison of Combustion Characteristics of Crude Oils Using Cone Calorimeter. ... fire safety; fire research; crude oil; cone calorimeters; combustion ...

234

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: fire research; fire science; smoke plumes; crude oil; water; in situ combustion; oil spills Abstract: Under the sponsorship ...

235

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... methodology; fire safety; fire investigations; wind tunnels ... towers to withstand unanticipated events such as ... wind tunnel studies conducted in 2002 ...

236

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fires; computational fluid dynamics; predictive models; field models; fire models; hazard assessment; nuclear power plants; nuclear reactor safety ...

237

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evaluation of Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications: Cable ... cable trays; fire models; nuclear power plants; computer models; ventilation ...

238

Fire Research Grants Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fire Research awards are open to institutions of higher education; hospitals; non-profit organizations ... The National Fire Research Laboratory. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

239

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurements for Fire Detection by Mean of Gas Sensors in an Insulation Material Factory. Measurements for Fire Detection ...

240

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 4, July--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: NOx emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; SOx emissions not greater than one-third NSPS; and particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; reduced air toxics emissions; and increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a commercial generation unit.

Not Available

1993-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fault diagnosis for the feedwater heater system of a 300MW coal-fired power generating unit based on RBF neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new style radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used for fault diagnosis of the high-pressure feed-water heater system of a coal-fired power generating unit. The structure of the RBF network and its training algorithm are given. ...

Liangyu Ma; Yongguang Ma; Jin Ma

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

No moving parts safe and arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and arm scheme with no moving parts. The safe and arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe and arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activated the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel.

Hendrix, J.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Proceedings of the joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference  

SciTech Connect

The joint contractors meeting: FE/EE Advanced Turbine Systems conference FEE fuel cells and coal-fired heat engines conference; was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, West Virginia 26507-0880, August 3--5, 1993. Individual papers have been entered separately.

Geiling, D.W. [ed.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Discrete-event modelling of fire spreading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We deal here with the application of discrete-event System Specification (DEVS) formalism to implement a semi-physical fire spread model. Currently, models from physics finely representing forest fires are not efficient and still under development. If ... Keywords: Cellular models, DEVS, Discrete-event modelling and simulation, Fire spread

Alexandre Muzy; Eric Innocenti; Antoine Aiello; Jean-François Santucci; Thierry Marcelli; Paul Antoine Santoni

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fire Protection Account Request Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection System Account Request Form Fire Protection System Account Request Form To obtain a user id and password to access the Fire Protection system, please complete the form, save the file and email it to hssUserSupport@hq.doe.gov or print and fax it to 301-903-9823. We will provide a username and password to new account holders. Please allow several business days to process your account request. When your request is approved, you will be contacted with your

246

Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development task 5 -- market study of the gas fired ATS. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), in partnership with the Department of Energy, will develop a family of advanced gas turbine-based power systems (ATS) for widespread commercialization within the domestic and international industrial marketplace, and to the rapidly changing electric power generation industry. The objective of the jointly-funded Program is to introduce an ATS with high efficiency, and markedly reduced emissions levels, in high numbers as rapidly as possible following introduction. This Topical Report is submitted in response to the requirements outlined in Task 5 of the Department of Energy METC Contract on Advanced Combustion Systems, Contract No, DE AC21-93MC30246 (Contract), for a Market Study of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System. It presents a market study for the ATS proposed by Solar, and will examine both the economic and siting constraints of the ATS compared with competing systems in the various candidate markets. Also contained within this report is an examination and analysis of Solar`s ATS and its ability to compete in future utility and industrial markets, as well as factors affecting the marketability of the ATS.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A coal-fired combustion system for industrial process heating applications. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

This advanced combustion system research program is for the development of innovative coal-fired process heaters which can be used for high temperature melting, smelting and waste vitrification processes. The process heater systems to be developed have multiple use applications; however, the Phase 3 research effort is being focused on the development of a process heater system to be used for producing value added vitrified glass products from boiler/incinerator ashes and industrial wastes. The primary objective of the Phase 3 project is to develop and integrate all the system components, from fuel through total system controls, and then test the complete system in order to evaluate its potential marketability. During the past quarter, the major effort was completing some of the system modification installation designs, completing industry funded testing, developing a surrogate TSCA ash composition, and completing the TSCA ash Test Plan. The installation designs will be used for the equipment modifications planned for the end of CY 93. The industry funded testing consisted of vitrifying Spent Aluminum Potliner (SPL) which is a listed hazardous waste. This testing has verified that SPL can be vitrified into a safe, recyclable glass product. Some results from this testing are provided in Section 2.2.1. The surrogate TSCA ash composition was developed with input from various DOE laboratories and subcontractors. The surrogate ash consists of a mixture of MSW fly ash and bottom ash spiked with heavy metal contaminants. The levels of metal additives are sufficient to ascertain the partitioning of the contaminants between the glass and effluent flow streams. Details of the surrogate composition and the planned testing is provided in Section 4.2.2.

Not Available

1993-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

PISCES: an expert system for coal fired power plant monitoring and diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economics and safety are two of the primary factors that influence the efficient operation of today's complicated power plants. The use of a computer expert system to assist in automatic plant system surveillance and diagnostics can reduce the operation ...

Eddie S. Washington; Moonis Ali

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Description and Verification of the NOAA Smoke Forecasting System: The 2007 Fire Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) current operational Smoke Forecasting System (SFS) is presented. This system is intended as guidance to air quality forecasters and the public for fine particulate matter ...

Glenn D. Rolph; Roland R. Draxler; Ariel F. Stein; Albion Taylor; Mark G. Ruminski; Shobha Kondragunta; Jian Zeng; Ho-Chun Huang; Geoffrey Manikin; Jeffery T. McQueen; Paula M. Davidson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fire Protection Program: Related Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science Brookhaven National Laboratory Hanford Fire Department CPSC OSHA NRC EPA FEMA National Fire Academy Fire Protection Association Australia National Fire...

251

Energy-Saving Analysis on Thermal System in 600MW Supercritical Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-efficiency, energy-saving and environmentally friendly supercritical thermal power units are gradually becoming main stream in China. In this paper, an advanced energy system analysis method, specific consumption analysis, is used to examine the ... Keywords: supercritical, energy-saving, specific consumption analysis, feed-water heating system, environmentally friendly

Yongping Yang; Yu Wu; Zhiping Yang; Ningling Wang; Gang Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fire suppressing apparatus. [sodium fires  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for smothering a liquid sodium fire comprises a pan, a perforated cover on the pan, and tubed depending from the cover and providing communication between the interior of the pan and the ambient atmosphere through the perforations in the cover. Liquid caught in the pan rises above the lower ends of the tubes and thus serves as a barrier which limits the amount of air entering the pan.

Buttrey, K.E.

1980-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

Multiwavelength Observations of a Developing Cloud System: The FIRE II 26 November 1991 Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous multiwavelength measurements of a developing cloud system were obtained by NOAA Doppler lidar, Doppler radar, Fourier transform infrared interferometer, and microwave and infrared radiometers on 26 November 1991. The evolution of the ...

J. M. Intrieri; W. L. Eberhard; T. Uttal; J. A. Shaw; J. B. Snider; Y. Han; B. W. Orr; S. Y. Matrosov

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young Unit 2 and TXU Monticello Unit 3. The work involves establishing Hg oxidation levels upstream of air pollution control devices (APCDs) and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with those removal rates, investigating the possibility of the APCD acting as a multipollutant control device, quantifying the balance of plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization.

Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Program: Fire Risk Reduction in Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... spread in order to develop science-based standards, codes, and practices for fire resistant communities and 2) incorporate cyber-physical systems ...

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

A NOVEL DEVICE FOR DISSEMINATING FIRE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... streaming agent. For it to work effectively, the location of the fire must be known ahead of time in order to orient the system Halon ...

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

1. Introduction 2. Fire suppression mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... may be similar to an outdoor fire, except for wind influence. b ... to installation of a water mist system in the turbine hoods of the offshore platforms of ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

259

Application of Flame Doctor to T-Fired Boilers: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flame Doctor, a burner diagnostic technology, is a packaged system consisting of hardware and software that ties into existing burner flame scanner systems of wall-fired, cyclone-fired, and turbo-fired boilers to provide real-time assessment of flame quality. This report describes feasibility tests to evaluate Flame Doctor for extension to tangentially fired (T-fired) boiler applications.

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

260

November 27, 2006 UNDERGROUND WATER LINES FOR DOMESTIC AND FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, guidelines and specifications. B. The following codes, as required by law: 1. ANSI/NFPA-70, National Electric.2 COPPER A. Wall-mounted 110-blocks (for voice applications) 1. Performance shall meet the performance 5e 110 Block Kits b) Panduit Pan-Punch 110 category 5e System Kits B. Angled patch panels 1. Size

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and m scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition.

Hendrix, James L. (Overland Park, KS)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 15, April 15 1996--June 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering; Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quote} Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis and Phases II and III on a cost-share basis.

1996-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

263

No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and arm scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition. 6 figures.

Hendrix, J.L.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

Exploratory Studies Facility Subsurface Fire Hazards Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is to confirm the requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) are sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public or the environment; Vital U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

Richard C. Logan

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... coal. Analysis of Fire Reports on File in the Massachusetts State Fire Marshal's Office Relating to Wood and Coal Heating Equipment. ...

266

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Crude Oil Full Scale Pool Fire Experiment in Tomakomai in 1998. Crude Oil Full Scale Pool Fire Experiment in Tomakomai in 1998. ...

267

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evaluation of Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications: Cable Tray Fires. ... ASME Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, Special Issue: Solar ...

268

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... oxygen consumption. Energy Balance in a Large Compartment Fire. Fire Safety Journal, Vol. 43, No. 3, 180-188, April 2008. ...

269

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Notarianni, KA; McGrattan, KB; Comparison of Fire Sprinkler Piping Materials: Steel ... Chapter 4; Section 5; NFPA HFPE-02;SFPE Handbook of Fire ...

270

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kawada, G. Fire Dynamics Simulator: User's Manual. ... 2; NFPA FPH2008;Fire Protection Handbook, 20th Edition ... Flow of Alternative Agents in Piping. ...

271

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... disasters; fire safety; fire investigations; terrorists; terrorism ... collected to document the event and as ... include first-person interviews conducted as part ...

272

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... plant operators and the NRC to use fire modeling and fire risk information, along with prescriptive requirements, to ensure that nuclear power plants ...

273

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Use of Fire Models in Risk Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants. ... Project to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications: Summary of 5th ...

274

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nuclear power plants; verification; validation; fire models; fire protection engineering ... in support of day-to-day nuclear power plant (NPP) applications ...

275

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... rate; ignition; liquid spills; nuclear power plants; pool fires; small scale fire tests; trash; wood Abstract: A major risk to a nuclear power plant is the ...

276

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Blevins, LG; Investigation of Oil and Gas Well Fires ... KB; Bouldin, C. Simulation of Oil Tank Fires ... Baum, HR; Rehm, RG; Smoke Production From Large ...

277

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... well as relevant reviewed manufacturer information. ... on the post-collision vehicle fire problem ... previous suppression research in vehicles, recent fire ...

278

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Investigation of Oil and Gas Well Fires and Flares. Final Report. Investigation of Oil and Gas Well Fires and Flares. Final Report. ...

279

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Passive fire protection needs to be evaluated for its ability to contain a fire ... For instance, a hospital may be a safe housing shelter for able-bodied ...

280

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Concurrent Flame Spread in Fires: State of the ... of the Waldbaum Fire, Brooklyn, New York, August 3 ... Width Produced by Ejected Propane Gas Fuel ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Our team has outlined a research plan based on an optimized analysis of a 250 MWe combined cycle system applicable to both frame type and aeroderivative gas turbines. Under the constraints of the cycle analysis we have designed a high temperature advanced furnace (FUTAF) which integrates several combustor and air heater designs with appropriate ash management procedures. The Cycle Optimization effort under Task 2 outlines the evolution of our designs. The basic combined cycle approach now includes exhaust gas recirculation to quench the flue gas before it enters the convective air heater. By selecting the quench gas from a downstream location it will be clean enough and cool enough (ca. 300F) to be driven by a commercially available fan and still minimize the volume of the convective air heater. Further modeling studies on the long axial flame, under Task 3, have demonstrated that this configuration is capable of providing the necessary energy flux to the radiant air panels. This flame with its controlled mixing constrains the combustion to take place in a fuel rich environment, thus minimizing the NO{sub x} production. Recent calculations indicate that the NO{sub x} produced is low enough that the SNCR section can further reduce it to within the DOE goal of 0. 15 lbs/MBTU of fuel input. Also under Task 3 the air heater design optimization continued.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Stone Fire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Change in Cookstove Types on Visibility - Case Study of the Berkeley-Darfur Stove and Three- Stone Fire Extended Abstract #1 Yungang Wang, Ashok J. Gadgil, Thomas W. Kirchstetter Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA September 2012 This publication was made possible by grant number 500-99-013 from the California Energy Commission (CEC). This work was also supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE- AC02- 05CH11231. LBNL-6291E LBNL-6291E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

283

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Quarterly technical progress report No. 17, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed between October 1 and December 31, 1996 by the ABB team on U.S. Department of Energy project ``Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems`` (LEBS), which is part of the DOE`s Combustion 2000 Program. The overall objective of the LEBS Project is to dramatically improve environmental performance of future coal-fired power plants without adversely impacting efficiency or the cost of electricity. Near-term technologies, i.e., advanced technologies that are partially developed, will be used to reduce NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emission to one-sixth current NSPS limits and particulates to one- third current NSPS limits.

Regan, J.W.; Bender, D.J.; Clark, J.P.; Wesnor, J.D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

From Monkey Alarm Calls to Human Language: How Simulations Can Fill the Gap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of alarm calling behavior in putty-nosed monkeys are suggestive of a link with human language evolution. However, as is often the case in studies of animal behavior and cognition, competing theories are underdetermined by the available data. ... Keywords: alarm calls, communication, evolution, individual-based modeling, language, primates

Jason Noble; J.P. De Ruiter; Kate Arnold

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: smoke plumes; computer programs; crude oil; field models; fire tests; pattern recognition; wind velocity Abstract: ...

286

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sponsor: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin., Washington, DC Keywords: well fires; crude oil; smoke Abstract: This ...

287

Fire, Smoke, and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Technologies Help Improve Homeland Security. AVI file (Smokeview simulation animation). Initial Model for Fires in ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Environmental Cycling of Cellulosic Thermal Insulation and Its Influence on Fire Performance. Environmental Cycling of ...

289

Capacitive discharge firing system for providing acoustic sources in the hot dry rock geothermal energy development project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a capacitive discharge firing unit designed to initiate electrically exploded foil slapper detonators in a subsurface, high-pressure (5000 psi), high-temperature (> 200/sup 0/C) environment is described. The unit is used to conduct acoustic ranging experiments in deep boreholes (approx. = 10,000 ft) in the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Hot Dry Rock experiment.

Patterson, W.W.; Deam, D.R.; MacDonald, H.J.; Rochester, R.H.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Consol Energy Summary Report: Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities With SCR and FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was a joint effort between EPRI, the U.S. Department of Energy, Consol Energy, and a number of electric utility companies who hosted the mercury field measurements. This report summarizes mercury measurements by the Consol Energy to characterize the impact of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury speciation and removal at ten (10) coal-fired power plants.

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase 2 and 3. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) by the year 2000 that is capable of: >47% thermal efficiency (HHV); NO{sub x}, SO{sub x} and particulates {ge} 10% NSPS; coal {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity 90% of present plant. The HIPPS generating plant integrates a combustion gas turbine/HRSG combined cycle arrangement with an advanced coal-fired boiler. The unique feature of the HIPPS plant is the partial heating of gas turbine (GT) compressor outlet air using energy released by firing coal in the high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The compressed air is additionally heated prior to entering the GT expander section by burning natural gas. Energy available, in the gas turbine exhaust and in the HITAF flue gas are used in a steam cycle to maximize energy production. The HIPPS plant arrangement is thus a combination of existing technologies (gas turbine, heat recovery boilers, conventional steam cycle) and new technologies (the HITAF design especially the heater located in the radiant section). Work reported herein is from Task 1.3, HIPPS Commercial Design and Task 2.2, HITAF Air Heaters.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Boilers and Fired Systems  

SciTech Connect

This chapter examines how energy is consumed, how energy is wasted, and opportunities for reducing energy consumption and costs in the operation of boilers.

Parker, Steven A.; Scollon, R. B.

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fire Suppression Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... docks and an electrical substation that provided ... pump, located on the ground floor, supplied ... sizes under “normally expected” operating conditions. ...

294

APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System  

SciTech Connect

An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

295

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 11, April 1995--June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quotes} Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis and Phases II and III on a cost-share basis. The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The specified primary objectives are: (1) NO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS. (2) SO{sub x} emissions not greater than one-third NSPS. (3) Particulate emissions not greater than one-half NSPS. The specific secondary objectives are: (1) Improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation. (2) Reduced air toxics emissions. (3) Increased generating efficiency. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives and a preliminary design of a Commercial Generation Unit. The work in Phase I covered a 24-month period and included system analysis, RD&T Plan formulation, component definition, and preliminary Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) design. Phase II will cover a 15-month period and will include preliminary Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) design and subsystem testing. Phase III will cover a 9-month period and will produce a revised CGU design and a revised POCTF design, cost estimate and a test plan. Phase IV, the final Phase, will cover a 36-month period and will include POCTF detailed design, construction, testing, and evaluation.

NONE

1995-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Title III Evaluation Report for the Subsurface Fire Water System and Subsurrface Portion of the Non-Portable Water System  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed SFWS/SNPWS. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed systems, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guidelines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

R.E. Flye

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fire Protection Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Fire Protection Overview The Department of Energy (DOE) Fire Protection Program is multi-faceted. It includes published fire safety directives (Orders, standards, and guidance documents), a range of oversight activities, an annual fire protection program summary, and a directory of fire safety professionals. DOE also sponsors fire safety conferences, various training initiatives, and a spectrum of technical assistance activities. This Home Page is intended to bring together in one location as much of the Program's resources as possible to facilitate greater understanding, communication, and efficiency of operations. Guidelines -- NFPA Codes and standards, CFRs, and DOE Directives (policy statements, Orders, Standards, and Guidance Documents)

298

Optimal Detector Sensitivity, Number, and Location of Alarm Detectors Against Unknown Instantaneous Air Pollutant Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of determining the optimal detector sensitivity number and location of alarm detectors against instantaneous sources was examined in terms of the conventional Gaussian dispersion model for flat terrain. Analytical expressions for the ...

Daniel L. Wu

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Large Fires: Burning of Oil Spills. Large Fires: Burning of Oil Spills. ... These oil burns in a pan ranged in size from 6 m square to 15 m square. ...

300

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: in situ burning; oil spills; fire research; environmental effects; crude oil; numerical models Abstract: A combination ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... National Technical Information Service Keywords: oil spills; combustion; smoke generation; crude oil; tests; pool fires; energy transfer Abstract: ...

302

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Emergency Response Operations ... Safety Investigation of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ...

303

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ... structural analysis; structural damage; structural response ...

304

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the World Trade Center Disaster. ... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire safety ... structures; thermal response; flameproofing; radiative ...

305

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to the World Trade Center Disaster. ... World Trade Center; disasters; building collapse ... fires; flameproofing; steels; evacuation; response time; roofs ...

306

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... pipes. Fluid Dispensing and Dispersion. ... Volume 2; Chapter 6 - Section 16; NFPA FPH2008;Fire Protection Handbook, 20th Edition. ...

307

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Nuclear Power Plants. NISTIR 6986; 569 p. September 2003.International Collaborative Project to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant ...

308

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evacuation Time Components: Lessons from Nuclear Power Plants, Hurricanes, and ... of Selected Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications. ...

309

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rate Characteristics of Some Combustible Fuel Sources in Nuclear Power Plants. ... to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications. ...

310

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are collaborating to assess and validate fire computer codes for nuclear power plant applications. ...

311

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas temperature; heat loss; enclosures; nuclear power plants; cables; ventilation ... validate fire computer codes for nuclear power plant applications. ...

312

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kwon, SW; Liapi, KA; Haas, CT; Sreenivasan, SV; McLaughlin, JT; Human Behavior and Fire Emergencies: An Annotated Bibliography. ...

313

Wind Driven Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fighters working in a single-story residential structure fire. ... Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency Assistance ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

314

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NFPA FPH2008;Fire Protection Handbook, 20th Edition ... Nonazeotropic Refrigerant Mixutres in Thermodynamic Diagrams ... Control of Edge Heat Loss ...

315

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of incomplete combustion, and have been found adsorbed on the particulate emissions from wood fires, pulverized coal combustion, waste ...

316

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Performance on Fires Exposed to an External Energy Source. ... Grosshandler, WL; Nyden, MR; Rinkinen, WJ; Simple Piezoelectric Droplet Generator. ...

317

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Concentration by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy ... Next Generation Fire Suppression Technology Program. FY1999 Annual Report. ...

318

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... insulation. Adiabatic Surface Temperature for Calculating Heat Transfer to Fire Exposed Structures. Volume 2;Interflam 2007. (Interflam '07). ...

319

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire ... adhesive strength; building codes; cohesive ... materials; thermal conductivity; thermal insulation ...

320

Wildland Fires Texas 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wildland-Urban Interface Fires, Amarillo, Texas 2011. ... The deployment was conducted jointly with the Texas Forest Service (TFS). ...

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 12, July--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The goals for emissions and plant efficiency are: NO{sub x} emissions not greater than 0.1 lb/million Btu; SO{sub x} emissions not greater than 0.1 lb/million Btu; particulate emissions not greater than 0.01 lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency (HHV basis) not less than 42%. Other goals include: improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives, and a preliminary design of a Commercial Generation Unit. The work in Phase I covered a 24- month period and included system analysis, RD&T Plan formulation, component definition, and preliminary Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) design. Phase II will cover a 15-month period and will include preliminary Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) design and subsystem testing. Phase III will cover a 9-month period and will produce a revised CGU design and a revised POCTF design, cost estimate and a test plan. Phase IV, the final Phase, will cover a 36- month period and will include POCTF detailed design, construction, testing, and evaluation.

NONE

1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

322

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

323

Voxels on Fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a method for the animation of fire propagation and the burning consumption of objects represented as volumetric data sets. Our method uses a volumetric fire propagation model based on an enhanced distance field. It can simulate the spreading ... Keywords: Fire Propagation, Distance Field, Lattice Boltzmann Model, Splatting, GPU Acceleration

Ye Zhao; Xiaoming Wei; Zhe Fan; Arie Kaufman; Hong Qin

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fire Department Emergency Response  

SciTech Connect

In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Optimizing Fire Station Locations for the Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality IMM seeks to determine locations for additional fire stations to build in Istanbul; its objective is to make residences and historic sites reachable by emergency vehicles within five minutes of a fire station’s ... Keywords: fire station location, geographic information system, maximal-covering problem, set-covering problem

Emel Akta?; Özay Özayd?n; Burçin Bozkaya; Füsun Ülengin; ?ule Önsel

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Dual sensitivity mode system for monitoring processes and sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for analyzing a source of data. The system and method involves initially training a system using a selected data signal, calculating at least two levels of sensitivity using a pattern recognition methodology, activating a first mode of alarm sensitivity to monitor the data source, activating a second mode of alarm sensitivity to monitor the data source and generating a first alarm signal upon the first mode of sensitivity detecting an alarm condition and a second alarm signal upon the second mode of sensitivity detecting an associated alarm condition. The first alarm condition and second alarm condition can be acted upon by an operator and/or analyzed by a specialist or computer program.

Wilks, Alan D. (Mount Prospect, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fire Protection Program Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual documents the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Fire Protection Program. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders 420.1B, Facility Safety, requires LLNL to have a comprehensive and effective fire protection program that protects LLNL personnel and property, the public and the environment. The manual provides LLNL and its facilities with general information and guidance for meeting DOE 420.1B requirements. The recommended readers for this manual are: fire protection officers, fire protection engineers, fire fighters, facility managers, directorage assurance managers, facility coordinators, and ES and H team members.

Sharry, J A

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

328

Development of a Low NOx Burner System for Coal Fired Power Plants Using Coal and Biomass Blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The low NOx burner (LNB) is the most cost effective technology used in coal-fired power plants to reduce NOx. Conventional (unstaged) burners use primary air for transporting particles and swirling secondary air to create recirculation of hot gases. LNB uses staged air (dividing total air into primary, secondary and tertiary air) to control fuel bound nitrogen from mixing early and oxidizing to NOx; it can also limit thermal NOx by reducing peak flame temperatures. Previous research at Texas A&M University (TAMU) demonstrated that cofiring coal with feedlot biomass (FB) in conventional burners produced lower or similar levels of NOx but increased CO. The present research deals with i) construction of a small scale 29.31 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) LNB facility, ii) evaluation of firing Wyoming (WYO) coal as the base case coal and cofiring WYO and dairy biomass (DB) blends, and iii) evaluating the effects of staging on NOx and CO. Ultimate and Proximate analysis revealed that WYO and low ash, partially composted, dairy biomass (LA-PC-DB-SepS) had the following heat values and empirical formulas: CH0.6992N0.0122O0.1822S0.00217 and CH_1.2554N_0.0470O_0.3965S_0.00457. The WYO contained 3.10 kg of Ash/GJ, 15.66 kg of VM/GJ, 0.36 kg of N/GJ, and 6.21 kg of O/GJ while LA-PC-DB-SepS contained 11.57 kg of Ash/GJ, 36.50 kg of VM/GJ, 1.50 kg of N/GJ, and 14.48 kg of O/GJ. The construction of a LNB nozzle capable of providing primary, swirled secondary and swirled tertiary air for staging was completed. The reactor provides a maximum residence time of 1.8 seconds under hot flow conditions. WYO and DB were blended on a mass basis for the following blends: 95:5, 90:10, 85:15, and 80:20. Results from firing pure WYO showed that air staging caused a slight decrease of NOx in lean regions (equivalence ratio, greater than or equal to 1.0) but an increase of CO in rich regions (=1.2). For unstaged combustion, cofiring resulted in most fuel blends showing similar NOx emissions to WYO. Staged cofiring resulted in a 12% NOx increase in rich regions while producing similar to slightly lower amounts of NOx in lean regions. One conclusion is that there exists a strong inverse relationship between NOx and CO emissions.

Gomez, Patsky O.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Development and testing of a commercial scale coal-fired combustion system, Phase 3. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of work performed in the development and proof-of-concept (POC) testing of a coal-fired space heating system for the commercial market sector. The objective of this program is to design, build and test a coal based heating system for this sector and determine the economic viability and market potential for the system. Coal water slurry (CWS) fuel has been chosen as the fuel form for this development effort. CWS eliminates the need to use dry pulverized coal with its attendant handling, metering and dusting problems as well as its explosive potential. Equally important in selecting a fuel form is the impact on emission levels and pollution control equipment requirements. CWS is amenable to coal washing since coal cleaning technologies are generally water-based processes requiring the fine grinding of the coal. In the first stage. an overall system heat balance was prepared, system components were designed and manufactured or purchased, the system was fully assembled and preliminary testing performed to validate component performance and identify key operating variables. In the second stage the system was operated for prolonged periods to simulate a commercial application, and combustion and thermal efficiencies; tendencies to slag, foul, erode and corrode; and gaseous and particulate emissions were evaluated. Also during the second stage, an assessment of the commercial viability of the system was made. This assessment included an evaluation of the economics and market potential, including the sensitivity to fluctuations in fuel prices.

Litka, A.; Breault, R.

1992-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Carnol System for methanol production and CO{sub 2} mitigation from coal fired power plants and the transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Carnol System consists of methanol production by CO{sub 2} recovered from coal fired power plants and natural gas and the use of the methanol as an alternative automotive fuel. The Carnol Process produces hydrogen by the thermal decomposition of natural gas and reacting the hydrogen with CO{sub 2} recovered from the power plant. The carbon produced can be stored or used as a materials commodity. A design and economic evaluation of the Carnol System is presented and compared to gasoline as an automotive fuel. An evaluation of the CO{sub 2} emission reduction of the process and system is made and compared to other conventional methanol production processes is including the use of biomass feedstock and methanol fuel cell vehicles. The CO{sub 2} for the entire Carnol System using methanol in automotive IC engines can be reduced by 56% compared to conventional system of coal plants and gasoline engines and by as much as 77% CO{sub 2} emission reduction when methanol is used in fuel cells in automotive engines. The Carnol System is shown to be an environmentally attractive and economically viable system connecting the power generation sector with the transportation sector which should warrant further development.

Steinberg, M.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Carnol System for methanol production and CO{sub 2} mitigation from coal fired power plants and the transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Carnol System consists of methanol production by C0{sub 2} recovered from coal fired power plants and natural gas and the use of the methanol as an alternative automotive fuel. The Carnol process produces hydrogen by the thermal decomposition of natural gas and reacting the hydrogen with C0{sub 2} recovered from the power plant. The carbon produced can be stored or used as a materials commodity. A design and economic evaluation of the process is presented and compared to gasoline as an automotive fuel. An evaluation of the C0{sub 2} emission reduction of the process and system is made and compared to other conventional methanol production processes is including the use of biomass feedstock and methanol fuel cell vehicles. The C0{sub 2} for the entire Carnol System using methanol in automotive IC engines can be reduced by 56% compared to conventional system of coal plants and gasoline engines and by as much as 77% C0{sub 2} emission reduction when methanol is used in fuel cells in automotive engines. The Carnol System is shown to be an environmentally attractive and economically viable system connecting the power generation sector with the transportation sector which should warrant further development.

Steinberg, M.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

335

Savannah River Site Waste Solidification Building Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design, May 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 HIAR SRS-2013-5-07 Site: Savannah River Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Waste Solidification Building (WSB) Corrective Actions from the January 2013 Report on Construction Quality of Mechanical Systems Installation and Fire Protection Design Dates of Activity : 05/07/2013 - 05/09/2013 Report Preparer: Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: 1. Review the corrective actions being implemented by the construction contractor to address Findings 1-4, 6, and 9 from a construction quality review performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) (Reference 1). 2. Meet with the SRS WSB project staff and Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) engineers to discuss the

336

Wildland Fire Management Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook Predictive Services National Interagency Fire Center Issued: June 1, 2013 Next Issuance: July 1, 2013 Outlook Period - June, July and August through September Executive Summary The June, July and August through September 2013 significant wildland fire potential forecasts included in this outlook represent the cumulative forecasts of the eleven Geographic Area Predictive Services Units and the National Predictive Services Unit. June - Significant fire potential will be above normal for much of the interior mountains and foothills of California, the Sacramento Valley, and adjacent lower foothills as well as the coastal areas. - Significant fire potential will increase to above normal in Arizona, western New Mexico, and far

337

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A. Computer Simulation of the Fires in the World Trade Center Towers. ... Flamm, J.; Bengtson, GF; Niemann, R. Cooling Mode Fault Detection and ...

338

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Krier, H.; Butler, PB; Modelling of Dropwise Evaporative Cooling on a Semi ... WW; Reconstruction of the Fires in the World Trade Center Towers. ...

339

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Combustion Theory and Modelling, Vol. ... EL; Donnelly, MK; Maranghides, A. Energy Balance in a ... to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant ...

340

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... EL; Donnelly, MK; Maranghides, A. Energy Balance in ... 1, Evaluation of Fire Models for Nuclear Facility. ... Thermal Fields in Window Glass I - Theory. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Effect of Pool Diameter on the Properties of Smoke Produced by Crude Oil Fires. Effect of Pool Diameter on the Properties ...

342

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Combustion of Mixtures of Weathered Alaskan Crude Oils and Water Under External ... in situ burning; oil spills; heat flux; ignition; mixtures; pool fires ...

343

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Keywords: oil spills; in situ burning; computer models; heat release rate; crude oil; plumes; pool fires; wind velocity; temperature profiles Abstract: ...

344

NIST Major Fire Investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tower ladders used to make fire attack; 6 people die in the SE Stairway, 13 more rescued at approx 6:30 PM. View of north ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

345

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fire safety of US passenger rail trains currently is ... have been working on such an alternative approach. This effort included a systematic study of the ...

346

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US passenger train fire safety has historically been addressed primarily through ... To develop such an alternative approach, a systematic study of ...

347

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... deRis, JL; Fire-Resistance and Sound-Insulation Ratings for Walls, Partitions, and Floors. ... Testing of Gypsum/Steel-Stud Wall Assemblies. ...

348

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Boyd, CF; diMarzo, M. Fire-Resistance and Sound-Insulation Ratings for Walls, Partitions, and Floors. TRBM 44; 52 p. 1944. ...

349

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in intensity of the sound as it travels through the wall. This paper gives the fire-resistance and sound-insulation ratings of walls, partitions, and floors ...

350

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... S.; Baum, HR; CFD Simulation of a 2.5 MW Oil Pool Fire in a Nuclear Power Plant Containment Building Using Multi-Block Large Eddy Simulation. ...

351

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 569 p. September 2003.International Collaborative Project to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications: Summary of 5th Meeting. ...

352

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of a Solid-Solid Hybrid Gas Generator Fire ... US/Japan Natural Resources Development Program ... A. Remotely Accessed Photovoltaic Power Project. ...

353

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Davis, WD; Ignition of Weathered and Emulsified Oils. ... Mullin, JV; Investigation of Oil and Gas Well Fires ... From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil in Alaska. ...

354

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... JV Smoke Production From Large Oil Pool Fires. ... DD; Walton, WD Suppression of Gas Well Blowout ... DD Ignition of Weathered and Emulsified Oils. ...

355

Project: Advanced Fire Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... residential fire deaths through development of measurement ... Beyond advances in sensing technologies, a key ... data will be used to develop and test ...

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Proceedings. October 15-17, 2008, Poznan, Poland, 1-8 pp, 2008. Domanski, PA; Yashar, DA; Kaufman, K. Fire Safe Materials Project at NIST. ...

357

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Proceedings. October 15-17, 2008, Poznan, Poland, 1-8 pp, 2008. Domanski, PA; Yashar, DA; Kaufman, K. Fire Exposure Protection. ...

358

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2002. Kwon, SW; Liapi, KA; Haas, CT; Sreenivasan, SV; McLaughlin, JT; In-Situ Gas Concentration Measurements for Fires. ...

359

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 97, No. 3-4, 251-260, 1994. Dutta, P.; Gore, JP; Sivathanu, YR; Sojka, PE; Investigation of Oil and Gas Well Fires and Flares. Final Report. ...

360

Topic: Fire Protection Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Evaluates Firefighting Tactics In NYC High-Rise ... Fire Modeling for Performance-Based Design Project. Safety of Building Occupants Projects. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Topic: Fire Fighting Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST Evaluates Firefighting Tactics In NYC High-Rise Test. High Rise Fire Fighting—Effective Use of Positive Pressure Ventilation. Project-Program. ...

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Project to Evaluate Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications: Summary of ... A Routine for Estimating the Initial Wave Front Resulting From ...

363

Fire on the Web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... failed to fire the tree. Finally they applied an open flame to the tree using a propane torch. The branches ignited briefly, but ...

364

Co-firing biomass  

SciTech Connect

Concern about global warming has altered the landscape for fossil-fuel combustion. The advantages and challenges of co-firing biomass and coal are discussed. 2 photos.

Hunt, T.; Tennant, D. [Hunt, Guillot & Associates LLC (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fundamentals of Combustion, Air Pollution and Global ... FPH2008;Fire Protection Handbook, 20th Edition ... Two-Step Combustion Chemistry for Large ...

366

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fundamentals of Combustion, Air Pollution and Global ... FPH2008;Fire Protection Handbook, 20th Edition ... Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK ...

367

Fire Protection Program: Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training DOE IAFF Training for Radiation Emergencies Hanford Fire Department Radiation Fundamentals for Emergency Responders For more information contact: Jim Bisker This page...

368

Fire Protection Program Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines Principal Orders Related Orders Technical Standards Guidance Current fire protection requirements of the Department reside in: DOE O 420.1C, "Facility Safety", 10 CFR...

369

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for Low-Density Fibrous-Glass Thermal Insulation. NIST TN 1606; NIST Technical Note 1606; 55 p. February 2009. Zarr, RR; Building and Fire ...

370

Fire Protection Technologies Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sprinkler Use Decisioning is a Web-tool designed to facilitate economic analysis of residential fire sprinklers at the homeowner-and … more. ...

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fire Protection Technologies Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Sprinkler Use Decisioning is a Web-tool designed to facilitate economic analysis of residential fire sprinklers at the homeowner-and … more. ...

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

372

Gas Turbine Fired Heater Integration: Achieve Significant Energy Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faster payout will result if gas turbine exhaust is used as combustion air for fired heaters. Here are economic examples and system design considerations.

Iaquaniello, G.; Pietrogrande, P.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems: Technical progress report No. 16, July-September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The Project is under budget and generally on schedule. The current status is shown in the Milestone Schedule Status Report included as Appendix A. Under Task 7--Component development and optimization, the CeraMem filter testing was completed. Due to an unacceptably high flue gas draft loss, which will not be resolved in the POCTF timeframe, a decision was made to change the design of the flue gas cleaning system from Hot SNO{sub x}{sup {trademark}} to an advanced dry scrubber called New Integrated Desulfurization (NID). However, it is recognized that the CeraMem filter still has the potential to be viable in pulverized coal systems. In Task 8-- Preliminary POCTF design, integrating and optimizing the performance and design of the boiler, turbine/generator and heat exchangers of the Kalina cycle as well as the balance of plant design were completed. Licensing activities continued. A NID system was substituted for the SNO{sub x} Hot Process.

Barcikowski, G.F.; Borio, R.W.; Bozzuto, C.R.; Burr, D.H.; Cellilli, L.; Fox, J.D.; Gibbons, T.B.; Hargrove, M.J.; Jukkola, G.D.; King, A.M.

1996-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fire Retardants and their Potential Impact on Fire Fighter ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... containing products currently (and for the foreseeable future) in homes where fires ... Risk-based analysis of the value of fire retardant chemicals; A ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fire Executive Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dear Reader, The Quadrennial Fire Review (QFR) is a strategic assessment process that is conducted every four years to evaluate current mission strategies and capabilities against best estimates of the future environment for fire management. This integrated review is a joint effort of the five federal natural resource management agencies and their state, local, and tribal partners that constitute the wildland fire community. The objective is to create an integrated strategic vision document for fire management. The 2009 QFR presents incoming federal policy leadership and the agency senior executives with the driving forces for change, suggested mission strategies, and analyses of workforce and operational capabilities. The document provides a solid foundation for policy discussions within the federal agencies and, importantly, among the federal agencies and state, local, tribal, and other partners. While the QFR is not a formal policy or decision document, it sets the stage for a “strategic conversation ” about future direction and change in fire management. Our thanks goes to the QFR Integration Panel members who led the two-year analysis and review process and who prepared the final report, along with those members of the wildland fire community who submitted information, commentary, and suggestions during the process. We look forward to joining our wildland fire colleagues in using the QFR to chart and implement a national approach to wildland fire management.

Jeff Jahnke; Abigail Kimbell; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; James Caswell; Mary A. Bomar; Jerry Gidner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Application of Multivariable Control to Oil and Coal Fired Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased visibility provided by advanced measurement and control techniques has shown that control of oil and coal fired boilers is a complex problem involving simultaneous determination of flue gas carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, opacity and temperature levels. A microcomputer-based control system which recognizes the inter-relationship of these variables has produced fuel savings averaging about 3% on coal and oil fired boilers. The system is described and case study data is presented for both coal and oil fired boilers.

Swanson, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Chicago Administration Building Fire 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was the simulation of the fire using the Fire Dynamic Simulator (FDS ... The objective of measuring the heat release rate of exemplar furnishings was ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hardware Store Basement Fire 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... computer simulations of the fire using the NIST Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS ... 3. How would different initial heat release rates (500 kW, 1 MW, and 2 ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fire Research Division Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fire Research Division Staff. Fire Research Division Office (733). ... Dr. Rick Davis, Leader, Supervisory Materials Research Engineer, 301-975-5901. ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

National Fire Research Laboratory Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... scale fire experiments is essential to understanding ... there is no research facility in the ... Facilities. National Fire Research Laboratory. staff_directory. ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Restaurant Fire Houston Texas 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Houston Fast Food Restaurant Fire, Texas, 2000. On February 14, 2000, a fire in a one story restaurant in Texas claimed the lives of two firefighters. ...

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

382

Examining Fire Fighting Tactics Under Wind Driven ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examining Fire Fighting Tactics Under Wind Driven Conditions: Laboratory Experiments. ... Wind Driven Fire Measurement Tests. Objectives: ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{trademark} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{trademark} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{trademark} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury--elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{trademark}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{trademark} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{trademark} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

384

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{trademark}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Trent Taylor; Cindy Larson

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

387

FIELD TEST PROGRAM FOR LONG-TERM OPERATION OF A COHPAC SYSTEM FOR REMOVING MERCURY FROM COAL-FIRED FLUE GAS  

SciTech Connect

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001 ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, AL). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury: elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Tom Millar

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

390

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Sorbent injection technology represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. It involves injecting a solid material such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas. The gas-phase mercury in the flue gas contacts the sorbent and attaches to its surface. The sorbent with the mercury attached is then collected by the existing particle control device along with the other solid material, primarily fly ash. During 2001, ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) conducted a full-scale demonstration of sorbent-based mercury control technology at the Alabama Power E.C. Gaston Station (Wilsonville, Alabama). This unit burns a low-sulfur bituminous coal and uses a hot-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) in combination with a Compact Hybrid Particulate Collector (COHPAC{reg_sign}) baghouse to collect fly ash. The majority of the fly ash is collected in the ESP with the residual being collected in the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Activated carbon was injected between the ESP and COHPAC{reg_sign} units to collect the mercury. Short-term mercury removal levels in excess of 90% were achieved using the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit. The test also showed that activated carbon was effective in removing both forms of mercury-elemental and oxidized. However, a great deal of additional testing is required to further characterize the capabilities and limitations of this technology relative to use with baghouse systems such as COHPAC{reg_sign}. It is important to determine performance over an extended period of time to fully assess all operational parameters. The project described in this report focuses on fully demonstrating sorbent injection technology at a coal-fired power generating plant that is equipped with a COHPAC{reg_sign} system. The overall objective is to evaluate the long-term effects of sorbent injection on mercury capture and COHPAC{reg_sign} performance. The work is being done on one-half of the gas stream at Alabama Power Company's Plant Gaston Unit 3 (nominally 135 MW). Data from the testing will be used to determine: (1) If sorbent injection into a high air-to-cloth ratio baghouse is a viable, long-term approach for mercury control; and (2) Design criteria and costs for new baghouse/sorbent injection systems that will use a similar, polishing baghouse (TOXECON{trademark}) approach.

Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac; Travis Starns; Sharon Sjostrom; Cindy Larson

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

391

Electrical Sitchgear Building No. 5010-ESF Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives, identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Fire Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: (1) The occurrence of a fire or related event; (2) A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of the employees, the public, and the environment; (3) Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; (4) Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and (5) Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related event.

N.M. Ruonavaara

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

392

False Alarms and Close Calls: A Conceptual Model of Warning Accuracy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The false alarm rate (FAR) measures the fraction of forecasted events that did not occur, and it remains one of the key metrics for verifying National Weather Service (NWS) weather warnings. The national FAR for tornado warnings in 2003 was 0.76, ...

Lindsey R. Barnes; Eve C. Gruntfest; Mary H. Hayden; David M. Schultz; Charles Benight

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Proof-of-concept tests of the magnetohydrodynamic steam-bottoming system at the DOE Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power can be viewed as consisting of two parts; the topping cycle and the bottoming cycle. The topping cycle consists of the coal combustor, MHD generator and associated components. The bottoming cycle consists of the heat recovery, steam generation, seed recovery/regeneration, emissions control (gas and particulate), ash handling and deposition, and materials evaluation. The report concentrates on the bottoming cycle, for which much of the technology was developed at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI). Because of the complexity of the required technology, a number of issues required investigation. Of specific concern regarding the bottoming cycle, was the design of the steam cycle components and emissions control. First, the high combustion temperatures and the use of large quantities of potassium in the MHD combustor results in a difference in the composition of the gases entering the bottoming cycle compared to conventional systems. Secondly, a major goal of the UTSI effort was to use a variety of coals in the MHD system, especially the large reserves of high-sulfur coals available in the United States.

Attig, R.C. [ed.

1996-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fire Protection Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fire Protection Database Fire Protection Database Fire Protection Database DOE O 231.1, Environment, Safety, And Health Reporting, requires the submission of an Annual Fire Protection Summary. The previous process used to collect the required data utilizes a Microsoft Access database that was downloaded, completed by the field and then sent to Headquarters for summation and analysis by engineers in Office of Sustainability Support. Data collection for the CY2013 Summary will begin Jan. 1, 2014, and a commitment has been made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board to collect this information and make it available utilizing a standard systematic approach. This approach will be accomplished via a web based system which will allow reporting organizations to enter or edit information.

395

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report number 14, January--March, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Project is under budget and generally on schedule. The current status is shown in the Milestone Schedule Status Report included as Appendix A. Task 7--Component Development and Optimization and Task 11--Subsystem Test Operation and evaluation are shown to be slightly behind schedule. Also, addition of Kalina technology may delay completion of Task 8. However, Phase 2 will be completed on schedule. The Project and plans for the POCTF were presented to the Richmond Power and Light Board of Directors. Technology transfer activities included delivering papers at two conferences, submitting paper abstracts for two other conferences and organizing a Technical Session for a conference. Under Task 7 the 200 acfm CeraMem filter test rig was installed at Richmond Power and Light and testing commenced. Low-NO{sub x} firing system work was essentially completed. In Task 8 integrating and optimizing the performance and design of the boiler, turbine/generator and heat exchangers of the Kalina cycle is proceeding but it has required much more time than anticipated. Preliminary designs of this equipment are nearly complete. Plant design and licensing activities will restart in April. The test designs and plan created in Task 9 were previously submitted and approved, although the plan for the 5,000 acfm CeraMem filter test will be updated following completion of the 200 acfm test. Task 10 work is nearly complete. The test rig for the 5,000 acfm CeraMem test has been shipped to the fabricator`s shop, inspected, cleaned and is being modified based on input from the 200 acfm testing. Task 11 work on the CeraMem filter was delayed and is expected to be started during the next reporting period. The second series of combustion testing of the low-NO{sub x} firing system was completed and the data is being analyzed. Early review indicates that 0.1 lb of NO{sub x}/million Btu may be achievable with reasonable stoichiometry and carbon loss.

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fire PRA Methods Enhancements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes research on fire probabilistic risk assessment PRA methods. The fire PRA methods presented in this report provide additions, clarifications, and refinements to the methods proposed in 2005 by the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NRC in EPRI/NRC-RES Fire PRA Methodology for Nuclear Power Facilities EPRI 1011989/NUREG/CR-6850. The purpose of the current report is to provide the most current, state-of-the-art information in order to supp...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

397

Independent Oversight Review of Management of Safety Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Accident Alarm System CAP Corrective Action Plan CAR Corrective Action Report CAS Contractor Assurance System CBM Condition Based Maintenance CFR Code of Federal...

398

Forensic Database Fire Explosives Table  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fire & Explosives. Name. Subdiscipline. Maintained By. Overview & Contents. Access & Fees. Collection Method. Evidence Type. POC. ...

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cycling firing method for bypass operation of bridge converters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The bridge converter comprises a number of switching elements and an electronic logic system which regulated the electric power levels by controlling the firing, i.e., the initiation of the conduction period of the switching elements. Cyclic firing of said elements allows the direct current to bypass the alternating current system with high power factor and negligible losses.

Zabar, Zivan (99-72 66th Rd., Apt. 9N, Forest Hills, NY 11375)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Detection of Multilayer Cirrus Cloud Systems Using AVHRR Data: Verification Based on FIRE II IFO Composite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical scheme has been developed to identify multilayer cirrus cloud systems using Advanced Very Higher Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data. It is based on the physical properties of the AVHRR channels 1?2 reflectance ratios, the brightness ...

S. C. Ou; K. N. Liou; B. A. Baum

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Effect of Coal Chlorine on Waterwall Wastage in Coal-Fired Boilers with Staged Low-NOx Combustion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several boilers retrofitted with nitrogen oxides reducing (low-NOx) burner systems have experienced severe waterwall wastage. In this report, the link between chlorine in coal and accelerated wastage will be explored.

2002-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comparison of Control System Performance for Fossil-Fuel Fired Power Plants Using Emission Measurement Data from the Utility Industr y Information Collection Request for Hazardous Air Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On On May 3, 2011, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice of proposed rulemaking (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 60 and 63: National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from Coal- and Oil-Fired Electric Utility Steam Generating Units and Standards of Performance for Fossil-FuelFired Electric Utility, Industrial-Commercial-Institutional, and Small Industrial-Commercial-Institutional Steam-Generating Units). The intent of this rulemaking is to set Maximum Achiev...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

403

Flooding and Fire Ants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fire ants can be a serious problem during and after a flood. This publication explains how to protect yourself when you must return to flooded structures or deal with storm debris.

Nester, Paul

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

404

Detecting moving fires on coal conveyors  

SciTech Connect

To comply with certain elements of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, a number of utilities operating coal fired power plants have switched to low-rank bituminous and semi-bituminous coals as an alternative to other fuels like natural gas. Power plants firing and handling this variety of coal may be extremely prone to fires nd explosions as the coal is conveyed from storage on to the boilers due to a phenomenon known as spontaneous combustion. The American Society of Testing for Materials ranks coals by their tendency to oxidize. The lower the coal`s rank, the greater its tendency to absorb oxygen and, consequently, the greater its tendency to spontaneously combust. This unique property creates a new type of fire and explosion hazard not previously experienced by many coal-fired plants. Fires involving coal crushers, storage silos, conveyors, bunkers and pulverizer mills generally occur as a result of two ignition sources: spontaneous combustion (self-heating) of coal and frictional heating of the coal`s conveyance system.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DOE/EA-1472: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Commercial Demonstration of the Low NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air Integration System Emission Reduction Technology (03/11/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPACT IMPACT COMMERCIAL DEMONSRATION OF THE LOW NOx BURNER/SEPARATED OVER- FIRE AIR (LNB/SOFA) INTEGRATON SYSTEM EMISSION REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY HOLCOMB STATION SUNFLOWER ELECTRIC POWER CORPORATION FINNEY COUNTY, KANSAS AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), to analyze the potential impacts of the commercial application of the Low-NOx Burner/Separated Over-Fire Air (LNB/SOFA) integration system to achieve nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction at Sunflower's Holcomb Unit No. 1 (Holcomb Station), located near Garden City, in Finney County, Kansas. The Holcomb Station would be modified in three distinct phases to demonstrate the synergistic effect of layering NO,

406

Repowering oil-fired boilers with combustion turbines fired with gas from coal. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a study on repowering of oil fired reheat steam plants using combustion turbines and coal gas from the Texaco oxygen blown gasifier are presented. The steam plant utilizes combustion turbine exhaust gas as its combustion air supply. In some examples coal gas is fired in both the combustion turbines and the main boiler, while, in other cases, oil firing is retained in the boiler. Plant configurations, equipment changes, and performance are determined for three basic forms: (1) repowering based on coal gas supplied by pipeline (remote source); (2) repowering based on complete integration of the gasification system with the power plant; and (3) repowering based on partial integration of the gasification system wherein the boiler retains oil firing.

Garland, R.V.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Cyber Friendly Fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber friendly fire (FF) is a new concept that has been brought to the attention of Department of Defense (DoD) stakeholders through two workshops that were planned and conducted by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and research conducted for AFRL by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. With this previous work in mind, we offer a definition of cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, a fundamental need in avoiding cyber FF is to maintain situation awareness (SA). We suggest that cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system (and that populate the nodes), the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive (and offensive) countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. A training implication is to raise awareness and understanding of these critical knowledge units; an approach to decision aids and/or visualizations is to focus on supporting these critical knowledge units. To study cyber FF, we developed an unclassified security test range comprising a combination of virtual and physical devices that present a closed network for testing, simulation, and evaluation. This network offers services found on a production network without the associated costs of a real production network. Containing enough detail to appear realistic, this virtual and physical environment can be customized to represent different configurations. For our purposes, the test range was configured to appear as an Internet-connected Managed Service Provider (MSP) offering specialized web applications to the general public. The network is essentially divided into a production component that hosts the web and network services, and a user component that hosts thirty employee workstations and other end devices. The organization's network is separated from the Internet by a Cisco ASA network security device that both firewalls and detects intrusions. Business sensitive information is stored in various servers. This includes data comprising thousands of internal documents, such as finance and technical designs, email messages for the organization's employees including the CEO, CFO, and CIO, the organization's source code, and Personally Identifiable client data. Release of any of this information to unauthorized parties would have a significant, detrimental impact on the organization's reputation, which would harm earnings. The valuable information stored in these servers pose obvious points of interest for an adversary. We constructed several scenarios around this environment to support studies in cyber SA and cyber FF that may be run in the test range. We describe mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches. Finally, we discuss possible future research directions.

Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of an SNCR Trim System on 145 MW and 375 MW Tangential Design, Coal-Fired Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As regulations on nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from fossil-fueled power plants become stricter, post-combustion techniques such as selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) become viable options to achieve compliance. In the SNCR process, urea injected into the combustion products reacts selectively with NOx to form nitrogen and water. In this SNCR trim demonstration project, a single-level reagent injection system was evaluated at Alabama Power's Plant Barry Units 2 and 4. These units are single furnac...

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Detecting false alarms in transit data from space: Rejection methods tested in Corot Blind Test 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transit searches provide a large number of planet candidates. Before attempting follow-up observations, the best effort should be spent in classifying the light-curves, rejecting false alarms and selecting the most likely ones for real planets. A number of analysis tools has been developed with these objectives. Here, we apply such tools to 237 simulated multi-color light-curves from CoRoT Blind Test 2, which contain simulated planet transits and several configurations of impostors. Their comparison gives indications of the various tools' classification and false-alarm rejection capabilities. In order to arrive at the candidate identifications, we used an automated scheme of weighted punctuations assigned to the individual tests, which avoids that results from a single test dominate a candidate's classification.

J. M. Almenara; H. J. Deeg; C. Regulo; R. Alonso

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

Fire Weather Outlooks | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Fire Weather Outlook areas - a Critical Fire Weather Area for Wind and Relative Humidity, an Extremely Critical Fire Weather Area for Extreme Conditions of Wind and Relative...

411

NIST Building and Fire Research Laboratory Publications ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of building materials, lighting, and indoor air quality. ... Pello, AC Fire Propagation in Concurrent Flows. ... 193844 fire spread; buoyant flow; fire research ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

412

Control and extinguishment of LPG fires. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 100 fire control and fire extinguishment tests were run on free-burning LPG pool fires from 25 ft/sup 2/ to 1600 ft/sup 2/ in area. The LPG was contained in concrete pits, and the pit floors were allowed to cool before the fires were ignited so that the burning rates were not influenced by boiloff from the warm floor. High expansion foam was used for fire control. The foam was applied from fixed generators located on the upwind side of the pit. Fires were controlled after foam application of less than a minute to about 10 minutes, depending on the application rate. Fires were extinguished with dry chemical agents applied through fixed piping systems with tankside nozzles and by manual application using hoselines and portable extinguishers. Fires could readily be extinguished in times ranging from a few seconds to about half a minute, depending on the application rate, system design, and ambient conditions. Additional tests were conducted in 1-ft/sup 2/ and 5-ft/sup 2/ pits to determine the boiloff rates for LPG spilled on concrete, a sand/soil mix, and polyurethane foam substrates. Burning rates for free-burning LPG pool fires from 1 ft/sup 2/ to 1600 ft/sup 2/ in area are also reported.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Control and extinguishment of LPG fires. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 100 fire control and fire extinguishment tests were run on free-burning liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) pool fires from 25 ft/sup 2/ to 1600 ft/sup 2/ in area. The LPG was contained in concrete pits, and the pit floors were allowed to cool before the fires were ignited so that the burning rates were not influenced by boiloff from the warm floor. High expansion foam was used for fire control. The foam was applied from fixed generators located on the upwind side of the pit. Fires were controlled after foam application of less than a minute to about 10 minutes, depending on the application rate. Fires were extinguished with dry chemical agents applied through fixed piping systems with tankside nozzles and by manual application using hoselines and portable extinguishers. Fires could readily be extinguished in times ranging from a few seconds to about half a minute, depending on the application rate, system design, and ambient conditions. Additional tests were conducted in 1-ft/sup 2/ and 5-ft/sup 2/ pits to determine the boiloff rates for LPG spilled on concrete, a sand/soil mix, and polyurethane foam substrates. Burning rates for free-burning LPG pool fires from 1 ft/sup 2/ to 1600 ft/sup 2/ in area are also reported.

Johnson, D.W.; Martinsen, W.E.; Cavin, W.D.; Chilton, P.D.; Lawson, H.P.; Welker, J.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and are both equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

C. Jean Bustard

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

With the nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous systems of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of projected DOE/EPA early cost estimates. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that was tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology injects a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. PG&E National Energy Group provided two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company provided a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company hosted a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the fifteenth reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) Test Sites--Final Reports for the two remaining plants are being written (Salem Harbor and Brayton Point). (2) Technology Transfer--Technical information about the project was presented to a number of organizations during the quarter including members of congress, coal companies, architect/engineering firms, National Mining Association, the North Carolina Department of Air Quality, the National Coal Council and EPA.

Jean Bustard; Richard Schlager

2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

2.01 GAS-FIRED UNIT HEATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a. Requirement for gas fired equipment is limited to structures which are constructed outside the practical limits of the campus central steam distribution system and have access to natural gas from Public Service Company utility distribution system.

Section Basic Mechanical Requirements; A. Design Requirements; A. Manufacturers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Comparison of Three Fire Models in the Simulation of Accidental Fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R.L. , “Ceiling Jet Flows”, SFPE Handbook of Fire ProtectionJet Flames and Pool Fires”, SFPE Handbook of Fire ProtectionCompounds in Fires”, SFPE Handbook of Fire Protection

Rein, Guillermo; Bar-Ilan, Amnon; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Alvares, Norman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Numerical simulations for a typical train fire in china  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Railway is the key transport means in China including the Mainland, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Consequent to so many big arson and accidental fires in the public transport systems including trains and buses, fire safety in passenger trains is a concern. ...

W. K. Chow; K. C. Lam; N. K. Fong; S. S. Li; Y. Gao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fire safety of LPG in marine transportation  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an analytical examination of cargo spill and fire hazard potential associated with the marine handling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo. Principal emphasis was on cargo transfer operations for ships unloading at receiving terminals, and barges loading or unloading at a terminal. Major safety systems, including emergency shutdown systems, hazard detection systems, and fire extinguishment and control systems were included in the analysis. Spill probabilities were obtained from fault tree analyses utilizing composite LPG tank ship and barge designs. Failure rates for hardware in the analyses were generally taken from historical data on similar generic classes of hardware, there being very little historical data on the specific items involved. Potential consequences of cargo spills of various sizes are discussed and compared to actual LPG vapor cloud incidents. The usefulness of hazard mitigation systems (particularly dry chemical fire extinguishers and water spray systems) in controlling the hazards posed by LPG spills and spill fires is also discussed. The analysis estimates the probability of fatality for a terminal operator is about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ per cargo transfer operation. The probability of fatality for the general public is substantially less.

Martinsen, W.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Welker, J.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Real-time analysis of physiological data and development of alarm algorithms for patient monitoring in the Intensive Care Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of effective data integration and knowledge representation in patient monitoring limits its utility to clinicians. Intelligent alarm algorithms that use artificial intelligence techniques have the potential to ...

Zhang, Ying, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Emergency, Fire Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency, Fire Information Emergency, Fire Information Emergency, Fire Information Protecting our people, emergency personnel, national security information, facilities, lands, and neighboring communities. Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Email LANL Update (505) 667-6622 or (877) 723-4101 toll-free Emergency Public Information In the event of an emergency, Los Alamos National Laboratory will provide you with needed information here as it becomes available. The Los Alamos Site Office/Los Alamos National Laboratory Emergency Public Information Plan provides a framework for coordinated, accurate, and timely release of information to Laboratory employees, the news media, potentially affected members of the public, and other stakeholders. Want emergency news emailed to you? Subscribe here.

423

Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a movement to introduce risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) analyses into fire protection engineering practice, both domestically and worldwide.  This movement exists in both the general fire protection and the nuclear power plant (NPP) fire protection communities.  The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has used risk-informed insights as a part of its regulatory decision making since the 1990s.In 2001, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

An assessment of fire vulnerability for aged electrical relays  

SciTech Connect

There has been some concern that, as nuclear power plants age, protective measures taken to control and minimize the impact of fire may become ineffective, or significantly less effective, and hence result in an increased fire risk. One objective of the Fire Vulnerability of Aged Electrical Components Program is to assess the effects of aging and service wear on the fire vulnerability of electrical equipment. An increased fire vulnerability of components may lead to an overall increase in fire risk to the plant. Because of their widespread use in various electrical safety systems, electromechanical relays were chosen to be the initial components for evaluation. This test program assessed the impact of operational and thermal aging on the vulnerability of these relays to fire-induced damage. Only thermal effects of a fire were examined in this test program. The impact of smoke, corrosive materials, or fire suppression effects on relay performance were not addressed in this test program. The purpose of this test program was to assess whether the fire vulnerability of electrical relays increased with aging. The sequence followed for the test program was to: identify specific relay types, develop three fire scenarios, artificially age several relays, test the unaged and aged relays in the fire exposure scenarios, and compare the results. The relays tested were Agastat GPI, General Electric (GE) HMA, HGA, and HFA. At least two relays of each type were artificially aged and at least two relays of each type were new. Relays were operationally aged by cycling the relay under rated load for 2,000 operations. These relays were then thermally aged for 60 days with their coil energized.

Vigil, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nowlen, S.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

FIRE Physics Validation Review Hampton Inn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00 am FIRE Divertor Design Mike Ulrickson 9:00 am FIRE Vacuum Vessel and Remote Handling Overview Brad

427

Building and Fire Research Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 4827 Building and Fire Research Laboratory Publications, 1991 Nora H. Jason N lsr United States Department ...

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

428

MICROGRAVITY RESEARCH IN SPACECRAFT FIRE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For example, fire initiation and flammability hazards arising from radiation shielding, waste disposal, trash storage, laundry, and household ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fire models for assessment of nuclear power plant fires  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in available fire models for the assessment of nuclear power plants fires. The advantages and disadvantages of three basic types of fire models (zone, field, and control volume) and Sandia's experience with these models will be discussed. It is shown that the type of fire model selected to solve a particular problem should be based on the information that is required. Areas of concern which relate to all nuclear power plant fire models are identified. 17 refs., 6 figs.

Nicolette, V.F.; Nowlen, S.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Smokeless Gasoline Fire Test  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the recent concern by environmentalists, the hypothetical accident thermal test can no longer be performed by simply burning gasoline in an open pit. The uncontrolled open pit technique creates thick, dense, black clouds of smoke which are not permitted by local authorities. This paper deals with the design of the fire test facility and the techniques used to eliminate the smoke plume. The techniques include the addition of excess air to the fire in combination with a spray of water mist near the fuel surface. The excess air technique has been used successfully in an experimental setup; it was found that the temperature could be controlled in the neighborhood of the required 1475 degrees F environment and the smoke could be reduced to very low levels. The water spray technique has been successfully used by others in similar applications and, on completion of a permanent fire test facility at Mound Laboratory (anticipated July, 1974), test results will be available. The water is believed to interact with the combustion reaction to provide more complete combustion. The permanent facility will be a 10 x 10 ft cement block enclosure lined with firebrick. It will be 8 ft high on three sides and 4 ft high on one side to provide for observation of the test. A 5000 gal underground tank provides storage for the aviation gasoline which is gravity fed to the fire.

Williams, H.; Griffin, J. F.

1974-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Comparison of Single-Fired and Delay-Fired Explosions at Regional and Local Distances,  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of blasting practices are utilized by the U.S. mining industry resulting in dramatically different local and regional seismic signatures. This variability in blasting and resulting seismograms suggests that no single discriminant may be appropriate for identifying this class of sources. A range of blasting styles are identified in this paper and the distinguishing characteristics at regional distances are determined. The blasting styles are quantified with the help of mining company records and close-in acoustic,seismic and video graphic data. The regional data consists of portable deployments of high frequency and broadband sensors as well as data from the International Monitoring System Primary Array at Pinedale, Wyoming. Critical to the success of this study is the comparison of regional data from the mining explosions to data from contained, single-fired explosions. Two types of single-fired explosions are utilized, the first a calibration explosion (8 vertical boreholes with 5,000 lbs of explosives each) fired simultaneous. The second, single-fired explosion consists of a number of boreholes detonated simultaneously in the mine for the purpose of pre-splitting the material (driving fractures between boreholes) prior to a large cast shot. Data from these explosions provide the basis for identifying the source signatures of the more typical delay-fired explosions. At high frequencies the single-fired and delay-fired explosions exhibit very similar waveforms at regional distances.Both event types show a high P/L{sub g} ratio at the highest frequencies with L{sub g} dominating at lower frequencies. Mining explosions that cast material show an enrichment in surface wave energy at relatively long periods of 4-12 seconds. Timing anomalies are identified in a high percentage of mining explosions designed to cast material. The accidental, simultaneous detonation of a number of boreholes has been observed in 2 of 9 carefully instrumented cast blasts. These produce regional waveforms that can have characteristics of a single-fired explosion. Spectral scalloping is observed from some delay-fired explosions while not from others. The existence of these characteristics is dependent on the exact delay pattern utilized. Data from a single- fired explosion allows the assessment of local receiver effects that might appear as a characteristic of delay-firing. 9 figs.

Stump, B.W., Pearson, D.C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

TRANSIENT ACCIDENT ANALYSIS OF THE GLOVEBOX SYSTEM IN A LARGE PROCESS ROOM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Local transient hydrogen concentrations were evaluated inside a large process room when the hydrogen gas was released by three postulated accident scenarios associated with the process tank leakage and fire leading to a loss of gas confinement. The three cases considered in this work were fire in a room, loss of confinement from a process tank, and loss of confinement coupled with fire event. Based on these accident scenarios in a large and unventilated process room, the modeling calculations of the hydrogen migration were performed to estimate local transient concentrations of hydrogen due to the sudden leakage and release from a glovebox system associated with the process tank. The modeling domain represented the major features of the process room including the principal release or leakage source of gas storage system. The model was benchmarked against the literature results for key phenomena such as natural convection, turbulent behavior, gas mixing due to jet entrainment, and radiation cooling because these phenomena are closely related to the gas driving mechanisms within a large air space of the process room. The modeling results showed that at the corner of the process room, the gas concentrations migrated by the Case 2 and Case 3 scenarios reached the set-point value of high activity alarm in about 13 seconds, while the Case 1 scenario takes about 90 seconds to reach the concentration. The modeling results were used to estimate transient radioactive gas migrations in an enclosed process room installed with high activity alarm monitor when the postulated leakage scenarios are initiated without room ventilation.

Lee, S

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Coal-fired diesel generator  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

An evaluation of fire-plume properties simulated with the Fire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Clark model cannot model fire convection without losing some vor- ticity production. ... The effect of fire diameter on the burning of crude oil pool fires. ...

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

435

Selenium Removal by Iron Cementation from a Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas Desulfurization Wastewater in a Continuous Flow System-- a Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and performed by MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) at a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal (identified in this report as Plant E). This work was based on encouraging results obtained during previous EPRI-funded work on flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater treatability testing by MSE, which focused on selenium removal from a variety of FGD wastewater sources. The results from th...

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

GASIFICATION BASED BIOMASS CO-FIRING - PHASE I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass gasification offers a practical way to use this locally available fuel source for co-firing traditional large utility boilers. The gasification process converts biomass into a low Btu producer gas that can be fed directly into the boiler. This strategy of co-firing is compatible with variety of conventional boilers including natural gas fired boilers as well as pulverized coal fired and cyclone boilers. Gasification has the potential to address all problems associated with the other types of co-firing with minimum modifications to the existing boiler systems. Gasification can also utilize biomass sources that have been previously unsuitable due to size or processing requirements, facilitating a reduction in the primary fossil fuel consumption in the boiler and thereby reducing the greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere.

Babul Patel; Kevin McQuigg; Robert F. Toerne

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Micronized coal-fired retrofit system for SO{sub x} reduction Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of a technical, financial and environmental assessment study for a project, which would have included a new TCS micronized coal-fired heating plant for the Produkcja I Hodowla Roslin Ogrodniczych (PHRO) Greenhouse Complex; Krzeszowice, Poland. Project site is about 20 miles west of Krakow, Poland. During the project study period, PHRO utilized 14 heavy oil-fired boilers to produce heat for its greenhouse facilities and also home heating to several adjacent apartment housing complexes. The boilers burn a high-sulfur content heavy crude oil, called mazute, The project study was conducted during a period extended from March 1996 through February 1997. For size orientation, the PHRO Greenhouse complex grows a variety of vegetables and flowers for the Southern Poland marketplace. The greenhouse area under glass is very large and equivalent to approximately 50 football fields, The new micronized coal fired boiler would have: (1) provided a significant portion of the heat for PHRO and a portion of the adjacent apartment housing complexes, (2) dramatically reduced sulfur dioxide air pollution emissions, while satisfying new Polish air regulations, and (3) provided attractive savings to PHRO, based on the quantity of displaced oil.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Co-firing a pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system with coal and refuse derived fuels and/or sludges. Task 16  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal waste. Leading this approach, the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC) has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The fluidized bed, with its stability of combustion, reduces the amount of thermochemical transients and provides for easier process control. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire-derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

DeLallo, M.; Zaharchuk, R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

GASIFICATION BASED BIOMASS CO-FIRING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass gasification offers a practical way to use this widespread fuel source for co-firing traditional large utility boilers. The gasification process converts biomass into a low Btu producer gas that can be used as a supplemental fuel in an existing utility boiler. This strategy of co-firing is compatible with a variety of conventional boilers including natural gas and oil fired boilers, pulverized coal fired conventional and cyclone boilers. Gasification has the potential to address all problems associated with the other types of co-firing with minimum modifications to the existing boiler systems. Gasification can also utilize biomass sources that have been previously unsuitable due to size or processing requirements, facilitating a wider selection of biomass as fuel and providing opportunity in reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere through the commercialization of this technology. This study evaluated two plants: Wester Kentucky Energy Corporation's (WKE's) Reid Plant and TXU Energy's Monticello Plant for technical and economical feasibility. These plants were selected for their proximity to large supply of poultry litter in the area. The Reid plant is located in Henderson County in southwest Kentucky, with a large poultry processing facility nearby. Within a fifty-mile radius of the Reid plant, there are large-scale poultry farms that generate over 75,000 tons/year of poultry litter. The local poultry farmers are actively seeking environmentally more benign alternatives to the current use of the litter as landfill or as a farm spread as fertilizer. The Monticello plant is located in Titus County, TX near the town of Pittsburgh, TX, where again a large poultry processor and poultry farmers in the area generate over 110,000 tons/year of poultry litter. Disposal of this litter in the area is also a concern. This project offers a model opportunity to demonstrate the feasibility of biomass co-firing and at the same time eliminate poultry litter disposal problems for the area's poultry farmers.

Babul Patel; Kevin McQuigg; Robert Toerne; John Bick

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Engineering work plan for PFP criticality alarm panel first unit re-build  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the first step in increasing the quality, reliability, and ease of maintenance of the nine Criticality Alarm Panels (CAP) at PFP. Development control practices and guidelines of WHC-CM-6-1, EP-2.4 and WHC-IP-1026, EPG-2.4 are applied to develop a prototype of a replacement Criticality Alarm Panel (CAP) with facility-use potential. During the development of the prototype CAP, the design requirements of all of PFP`s nine CAPs are considered to develop standardized hardware and detailed design drawings that are tailored to PFP maintenance needs. Increased quality and reliability is achieved through quality hardware, proven technology and design techniques, and the use of the Class 1E workmanship standards of WHC-CM-8-1. The end result of the work described by this work plan is a verified/read-to-install replacement for CAP Z4 and verified/released H-2 drawings that are formatted such that they can easily be replicated when producing design drawings for the other eight CAPs.

Clem, W.E.

1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Decisions in the perspective automated artillery fire support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is focused on decisions in the future Automated Artillery Fire Support Control System. Artillery units of the Army of the Czech Republic, reflecting current global security neighborhood, can be used outside the Czech Republic. The paper presents ...

M. Blaha; L. Potužák

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Description of ALARMA: the alarm algorithm developed for the Nuclear Car Wash  

SciTech Connect

The goal of any alarm algorithm should be that it provide the necessary tools to derive confidence limits on whether the existence of fissile materials is present in cargo containers. It should be able to extract these limits from (usually) noisy and/or weak data while maintaining a false alarm rate (FAR) that is economically suitable for port operations. It should also be able to perform its analysis within a reasonably short amount of time (i.e. {approx} seconds). To achieve this, it is essential that the algorithm be able to identify and subtract any interference signature that might otherwise be confused with a fissile signature. Lastly, the algorithm itself should be user-intuitive and user-friendly so that port operators with little or no experience with detection algorithms may use it with relative ease. In support of the Nuclear Car Wash project at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, we have developed an alarm algorithm that satisfies the above requirements. The description of the this alarm algorithm, dubbed ALARMA, is the purpose of this technical report. The experimental setup of the nuclear car wash has been well documented [1, 2, 3]. The presence of fissile materials is inferred by examining the {beta}-delayed gamma spectrum induced after a brief neutron irradiation of cargo, particularly in the high-energy region above approximately 2.5 MeV. In this region naturally occurring gamma rays are virtually non-existent. Thermal-neutron induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}P, on the other hand, leaves a unique {beta}-delayed spectrum [4]. This spectrum comes from decays of fission products having half-lives as large as 30 seconds, many of which have high Q-values. Since high-energy photons penetrate matter more freely, it is natural to look for unique fissile signatures in this energy region after neutron irradiation. The goal of this interrogation procedure is a 95% success rate of detection of as little as 5 kilograms of fissile material while retaining at most .1% false alarm rate. Plywood is used to simulate hydrogenous cargo material and steel (pipes) is used to simulate metallic cargo. The wood consists of 120 x 240 cm sheets and has approximately .65 g/cm{sup 3}. The steel pipes have approximately 10 cm diameters x 6.4 mm wall thickness are .6 g/cm{sup 3}. Fissile sources consist of a ''large'' (380 g) and ''small'' (250 g) sample of HEU (U{sub 3}O{sub 8} 94% enriched). Note that the masses of the HEU sources used in our experimental runs are at least an order of magnitude smaller than 5 kilograms. Runs are done with either wood or steel cargoes stacked at various heights and the HEU sources placed at various depths within the cargo.

Luu, T; Biltoft, P; Church, J; Descalle, M; Hall, J; Manatt, D; Mauger, J; Norman, E; Petersen, D; Pruet, J; Prussin, S; Slaughter, D

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

443

Fire Protection Program: Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Summary Since May 1950, an Annual Fire Protection Program Summary has been submitted by DOE's fire protection community. Currently, this report is required by section 5a.(8) of DOE Order 231.1. "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting." In 1999, an automation initiative was undertaken to streamline data collection and provide a more through review of DOE Reporting Element activities. This action resulted in the delayed publications of the CY 1999 and 2000 reports until 2002. It is now possible however to view all Annual Summary Reporting Element responses since 1991 at the Site, Operations, Lead Program Secretarial Office and Headquarters levels. Additionally, a build-in reference to other DOE reporting activities (CAIRS and ORPS) is available that allows Reporting Elements and managers the opportunity to review all fire protection events along previously mentioned categories. Reports listed below were generated from this application. To obtain a copy of the Annual Summary Application please contact Jim Bisker in the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy (EH-53) at (301)903-6542 or Jim Bisker.

444

Application of a Heat Integrated Post-combustion CO2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Award Number: DE-FE0007395 DOE Project Manager: José D. Figueroa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Heat Integrated Post- a Heat Integrated Post- combustion CO 2 Capture System with Hitachi Advanced Solvent into Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant University of Kentucky Research Foundation Partnered with U.S. Department of Energy NETL Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities Electric Power Research Institute (with WorleyParsons) Hitachi Power Systems America Smith Management Group July 9, 2013 Goals and Objectives * Objectives 1) To demonstrate a heat-integrated post-combustion CO 2 capture system with an advanced solvent; 2) To collect information/data on material corrosion and identify appropriate materials of construction for a 550 MWe commercial-scale carbon capture plant.  To gather data on solvent degradation kinetics, water management, system dynamic control as well as other information during the long-term

445

Project: Fire Resistance Design and Retrofit of Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... tool, fire loads and fire scenarios, thermal analysis ... Interactive Visualization and Analysis Environment to ... fire load and fire scenario criteria, thermal ...

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fire.Gov - Better Fire Fighting Through Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... site of an old Spartanburg, SC, textile mill into proving ... The winds caused a rapid change in the dynamics of ... Wind Driven Fire in Home, Texas, 2009. ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Live Fire Tests with FDNY Will Guide Improvements in Fire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a kilometer from the southern tip of Manhattan. ... Suppression Exercise, go to: www.nyc.gov/html ... Effectiveness of Fire Fighting Tactics Project, go to ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

448

Suitability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to Predict the June 2005 Fire Weather for Interior Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard indices used in the National Fire Danger Rating System (NFDRS) and Fosberg fire-weather indices are calculated from Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations and observations in interior Alaska for June 2005. Evaluation ...

Nicole Mölders

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Multiscale Simulation of a Prescribed Fire Event in the New Jersey Pine Barrens using ARPS-CANOPY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke prediction products are one of the tools used by land management personnel for decision-making regarding prescribed fires. This study documents the application to a prescribed fire of a smoke prediction system that employs ARPS-CANOPY, a ...

Michael T. Kiefer; Warren E. Heilman; Shiyuan Zhong; Joseph J. Charney; Xindi Bian; Nicholas S. Skowronski; John L. Hom; Kenneth L. Clark; Matthew Patterson; Michael R. Gallagher

450

Oxygen-Fired CO{sub 2} Recycle for Application to Direct CO{sub 2} Capture form Coal-Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Southern Research/Southern Company 1 MWth Pilot-Scale Coal-Fired Test Facility was successfully retrofit to fire in either the traditional air-fired mode or with 100% oxygen and recycled flue gas, with a fully integrated feedback and control system, including oxygen and recycled flue gas modulation during startup, transfer, and shutdown, safety and operational interlocks, and data acquisition. A MAXON Staged Oxygen Burner for Oxy-Coal Applications produced a stable flame over a significant range of firing turn-down, staging, and while firing five different U.S. coal types. The MAXON burner design produces lower flame temperatures than for air firing, which will enable (A) Safe operation, (B) Reduction of recycle flow without concern about furnace flame temperatures, and (C) May likely be affective at reducing slagging and fouling in the boiler and super heater at full-scale Power Plants. A CFD model of the Oxy-fired Combustion Research Facility (OCRF) was used to predict the flame geometry and temperatures in the OCRF and make a comparison with the air-fired case. The model predictions were consistent with the experimental data in showing that the MAXON burner fired with oxygen produced lower flame temperatures than the air-fired burner while firing with air.

Thomas Gale

2010-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

451

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

452

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Manufacturing and Co-firing Switchgrass and Coastal Bermudagrass Cubes for Generating Renewable Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-firing grasses in existing coal-fired units is a potential low-cost option for generating renewable energy. The most basic approach to co-firing involves mixing biomass with coal and introducing the mix into the plant's coal handling system. Loose grass with coal will not flow reliably, so a study was created to determine if local grasses could be cost-effectively compressed into dense cubes that could then be successfully mixed with coal and fired in existing coal-fired boilers. Success with cubing t...

2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

Residential Structure Separation Fire Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... room was centered between the north and south ... Bradley S. Pabody of the United States Fire Administration for ... A natural gas burner with active flow ...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

455

Unified Fire Recovery Command Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_____________________ Electric Company _____________________ Telephone Company _____________________ Red Cross Sheriff _____________________ Fire Department _____________________ Colorado State Forest Service _____________________ Colorado Division of Wildlife _____________________ USDA Forest Service _____________________ Natural

456

Building and Fire Research News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Carbon, the active ingredient in charcoal, is normally not considered a fire retardant ... just published a new strategic plan to guide the activities of the ...

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Station Nightclub Fire 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The final report, "Report of the Technical Investigation of The Station Nightclub Fire (NIST NCSTAR 2), Volume 1 and Volume 2 ," includes details of ...

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Director for Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Systems Design Fire Alarm Systems Audio/Video Systems Energy Analysis Power & Light Analysis Cordero Manager for Architectural Services Jeff Sutherland, AIA Manager for Electrical Engineering David Contract Management Construction Inspection HVAC Design Plumbing Design Fire Suppression System Energy

Zhang, Yuanlin

459

Building Ultra-Low False Alarm Rate Support Vector Classifier Ensembles Using Random Subspaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the Cost-Sensitive Random Subspace Support Vector Classifier (CS-RS-SVC), a new learning algorithm that combines random subspace sampling and bagging with Cost-Sensitive Support Vector Classifiers to more effectively address detection applications burdened by unequal misclassification requirements. When compared to its conventional, non-cost-sensitive counterpart on a two-class signal detection application, random subspace sampling is shown to very effectively leverage the additional flexibility offered by the Cost-Sensitive Support Vector Classifier, yielding a more than four-fold increase in the detection rate at a false alarm rate (FAR) of zero. Moreover, the CS-RS-SVC is shown to be fairly robust to constraints on the feature subspace dimensionality, enabling reductions in computation time of up to 82% with minimal performance degradation.

Chen, B Y; Lemmond, T D; Hanley, W G

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

Wireless boundary monitor system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments.

Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fire alarm system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Wireless boundary monitor system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wireless boundary monitor system used to monitor the integrity of a boundary surrounding an area uses at least two housings having at least one transmitting means for emitting ultrasonic pressure waves to a medium. Each of the housings has a plurality of receiving means for sensing the pressure waves in the medium. The transmitting means and the receiving means of each housing are aimable and communicably linked. At least one of the housings is equipped with a local alarm means for emitting a first alarm indication whereby, when the pressure waves propagating from a transmitting means to a receiving means are sufficiently blocked by an object a local alarm means or a remote alarm means or a combination thereof emit respective alarm indications. The system may be reset either manually or automatically. This wireless boundary monitor system has useful applications in both indoor and outdoor environments. 4 figs.

Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

462

Early Cloud Formation by Large Area Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fires simultaneously burning in hundreds of square kilometers could result from a nuclear weapon explosion. The strong buoyancy field of such large area fires induces high-velocity fire winds that turn upward in the burning region. This results ...

R. D. Small; K. E. Heikes

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Horizontal Roll Vortices and Crown Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational evidence from nine crown fires suggests that horizontal roll vortices are a major mechanism in crown-fire spread. Post-burn aerial photography indicates that unburned tree-crown streets are common with crown fire. Investigation of ...

Donald A. Haines

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Wind-Driven House Fire, Texas, 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind-Driven House Fire, Texas 2009. ... Selected Publications. Simulation of the Dynamics of a Wind-Driven Fire in a Ranch-Style House - Texas. ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

465

Sept. 2009 Fire Retardants Workshop Agenda and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The role of NIOSH in protecting the on-the-job health of fire ... Life Cycle Analysis of Fire Retardants, Dr. Margaret Simonson McNamee, Research ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait Oil Fires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Middle East Kuwait Oil Fires Graphics CO2 Emissions from the 1991 Kuwait Oil Fires Data graphic Data...

467

Project: Enhanced Effectiveness of Fire Fighting Tactics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Draft sections of Fire Fighting Essentials, 6th edition, incorporating new material based on NIST research results on fire ... el. Facilities/Tools Used: ...

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Video of Cook County Administration Building Fire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NIST team also documented the fire damage in order to compare fire ... The magnitude of the third peak is larger than the second peak and this is ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fire Rescue Group, Emergency Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mission of the Fire Rescue Group is to provide at Brookhaven with fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, confined space rescue, technical...

470

Alcohol fired alcohol fuel still  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The best method for using alcohol as the base for alcohol fuel distillation would be in the conservation of the initial heat input. In other words, the 20 gallon system would, at the end of a load, in effect waste a full gallon of alcohol fuel with each batch. Therefore either a continual feed system needs to be developed which would serve the 20 gallon heater or heat exchangers of some type should be designed to salvage a great portion of the heat. If, on the other hand, large amounts of fuel are not required, a large single batch still fired by alcohol would not be too wasteful. It would be adviseable that some form of alcohol fuel research both small and large scale be continued. While not necessarily an important part of the energy picture now, it may well be in the future. It could also open up overseas markets where fuels in liquid form are scarce, yet raw materials are not. Lastly, this project, while accomplishing muon, needs further study to make the system more efficient in fuel economy.

Johnson, F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471