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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Quantification and comparison of terpene concentrations in various balsam fir growth forms and foliage ages, and a simulation of moose browsing on balsam fir trees at Isle Royale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pressure are approximately similar (2A% difference) to those reported in a study of white-tailed deer (Odocolleus virginianus) browsing on eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadentis), balsam fir, and 4 deciduous species in Wisconsin (Anderson and Katz 1993), 28... pressure are approximately similar (2A% difference) to those reported in a study of white-tailed deer (Odocolleus virginianus) browsing on eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadentis), balsam fir, and 4 deciduous species in Wisconsin (Anderson and Katz 1993), 28...

Terra-Berns, Mary Helen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hemlock Semiconductor Corp HSC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hemlock Semiconductor Corp HSC Hemlock Semiconductor Corp HSC Jump to: navigation, search Name Hemlock Semiconductor Corp (HSC) Place Hemlock, Michigan Zip 48626 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer polycrystalline silicon for semiconductor and solar industries. Coordinates 39.589497°, -82.153275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.589497,"lon":-82.153275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

3

Hemlock, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hemlock, Michigan: Energy Resources Hemlock, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.4147488°, -84.2305398° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.4147488,"lon":-84.2305398,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Abies lasiocarpa subalpine fir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abies lasiocarpa subalpine fir · Needle single, flat in cross-section · Twigs not roughened irregularly serrate · Rough twigs and bark · Riparian #12;Juniperus scopulorum Rocky Mountain juniper

5

Photo Retro-DielsAlder Reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photo Retro-DielsAlder Reactions ... Photo-retro-DielsAlder (PrDA) reactions of a variety of DielsAlder (DA) adducts were studied. ... In fact, photo-rDA (PrDA) reactions have been sparsely reported in literature. ...

Valentine K. Johns; Zheng Shi; Wei Dang; Matthew D. McInnis; Yuxiang Weng; Yi Liao

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

6

69. Red Butte-Red Fir Ridge (Shasta Red Fir) (Imper 1988b, Cheng 1996d)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

69. Red Butte-Red Fir Ridge (Shasta Red Fir) (Imper 1988b, Cheng 1996d) Location This established (fig. 139). Ecological subsection ­ High Cascades (M261Df). Target Element Red Fir (Abies magnifica) Distinctive Features Shasta Red Fir Forest: Taxonomically, the description of Shasta red fir (Abies magnifica

Standiford, Richard B.

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - arizona alder trees Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shrub stand dominated by Alnus tenuifolia (thinleaf alder). The fast-growing deciduous tree Populus... , and growth dynamics of Alnus tenuifolia (thinleaf alder) and...

8

GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-240 Insertion Site Selection and Feeding of the Hemlock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entirely and exclusively susceptible to HWA. However, in the wake of widespread mortality, anecdotal. Dispersal occurs either by crawling to nearby branches, wind, phoresy on macro-vertebrates (e.g., birds determine feeding sites on hemlocks. The distal segment of the HWA labium possesses two fields of sensilla

Standiford, Richard B.

9

Predicted new optically pumped FIR molecular lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of nine CW FIR laser lines are reported from two new FIR laser molecules CH2CHF and S(O-18)2. These two are from a list of twelve candidate molecules that were predicted using a set of selection criteria. The candidate D2(O-18) was tested, but did not lase. Combining these results with independent studies on other candidates, brings the number of proven laser molecules to 4 out of 5 that were tested. These results confirm the value of the selection criteria as a guideline for predicting new optically pumped FIR laser molecules.

Calloway, A.R.; Danielewicz, E.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc Place Washington Utility Id 287 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0640/kWh Commercial: $0.0661/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Alder_Mutual_Light_Co,_Inc&oldid=408960"

11

Electronic effects in the Diels-Alder reactions of vinylboranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRONIC EFFECTS IN THE DIEI. S-ALDER REACTIONS OF VINYLBORANES A Thesis by JOSE VERNON WATSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Chemistry ELECTRONIC EFFECTS IN THE DIELS-ALDER REACTIONS OF VINYLBORANES A Thesis by JOSE VERNON WATSON Approved as to style and content by: Daniel A. Singleton (Chair of Committee) David E. Bergbreit (Member...

Watson, Jose Vernon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Low-Noise-Far-Infrared (FIR) Receiver tasks: FIR laser development. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Low-Noise Far-Infrared (FIR) Receiver program for FIR laser development were established with the particular goal of improving magnetic fusion diagnostics in tokamak fusion reactors. Development of both FIR sources and receivers can greatly benefit such programs studying controlled nuclear fusion by providing vital data on particle velocity (temperature) and density through scattering measurements. The Department of Energy (DOE), through the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), has funded The Aerospace Corporation to design and implement state-of-the-art techniques in the FIR/near-millimeter-wave spectral region. Specific areas of interest to DOE are portable FIR lasers, near-millimeter-wave mixers, solid-state sources, and the integration of these areas into advanced diagnostic tools for plasma studies. This report documents the work accomplished in those areas of interest.

Foote, F.B.; Danielewicz, E.J.; Galantowicz, T.A.

1984-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder tree labiate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fertilization on the Early Growth of Red Alder... Plantations By Kevin R. Brown, Ph.D., R.P. Bio. and Paul J. Courtin, M.F., R.P.F. KEYWORDS: red alder... .R and P.J....

14

Analog FIR Filter Used for Range-Optimal Pulsed Radar Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of implementing the matched filter with an analog FIR filter is proposed. The FIR filter provides a linear phase response which is suitable for radar applications. Analog FIR filters can be implemented in the discrete domain, requiring operational amplifiers...

Su, Eric Chen

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

MHK Projects/White Alder Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alder Project Alder Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.2165,"lon":-91.1593,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric hetero-diels-alder reactions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Correction Paper No. b927076k Summary: . The classic hetero-Diels Alder reaction of acrolein with methyl vinyl ketone (Scheme 3) was examined in great... is unsymmetrically...

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder click chemistry Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

click chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alder click chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Influence of species proportion...

18

Diels-Alder Cycloaddition for Fluorophore Targeting to Specific Proteins inside Living Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition between trans-cyclooctenes and tetrazines is biocompatible and exceptionally by chemoselective derivatization with a tetrazine-fluorophore conjugate in the second step. On the cell surface-cycloalkyne cycloadditions,10 and inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloadditions of tetrazines and trans-cyclooctenes.11

19

Theory of Brownian motion with the Alder-Wainwright effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Stokes-Boussinesq-Langevin equation, which describes the time evolution of Brownian motion with the Alder-Wainwright effect, can be treated in the framework of the theory of KMO-Langevin equations which describe the time evolution of a real, stationary Gaussian process with T-positivity (reflection positivity) originating in axiomatic quantum field theory. After proving the fluctuation-dissipation theorems for KMO-Langevin equations, the authors obtain an explicit formula for the deviation from the classical Einstein relation that occurs in the Stokes-Boussinesq-Langevin equation with a white noise as its random force. The authors interested in whether or not it can be measured experimentally.

Okabe, Y.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Recyclable DielsAlder Furan/Maleimide Polymer Networks with Shape Memory Effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The DielsAlder and retro-DielsAlder reactions between PHAEs and MPDBMI were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and solubility test. ... Furthermore, the mechanical properties and shape memory properties of the original and recycled MPDBMI/PHAE networks were systematically investigated by a tensile test and a quantitative shape memory evaluation method, respectively. ... DSC measurement indicated that the retro-DielsAlder reaction will occur upon heating, and the solubility test showed that the recycled MPDBMI/PHAE films may still be considered as recyclable. ...

Mengjin Fan; Jialin Liu; Xiangyuan Li; Junying Zhang; Jue Cheng

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder bigleaf maple Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 3 Use of the ZELIG Forest Simulation Model in the Coastal Landscape Analysis and Modeling Study (CLAMS) Summary: ) Bigleaf maple (ZELIG) Douglas-fir...

22

Multi-Channel FIR HCN Laser Interferometer on HT-7 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Five-channel far-infrared (FIR) hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer was developed to measure plasma electron density profile on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The structure of the five-channel FIR .....

Y. X. Jie; X. Gao; Y. F. Cheng; K. Yang

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Simulations of a FIR Oscillator with Large Slippage parameter at Jefferson Lab for FIR/UV pump-probe experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We previously proposed a dual FEL configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that would allow simultaneous lasing at FIR and UV wavelengths. The FIR source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules, using the exhaust beam from a UVFEL as the input electron beam. Since the UV FEL requires very short pulses, the input to the FIR FEL is extremely short compared to a slippage length and the usual Slowly Varying Envelope Approximation (SVEA) does not apply. We use a non-SVEA code to simulate this system both with a small energy spread (UV laser off) and with large energy spread (UV laser on).

Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Campbell, L. T. [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (Great Britain); Daresbury Laboratory and Cockcroft Institute, Warrington (Great Britain); McNeil, B.W.T. [University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (Great Britain); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Shinn, Michelle D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at The Teakettle Comparisons with Existing Classifications of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests.....................................................................................23 Intensive Measurements of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests ............24 Mixed-Conifer Patch

Standiford, Richard B.

25

The FIR-Radio Correlation & Implications for GLAST Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· if tcool > Bmin ­ Lradio ~ eB3/2: e B · MW: tsyn ~ tIC ~ tesc ~ 107-108 yr · Arp 220: tsyn ~ ? (B ~ ?) tIC ~ 5000 yr tesc ~ ?; tesc > R/vw~ 3x105 yr tIC in Starbursts & FIR-Radio favor tcool tIC, i

Wurtele, Jonathan

26

On the Way to Biofuels from Furan: Discriminating DielsAlder and Ring-Opening Mechanisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the Way to Biofuels from Furan: Discriminating DielsAlder and Ring-Opening Mechanisms ... (2) While this is an attractive approach, only a fraction of the biomass carbon ends up in the resulting fuel (in effect increasing the price of this cellulosic biofuel), largely because of the tendency to form solid carbonaceous materials (i.e., coke) in the process. ...

S. Vaitheeswaran; Sara K. Green; Paul Dauenhauer; Scott M. Auerbach

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 4 VERSION 1 Conjugation, Diels-Alder, Aromaticity, Aromatic Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybridization Basicity Na Nb Nc Nd Heat of Hydrogenation O O O Reactivity Towards Br BrBr Reactivity toward SN21 JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 4 VERSION 1 Conjugation, Diels-Alder, Aromaticity, Aromatic Reactions 1 #12;2 5. Synthesis Reactions. Draw the feature product of the following reactions (need not show any

Jasperse, Craig P.

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - appalachian spruce fir Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

topography, and potential insolation on the Summary: United States (Noss et al. 1995; White and Miller 1998). Appalachian montane spruce-fir forests... by wind, with natural...

29

Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

S. Henrot-Versille; R. Cizeron; F. Couchot

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Characterisation of pulsed Carbon fiber illuminators for FIR instrument calibration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We manufactured pulsed illuminators emitting in the far infrared for the Planck-HFI bolometric instrument ground calibrations. Specific measurements have been conducted on these light sources, based on Carbon fibers, to understand and predict their properties. We present a modelisation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity and the calorific capacitance of the fibers. A comparison between simulations and bolometer data is given, that shows the coherence of our model. Their small time constants, their stability and their emission spectrum pointing in the submm range make these illuminators a very usefull tool for calibrating FIR instruments.

Henrot-Versill, S; Couchot, F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Poster Paper Annosus Root Disease in Noble Fir Christmas Trees1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Poster Paper #12;Annosus Root Disease in Noble Fir Christmas Trees1 Alan Kanaskie Gene Milbrath and discoloration of 6- to 8-year-old noble fir (Abies procera) Christmas trees at one location in northwestern harvested in 1988 were infected (table 1). Lightly infected trees (less than 12 percent of stump surface

Standiford, Richard B.

32

UV and FIR selected star-forming galaxies at z=0: differences and overlaps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study two samples of local galaxies, one is UV (GALEX) selected and the other FIR (IRAS) selected, to address the question whether UV and FIR surveys see the two sides ('bright' and 'dark') of the star formation of the same population of galaxies or two different populations of star forming galaxies. No significant difference between the L$_{tot}$ ($=L_{60}+L_{FUV}$) luminosity functions of the UV and FIR samples is found. Also, after the correction for the `Malmquist bias' (bias for flux limited samples), the FIR-to-UV ratio v.s. L$_{tot}$ relations of the two samples are consistent with each other. In the range of $9 \\la \\log(L_{tot}/L_\\sun) \\la 12$, both can be approximated by a simple linear relation of $\\log (L_{60}/L_{FUV})=\\log(L_{tot}/L_\\sun)-9.66$. These are consistent with the hypothesis that the two samples represent the same population of star forming galaxies, and their well documented differences in L$_{tot}$ and in FIR-to-UV ratio are due only to the selection effect. A comparison between the UV luminosity functions shows marginal evidence for a population of faint UV galaxies missing in the FIR selected sample. The contribution from these 'FIR-quiet' galaxies to the overall UV population is insignificant, given that the K-band luminosity functions (i.e. the stellar mass functions) of the two samples do not show any significant difference.

C. Kevin Xu; Veronique Buat; Jorge Iglesias-Pramo; Tsutomu T. Takeuchi; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Jose Donas; Karl Forster; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; D. Christopher Martin; Bruno Milliard; Patrick Morrissey; R. Michael Rich; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Ted K. Wyder; Sukyoung Yi

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Experimental Determination of Droplet Impaction on Canopy Components of Balsam Fir  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capture efficiencies of balsam fir [Abies balsamea (L.) Mill] canopy components for monodisperse glycerin droplets were measured in a low-speed wind tunnel. Droplets were produced at sizes and wind speeds typical of cloudy conditions in a ...

Philip G. Thorne; Gary M. Lovett; William A. Reiners

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - appalachian spruce-fir forest Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HardwoodsSpruce-Fir Open Upland Brush Lowland Brush UrbanBare Rock CedarMixed Conifer 12;... Ford Forestry Center and Research Forest Historical Stand Cover (c. 1956)...

35

A convergent intermolecular Diels-Alder approach to the spirocycles found in the marine neurotoxic agents, the gymnodimines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)-diene 68 undergoes isomerization to (E)-diene 68 in situ and the Diels-Alder reaction then proceeds with exo selectivity (Scheme 34) since it has been observed that (Z)-diene 68 can undergo isomerisation under acidic conditions. Another possible...)-diene 68 undergoes isomerization to (E)-diene 68 in situ and the Diels-Alder reaction then proceeds with exo selectivity (Scheme 34) since it has been observed that (Z)-diene 68 can undergo isomerisation under acidic conditions. Another possible...

Cohn, Stephen Todd

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel December 12, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Rajit Sapar analyzes samples at the Joint BioEnergy Institute's lab. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Rajit Sapar analyzes samples at the Joint BioEnergy Institute's lab. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science One of the best parts of the season - next to presents of course - is the hint of evergreen in the air. Yet the sweet smell doesn't last. It fades into forgotten corners, along with unused gift cards. But it doesn't have to be that way. In fact, researchers at the Office of Science's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have discovered a way to keep

37

Optimal linear phase FIR filter design using particle swarm optimization with constriction factor and inertia weight approach with wavelet mutation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, Particle Swarm Optimization with Constriction Factor and Inertia Weight Approach is hybridized with Wavelet Mutation PSOCFIWA-WM strategy for the optimal design of linear phase FIR filters. Real coded genetic algorithm RGA, particle swarm ... Keywords: Band Pass, Band Stop, Convergence, Evolutionary Optimization Technique, Fir Filter, High Pass, Low Pass, Magnitude Response, Pso, Psocfiwa, Psocfiwa-Wm, Rga

S. K. Saha; R. Kar; D. Mandal; S. P. Ghoshal

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle Experimental Forest Figure 37--Density of tree seed-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle,900 and 2,300 m, mixed-conifer forest predominates, although red fir is locally common along riparian.38 #12;Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle

Standiford, Richard B.

39

Oyamel fir forest trunks provide thermal advantages for overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oyamel fir forest trunks provide thermal advantages for overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico, UniversidadNacionalAutonomadeMexico,AntiguaCarreteraaPa´ tzcuaro,Morelia,Michoacan,Mexico,5 InstitutodeGeografi´aCiudad Universitaria,UniversidadNacionalAutonomadeMexico,Coyoacan,MexicoD.F.,Mexico,6 Departmentof

Williams, Ernest H.

40

Nutrient cycling and distribution in different-aged plantations of Chinese fir in southern China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient cycling and distribution in different-aged plantations of Chinese fir in southern China in revised form 25 January 2007; accepted 7 February 2007 Abstract The distribution in tree biomass), potassium (K), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) were measured in young, middle-aged and mature plantations (8

Heal, Kate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

[)r PAR1 rMF.Nr o Dr (.FIrMr( A .IF]CNC)I,OGIi,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[)r PAR1 rMF.Nr o Dr (.FIrMr( A E .IF]CNC)I,OGIi, f)?]I I-ARMACo @ ;^.*r.l-EN,.m BANDO Dl SELEZIONE

Guidoni, Leonardo

42

An Efficient Arithmetic Sum-of-Product (SOP) based Multiplication Approach for FIR Filters and DFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the output of a FIR filter is the weighted sum of the current value and a finite number of previous values of the input. An important property of FIR filters is their inherent stability due to the lack of feedback from the output. Y (n) = N?1 ? l=0 x(n... . . . . . . +++ . . . . . .+ + + + MCM z?1 z?1 z?1 z?1 a) Direct Form Realization z?1 z?1 z?1 z?1 b) Transposed Direct Form Realization c0 c1 c2 c3 cN?1 cN?3cN?1 c0cN?2 x(n) x(n) SOP Y (n) Y (n) cN?4 Fig. I.1. Implementation of DFT The previous approaches for solving...

Kumar, Rajeev

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

Variation in wood anatomical structure of Douglas-fir defoliated by the western spruce budworm: a case study in the coastal-transitional zone of British Columbia, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An outbreak of the western spruce budworm temporarily modifies cellular wood anatomy of stem wood in natural and mature Douglas-fir stands impacting wood quality properties.

J. N. Axelson; A. Bast; R. Alfaro; D. J. Smith; H. Grtner

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Please cite this article in press as: Hart, S.J., Laroque, C.P., Searching for thresholds in climateradial growth rela-tionships of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada. Dendrochronologia (2012),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in climate­radial growth rela- tionships of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir, Jasper National Park, Alberta for thresholds in climate­radial growth relationships of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir, Jasper National Park

Walters, Bradley B.

45

The UV to FIR spectral energy distribution of star-forming galaxies in the redshift desert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the rest-frame UV-to-near-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), star-forming (SF) BzK (sBzK), and UV-selected galaxies at 1.5 deep FIR data taken within the framework of the GOODS-Herschel project. According to their best-fitted SED-derived properties we find that, due to their selection criterion involving UV measurements, LBGs tend to be UV-brighter, bluer, have less prominent Balmer break (are younger), and have higher dust-corrected total SFR than sBzK galaxies. In a color versus stellar mass diagram, LBGs at z ~ 2 tend to be mostly located over the blue cloud of galaxies at their redshift, although galaxies with older ages, higher dust attenuation, and redder UV continuum slope deviate to the green valley and red sequence. We find PACS (100um or 160um) individual detection...

Oteo, I; Magdis, G; Prez-Garca, A M; Cepa, J; Cedrs, B; Snchez, H Domnguez; Ederoclite, A; Snchez-Portal, M; Prez-Martnez, R; Pintos-Castro, I; Polednikova, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Density effects on the conifer mortality in declining spruce-fir forest in northern Japan: Implication of bark beetle attack to, cause spruce decline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examined mortality patterns of two conifer species in relation to tree abundance and species composition in a declining spruce-fir forest in Akan National park, Hokkaido, northern...Picea jezoensis (Sieb. et Z...

Kenichi Ozaki; Kenji Fukuyama; Kaoru Maet; Kensuke Itoh

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

2-Methoxyestradiol, an Endogenous Estrogen Metabolite, Sensitizes Radioresistant MCF-7/FIR Breast Cancer Cells Through Multiple Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The requirement for a well-tolerated and highly effective radiosensitizer that preferentially sensitizes tumor cells at multiple levels of radioresistance remains largely unmet. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME) has polypharmacological profiles that target multiple signaling pathways involved in the development of radioresistance. In the current study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of 2ME on the radioresistant breast cancer MCF-7/FIR cell line and explored the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitizing effect of 2ME was evaluated on the basis of cell death and clonogenic survival. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and cell cycle progression were assessed by flow cytometry. Radiation-induced DNA damage was evaluated on the basis of histone {gamma}-H2AX phosphorylation and foci formation. Immunoblotting was used to assess the effects of {gamma} radiation and/or 2ME on radioresistance pathways. Results: Our data demonstrate that MCF-7/FIR cells expressed higher levels of Bcl-2 and HIF-1{alpha} and displayed a lower ROS phenotype than the parental MCF-7 cells. Treatment of parental MCF-7 cells with 2ME (0.5 {mu}M) had minimal effect on {gamma} radiation-induced cell proliferation and surviving fractions. On the contrary, in MCF-7/FIR cells, treatment with 2ME significantly enhanced {gamma} radiation-induced reduction in cell proliferation and surviving fraction. This combination was effective in activating apoptosis, arresting the cell cycle at the G{sub 2}/M phase, and increasing the level of {gamma} radiation-induced ROS and the number of {gamma}-H2AX foci. In addition, 2ME significantly ameliorated {gamma} radiation-induced expression of the HIF-1{alpha} transcription factor and its downstream targets AKT/mTOR. Conclusion: 2ME preferentially sensitizes radioresistant MCF-7/FIR cells to {gamma} radiation by targeting multiple signaling pathways involved in the development of radioresistance. This polypharmacological profile qualifies 2ME as a promising radiosensitizer in the treatment of radioresistant breast cancer cells and warrants systematic preclinical and clinical studies.

Salama, Salama, E-mail: salama@bcm.ed [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion; Patel, Deepa; Botting, Shaleen [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States); Hatch, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Similarity of nutrient uptake and root dimensions of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir at two contrasting sites in Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nutrient uptake capacity is an important parameter in modeling nutrient uptake by plants. Researchers commonly assume that uptake capacity measured for a species can be used across sites. We tested this assumption by measuring the nutrient uptake capacity of intact roots of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanni Parry) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) at Loch Vale Watershed and Fraser Experimental Forest in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado. Roots still attached to the tree were exposed to one of three concentrations of nutrient solutions for time periods ranging from 1 to 96 hours, and solutions were analyzed for ammonium, nitrate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Surprisingly, the two species were indistinguishable in nutrient uptake within site for all nutrients (P > 0.25), but uptake rates differed by site. In general, nutrient uptake was higher at Fraser (P = 0.01, 0.15, 0.03, 0.18 for NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}, respectively), which is west of the Continental Divide and has lower atmospheric deposition of N than Loch Vale. Mean uptake rates by site for ambient solution concentrations were 0.12 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.02 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1}, 0.21 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and 0.01 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1} at Loch Vale, and 0.21 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, 0.04 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.51 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+}g{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, and 0.07 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1} at Fraser. The importance of site conditions in determining uptake capacity should not be overlooked when parameterizing nutrient uptake models. We also characterized the root morphology of these two species and compared them to other tree species we have measured at various sites in the northeastern USA. Engelman spruce and subalpine fir were indistinguishable in specific root length and diameter distribution, while most of the other ten species had statistically distinct diameter distributions across five diameter classes < 2 mm. Based on specific root length, subalpine fir and Engelmann spruce had significantly coarser roots than red pine (Pinus resinosa Soland), yellow birch (Betula allegheniensis Britt.), sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), chestnut oak (Quercus prinus L.), black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), and red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.). White oak (Quercus alba L.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) were intermediate in SRL (indistinguishable from Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir by ANOVA). Species that differ more in physiology and morphology than the two species we compared would likely show dissimilar uptake characteristics even at the same site.

Yanai, R; McFarlane, K; Lucash, M; Kulpa, S; Wood, D

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effects of acidic deposition on nutrient uptake, nutrient cycling and growth processes of vegetation in the spruce-fir ecosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in three years of field research designed to evaluate biological and chemical indicators of the current and future health of the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecosystem. The emphasis of this research has been on the identification and understanding of mechanisms through which current levels of acidic deposition are impacting ecosystem processes. The identification of these principal mechanisms and key biological indicators of change was designed to improve our capabilities to detect, monitor, and assess the effects of air quality regulations and attendant future air quality changes on ecosystem response. Individual research tasks focused on the following research areas: (1) the significance of foliar uptake of atmospheric sources of nitrogen in relationship to plant utilization of N from available soil reserves; (2) linkages between atmospheric inputs to the soil surface, solution chemistry, and decomposition in the upper organic soil horizons; (3) effects of soil solution chemistry on uptake of cations and aluminum by fine roots; and (4) the effects of varying rates of calcium supply on carbon metabolism of Fraser fir and red spruce, and the relationship between calcium levels in wood cells and integrity of wood formed in bole and branches. Each of the individual tasks was designed to focus upon a mechanism or process that we consider critical to understanding chemical and biological linkages. These linkages will be important determinants in understanding the basis of past and potential future responses of the high elevation Southern Appalachian Forest to acidic deposition and other co-occurring environmental stresses. This report contains (1) background and rationale for the research undertaken in 1992-94; (2) a summary of principal research findings; (3) publications from this research; and (4) characterization of data sets produced by this research which will be the basis of future research, analyses and/or publications.

McLaughlin, S.B.; Garten, C.T.; Wullschleger, S.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1996-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle Experimental Forest Anonymous. 1970. Recommendations for an international standard for a mapping method in bird  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation and Ecological Characteristics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle-1192. Fiegener, Rob. 2002. A fire history of mixed conifer at the Teakettle Experimental Forest. Unpublished Experimental Forest References Anonymous. 1970. Recommendations for an international standard for a mapping

Standiford, Richard B.

51

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle Experimental Forest in tree clusters or, where unobstructed in gaps there are few trees. Although the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation and Ecological Charactistics of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle requirement, many forest inventories in mixed conifer may not produce accurate estimates of mean basal area Patch Conditions Mixed-conifer forests do not have continuous canopy cover, and vegetation is highly

Standiford, Richard B.

52

Post-1935 changes in forest vegetation of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA: Part 2Mixed conifer, spruce-fir, and quaking aspen forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined changes in never-harvested mixed conifer (MCF), spruce-fir (SFF), and quaking aspen forests (QAF) in Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP), Arizona, USA based on repeat sampling of two sets of vegetation study plots, one originally sampled in 1935 and the other in 1984. The 1935 plots are the earliest-known, sample-intensive, quantitative documentation of forest vegetation over a Southwest USA landscape. Findings documented that previously described increases in densities and basal areas attributed to fire exclusion were followed by decreases in 19352004 and 19842005. Decreases in MCF were attributable primarily to quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) and white fir (Abies concolor), but there were differences between dry-mesic and moist-mesic MCF subtypes. Decreases in SFF were attributable to quaking aspen, spruce (Picea engelmannii+Picea pungens), and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa). Decreases in QAF resulted from the loss of quaking aspen during succession. Changes in ponderosa pine forest (PPF) are described in a parallel paper (Vankat, J.L., 2011. Post-1935 changes in forest vegetation of Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA: part 1 ponderosa pine forest. Forest Ecology and Management 261, 309325). Graphical synthesis of historical and modern MCF data sets for GCNP indicated tree densities and basal areas increased from the late 19th to the mid 20th century and then decreased to the 21st century. Changes began earlier, occurred more rapidly, and/or were larger at higher elevation. Plot data showed that basal area decreased earlier and/or more rapidly than density and that decreases from 1935 to 2004 resulted in convergence among MCF, SFF, and PPF. If GCNP coniferous forests are trending toward conditions present before fire exclusion, this implies density and basal area were more similar among these forests in the late 19th century than in 1935. Changes in MCF and SFF can be placed in a general framework of forest accretion, inflection, and recession in which increases in tree density and basal area are followed by an inflection point and decreases. Accretion was triggered by the exogenous factor of fire exclusion, and inflection and recession apparently were driven by the endogenous factor of density-dependent mortality combined with exogenous factors such as climate. Although the decreases in density and basal area could be unique to GCNP, it is likely that the historical study plots provided a unique opportunity to quantitatively determine forest trends since 1935. This documentation of post-1935 decreases in MCF and SFF densities and basal areas indicates a shift in perspective on Southwestern forests is needed.

John L. Vankat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Population differentiation in tree-ring growth response of white fir (Abies concolor) to climate: Implications for predicting forest responses to climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forest succession models and correlative models have predicted 200--650 kilometer shifts in the geographic range of temperate forests and forest species as one response to global climate change. Few studies have investigated whether population differences may effect the response of forest species to climate change. This study examines differences in tree-ring growth, and in the phenotypic plasticity of tree-ring growth in 16-year old white fir, Abies concolor, from ten populations grown in four common gardens in the Sierra Nevada of California. For each population, tree-ring growth was modelled as a function of precipitation and degree-day sums. Tree-ring growth under three scenarios of doubled C0{sub 2} climates was estimated.

Jensen, D.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

55

First results from the FPGA/NIOS Adaptive FIR Filter Using Linear Prediction Implemented in the AERA Radio Stations to Reduce Narrow Band RFI for Radio Detection of Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The FPGA/NIOS FIR filter based on linear prediction (LP) to suppress radio frequency interference (RFI) has been installed in several radio stations in the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) experiment. AERA observes coherent radio emission from extensive air showers induced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays to make a detailed study of the development of the electromagnetic part of air showers. Radio signals provide complementary information to that obtained from Auger surface detectors, which are predominantly sensitive to the particle content of an air shower at the surface. The radio signals from air showers are caused by the coherent emission due to geomagnetic and charge-excess processes. These emissions can be observed in the frequency band between 10 - 100 MHz. However, this frequency range is significantly contaminated by narrow-band RFI and other human-made distortions. A FIR filter implemented in the FPGA logic segment of the front-end electronics of a radio sensor significantly improves the signal...

Szadkowski, Zbigniew; Timmermans, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Climate, geography, and tree establishment in Subalpine Meadows of the Olympic Mountains, Washington, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noticeable changes in vegetation distribution have occurred in the Pacific Northwest during the last century as trees have established in some subalpine meadows. To study the relationship of this process to climate, recently established trees were aged in six subalpine meadows in the Olympic Mountains, Washington. The sites represent three points along a steep precipitation gradient. Subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) has been establishing at the dry end of the gradient, mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana) at the wet end, and both species in the center. Establishment patterns were compared with deviations from the century-long average for these weather variables: winter precipitation, Palmer Drought Severity Index, and winter, October and May temperatures. Results show that establishment occurred in dry areas when weather conditions were wetter than average, and in wet areas under drier than average conditions. Establishment at central sites did not show consistent relationships with climate. If future climatic conditions continue to warm, establishment of subalpine fir in subalpine meadows in dry areas may cease and mountain hemlock may resume in wet areas. 34 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Woodward, A.; Silsbee, D.G. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Schreiner, E.G. [National Biological Service, Port Angeles, WA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Design and analysis of FIR filters based on Matlab.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In digital control system, interference, which is mixed in the input signal, has a great influence on the performance of the system. Therefore, processing (more)

Peng, Su

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Cytokinin nucleotides contents in sexual buds of Douglas-fir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cytokinin nucleotides were extracted from male and female buds of Pseudotsuga menxiesii by 10 % perchloric acid. They were prepurified on cation exchanger columns (CBA, Amersham) and then separated by two HPLC systems. The first one (Partisil 10 SAX, 10{mu}m, Wathman) separates the mono-, di- and tri-phosphates groups which were collected. The second one (Ultraspher, 5 {mu}m, Beckman) separates the cytokinin nucleotides inside each group. After separation, cytokinin nucleotides were assayed by radioimmunoassay with anti ribosyl zeatin (RZ) and anti isopentenyladenosine (iPA) antibodies. The analysis showed in the monophosphate (mono-P) group one immunoreactant peak in RZ fraction which co-chromatographied with RZ-5{prime}-mono-P and two peaks in the iPA fraction. One of them co-chromatographied with iPA-5{prime}-mono-P. In the diphosphate group, there were three peaks which reacted with anti RZ antibodies and one with anti iPA antibodies. The nucleotides obtained after the first HPLC system, were hydrolysed by a 5{prime}-nucleotidase showed compounds co-chromatographing with RZ and iPA. We did not observe any qualitative differences between the male and female buds. This is the first evidence of cytokinin nucleotides in tissue from woody plants.

Imbault, N.; Doumas, P.; Bonnet-Masimbert, N. (INRA Station, Ardon (France)); Pethe, C.; Laloue, M. (CNRS Physiologie, Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

Shinn, Michelle D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Development of Three Reaction Methodologies En Route to Nitrogen Containing Heterocycles: a Diels-Alder/Schmidt, a DIels-Alder/Acylation and a Catalytic Intramolecular Schmidt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or DMSO 8% N 3 5 An activated azido diene, (E)-(6-azidohexa-1,3-dien-2-yloxy)trimethylsilane (10), was also prepared for investigation in this study (Scheme 8). The Michael addition of sodium azide to acrolein provided the azido aldehyde 7 in nearly... acyclic azido enones as starting materials (Scheme 9). Thus, 9 and 12 were synthesized in two steps from acrolein in a similar manner to silyloxydiene 10. This synthesis began with a Michael addition into acrolein and was followed by a Horner...

Hirt, Erin Elaine

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A combined intramolecular Diels-Alder/intramolecular Schmidt reaction: Formal synthesis of (+/-)-stenine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The specific context of this work is the formal total synthesis of stenine, shown retrosynthetically in Scheme 1. A B N O O H D N BnO O H C BnO N 3 O stenine Scheme 1 Stenine and related alkaloids [3-11] have drawn considerable attention from... of the stereocenters were formed in a single chemical step beginning with acyclic precursor 4 (Scheme 2). 2 BnO OTBS 3 CHO OTBS N NN N Ph SO 2 BnO N BnO O H N 3 CHO N O BnO H O N 3 BnO N BnO O H MeAlCl 2 + LHMDS THF, -78 ?C 90% 123 (Z/E 85/15) 3 4 CH 2 Cl 2...

Golden, Jennifer E.; Aubé , Jeffrey

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Theory of gated hemicarcerands and Diels-Alder reactions of tetrazines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dimethyltetrazine 4 (green: distortion energy of dienophile,dienophiles 8-11 (green: distortion energy of dienophile,trans-2-butene 9 (green: distortion energy of dienophile,

LIU, FANG

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder-winter theory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ulm Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 79 Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Applications, limitations and ... new frontiers Summary: Time...

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder alnus incana Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

collected from Populus angustifolia James, Populus tremuloides Michx., ... Source: Stiller, Volker - Department of Biological Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University...

65

Vinylboranes as trans-dihydroxyethylene equivalents in Diels-Alder reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Bis[dichloroboryl]ethylene is synthesized by the addition of B2C14 to acetylene and subsequent isomerisation by irradiation (Scheme 27). 32 However, this synthetic route to trans-bis[dichloroboryl]ethylene not readily available, because the only one way to synthesize B2C14...-Bis[dichloroboryl]ethylene is synthesized by the addition of B2C14 to acetylene and subsequent isomerisation by irradiation (Scheme 27). 32 However, this synthetic route to trans-bis[dichloroboryl]ethylene not readily available, because the only one way to synthesize B2C14...

Redman, Aniko Maria

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder receives national Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and detritus export from headwater streams to downstream habitats in the Tongass National Forest, southeastern... four riparian canopy types: old growth, clearcut, young-growth...

67

Theory of gated hemicarcerands and Diels-Alder reactions of tetrazines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tags with fluorogenic tetrazine cycloadditions. Angew. Chem.M. ; Fox, J. M. Tetrazine ligation: fast bioconjugationR. ; Hilderbrand, S. A. Tetrazine-based cycloadditions:

LIU, FANG

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Control of the exo and endo pathways of the Diels-Alder reaction by antibody catalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interac-tions responsible for the lower energy of activation for the endo transition...structure corresponds to the higher energy boat conformation of the product...reaction products adopt the lower energy twisted-chair conformation...iodotrimethylsilane, dry chloroform, room temperature, 2 hours. (f...

VE Gouverneur; KN Houk; B de Pascual-Teresa; B Beno; KD Janda; RA Lerner

1993-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - alder alnus acuminata Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

49(1) 2003 National-Scale Biomass Estimators for Summary: . of eqs. Genus Species Wood-specific gravity* Literature reference Aspenalder 36 Alnus rubra 0.37 7... Species...

70

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Biology, Ecology, and Management of Western Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe in Coastal British.W. Negrave. 2007. Biology, Ecology, and Management of Western Hemlock Dwarf Mistletoe in Coastal British

71

Beyond Density: Measuring Neighborhood Form in New England's Upper Connecticut River Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Late 20 th Century: Only one example, Camp Brook, was foundcentury single- family neighborhoods (e.g. Hemlock Ridge, Camp

Owens, Peter Marshall

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Guiding Douglas-fir Seed Selection in Europe Under Changing Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Germany S. Germany Italy Central Europe Coastal Balkans Balkans Romania Turkey Planting Sites Spain 300 20(°C) 0.0001 0.001 0.1 1 Random forest class probability Turkey Romania Balkans Coastal Balkans Central Southern UK Scotland Norway Finland Turkey Romania Balkans Coastal Balkans Central Europe Poland Eastern

Hamann, Andreas

73

The 7-channel FIR HCN Interferometer on J-TEXT Tokamak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A seven-channel far-infrared hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer has been established aiming to provide the line integrated plasma density for the J-TEXT experimental scenarios. A continuous wave glow discharge HCN laser designed with a cavity length 3.4 m is used as the laser source with a wavelength of 337 {\\mu}m and an output power up to 100 mW. The system is configured as a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer. Phase modulation is achieved by a rotating grating, with a modulation frequency of 10 kHz which corresponds to the temporal resolution of 0.1 ms. The beat signal is detected by TGS detector. The phase shift induced by the plasma is derived by the comparator with a phase sensitivity of 0.06 fringe. The experimental results measured by the J-TEXT interferometer are presented in details. In addition, the inversed electron density profile done by a conventional approach is also given. The kinematic viscosity of dimethyl silicone and vibration control is key issues for the system performance. The laser power stability under different kinematic viscosity of silicone oil is presented. A visible improvement of measured result on vibration reduction is shown in the paper.

Wei Chen; L. Gao; J. Chen; Q. Li; Z. J. Wang; G. Zhuang

2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

Overstory/understory relationships in old growth Grand fir habitat types of northeast Oregon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limber ol Ides I I PIPOIPHD Numbsf ol sitils 182A 21D 85C 140E 32E 158 51E Sdl Type 182A 21D 85C 86C 1828 ID7D 78D Scil Type 85C 1528 Swl Type I 82A ISD 312D 31 3E Scil Type 51E TamaraSyrupcresk conlplex, 0 lo 15 pwcent... limber ol Ides I I PIPOIPHD Numbsf ol sitils 182A 21D 85C 140E 32E 158 51E Sdl Type 182A 21D 85C 86C 1828 ID7D 78D Scil Type 85C 1528 Swl Type I 82A ISD 312D 31 3E Scil Type 51E TamaraSyrupcresk conlplex, 0 lo 15 pwcent...

Schreder, Peter Todd

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

MECHANO-SORPTIVE DEFORMATION OF DOUGLAS-FIR SPECIMENS UNDER TANGENTIAL TENSILE STRESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

observed in wooden beams (Armstrong and Kingston 1960; Armstrong and Christensen 196I). The magnitude conditions (Armstrong and Kingston 1962; Hearmon and Paton 1964). In particular, a reduction in MC causes deformation in bending and tension in- creasesmarkedly, even after allowanceis made for swelling (Armstrong

76

Catalytic microwave torrefaction and pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellet to improve biofuel quality .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aims of this dissertation were to understand the effects of torrefaction as pretreatment on biomass pyrolysis and catalytic pyrolysis for improving biofuel quality, and (more)

[No author

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Subalpine Fir Facilitation in Aspen-Conifer Forests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis includes two studies. The first study examined changes in soil characteristics as a result of prolonged conifer dominance in successional aspen-conifer forests. Changing (more)

Buck, Joshua R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Lost Research of Early Northeastern Spruce-Fir Experimental A Tale of Lost Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The northern conifer forest extends from eastern Canada and Maine into the Adirondack Mountains of New York. These forests are characterized by a mixture of conifer species and northern hardwoods in varying proportions, Northern Research Station, Orono, ME and Burlington, VT #12;forests are described as northern mixed conifer

79

Spectroscopic FIR mapping of the disk and galactic wind of M82 with Herschel-PACS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Abridged] We present maps of the main cooling lines of the neutral atomic gas ([OI] at 63 and 145 micron and [CII] at 158 micron) and in the [OIII] 88 micron line of the starburst galaxy M82, carried out with the PACS spectrometer on board the Herschel satellite. By applying PDR modeling we derive maps of the main ISM physical parameters, including the [CII] optical depth, at unprecedented spatial resolution (~300 pc). We can clearly kinematically separate the disk from the outflow in all lines. The [CII] and [OI] distributions are consistent with PDR emission both in the disk and in the outflow. Surprisingly, in the outflow, the atomic and the ionized gas traced by the [OIII] line both have a deprojected velocity of ~75 km/s, very similar to the average velocity of the outflowing cold molecular gas (~ 100 km/s) and several times smaller than the outflowing material detected in Halpha (~ 600 km/s). This suggests that the cold molecular and neutral atomic gas and the ionized gas traced by the [OIII] 88 micron...

Contursi, A; Graci-Carpio, J; Veilleux, S; Sturm, E; Fischer, J; Verma, A; Hailey-Dunsheath, S; Lutz, D; Davies, R; Gonzlez-Alfonso, E; Sternberg, A; Genzel, R; Tacconi, L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Reliability models for finger joint strength and stiffness properties in Douglas-fir visual laminating grades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combination of formaldehyde, phenol, resorcinol, melamine, or urea. Two of the most common are melamine-urea resins and phenol-resorcinol resins. Melamine-urea resins are colorless liquids and are prepared by mixing powdered resins at a 60:40 melamine... . This curing is usually accomplished with r adiofr equency (RF ) heating. Phenol-resorcinol resins are dark reddish liquids and are prepared by adding powdered hardeners such as formaldehyde. They are popular in the laminating industry because they can...

Burk, Allan Gerard

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Synthesis of terephthalic acid via Diels-Alder reactions with ethylene and oxidized variants of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DMT). The partially oxidized HMF, 5-(hydroxymethyl)furoic...5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), is a valuable platform chemical being considered for the production...biomass feedstocks (24). HMF is now being manufactured at...

Joshua J. Pacheco; Mark E. Davis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A structural basis for the activity of retro-DielsAlder catalytic antibodies: Evidence for a catalytic aromatic residue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...increase the HOMOLUMO energy gap and thus slow...dienophile and hence lower its LUMO energy further. In the10F11...catalysis by lowering the LUMO energy of the dienophile when...Hilvert D Hill K W Nared K D Auditor M-TM ( 1989 ) J Am Chem Soc...

Marina Hugot; Nicolas Bensel; Monique Vogel; Martine T. Reymond; Beda Stadler; Jean-Louis Reymond; Ulrich Baumann

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our People In The Spotlight In The Spotlight Berni Alder, 2009 National Medal of Science Winner Berni Alder Role: Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence...

84

Junipers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Junipers Junipers Nature Bulletin No. 362-A December 13, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation JUNIPERS Many years ago, on a farm in hilly regions of the Middle West, the Christmas tree was apt to be a "cedar" selected from those that punctuated the hillsides and pastures. According to the notebooks kept by the first surveyors of Cook County, in the 1830' s, there were cedars here. If we had them now they would not only add character and beauty to the landscape, especially in winter, but also furnish food and cover for many birds and small mammals. Actually, this tree is a juniper, known commercially and in tree books as Eastern Redcedar. The name "cedar" is very confusing. Instead of being used for one type of evergreen -- such as pine, spruce, fir or hemlock -- it has been applied to junipers, whitecedars, cypresses and other kinds of trees. None of the true cedars is native to this country but the Cedar of Lebanon, the Atlas Cedar from the mountains of North Africa, and the Deodar of "god tree" of the Himalayas have been extensively planted for ornamental purposes.

85

Use of LiDAR to estimate stand characteristics for thinning operations in young Douglas-fir plantations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) has been successfully used to describe a wide range of forest metrics at local, regional and national scales. However, little research has used this technology in young Doug...

Michael S Watt; Andrew Meredith; Pete Watt

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Estimation of population structure in coastal Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii] using allozyme and microsatellite markers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

al. 2001; Yu et al. 2006; Camus-Kulandaivelua et al. 2007).of 375 maize inbred lines (Camus-Kulandaivelu et al. 2006).Bot Gaz 136:290298 Camus-Kulandaivelu L, Veyrieras J-B,

Krutovsky, Konstantin V.; St. Clair, John Bradley; Saich, Robert; Hipkins, Valerie D.; Neale, David B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

LIQUEFACTION OF DOUGLAS FIR WOOD SLURRIES TITRATION OF ACIDS AND ANIONS IN AQUEOUS PRODUCT AND FEED SLURRIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applications for Industry, Biomass Energy Systems DivisionU.S. Department of Energy, Biomass Energy Systems Division,

Davis, Hubert G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

IEE Electronics Letters, vol. 34, no. 19, pp. 18171819, 1998. A Lowpower Coefficient Segmentation Algorithm for FIR Filter Implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ordering [1], choice of appropriate coding techniques [2,3], and the application of high level be generalised to filters with multipliers using other data representations such as sign magnitude etc. Fig.1 A flow chart of the algorithm Implementation: The flow chart in Figure 1 illustrates the main stages

Arslan, Tughrul

89

Spruce Forests (Norway and Sitka Spruce, Including Douglas Fir): Carbon and Water Fluxes and Balances, Ecological and Ecophysiological Determinants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural forests with a high percentage of spruce will be found in Europe only in subalpine and alpine regions or in the boreal forests of Scandinavia and Russia. Nevertheless, spruce belongs to the most import...

C. Bernhofer; M. Aubinet; R. Clement

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

International Journal of Infrared and Millimeter Waves, VoL 8, No. 6, 1987 NEW FIR LASER LINES AND FREQUENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Dyubko et al. (5) who found 70 cw transitions ranging from 180 to 1300 ~m. Subsequently, Danielewicz

Cohen, Ronald C.

91

Harvest residue management effects on tree growth and ecosystem carbon in a Chinese fir plantation in subtropical China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total C accumulation in forest biomass ranged between 82.9 and 95.4...?1...at age 15. On average, foliage contained 7.3%, branch wood 6.0%, stem wood 60.9%, stem bark 10.1 ... , and roots 15.7% of total biomass

Zhiqun Huang; Zongming He; Xiaohua Wan; Zhenhong Hu; Shaohui Fan

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategies for Commercializing the Small Diameter Douglas-fir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Marketing Strategies the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;WOOD 465 ASSIGNMENT Marketing Strategies may think of this huge market and find a new way to commercialize our small diameter Douglas

93

Some improvements will be almost immediate...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some improvements will be almost immediate... Hemlock Dam before removal After removal #12;Some #12;Recommendation: Additional dialogue needed between habitat managers, scientists, and policy

94

A hybrid particle-continuum method for hydrodynamics of complex fluids Aleksandar Donev,1, John B. Bell,1 Alejandro L. Garcia,2 and Berni J. Alder3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the dynamic structure factor for both a "bulk" (periodic) and a finite system, it is verified that the hybrid- scale gas flows [5]. It is also not a priori obvious how to account for the bidirectional coupling the fluctuations are omitted even though they can be important at instabilities [10] or in driving polymer dynamics

95

A Thermodynamically-Consistent Non-Ideal Stochastic Hard-Sphere Fluid Aleksandar Donev,1, 2 Berni J. Alder,1 and Alejandro L. Garcia3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factor that gives con- sistent compressibility, as first proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101:075902 (2008. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified by comparing its dynamic structure factor the fluctuations are not included even though they can be very important at instabilities [6] or in driving

96

Nickel-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura reactions of unactivated halides with alkyl boranes and planar-chiral borabenzene catalysts for Diels-Alder reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part I describes the expansion in scope of a nickel-catalyzed coupling reaction of unactivated alkyl bromides and alkyl boranes to include unactivated alkyl chlorides. The new method is adapted for use outside of a glove ...

Lu, Zhe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Mercury Distribution across 14 U.S. Forests. Part II: Patterns of Methyl Mercury Concentrations and Areal Mass of Total and Methyl Mercury  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(9) In summary, the sites include (in order from south to north): (S1) a pine forest located near Gainesville, Florida; (S2) a mixed deciduous hardwood forest near Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (S3) an oak forest in Ashland, Missouri; (S4 and S5) two sites in the Sierra Nevada Mountain range south of Reno, Nevada, with one site affected by a stand-replacing wildfire in 1981 and an adjacent intact site that received no mature tree mortality;(28) (S6) a blue oak site in the foothills of California near Marysville; (S7 and S8) two Jeffrey pine forests near Truckee, California, where one site experienced prescribed burning treatments in 2002 while no prescribed burning was conducted in an adjacent site; (28) (S9) a high-elevation Rocky Mountain coniferous forest at Niwot Ridge, Colorado; (S10) a sugar-maple forest located near Hart, Michigan; (S11) a mixed, deciduous forest in Bartlett, New Hampshire; (S12) a coniferous forest in Howland, Maine; and (S13 and S14) two forest sites southeast of Seattle, Washington, one dominated by previously planted coniferous Douglas fir and an adjacent deciduous stand dominated by red alder. ... MeHg was analyzed for 12 of the 14 sites, not considering the two sites affected by prescribed burning and wildfires (sites S5 and S8). ...

Daniel Obrist

2012-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

Finding Structure via Compression Jason L. Hutchens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structurevia Compression Jason L. Hutchens and Michael D. Alder (1998) Finding Structure via Compression. In D.M.W

99

2013NatureAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. 1620 | VOL.8 NO.8 | 2013 | nature protocols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

function, and trans-cyclooctene and tetrazine reagents for Diels-Alder are not as synthetically accessible

100

Final Report fir DE-SC0005507 (A1618): The Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical Product for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using RACORO Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We proposed to analyze data collected during the Routine Aerial Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number concentration of drops in different size bins, total liquid drop concentration integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds, effective radius of water drops, and radar reflectivity factor) that could be used to evaluate large-eddy simulations (LES), general circulation models (GCMs) and ground-based remote sensing retrievals, and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. We have completed the development of this microphysical database. we investigated the differences in the size distributions measured by the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) and the Forward Scattering Probe (FSSP), between the one dimensional cloud imaging probe (1DC) and the two-dimensional cloud imaging probe (2DC), and between the bulk LWCs measured by the Gerber probe against those derived from the size resolved probes.

McFarquhar, Greg M.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Extraction of Maltol from Fraser Fir: A Comparison of Microwave-Assisted Extraction and Conventional Heating Protocols for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Second-Year Undergraduate; Hands-On Learning/Manipulatives; Laboratory Instruction; Organic Chemistry; Green Chemistry; Separation Science; NMR Spectroscopy; Acids/Bases; Student-Centered Learning; Inquiry-Based/Discovery Learning ...

Andrew S. Koch; Clio A. Chimento; Allison N. Berg; Farah D. Mughal; Jean-Paul Spencer; Douglas E. Hovland; Bessie Mbadugha; Allan K. Hovland; Leah R. Eller

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

102

UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T. [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 9808578 (Japan); Miyazaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Figure 10--Proportion of basal area accounted for by each tree spe-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests at the Teakettle Experimental Forest Intensive Measurements of Mixed-Conifer and Red Fir Forests After our initial survey, we sampled the mixed-conifer and red fir forests more for the remaining 13 percent (fig. 10). Other tree species characteristic of mixed-conifer or red fir forest types

Standiford, Richard B.

104

Diagnostic experiments and modeling of the 118 03BCm CH3OH laser (*) J.-M. Lourtioz and R. Adde  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant FIR saturation (see section 3). Therefore we have followed the fruitful approach of Danielewicz

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Kinematics and Mechanics of Jumping Lizards: the Modulation of Jump Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physiology 271, C571-C578. Marsh, R. L. and John-Alder, H.Biol. Sci. Roberts, T. J. , Marsh, R. L. , Weyand, P. G. and

Olberding, Jeffrey Paul

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambrosia tenuifolia sprengel Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cups (circular leaf scar) 2. Alnus tenuifolia - alder (BETULACEAE) - Strobili Source: Colorado State University, Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands (CEMML)...

107

Hay Fever as a Christmas Gift  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which for alders in this region of Switzerland is in December (Figure 1). Near Christmas of 2011, large amounts of alder pollen were noted in the trap. It seems likely that this newly introduced plant species, along with changing temperatures and street lighting, may have influenced the release of pollens... Pollen allergies are considered uncommon in winter. After hybrid alders were planted along a boulevard in Switzerland, allergic symptoms developed in children in the winter. Serum IgE antibodies against alder implicated the hybrid tree as the culprit.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and...

109

Enantioselective [4 + 2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : application to the total synthesis of (-)-quinolizidine 2071  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iminoacetonitriles participate as reactive dienophiles in intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions affording quinolizidines and indolizidines. The resulting a-amino nitrile cycloadducts are versatile intermediates that ...

Fontaine, Shaun D. (Shaun David)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - acyclic diols triols Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of cyclophane molecular sensors... -Diels-Alder reaction of electron deficient tetrazine 48 with benzene cis-diol to produce dihydrodiol containing the 1... -shift Scheme...

111

[4+2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : a general strategy for the synthesis of quinolizidines, indolizidines, and piperidines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Iminoacetonitriles participate as reactive dienophiles in intermolecular and intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions leading to quinolizidines, indolizidines, and piperidines. The resultant a-amino nitrile cycloadducts ...

Maloney, Kevin M. (Kevin Matthew)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Duct Leakage Modeling in EnergyPlus and Analysis of Energy Savings from Implementing SAV with InCITeTM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOE-2 inputs) Douglas fir plywood p.25.5 2005 ASHRAE Hdbk ofDOE-2 inputs) Material is Douglas fir plywood p.25.5 2005 ASHRAE Hdbk

Wray, Craig

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - aurifrons shuckard hymenoptera Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Cirrospilus vittatus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae... eggs of Neodiprion abietis Harris (Hymenoptera: Diprionidae) on balsam fir, Abies balsamea (L.) Mill... vittatus...

114

The atom economy--a search for synthetic efficiency  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the reacting partners onto iron (Eq. 3; L = ligand) (9...observed (Eq. 7; acac = acetylacetonate, ee = enantiomeric excess...ability to achieve both an iron(33) and a nickel-(Eq...Diels-Alder cycloaddition. The iron-catalyzed Alder ene-type...

BM Trost

1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

The influence of LiDAR pulse density on the precision of inventory metrics in young unthinned Douglas-fir stands during initial and subsequent LiDAR acquisitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LiDAR is an established technology that is increasingly being used to characterise spatial variation in stand metrics used in forest inventory. As the cost of LiDAR acquisition markedly declines with LiDAR pul...

Michael S Watt; Andrew Meredith; Pete Watt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hardwood ­ conifer systems. 1.2 Justification Lowland spruce-fir forest covers approximately 10% of New spruce-fir or northern hardwood-conifer forest. Past harvesting in some of these areas have resulted in conversion of former spruce-fir sites to northern hardwood-conifer forest. 2.3 Protection and Regulatory

New Hampshire, University of

117

The effects of in vitro and greenhouse irradiance, fertility, and media on the growth of a hybrid Phalaenopsis orchid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2ON-8.6-P-16.6K], DynaGro, and Wilder's, was applied to Phalaenopsis Atien Kaala 'TSC 22' plants grown in either fir bark alone or 70% fir bark and 3 0% Canadian sphagnum peat (bark/peat). Plants grown in the fir bark medium with 2ON-2.2P-I 5.8K...

Konow, Elise Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

N /A

2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

119

Revised 29 April 2008 FITZRANDOLPHRD.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEMLOCK CIR PINEST LAKE DR ADAMS DR Legend Tiger Transit Stops Stop Transfer Forrestal/PPPL Tiger Transit Routes Dinky Fisher Hall Lot 23A Dean Mathey Millstone Apts. Forrestal AOS PPPL South Campus Frist/Guyot Princeton Tiger Transit Routes: Forrestal/PPPL NORTH #12;

120

2011 ISRP Retrospective Presented by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spillway PIT tag detection systems �Additional analysis needed of PIT tag loss and tag-related mortality improvements will be almost immediate... Hemlock Dam before removal After removal #12;Some will take decades;Recommendation: Additional dialogue needed between habitat managers, scientists, and policy-makers so

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

New Hampshire Directory of Sawmills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Soon after, New Hampshire's patriots joined in the American Revolution, not for tea but to protect Green Lumber, Cants/Timbers, Pallets/Crates, Sawdust Barton Lumber Co., Inc. (Sawmill Not Presently, Retail, Custom Sawing, Custom Planing Species: White Pine, Hemlock, Red Pine Products: Rough Green Lumber

New Hampshire, University of

122

VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE AND STATE UNIVERSITY VIRGINIA STATE UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regions of the United States and Canada. It attacks spruce, arborvitae, juniper, hemlock, pine, Douglas stock. Control Backyard Plantings Dormant oil applied in the late winter will kill the over- wintering, vigorous plants is an important preventive measure for keeping mite populations low. Predacious mites, lady

Liskiewicz, Maciej

123

Alkylaluminum Halide Induced Reactions of Carbonyl Compounds with Unactivated Alkenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aldehydes, ketones and ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones undergo a wide variety of reactions with unactivated alkenes in the presence of alkylaluminum halide catalysts. Ene reactions, Diels-Alder reactions...

Barry B. Snider

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

CyclobutadieneC[subscript 60] Adducts: N-Type Materials for Organic Photovoltaic Cells with High V[subscript OC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New tetraalkylcyclobutadieneC[subscript 60] adducts are developed via DielsAlder cycloaddition of C[subscript 60] with in situ generated cyclobutadienes. The cofacial ?-orbital interactions between the fullerene orbitals ...

Han, Ggoch Ddeul

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyl dimethyl benzyl Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acceptable, but models show that it Summary: -Alder reaction of dimethyl 1,2,4,5-tetrazine-3,6-dicarboxylateand a subsequent in- tramolecular Diels... : the inverse electron...

126

Synthesis and Optical Properties of Phenylene-Containing Oligoacenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis of a new class of fully unsaturated ladder structures, phenylene-containing oligoacenes (POAs), using 3,4-bis(methylene)cyclobutene as a building block for sequential DielsAlder reactions is described. The ...

Parkhurst, Rebecca R.

127

Watson, R., D. Zeller and D. Pauly. 2011. Spatial expansion of EU and non-EU fishing fleets into the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

arguably the most important is the solar energy that ocean ecosystems receive and which drive, such as West and East Africa (Alder and Sumaila 2004; Atta- Mills et al. 2004; Le Manach et al. 2012

Pauly, Daniel

128

University of Delaware | Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Green Aromatics Transition state for the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene in zeolite LiY Most polymers and plastics require six-carbon ring structures. Sugars...

129

Downlink W-CDMA performance analysis and receiver implmentation on SC140 Motorola DSP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model (Section 3.2.1) and receiver (Section 3.2.3) structure. Antenna 1 Antenna 2 Multi-path Rayleigh fading channel Despreading & Descrambling RRC FIR Filter. Channel Additive Gaussian noise Multi...-path Rayleigh fading channel Spreading & Scrambling RRC FIR Filter. STTD Mapping Additive Gaussian noise Rake receiver Transmitter Spreading & Scrambling Viterbi decoding QPSK signal RRC FIR Filter. Channel Estimation Channel Encoding Receiver...

Ghosh, Kaushik

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

A dendroecological reconstruction of western spruce budworm outbreaks (Choristoneura occidentalis) in the Front Range, Colorado, from 1720 to 1986  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radial increment cores from Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and blue spruce (Picea pungens), defoliated by western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis), were analyzed by means of dendrochronological me...

Urs M. Weber; Fritz H. Schweingruber

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum triso-ethylphosphonate butylate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resistance Advancements: Dr. Dragan CurcijaDr. Dragan Curcija Summary: -Expanded (EPS) Pine or Douglas Fir Frame Cavity Polyfoam tape Urethane Sealant Silicone...

132

The Dividing Link: Speciation and Hybridization in the Salamander Ring Species Ensatina eschscholtzii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fir forest, mixed conifer forest, and chaparral (Axelrodof conifer and mixed conifer forest at middle and highand high elevation sky-island conifer forest in the Eastern

Devitt, Thomas James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Sparsity Optimization in Design of Multidimensional Filter Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FIR filter is represented in the spatial domain by a limited-size kernel defined by a ...... Muthukrishnan S (2005) Data streams: algorithms and applications.

2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

C:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radio synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons spiraling along magnetic field lines. To explain the FIR-radio luminosity correlation, the cosmic ray calorimeter...

135

Terre d'asile, terre d'exil l'Europe tsigane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). 3. Comme celle du poète persan Fir- clausi, souvent ci- tée, évoquant l'en- voi en Perse de douze

Boyer, Edmond

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - adiposo marrom tam Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nepal Summary: ), Thasing (Tam), Silver fir (Eng) Tree Leaf Respiratory problems, cough. Decoction used for bronchitis... and cough. 2. Aconitum ferox Wall.ex Seringe...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe ferox leaf Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nepal Summary: ), Thasing (Tam), Silver fir (Eng) Tree Leaf Respiratory problems, cough. Decoction used for bronchitis... and cough. 2. Aconitum ferox Wall.ex Seringe...

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - all-ceramic crowns part Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northwestern University Collection: Materials Science ; Renewable Energy 50 Three-Dimensional Canopy Structure of an Old-Growth Douglas-Fir Forest Summary: the cumulative...

139

TREE AND SHRUB SPECIES LIST FOR PINGREE PARK REGION Abies 1asiocarpa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

__ TREES 1. Abies lasiocarpa - subalpine fir (PINACEAE) - Needle single, flat in cross-section - Twigs scopulorum - Rocky Mountain juniper (CUPRESSACEAE) - Needles scale-like, appressed, opposite, four ranked

140

Microsoft Word - Argonne_WindPowerForecasting_Report_Final_Nov...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of Texas ESB Electricity Supply Board (Ireland) EU European Union EWEA European Wind Energy Association FIR-NN finite-impulse response neural network FIS Fuzzy Inference...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft Word - TR11-29.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Parkersburg, WV Parkersburg, WV November 2010 Page 1 2010 Annual Inspection for the Parkersburg, West Virginia, Nuclear Waste Policy Act Section 151(c) Disposal Site Summary The Parkersburg, West Virginia, Site was inspected on October 21, 2010 to confirm the integrity of visible features and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, additional inspections, or monitoring. Results of the inspection conclude that the disposal cell is in excellent condition. No evidence of erosion or slope instability on the disposal cell was noted during the inspection. More attention needs to be given to vegetation control at the site. The mow and spray program has failed to control poison hemlock in a few areas. More attention needs to be given to these trouble areas in the upcoming year to address the poison hemlock.

142

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs for entering local weather data. Retrieval Terms: Douglas-fir, seed orchard, pest management, pest, for his encouragement, David L. Rowney for his programming assistance, and William A. Copper for preparing. The computer program described provides a Douglas-fir seed orchard manager (user) with a quantitative method

Standiford, Richard B.

143

Original article Predicted global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation Résumé offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 °C could occur within the next century, particularly

Boyer, Edmond

144

San Augustin PlainsPleistocene Climatic Changes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oil (3 g), and HMW salts (4 g) (12). Each...solids) (92 g), HMW salts (4 g) (12), starch...increase in the semi-desert vegetation. Fir and Douglas-fir...nontree (semidesert) scrub and grass) in the shaded...from rhyolite to ba-salt, and both flow and pyroclastic...

KATHRYN H. CLISBY; PAUL B. SEARS

1956-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

145

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared sideband generation induced by intense far-infrared radiation in GaAs quantum wells J illuminated with near-infrared NIR radiation at frequency nir and intense far-infrared FIR radiation from and quenching of photoluminescence PL .8,9 The nonlinear interaction of FIR and near-infrared NIR radiation

Kono, Junichiro

146

CX-008597: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

97: Categorical Exclusion Determination 97: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008597: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alder Stream Wind Project Feasibility Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to the Penobscot Indian Nation Enterprises (Penobscot) for preconstruction and feasibility activities for the Alder Stream Wind Project on the Penobscot Indian Reservation in Franklin County (Alder Stream, Chain of Ponds, and Tim Ponds Townships) near Eustis, Maine. This proposed project would include information gathering, data analysis, modeling, mapping, cultural and wildlife surveys, and reporting. CX-008597.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1888: Final Environmental Assessment

147

Experimental Characterization and Molecular Study of Natural Gas Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for molecular interactions. Among these EoS, called generalized Van der Waals EoS, are: BACK (Boublic-Alder-Chen-Kresglewski,), PHCT (perturbed-hard-chain-theory), COR (chain of rotators), SAFT (statistical associated fluid theory) 25 and others 16. Although... for molecular interactions. Among these EoS, called generalized Van der Waals EoS, are: BACK (Boublic-Alder-Chen-Kresglewski,), PHCT (perturbed-hard-chain-theory), COR (chain of rotators), SAFT (statistical associated fluid theory) 25 and others 16. Although...

Cristancho Blanco, Diego Edison

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

A COMPARISON OF FAR-IR AND H I AS REDDENING PREDICTORS AT HIGH GALACTIC LATITUDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the Galactic 21 cm line flux from neutral hydrogen (H I) in interstellar medium and the far-infrared (FIR) emission from Galactic dust grains have been used to estimate the strength of Galactic reddening of distant sources. In this work we use a collection of uniform color distant galaxies as color standards to determine whether the H I method or the FIR method is superior. We find that the two methods both produce reasonably accurate maps, but that both show significant errors as compared to the typical color of the background galaxies. We find that a mixture of the FIR and H I maps in roughly a 2-to-1 ratio is clearly superior to either map alone. We recommend that future reddening maps should use both sets of data, and that well-constructed FIR and H I maps should both be vigorously pursued.

Peek, J. E. G., E-mail: jegpeek@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

149

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station, for technical assistance; the Station s biometrics branch for assistance with computer programs, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 Experiment Station WEATHER, LOGGING, and TREE GROWTH associated with FIR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Weather

Standiford, Richard B.

150

New Educational Technologies Cannot be Fully Integrated in Existing Educational Systems Some Lessons Drawn from the Analysis of the Introduction of Computers in French Schools During the Last Decade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the context of future educational systems design, this paper addresses the important point of new technologies integration. A general overview of possible uses of computers in education is provided as a fir...

Monique Grandbastien

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reaction mechanism and kinetics of pressurized pyrolysis of Chinese oil shale in the presence of water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of pressurized pyrolysis of Chinese Liushuhe oil shale in the presence of water were conducted ... thermal degradation. It was found that the oil shale was fir...

Chaohe Fang; Shuyuan Li; Guili Ma; Hongyan Wang; Zhilong Huang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Star Formation Rate Function of the Local Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have derived the bivariate luminosity function for the far ultraviolet (1530Angstroms) and far infrared (60 microns). We used matched GALEX and IRAS data, and redshifts from NED and PSC-z. We have derived a total star formation luminosity function phi(L_{tot}), with L_{tot} = L_{FUV}+L_{FIR}. Using these, we determined the cosmic ``star formation rate'' function and density for the local universe. The total SFR function is fit very well by a log-normal distribution over five decades of luminosity. We find that the bivariate luminosity function phi(L_{FUV},L_{FIR}) shows a bimodal behavior, with L_{FIR} tracking L_{FUV} for L_{TOT}< 10^10 L_sun, and L_{FUV} saturating at 10^10 L_sun, while L_{TOT} L_{FIR} for higher luminosities. We also calculate the SFR density and compare it to other measurements.

D. Christopher Martin; Mark Seibert; Veronique Buat; Jorge Inglesias-Paramo; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Jose Donas; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Timothy M. Heckman; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; Bruno Milliard; Patrick F. Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; R. Michael Rich; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Ted K. Wyder

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

From channel modeling to signal processing for Bit patterned media recording  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with FIR f (D) and with a 1-D target g(D) for BPM recordingof timing window for BPM recording. . . . . . . . Figure 3.1for bit-patterned me- dia (BPM) recording channels. The

Karakulak, Seyhan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Taking Biodiversity into Account in Territorial Planning Documents: A Methodological Approach Applied to the Marine Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Then, specific attention was devoted to the marine domain with three regional planning documents: the ... SCOT (Scheme of Territorial Coherency), the marine ZNIEFF (Zone with Flora and Fauna Interest ... , we fir...

E. Seigneur; N. Mazouni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids mortality trends Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

White fir... a b s t r a c t We monitored tree mortality in northern Arizona (USA) mixed-conifer and ponderosa pine Source: USDA, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station -...

156

Mixed Conifer Forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed Conifer Forest occurs in an elevational band below Spruce-Fir Forest and above Ponderosa Pine Forest. It has diverse stands reflecting elevation, ... and others. A primary driver of Mixed Conifer Forest has...

John L. Vankat; John L. Vankat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Solution chemistry profiles of mixed-conifer forests before and after fire  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solution chemistry profiles of mixed-conifer forests in granitic catchments of the Sierra Nevada ... in both white-fir and giant-sequoia dominated forest stands underlain by poorly developed inceptisols. Stream.....

Jon Chorover; Peter M. Vitousek; Daniel A. Everson; Anne M. Esperanza

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 61996221, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/6199/2008/  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

profiles have been compared to observations made from space by MLS and HALOE, and from stratospheric balloons by SPIRALE, FIRS-2 and Mark-IV. Partial columns derived from the ACE-FTS data were also compared

Nassar, Ray

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - anna-karin borg-karlson jt Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Douglas fir (Borg- Karlson et al., 1985; Rappaport et al... . Chap- man and Hall, London. BORG-KARLSON, A.-K., EIDMANN, H. H., LINDSTROM, M., NORIN T., and WIERSMA... :...

160

Forest Resource Policy in Cte dIvoire, Cameroon and Gabon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article analyses activities carried out over the past 15 years to contain deforestation and to phase in sustainable forestry in three West African countries:Cte dIvoire, Cameroon and Gabon. The article firs...

Jean-Pierre Kiekens; Yirdaw Eshetu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cosmology with Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 #12;Title Here IR/Opt: Direct emission from stars FIR: Processed emission of Opt/IR light by dust IRAC Instrument Team's GTO Survey PI: Peter Eisenhardt (JPL) + ~20 collaborators IRAC Spitzer Bootes

Leka, K. D .

162

Updated 9/18/13 Jeremy Scott Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of genomics on ecological biogeography. Progress in Physical Geography Maps: "Figure 1. Our water project area genetics and genomics into ecological biogeography: A case study using Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii

163

Draft version March 23, 2004 Preprint typeset using LATEX style emulateapj v. 2/19/04  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the brightest FIR line in galaxies. Our observed 1 RMS = 1.3 mK in the T A scale translates to L[CII] +5251 L[CII]/LFIR ultra-luminous infrared galaxies

Bolatto, Alberto

164

Space Ecological Systems 19601975  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There appears to be a great deal of varied opinions in regard to the types of ecological systems required in manned space vehicles. In order to logically discuss designs of various ecological systems we must firs...

Eugene B. Konecci

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

"NH Big Tree of the Month December 2006" White Spruce Picea Glauca  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and crowding, the conditions found on mountaintops and rocky crevices, they grow in climates where no others that grow all around the fat twigs that are distinctly sharp and prickly. Firs have flat, two-sided needles

New Hampshire, University of

166

EXPLAINING THE [C II]157.7 {mu}m DEFICIT IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES-FIRST RESULTS FROM A HERSCHEL/PACS STUDY OF THE GOALS SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first results of a survey of the [C II]157.7 {mu}m emission line in 241 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) comprising the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample, obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The [C II] luminosities, L{sub [C{sub II]}}, of the LIRGs in GOALS range from {approx}10{sup 7} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} L{sub Sun }. We find that LIRGs show a tight correlation of [C II]/FIR with far-IR (FIR) flux density ratios, with a strong negative trend spanning from {approx}10{sup -2} to 10{sup -4}, as the average temperature of dust increases. We find correlations between the [C II]/FIR ratio and the strength of the 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption feature as well as with the luminosity surface density of the mid-IR emitting region ({Sigma}{sub MIR}), suggesting that warmer, more compact starbursts have substantially smaller [C II]/FIR ratios. Pure star-forming LIRGs have a mean [C II]/FIR {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, while galaxies with low polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) equivalent widths (EWs), indicative of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), span the full range in [C II]/FIR. However, we show that even when only pure star-forming galaxies are considered, the [C II]/FIR ratio still drops by an order of magnitude, from 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3}, with {Sigma}{sub MIR} and {Sigma}{sub IR}, implying that the [C II]157.7 {mu}m luminosity is not a good indicator of the star formation rate (SFR) for most local LIRGs, for it does not scale linearly with the warm dust emission most likely associated to the youngest stars. Moreover, even in LIRGs in which we detect an AGN in the mid-IR, the majority (2/3) of galaxies show [C II]/FIR {>=} 10{sup -3} typical of high 6.2 {mu}m PAH EW sources, suggesting that most AGNs do not contribute significantly to the FIR emission. We provide an empirical relation between the [C II]/FIR and the specific SFR for star-forming LIRGs. Finally, we present predictions for the starburst size based on the observed [C II] and FIR luminosities which should be useful for comparing with results from future surveys of high-redshift galaxies with ALMA and CCAT.

Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Howell, J. H.; Surace, J. A. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [IESL/Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, GR-71110, Heraklion (Greece); Stierwalt, S.; Evans, A. S.; Mazzarella, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Haan, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield NSW 2122 (Australia); Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Malhotra, S. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Meijerink, R. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Stacey, G. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Petric, A. O.; Lu, N. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Veilleux, S. [Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Van der Werf, P. P. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lord, S.; Appleton, P., E-mail: tanio@ipac.caltech.edu [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Cech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Extremely fast prey capture in pipefish is powered by elastic recoil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the dynamic constants of muscleProc. R. Soc. B. 126, 136-195. doi:10...Press. Lou, F , N.A Curtin, and R.C Woledge1999Elastic energy storage...canicula J. Exp. Biol. 202, 135-142. Marsh, R.L , and H.B John-Alder1994Jumping...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Muscle performance during frog jumping: influence of elasticity on muscle operating lengths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...BF00711916 ) Askew, G. , and R. Marsh 1998 Optimal shortening velocity...1152/japplphysiol.01045.2004 ) Marsh, R. L. 1994 Jumping ability of anuran...Sci. Comp. Med. 38B, 51-111. Marsh, R. L. , and H. B. John-Alder...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

The weak link: do muscle properties determine locomotor performance in frogs?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...10.1126/science.8278808 ) 2 Marsh, R. L. 1994 Advances in veterinary...New York, NY: Academic Press. 3 Marsh, R. L. , John-Alder, J. B. 1994...s003600050259 ) 9 Peplowski, M. M. , Marsh, R. L. 1997 Work and power output...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

New Strategies for Organic Catalysis: The First Enantioselective Organocatalytic 1,3-Dipolar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Versity of California Berkeley, California 94720 DiVision of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering California Institute of broadly useful new strategies for enantioselective catalysis that utilize organic chemicals as reaction platform for the develop- ment of enantioselective organocatalytic Diels-Alder reactions (eq 2

MacMillan, David W. C.

171

Syphilis: Review with Emphasis on Clinical, Epidemiologic, and Some Biologic Features  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...defined a five-point syphilis control plan including public education, screening...Secondary syphilis: a clinico-pathological review. . Alder J. Jarvis K. Mitten M. Shipkowitz...Maligna. Presentation of a case and a review of the literature. . Fitzgerald T. J...

Ameeta E. Singh; Barbara Romanowski

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

S3444D Syllabus Summer session 2011 S3444DOrganic Chemistry II Summer 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S3444D Syllabus Summer session 2011 S3444D­Organic Chemistry II Summer 2011 Lecture: 209 Havemeyer, MTWR 10:45 am to 12:20 pm Text: Organic Chemistry, John McMurry, 7th Edition Instructor: Fay Ng (office Date Book chapter topic 7/5 14 Conjugated compounds and Diels-Alder reaction 7/6 15 Benzene

Lin, Qiao

173

ACADEMIC SENATE COMMITTEE April 5, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Stephen Lessnick, Edward M. Levine, Joelle Lien, Brad Lundahl, James Metherall, Joseph Metz, William C Torres, Margaret Wan, Donna White, Bryce Williams, Lindsay Williams, Seth Welborn, Braden York, Nick Floor, Kathryn Stockton, Martha Bradley, Stephen Alder, Sue Cantarini, Jeff Webb, Cathy Chambless

Capecchi, Mario R.

174

Energy use by biological protein transport pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residing within energy-conserving membranes use transmembrane ion gradients to drive substrate transport receptors impart specificity to a targeting route, and transport across or into the membrane is typicallyEnergy use by biological protein transport pathways Nathan N. Alder1 and Steven M. Theg2 1

Economou, Tassos

175

Kinetic isotope effects, dynamic effects, and mechanistic studies of organic reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?-conjugating substituent is distal to the oxazolidinone but decreased steric interaction when the Ï?-conjugating substituent is proximal to the oxazolidinone. Dynamic effects were studied in Diels-Alder reaction between acrolein and methyl vinyl ketone. This reaction...

Wang, Zhihong

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

EN-019 Silviculture March 2003 Effects of Phosphorus Fertilization on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plantations By Kevin R. Brown, Ph.D., R.P. Bio. and Paul J. Courtin, M.F., R.P.F. KEYWORDS: red alder Bong.) is the most widespread hardwood tree species in low- elevation forests of coastal British Colum seedlings were fertilized with P (but not other elements) within a year of planting, tree volumes in

177

Multicomponent Reactions in Total Synthesis Kevin Allan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Ugi Reaction · Cycloadditions · Povarov Reaction · Knoevenagel / Hetero-Diels-Alder Cycloaddition · 1-VCH; Weinheim, 2005. Orru, R. V. A.; de Greef, M. Synthesis 2003, 10, 1471-1499. Ugi, I. Pure Appl. Chem. 2001, 73, 187-191. Bienaymé, H.; Hulme, C.; Oddon, G.; Schmitt, P. Chem. Eur. J. 2000, 6, 3321-3329. Ugi, I

Stoltz, Brian M.

178

Quaternary upper plate deformation in coastal Oregon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...number in the alphanumeric soil code iden- tifies the terrace: 1...Ridge; 6, Alder Grove. Soil codes with lower-case f are sites...cm) texture* (% clay)* NS2 65 N.D. 145 sicl N.D. 2mkpf...table: lowest terrace south = NS2, TH2, LC2; second-lowest...

179

Template for SYNLETT and SYNTHESIS Thieme Stuttgart New York 2009-04-27 page 1 of 5 Abstract: The synthesis of the first vinyltetrazine derivative is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: The synthesis of the first vinyltetrazine derivative is described. 3,6-Divinyl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine on high-nitrogen polymers, it appeared that tetrazine-containing polymers had been largely unexplored,4 although tetrazines are known for their ability to react in inverse demand Diels- Alder reactions,5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

180

Synthetic Strategies for the Lepadiformines and Cylindricine C via Tandem Schmidt Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a formal synthesis of lepadiformine A and a total synthesis of lepadiformine C. In another project, a tandem Diels-Alder/Schmidt reaction is utilized to prepare a similar tricyclic lactam. This process is applied toward an asymmetric total synthesis...

Meyer, Angelica Michelle

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

STRATEGIC COMBINATION OF TRANSITION METAL-CATALYZED REACTIONS FOR ECONOMICAL ONE-POT SYNTHESES OF N-HETEROCYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a one-pot imino DielsAlder reaction for the synthesis of dihydrobenzoquinoline 2.46a derivatives catalyzed by antimony trichloride (Scheme 2.30).63 The fully aromatized benzoquinoline 2.46b was also formed as a minor product. Due to its...

Raikar, Sandeep

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Appendix List for Upper Middle Mainstem Columbia River Appendix A. WNHP. 2003.Known High Quality or Rare Plant Communities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wetland ecosystems of the UMM Subbasin, WA. SCIENTIFIC NAME COMMON NAME Abies amabilis - Tsuga mertensiana shrubland (provisional) Sitka alder #12;SCIENTIFIC NAME COMMON NAME Artemisia arbuscula / Festuca idahoensis dwarf-shrub herbaceous vegetation Low sagebrush /Idaho fescue Artemisia rigida / Poa secunda dwarf

183

NNSA NEWS DRAFT October final edits 19 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2009 2009 National Nuclear Security Administration Monthly News (continued on page 2) This month President Obama presented Dr. Berni Alder, a retired physicist from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with the National Medal of Science and awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation to IBM for its Blue Gene series of supercomputers, developed in partnership with NNSA. The awards are the nation's most prestigious honors in the fields of science and technology innovation. Alder is widely regarded as the founder of molecular dynamics, a type of computer simulation used for studying the motions and interactions of atoms over time. His contributions include changing kinetic molecular theory by showing that simulations can significantly affect a scientific field.

184

2011 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 2011 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources On their Allocation Year 2012 ERCAP Request Forms Principal Investigators reported 1,770 refereed publications (published or in press) - as well as 93 publications submitted to refereed journals - for the preceding 12 months, based on using, at least in part, NERSC resources. A Adams, Paul Liu H, Sale KL, Simmons BA and Singh S, "Molecular dynamics study of polysaccharides in binary solvent mixtures of an ionic liquid and water." J Phys. Chem. B. 2011 115(34):10251-8. Aldering, Greg "Type Ia Supernova Carbon Footprints", Thomas, R. C., Aldering, G., Antilogus, P., Aragon, C., Bailey, S., Baltay, C., Bongard, S., Buton, C., Canto, A., Childress, M., Chotard, N., Copin, Y., Fakhouri, H. K., Gangler,

185

(DOE/EIS-0285/SA-105): Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (08/22/02)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA 105 Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No. 1 James Jellison - TFO/Olympia Proposed Action: Vegetation Management along the Elbe Tap to Alder-LaGrande No.1 and 115kV transmission line from structure 1/1 through structure 7/17. Corridor width varies. The project area is located within Whatcom County, Washington. Location: Transmission line is located at and west of Elbe, Pierce County Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing

186

In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog In The Spotlight Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight In The Spotlight Berni Alder, 2009 National Medal of Science Winner Berni Alder Role: Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore

187

Development of WTI and turbidity estimation model using SMA application to Kushiro Mire, eastern Hokkaido, Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new water-turbidity index (WTI) based on multispectral images was developed and tested at Kushiro Mire, eastern Hokkaido, Japan. An algorithm for turbidity estimation was developed and applied to Landsat TM images to monitor the turbid water on the mire surface during the snow-melting season. We used spectral mixture analysis (SMA) to produce a turbidity estimation model. The SMA unmixes a mixed pixel determining the fractions due to each spectral end member. In this study, we used four end members (1, alder; 2, reed; 3, high-concentration turbid water (485 ppm); 4, low-concentration turbid water (10 ppm) measured in the test site. The WTI was determined by the following equation: WTI=amax/(amax+amin), where amax is abundance of high-concentration turbid water and amin is abundance of low-concentration turbid water. The end-member spectra of alder and reed were measured in the laboratory using specimens collected at the test site. The spectrum of turbid water was measured at the test sites. The relative abundance of each end member was estimated based on this spectral information using SMA. The same formula was applied to Landsat TM images. Then we applied the WTI equation to the end-member images to obtain a WTI map. In the mire wetland region, turbid water spreads under alder trees and reed grasses. To verify our turbidity estimation method based on WTI under these conditions, we constructed a small experimental wetland consisting of mixed stands of alder and reed. WTI was calculated from the mixed spectrum of this artificial wetland and the regression curve for the relation between WTI and the actual turbidity was determined (R2=.91). Finally, this regression equation was used to derive a turbidity map from the WTI image.

Satoshi Kameyama; Yoshiki Yamagata; Futoshi Nakamura; Masami Kaneko

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A panel of Lab scientists ? including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering ? along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

189

Optical layout and mechanical structure of polarimeter-interferometer system for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Far-InfaRed (FIR) three-wave POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system for measurement current density profile and electron density profile is under development for the EAST tokamak. The FIR beams are transmitted from the laser room to the optical tower adjacent to EAST via ?20 m overmoded dielectric waveguide and then divided into 5 horizontal chords. The optical arrangement was designed using ZEMAX, which provides information on the beam spot size and energy distribution throughout the optical system. ZEMAX calculations used to optimize the optical layout design are combined with the mechanical design from CATIA, providing a 3D visualization of the entire POINT system.

Zou, Z. Y.; Liu, H. Q., E-mail: hqliu@ipp.ac.cn; Jie, Y. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Shen, J. S.; An, Z. H.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Li, G. S.; Zhu, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Lan, T. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

2004 Annual Inspection for the  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

for the for the Parkersburg, West Virginia, Nuclear Waste Policy Act Section 151(c) Disposal Site Summary The Parkersburg, West Virginia, Site was inspected on October 16, 2008, to confirm the integrity of visible features and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, additional inspections, or monitoring. Results of the inspection conclude that the site is in excellent condition. Vegetation control activities (mow and spray) have been effective in reducing the populations of weed species present at the site. An area of poison hemlock re-growth and an area of poison ivy were identified during the inspection. Although the site is currently mowed twice a year, the grass was rather high at the time of the inspection. It is recommended that the frequency of

191

Microsoft Word - TR11-07.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Parkersburg, WV Parkersburg, WV November 2011 Page 1 2011 Annual Inspection for the Parkersburg, West Virginia, Nuclear Waste Policy Act Section 151(c) Disposal Site Summary The Parkersburg, West Virginia, Site was inspected on October 5, 2011, to confirm the integrity of visible features and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, additional inspections, or monitoring. The disposal cell was in excellent condition. No evidence of erosion or slope instability on the disposal cell was noted during the inspection. Vegetation control was improved over last year, but problem areas still exist. Spraying for poison hemlock has allowed teasel to take hold in its place. It is recommended that the spraying program be amended next year to include spraying for teasel and that after areas are sprayed for

192

OTTER Project Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Campaigns > OTTER (Oregon) Field Campaigns > OTTER (Oregon) The Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project Overview The purpose of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project was to estimate major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water in forest ecosystems using an ecosystem-process model driven by remotely sensed data. The project was conducted from 1990 to 1991. The DAAC's data holdings include background data from 1989. OTTER data sets include: Canopy Chemistry Meteorology Field Sunphotometer Airborne Sunphotometer Timber Measurements These data were transferred to the ORNL DAAC from the Ames Research Center node of the Pilot Land Data System (PLDS). The ORNL DAAC LBA Data archive includes 14 data products. Study sites included a coastal forest of western hemlock, sitka spruce, and

193

Microsoft Word - TR11-18.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Parkersburg, WV Parkersburg, WV November 2009 Page 1 2009 Annual Inspection for the Parkersburg, West Virginia, Nuclear Waste Policy Act Section 151(c) Disposal Site Summary The Parkersburg, West Virginia, Site was inspected on October 22, 2009, to confirm the integrity of visible features and to determine the need, if any, for maintenance, additional inspections, or monitoring. Results of the inspection conclude that the site is in excellent condition. The grass covered disposal cell is in excellent condition. No evidence of erosion or slope instability on the disposal cell was noted during the inspection. Vegetation control activities (mow and spray) have been effective in reducing the populations of weed species present at the site. Areas of poison hemlock were identified during the inspection.

194

Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS] (ORCID:0000000210428452); Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Northeast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When European settlers arrived in the land that is now the northeastern United States, they found a vast forest with rich living resources. Stretching from the Coastal Plains to the Mississippi River was an environment shaped by trees. The climate, soils, and glacial history produced a forest that was unique in the world. In the 300 years since the arrival of Europeans, however, human activities have drastically changed this landscape. Still, as immense as the changes have been, they largely altered the appearance, but not the processes, of the ecosystems of the Northeast. A comparison of pictures of the Northeast from the 1700s with the 1900s would reveal striking differences. Early Europeans encountered great forests of American beeches, maples, birches, eastern hemlocks, and spruces from New England to northern Pennsylvania, and oaks, hickories, American chestnuts, and pines from Maryland through Ohio. Inhabiting these great forests were many wildlife populations:

unknown authors

196

Pine Tree Seed Germination  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Seed Germination Pine Tree Seed Germination Name: Debbie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I live in an area with many pine trees and pine cones. I would like to start seedlings to replace the older trees as I lose them. How do I do it? I have searched the internet for how but have yet to find an anwser. I've examined the pine cones and am at a loss, where are the seeds? I have soft long needle trees with medium pine cones, I have Hemlock trees with small cones and I have very sharp long needle trees with longer, narrow cones. Do the cones have to have already fallen off the tree before using seeds? Thank you!! Replies: Dear Debbie, The following may be helpful: http://www.uidaho.edu/cfwr/forres/nursery/research/research/projects.htm http://www.walden.org/thoreau/writings/seeds/dispersion_01.htm

197

From Border to Border: Skiing Across Finland John Bardsley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Swedish border at Tornio, and it traverses some of Finland's most beautiful countryside. Getting, an old school and reindeer farm, and gorgeous colors and scenery. The day's excursion ends at an old is similar, with winding and undulating track through the pine, spruce and fir forests of western Finland

Bardsley, John

198

New Forestry Commission District Office The new Forestry Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on sustainable design principles, ensuring a reduced carbon footprint in both the construction beams made from Douglas fir harvested from the Forestry Commission's own forests. The building design in Inverness demonstrates an exemplary approach to using sustainable principles and local timber

199

Combination of Fixed and Mobile Cameras for Automatic Pedestrian Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the shape, pose, color distribution, and behavior affect the robustness of the detection process. A novel the rest is dark. Nonetheless, since FIR images depend on the temperature of the objects, an outdoor scene has a number of factors that affect the images. Strong sun heating can introduce texture due

Bierlaire, Michel

200

www.forestry.gov.uk Trees are all good at different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they: Produce timber, food and many other useful products including medicines Provide places for work in the forest. There have been beech trees in southern Britain ever since the end of the Ice Age, which is over including making plywood and building houses. Douglas firs can also produce a lot of timber because

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Habitat associations of cavity-nesting owls in the Sierra Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for statistical analysis, with a detection probability of 0.25. I detected saw-whets in a wide range of conditions and it appeared that few factors influenced their distribution in the basin. Areas dominated by white fir, however, were correlated with the absence...

Groce, Julie Elizabeth

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sea-level rise orfall? SIR -Schneider' provides just one ex-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and energy production? Such questions can be addressed by comparing the data on the history of previous from various sources: projections of US energy demand in 2000 AD (heavy dotted line); measured distribution (heavy broken dash line) corres- ponding to the sample size per bin fir the energy data

Shlyakhter, Ilya

203

A fourier spectrometer for studying the radiation from Josephson Junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes a Fourier spectrometer designed to study the radiation generated by a Josephson junction in the millimeter and FIR bands with a resolution of {approx}2 GHz in the two-pass mode and {approx}1 GHz in the multipass mode. A feature is that one Josephson junctions operates as both generator and detector at the same time.

Verevkin, A.A.; Il`in, V.A.; Lipatov, A.P. [V.I. Lenin Moscow Pedagogical State Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Original article Belowground biomass and nutrient content in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Belowground biomass and nutrient content in a 47-year-old Douglas-fir plantation, France (Received 17 July 2000; accepted 6 October 2000) Abstract ­ Biomass and nutrient content and root biomass or nutrient content were observed. The root biomass was 58 t of dry matter, which was 18

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

205

132nd AAAS ANNUAL MEETING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Waring (Oregon State University). Estimating biomass and productivity in fir-spruce-birch...utilizing the t special EMI CsSb box and grid design. Typical gain of 3 x 106 at 1100...Place gel slab on its side in separating grid (shown below) of EC 730 ELUTION CONVECTION...

1965-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Wood and Fiber Science, 37(2), 2005, pp. 304313 2005 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 37(2), 2005, pp. 304­313 © 2005 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology EFFECTS OF PRUNING ON WOOD DENSITY AND TRACHEID LENGTH IN YOUNG DOUGLAS-FIR Barbara L. Gartner Professor Dept. of Wood Science and Engineering Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331 James M. Robbins

Lachenbruch, Barbara

207

PART III DIVISION 9 PAGE 1 RUTGERS DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL MAY 2008 DIVISION 09 FINISHES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Electrical Closets and Mechanical Rooms Armstrong School Zone Fine Fissured #466 24"x48" panels, square lay: Armstrong Mesa #680 for 2 x2 Armstrong Mesa#683 for 2 x4 NRC rating: .60 HumiGuard Plus BioBlock 55% recycled content / $ Upgrade: Armstrong Ultima #1911 for 2 x2 Armstrong Ultima #1914 fir 2x4 Beveled

208

SCIENTIFIC NOTES AND NEWS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...annouLncements of whieh v.'ill appear lat-er. PROFESSOR Z. B. JEFFERY delivered a lecture on October 9 on Einstein's theory of...ainniversary of the fir-st lecture in lhemistry at Yale by Professor Benjamin Silliman on April 4 1804. LADY LOCKYER and Miss Lockyer are...

1922-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

Plant Pathology (2005) 54, 3645 Doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3059.2004.01110.x 36 2005 BSPP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disease in fir and mixed conifer forests of Bhutan, Eastern Himalayas. The species causing this disease, Pretoria, South Africa; b Institute of Forest Entomology, Forest Pathology and Forest Protection (IFFF), Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, BOKU ­ University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences

210

Technical Report Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silvicultural Systems on Windthrow and Conifer Regeneration in a Coastal, Douglas-Fir-Dominated Forest: Summary ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife Forest Research Vancouver Forest Region 2100 Labieux Road, Nanaimo, BC, Canada, V9T 6E9, 250-751-7001 TR-007 Silviculture March 2001 Roberts Creek Study Forest Effects of Alternative

211

L o s P a d r e s N F A n g e l e s N F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The lower montane landscape (approximately 3,000 to 5,000 feet) contains patches of conifer/live oak forest California: bigcone Douglas-fir forest and Coulter pine forest. The montane conifer landscape (approximately the southernmost extension of coastal redwood forest. #12;Figure 2.17. Areas shown in red are montane conifer

Standiford, Richard B.

212

ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM VIABILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAIN ECOREGION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--MATRIX ......................................................................................... 46 MONTANE MOIST - MESIC MIXED CONIFER FOREST ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM--MATRIX....................................................................................................... 51 MONTANE DRY-MESIC MIXED CONIFER FOREST ECOLOGICAL SYSTEM- -MATRIX@lamar.colostate.edu http:www.cnhp.colostate.edu 2001 Front cover: Alpine tundra dry meadow, spruce-fir moist mesic forest

213

Patterns of Mortality in an Old-Growth Mixed-Conifer Forest of the Southern Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patterns of Mortality in an Old-Growth Mixed-Conifer Forest of the Southern Sierra Nevada-growth, mixed-conifer forest, in the absence of wildfire, were investigated at the Teakettle Experimental Forest. Mortality levels were proportional to the population size of the five dominant conifer species, white fir

North, Malcolm

214

45USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Management of OaksWithin the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,372,000 Oaks are also found as a stand component in many of the conifer forest types as well. Westside Ponderosa Pine, Sierrian Mixed Conifer, Klamath Mixed Conifer, and Douglas-fir forest all contain important and Tanoak/Madrone types along with the conifer forests on each National Forest. These ground-based sample

Standiford, Richard B.

215

7USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-202. 2007 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the historical and current conditions of conifer- ous forests of southern Utah to aid in the development),Engelmannspruce(Piceaengelmannii), and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) occur. Species dominance in these mixed conifer forests is mainly-agedgroupsandgrassymeadowsbetween #12;8 USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-202. 2007 Chapter 2--Ponderosa Pine, Mixed Conifer

Fried, Jeremy S.

216

o Fences roun Fi JAMES L. MURPHY AND HARRY E. SCHIMKE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clover (Chamaebatia foliosa), and manzanita brush r..Q.t9J~...tgRholus viscida). There were twoo Fences roun Fi JAMES L. MURPHY AND HARRY E. SCHIMKE ABSTRACT: Five meshes (1/8 to 1 inch) of 16-breaks - -retard them until fir e crews a r r i v ed, costs of installing and maintaining fences might be justified

Standiford, Richard B.

217

Area and Throughput Trade-Offs in the Design of Pipelined Discrete Wavelet Transform Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Area and Throughput Trade-Offs in the Design of Pipelined Discrete Wavelet Transform Architectures wavelet transform (DWT) as a linear space-to-frequency transform of the image domain in an irreversible compression. This irreversible discrete wavelet transform is implemented by FIR filter using 9/7 Daubechies

Boyer, Edmond

218

Sensor applications have now touched onto the realms of real-time data processing involving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensing needs, coupled with an interface integrating up to gigabyte scale energy efficient data storage sound / voice samples. Such applications demand real time storage, filtering, frequency domain analysis involving algorithms as sophisticated as Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), Finite Impulse Response (FIR

Najjar, Walid A.

219

Infrared reflectance and transmission spectra in II-VI alloys and superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room temperature measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) reflectance spectra are reported for the polar optical phonons in a series of bulk Cd[subscript x]Zn[subscript 1?x]Te (0 ? x ? 1) and CdSe[subscript x]Te[subscript ...

Talwar, Devki N.

220

1 of 1 | Last Upd roadmap is a re  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mentals of Tax ples of Microecon ent ent [15Credit Ho nting Software uction to Cost A ples of Macroeco s and shaded are mary (visit w Kent Core Catego dit hours) 21011; HONR 1 ritical Reasonin ne Arts (3 credit credit hours) credit hours) Title [17 Credit Ho nting I: Financia uction to Busin on Kent State: Fir ent

Sheridan, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nitrogen Dynamics in Stream Wood Samples Incubated with [14C]Lignocellulose and Potassium [15N]Nitrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Science, 2 and Fisheries and Wildlife, 3 Oregon State University...Science, and Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University...Science,2 and Fisheries and Wildlife,3 Oregon State University...Douglas fir log that had been wind-felled 7 years previously...

Nicholas G. Aumen; Peter J. Bottomley; Stan V. Gregory

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Religious Festivals December 2011 Buddhist Festivals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In many parts of Asia, Buddhist families, particularly in Japan, will hang bright lights on ficus trees is the season of preparation for Christmas, the feast of Christ's birth. `Advent' derives from the Latin for celebrating the birth of the Jesus Christ, the light of the world. Advent wreaths made with fir branches

Henderson, Gideon

223

BIBLIOGRAPHY 0 P Autho r Ind -19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Branch of Reports Bureau of Commercial Fis h er i es U .S . Fis h and Wildlife Service Seattle for the guidance of fis hery products ins pectors and is not fo r public dislribu- lion.) United States stan dards for grades of frozen ra w breaded fis h p o rtions. (March ), (Fir st iss ue ) 7 p . Gauglitz, E rich J. , Jr

224

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 377 1Pike and San Isabel National Forests,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 377 1Pike and San Isabel National Forests, USDA Forest Service, Pueblo, CO. Aspen Regeneration in South-Central Colorado, San Isabel National Forest Tim regeneration. Following harvest, the Douglas-fir and some Engelmann spruce stands in the Arkansas Hills area

225

ioEegions2of2the2gliforni2rovine2qrdens 0 250 500 750 1,000125  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest North Coast Maritime Chaparral/ North Coast Prarie North Coast Range-outer Northern California Habitat Redwood Forest/Riparian Santa Cruz Mountain Douglas Fir Forest Santa Cruz Mountain Flora Santa Cruz Region Ponderosa Pine/ Sand Hills Valley Oak Woodland Western Klamath Ranges 1 2 3 4 5 8 7 6 9 10

California at Santa Cruz, University of

226

THE ORIGIN OF LAND PLANTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...alone remain to remind us of their past glories. The more humble ferns and club-mosses still play an important role in the...seed plants still existing, the conifers-pines, firs, redwood, etc.-are the most nu-merous and familiar. The flowers...

Douglas H. Campbell

1930-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Lee J Rickard Long Wavelength Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning ICD Interface Control Document ION Ionosphere ­ in WBS, refers Monitoring & Control System MMIC Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit MRO Magdalena Ridge Observatory Design Review CIC Cascaded IntegratorComb ­ a combination of FIR filter and decimator CME Coronal

Ellingson, Steven W.

228

PlainsCottonwood QuakingAspen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 20 to 50 feet. Habitat: Open woodlands, alone or with junipers on dry rocky foothills, mesas on young trees; nearly 3 inches thick, red-orange and furrowed into large flat scaly plates on mature trees-fir, Rocky Mountain juniper and spruce. Relation to Fire: Resistant to fire, due to open crowns, thick

229

The Approximation of Outage Probability and the Trade-off between Capacity and Diversity for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

line channel model in [5]) at high SNR, and give approximations of the outage probability at lowThe Approximation of Outage Probability and the Trade-off between Capacity and Diversity of the equivalent FIR channel filter. The error probability is bounded by the outage probability and the error

Scharf, Louis

230

2011 New England Guide To Chemical Weed and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or Garlon to control perennial weeds, ferns and brush. 7. Keep good records of equipment calibration in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914: the United States Department for field-grown stock. Four-year transplants or "plugs plus one" of spruces and firs are recommended

New Hampshire, University of

231

Stand-scale tree mortality factors differ by site and species following drought in southwestern mixed conifer forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Impacts of drought on tree mortality in high-elevation mixed-conifer forests of southwestern U.S. are poorly understood. A recent extended and severe drought in the region provided an opportunity to investigate the patterns and factors associated with tree mortality in this forest type. Specifically, we quantified mortality that occurred between 1995 and 2008 of four tree species, white fir (Abies concolor), limber pine (Pinus flexilis), trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), in mixed-conifer forests over three sites in northern Arizona within 84, 0.02ha plots. We found: (1) varied but substantial tree mortality (456% by basal area) in most species between 1996 and 2006 in association with recent severe and prolonged drought; (2) tree mortality differed among sites and species with aspen and white fir having the most mortality (>30% by basal area); (3) relationships between tree mortality and most climatic factors (e.g. temperature, precipitation, Palmer Drought Severity Index) were lagged 14yr; (4) bark beetle attack and intraspecific tree basal area were consistently and positively related to tree mortality for most species and sites, whereas topographic and other stand characteristics were less consistently related to mortality. Results show that aspen, Douglas-fir, and white fir were more vulnerable to recent drought-associated mortality than limber pine. Associations between tree mortality and intraspecific basal area support further evaluation of treatments that reduce intraspecific competition within stands to lower risks of tree mortality in southwestern mixed conifer forests.

Jeffrey M. Kane; Thomas E. Kolb; Joel D. McMillin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Berni Alder Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

233

Sulfur-Free Selective Pulping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technoeconomic Appraisal," December 1991. 5. DOE Annual Report on Contract No. AC02-83CH10093, Bozell, J. J., Hames, B., Chum, H. L., Dimmel, D. R, Althen, E., Caldwell, P. L., Daube, Oxidation ;; Diels-Alder .. I I -Methanol .. ~ 5 I 3 (C~O) OCH... - Hydrogen 3 (Q-IP) # Q-I 3 o o ~ o 1 2 ~ (H) Lignin DMBQ =two OCH3 groups Anthraquinone MMBQ =one OCH3 group A. K, and Kuroda, K-I.,"Sulfur-free Selective Pulping," March 1992. 6. DOE Annual Report on Contrac No. DE-AC02-83CH10093, Bozell, J. J...

Dimmel, D. R.; Bozell, J. J.

234

Toward the Total Synthesis of Norzoanthamine: The Development of a Transannular Michael Reaction Cascade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Alder reaction O O H H OTMS O H PO H H tBuO H OP H H 2.7, P= TES OTMS OtBu OPO OP 2.5, P=TES KHMDS, PhSeBr, THF, -10 oC 91% O OTMS OtBu OPO OP mCPBA, CH2Cl2, -78 oC; then NaHCO3, CHCl3, 40 oC, 4 h O H H H HO H H H OH H H...

Xue, Haoran

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Diazo group as a new chemical reporter for bioorthogonal labelling of biomolecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with hydrazine and hydroxylamine derivatives,1,6,10 azides that can be modified with phosphines or reactive alkynes,7,8,11-13 terminal alkynes that can be tagged with azides,14 and strained alkenes15-20 and isonitriles21 that can be ligated with tetrazines... to perform very efficient [3+2] cycloadditions with 1,3-dipoles and inverse-electron-demand Diels Alder reactions with tetrazines, making it suitable for applications in chemical ligation.23 In order to test whether the diazo group could be used as a...

Josa-Culler, Laia; Wainman, Yelena A.; Brindle, Kevin M.; Leeper, Finian J.

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Communications: A systematic method for locating transition structures of A + B ? X type reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Search for transition structures (TSs) as first-order saddles is one of the most important tasks in theoretical study of chemical reaction. Although automated search has been established either by starting from a local minimum (MIN) or by connecting two MINs there is no systematic method which can locate TSs of A + B ? X ( + Y ) type reactions starting from separated reactants. We propose such an approach for the first time; it was demonstrated to work very well in the SN2 DielsAlder and Wittig reactions.

Satoshi Maeda; Keiji Morokuma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71 - 5080 of 31,917 results. 71 - 5080 of 31,917 results. Download PMCDP_Newsletter_February_2011_SHR.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/pmcdpnewsletterfebruary2011shrpdf Download February 2011 PMCDP Newsletter http://energy.gov/management/downloads/february-2011-pmcdp-newsletter Article Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel Researchers at the Office of Science's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have tapped an unlikely source to help create a renewable alternative to diesel fuel. http://energy.gov/articles/researchers-borrow-fir-tree-create-biodiesel Download Flash2011-30(1).pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/flash2011-301pdf Download EA-1557: Final Environmental Assessment National Security Test Range http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1557-final-environmental-assessment

238

Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

586 586 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 143 / Tuesday, July 27, 1999 / Notices Telephone: (202) 205-9817. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), you may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339. However, the Department is not able to reproduce in an alternate format the standard forms included in the application package. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sylvia Johnson, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW. (room 3318, Switzer Building), Washington, DC 20202-2649. Telephone (202) 205-9312. If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD), you may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339. Individuals with disabilities may obtain this document in an alternate format (e.g., Braille, large print,

239

Native Evergreens  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evergreens Evergreens Nature Bulletin No. 173-A December 12, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation NATIVE EVERGREENS There are few native evergreens in this region. Your Christmas tree -- unless it is one of those glistening imitations -- is likely to be a young spruce, balsam fir, or Scotch pine from Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota or Canada, perhaps a Douglas fir from the northwest. Long years ago, at Christmas time in many parts of rural Illinois, it was customary to search the hillsides and pastures for a well-shaped young cedar to be brought home as a Christmas tree. Or, if there was none, a young oak. They were decorated with strings of popcorn, cranberries and tinsel, chains of colored paper, and lighted with candles wired to the branches.

240

Far-IR and radio thermal continua in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the invention of new far-infrared (FIR) and radio mm and sub-mm instruments (DESIR on SMESE satellite, ESO-ALMA), there is a growing interest in observations and analysis of solar flares in this so far unexplored wavelength region. Two principal radiation mechanisms play a role: the synchrotron emission due to accelerated particle beams moving in the magnetic field and the thermal emission due to the energy deposit in the lower atmospheric layers. In this contribution we explore the time-dependent effects of beams on thermal FIR and radio continua. We show how and where these continua are formed in the presence of time dependent beam heating and non-thermal excitation/ionisation of the chromospheric hydrogen plasma.

Kaparov, J; Karlick, M; Moravec, Z; Varady, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SOFIA Astronomy and Technology in the 21st Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy mounted on-board a Boeing 747SP will open a new era in MIR/FIR astronomy. Starting in 2002, SOFIA will offer German and American astronomers a unique platform, providing regular access to the entire MIR and FIR wavelength range between 5 micron and 300 micron part of which is otherwise inaccessible from the ground. SOFIAs 2.7m mirror and optimized telescope system combines the highest available spatial resolution with excellent sensitivity. SOFIA will operate in both celestial hemispheres for the next two decades. In this paper we present an overview of the SOFIA project and the science that this observatory will be able to address.

Krabbe, A; Krabbe, Alfred; Roeser, Hans-Peter

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SOFIA Astronomy and Technology in the 21st Century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy mounted on-board a Boeing 747SP will open a new era in MIR/FIR astronomy. Starting in 2002, SOFIA will offer German and American astronomers a unique platform, providing regular access to the entire MIR and FIR wavelength range between 5 micron and 300 micron part of which is otherwise inaccessible from the ground. SOFIAs 2.7m mirror and optimized telescope system combines the highest available spatial resolution with excellent sensitivity. SOFIA will operate in both celestial hemispheres for the next two decades. In this paper we present an overview of the SOFIA project and the science that this observatory will be able to address.

Alfred Krabbe; Hans-Peter Roeser

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Comments on the paper "The initial conditions of isolated star formation - VI. SCUBA mapping of prestellar cores" (Kirk et al. 2005)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In their survey paper of prestellar cores with SCUBA, Kirk et al. (2005) have discarded two of our papers on L183 (Pagani et al. 2003, 2004). However these papers bring two important pieces of information that they cannot ignore. Namely, the real structure of L183 and the very poor correlation between submillimeter and far infrared (FIR) dust emission beyond \\Avb $\\approx$ 15 mag. Making the erroneous assumption that it is the same dust that we are seeing in emission at both 200 and 850 $\\mu$m, they derive constant temperatures which are only approximate, and column densities which are too low. In fact dust temperatures do decrease inside dark clouds and the FIR emission is only tracing the outer parts of the dark clouds (Pagani et al. 2004)

Laurent Pagani; Guilaine Lagache

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

244

Industrial Energy Conservation, Forced Internal Recirculation Burner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research project is to develop and evaluate an industrial low NOx burner for existing and new gas-fired combustion systems for intermediate temperature (1400 degree to 2000 degree F) industrial heating devices such as watertube boilers and process fluid heaters. A multi-phase effort is being pursued with decision points to determine advisability of continuance. The current contract over Phases II and III of this work. The objectives of each phase are as follows. Phase II - to design, fabricate, and evaluate prototype burners based on the Forced Internal Recirculation (FIR) concept. Phase III - to evaluate the performance of an FIR burner under actual operating conditions in a full-scale field test and establish the performance necessary for subsequent commercialization

Joseph Rabovitser

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

Vibration mitigation in J-TEXT far-infrared diagnostic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical structure stability is an important issue for far-infrared (FIR) phase measurements. To ensure good signal quality, influence of vibration should be minimized. Mechanical amelioration and optical optimization can be taken in turn to decrease vibration's influence and ensure acceptable measurement. J-TEXT (Joint Texal Experiment Tokamak, formerly TEXT-U) has two FIR diagnostic systems: a HCN interferometer system for electron density measurement and a three-wave polarimeter-interferometer system (POLARIS) for electron density and Faraday effect measurements. All use phase detection techniques. HCN interferometer system has almost eliminated the influence of vibration after mechanical amelioration and optical optimization. POLARIS also obtained first experimental results after mechanical stability improvements and is expected to further reduce vibration's influence on Faraday angle to 0.1 Degree-Sign after optical optimization.

Li, Q.; Chen, J.; Zhuang, G.; Wang, Z. J.; Gao, L.; Chen, W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Copyright 2012 AmeriCAn ChemiCAl SoCiety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-0-8412-2817-7 printeD in the UniteD StAteS of AmeriCA #12;Creating Safety CultureS in aCademiC inStitutionS: a report of the Safety Culture taSk forCe of the aCS Committee on ChemiCal Safety firSt edition a publiS Safety Culture task force

Whitton, Mary C.

247

MFR PAPER 1107 Some Marketing Considerations with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION rhere I, Ilne lh lng \\\\e ca n ,a) ahoul lhe Cllnlcl1lpllran li,h mar\\...el lng ,cene Illlhll i,h IIltll a realll) MARKETING PRO BLEMS \\\\ hat th:n .lrL the mar\\...el lng Pfllh- 11111, \\\\ Ith 'c\\...e end prllduct )' Hrnaull ,pea\\...lng \\Ie can Idellt!l, I'ur ul'>llnct pfl)hlcm, FIr,t. there I

248

The determination of volumes of forage produced after one year of protection in pine-hardwood stand as compared with production under current grazing practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?pyloaoatol torose te ihe o?aer bai also aotleoaMr rogaoe4 iho fir? hasar4. %tr last riatoasat Ls I? soapleto agrasaoat ?Lth ylo??D. , ot al (lye2). A sio4p by Casoagp (1951) showeg that grass prosastioa la tho pl?ef woo4s of Loclrlaaa a?4 oas'I O'rise wao Lafll4...

Seamans, Robert L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

Chakrabarti, Sukanya [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); McKee, Christopher F. [Physics and Astronomy Departments, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pozzi, Francesca, E-mail: chakrabarti@astro.rit.edu [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Catalogue of the Flora of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.) Kunze 4 ......................... normalis C . Chr . (D . patens Kunze) 1-2-3-4-5 ................. Thelypteris (L.) A . Gray Marsh Shieldfern 1-2 GYMNOPTERIS hispida (Mett.) Underw . (Bommeria hispida Underw.). ........ 6 NOTHOLAENA... ................................... . Taeda L Loblolly Pine 1-2 CATALOGUE OF THE FLORA OF TEXAS 13 PSEUDOTSUGA mucronata (Raf.) Sudw . Douglas Fir ....................... 6 TAXODIUM .............. distichum (L.) L . C . Rich Southern Cypress 1-2-3-4-5...

Cory, V. L. (Vivian L.); Parks, Harris Bradley

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

De-Confusing blended field images using graphs and bayesian priors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new technique for overcoming confusion noise in deep far-infrared \\Herschel space telescope images making use of prior information from shorter $\\lambdadistribution function of fluxes subject to these priors through Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) sampling by fitting the image. Assuming we can predict FIR flux of sources based on ultraviolet-optical part of their SEDs to within an order of magnitude, the simulations show that we can obtain reliable fluxes and uncertainties...

Safarzadeh, Mohammadtaher; Lu, Yu; Inami, Hanae; Somerville, Rachel S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Radio--Far infrared correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies with 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the radio--far infrared (FIR) correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies chosen from the PRism MUltiobject Survey (PRIMUS) up to redshift ($z$) of 1.2 in the XMM-LSS field. We use rest-frame emission at 1.4 GHz in the radio and both monochromatic (at 70$\\mu$m) and bolometric (between $8-1000~\\mu$m) emission in the FIR. To probe the nature of the correlation up to $z\\sim1.2$, where direct detection of blue star-forming galaxies is impossible with current technology, we employ the technique of image stacking at 0.325 and 1.4 GHz in the radio and in six infrared bands, viz. 24, 70, 160, 250, 350 and $500~\\mu$m. For comparison, we also study the correlation for more luminous galaxies that are directly detected. The stacking analysis allows us to probe the radio--FIR correlation for galaxies that are up to 2 orders of magnitude fainter than the ones detected directly. The $k-$correction in the infrared wavebands is obtained by fitting the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) with a composite mid-IR power...

Basu, Aritra; Beelen, Alexandre; Singh, Veeresh; Archana, K N; Sirothia, Sandeep; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

THE ABSENCE OF COLD DUST AROUND WARM DEBRIS DISK STAR HD 15407A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report Herschel and AKARI photometric observations at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths of the debris disk around the F3V star HD 15407A, in which the presence of an extremely large amount of warm dust ({approx}500-600 K) has been suggested by mid-infrared (MIR) photometry and spectroscopy. The observed flux densities of the debris disk at 60-160 {mu}m are clearly above the photospheric level of the star, suggesting excess emission at FIR as well as at MIR wavelengths previously reported. The observed FIR excess emission is consistent with the continuum level extrapolated from the MIR excess, suggesting that it originates in the inner warm debris dust and cold dust ({approx}50-130 K) is absent in the outer region of the disk. The absence of cold dust does not support a late-heavy-bombardment-like event as the origin of the large amount of warm debris dust around HD 15047A.

Fujiwara, Hideaki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Onaka, Takashi [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Takita, Satoshi; Kataza, Hirokazu; Murakami, Hiroshi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yamashita, Takuya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ishihara, Daisuke, E-mail: hideaki@naoj.org [Department of Physics, School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Host Galaxies of X-ray Quasars Are Not Strong Star Formers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use ultradeep SCUBA-2 850um observations (~0.37 mJy rms) of the 2 Ms CDF-N and 4 Ms CDF-S X-ray fields to examine the amount of dusty star formation taking place in the host galaxies of high-redshift X-ray AGNs. Supplementing with COSMOS, we measure the submillimeter fluxes of the 4-8 keV sources at z>1, finding little flux at the highest X-ray luminosities but significant flux at intermediate luminosities. We determine grey body and MIR luminosities by fitting spectral energy distributions to each X-ray source and to each radio source in an ultradeep Karl G. Jansky VLA 1.4 GHz (11.5uJy at 5-sigma) image of the CDF-N. We confirm the FIR-radio and MIR-radio correlations to z=4 using the non-X-ray detected radio sources. Both correlations are also obeyed by the X-ray less luminous AGNs but not by the X-ray quasars. We interpret the low FIR luminosities relative to the MIR for the X-ray quasars as being due to a lack of star formation, while the MIR stays high due to the AGN contribution. We find that the FIR...

Barger, A J; Owen, F N; Chen, C -C; Hasinger, G; Hsu, L -Y; Li, Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Far-Infrared Properties of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies Observed with AKARI/Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report basic far-infrared (FIR) properties of eight blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) observed by AKARI. We measure the fluxes at the four FIS bands (wavelengths of 65 um, 90 um, 140 um, and 160 um). Based on these fluxes, we estimate basic quantities about dust: dust temperature, dust mass, and total FIR luminosity. We find that the typical dust temperature of the BCD sample is systematically higher than that of normal spiral galaxies, although there is a large variety. The interstellar radiation field estimated from the dust temperature ranges up to 100 times of the Galactic value. This confirms the concentrated star-forming activity in BCDs. The star formation rate can be evaluated from the FIR luminosity as 0.01--0.5 $M_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. Combining this quantity with gas mass taken from the literature, we estimate the gas consumption timescales (gas mass divided by the star formation rate), which prove to span a wide range from 1 Gyr to 100 Gyr. A natural interpretation of this large variety can be provided by intermittent star formation activity. We finally show the relation between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity (we utilize our estimate of dust mass, and take other necessary quantities from the literature). There is a positive correlation between dust-to-gas ratio and metallicity as expected from chemical evolution models.

Hiroyuki Hirashita; Hidehiro Kaneda; Takashi Onaka; Toyoaki Suzuki

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Index of /research/alcator/facility/Procedures/DIAGNOSTICS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DIAGNOSTICS DIAGNOSTICS [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [ ] DNB Emergency Off Procedures42208.pdf 22-Apr-2008 15:58 73K [ ] DNB Emergency Off Procedures reva.pdf 04-Dec-2008 07:02 74K [ ] DNB Interim Safety Procedures050608.pdf 06-May-2008 14:11 1.2M [ ] FIR Laser Pumpout Procedure Rev 1.00.pdf 23-Apr-2008 16:05 22K [ ] FIR Laser Startup Procedure Rev 1.00.pdf 23-Apr-2008 16:05 29K [ ] FIR Laser Venting Procedure Rev 1.00.pdf 23-Apr-2008 16:05 22K [ ] Safety procedure for deuterium DNB operation.pdf 09-Jul-2003 13:01 8.2K [TXT] Safety procedure for deuterium DNB operation.txt 09-Jul-2003 13:01 4.5K [ ] TCI Window Cleaning.pdf 07-May-2003 14:32 62K [TXT] TCI Window Cleaning.txt 06-May-2003 14:38 3.2K

257

Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 20860 of 28,560 results. 51 - 20860 of 28,560 results. Download CX-008577: Categorical Exclusion Determination Acoustic Monitoring of Beluga Whale Interactions with Cook Inlet Tidal Energy Project CX(s) Applied: B3.3 Date: 07/19/2012 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008577-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-008597: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alder Stream Wind Project Feasibility Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008597-categorical-exclusion-determination Page EM Recovery Act Performance The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction,

259

Property:EIA/861/NercWecc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NercWecc NercWecc Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Nerc Wecc Entity conducts business operations within the WECC region (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/NercWecc" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3 Phases Energy Services + true + A Aguila Irrigation District + true + Ajo Improvement Co + true + Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority + true + Alamo Power District No 3 + true + Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc + true + Arizona Electric Pwr Coop Inc + true + Arizona Power Authority + true + Arizona Public Service Co + true + Arkansas River Power Authority + true + Avista Corp + true + Avista Turbine Power, Inc + true +

260

Property:EIA/861/ActivityBuyingTransmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ActivityBuyingTransmission ActivityBuyingTransmission Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Activity Buying Transmission Entity buys transmission service (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/ActivityBuyingTransmission" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Texas Central Company + true + AEP Texas North Company + true + AGC Division of APG Inc + true + Adams-Columbia Electric Coop + true + Aguila Irrigation District + true + Ak-Chin Electric Utility Authority + true + Alabama Municipal Elec Authority + true + Alabama Power Co + true + Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc + true + Allegheny Electric Coop Inc + true + Ameren Illinois Company + true +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

51 - 23960 of 26,764 results. 51 - 23960 of 26,764 results. Download CX-008597: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alder Stream Wind Project Feasibility Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-008597-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Summary Notes from 15 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis and Model Support http://energy.gov/em/downloads/sensitivity-and-uncertainty-analysis Download CX-008730: Categorical Exclusion Determination Materials and Fuels Complex Underground and Aboveground Storage Tank Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 06/07/2012 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

262

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlIIINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Penobscot Indian Nation/Penobcot indian Nation Enterprises STATE: ME PROJECT TITLE: Alder Stream Wind Project Feasibility Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000424 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOO5636 NEPA Control Number elD Number GF()..()()()5636.1 Hued on my review oCthe information concerning tbe proposed action, 115 NEPA Compliance Officer (autborized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made tht following determination: ex, EA, tiS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analys is, and dissemination 8 3.1 Site characterization .nd environment al monitoring Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits). data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation (including. but not

263

2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 2012 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources On their Allocation Year 2013 ERCAP Request Forms Principal Investigators reported 1,952 refereed publications (published or in press) for the preceding 12 months, based on using, at least in part, NERSC resources. Aldering | Greg Scalzo et al., A Search for New Candidate Super-Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia Supernovae in the Nearby Supernova Factory Data Set, The Astrophysical Roepke et al., Constraining Type Ia Supernova Models: SN 2011fe as a Test Case, The Astrophysical Journal Wang et al., Evidence for Type Ia Supernova Diversity from Ultraviolet Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope, The Astrophysical Journal Fu et al., The Nature of Double-peaked [O III] Active Galactic Nuclei, The Astrophysical Journal

264

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Ionic Liquids Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Ionic Liquids May 8-11, 2006 * Hilton Alexandria Mark Center * Alexandria, Virginia Joan F. Brennecke, Jessica L. Anderson, JaNeille K. Dixon, Edward J. Maginn Outline * Introduction to ionic liquids (ILs) * ILs for capturing CO 2 from flue gas * IL property-structure solubility relationships * ILs for energy efficient gas separations * Summary Ionic Liquids - a New Kind of Solvent * Organic salts that are liquid at temperatures around ambient * Liquid over a wide range of temperature; hence, can be used as solvents * Demonstrated successes as reaction solvents (olefin dimerization, metathesis, isomerizations, Diels-Alder, Friedel-Crafts alkylations and acylations, hydrogenations, C-C coupling) * Ionic liquids have vanishingly low vapor pressures

265

Awards - Argonne National Laboratories, Materials Sicence Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Awards Awards Awards ACA Bertram E. Warren Award D. Price - 1997 ACCA Programming Competition N. Adams - 2009 - 2nd place Alumni Achievement Awards J. D. Jorgensen - 1992 - Honored Alumnus from Brigham Young University College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences B. J. Kestel (1957) - 1998 - Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award from Joliet Junior College Dieter Gruen - 2001 - Alumni Merit Award from Northwestern University American Academy of Arts and Sciences A. A. Abrikosov - Foreign Honorary Member - 1991 American Physical Society Axel Hoffmann - Fellow - 2012 Alder Award S. Bader - 2007 Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Prize J. C. Campuzano - 2011 - for physics work in spectroscopy American Vacuum Society S. Bader - 1999 S. Bader - 2001 - John A. Thornton Memorial Award

266

Test of internal-conversion theory with measurements in Cs-134 and Ba-137  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray areas 2717400(5300) 1712200(4400) 2633700(5100) 1904100(4600) 80Brm impurity K x rays (%) ?0.18(2) ?0.28(3) ?0.38(4) 122Sb impurity K x rays (%) ?0.066(2) ?0.292(8) ?0.056(2) 124Sb impurity K x rays (%) ?0.0088(4) ?0.0473(9) ?0.0074(3) 134Cs g...-Holland, Amsterdam 1958). [2] R. S. Hager and E. C. Seltzer, Nucl. Data, Sect. A 4, 1 (1968). [3] F. Ro?sel, H. M. Fries, K. Alder, and H. C. Pauli, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 21, 91 (1978). [4] I. M. Band and M. B. Trzhaskovskaya, Tables of Gamma Ray Internal...

Nica, N.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, V. E.; Rockwell, W. E.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Livermore, CA); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ filling through hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxides has been utilized to generate nanocomposites in which the filler phase can be intimately associated with the polymer on relatively small length scales. One problem of the method has been achieving useful fill volumes without bulk phase separation of the reacting silicon monomer from the polymer. In this paper, we describe the preparation of a new class of nanocomposite materials in which the inorganic filler phase is pre-assembled before copolymerization with an organic species. Maleimide monomers, prepared from alkoxysilylpropyl amines and maleic anhydride, were protected against side reactions by forming the oxonorbornene Diels-Alder adduct with furan. The monomers were then reacted under sol-gel conditions to form oligomers or polymers-the filler phase. The material was activated by thermal deprotection of the maleimide and reacted with organic monomers or polymers to form the filled nanocomposite.

Shaltout, R.M.; Loy, D.A.; Wheeler, D.R.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

269

91.5x122 cm Poster Template  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2008 2008 www.PosterPresentations.com HST Cluster Supernova Survey Nao Suzuki 1 , G. Aldering 1 , R. Amanullah, K. Barbary 1,2 , L. Barrientos, M. Brodwin, N. Connolly, K. Dawson, R. de Jong, A. Dey, M. Doi, M. Donahue, P. Eisenhardt, E. Ellingson, L. Faccioli 1 , V. Fadeyev, H. Fakhouri 1,2 , A. Fruchter, D. Gilbank, M. Gladders, G. Goldhaber 1,2 , A. Gonzalez, A. Goobar, A. Gude 1,2 , J. Hennawi, H. Hoekstra, E. Hsiao 1 , X. Huang 1,2 , Y. Ihara, B. Jannuzi, M. J. Jee, B. Koester, M. Kowalski 2 , C. Lidman 1 , B. E. Linder 2 , L. Lubin, J. Meyers 12 , T. Morokuma, S. Perlmutter 1,2 , M. Postman, J. Rhodes, P. Rosati 2 , P. Ripoche 1 , D. Rubin 12 , D. Schlegel 1 , A. Spadafora 1 , A. Stanford, D. Stern, N. Yasuda, H. Yee, Supernova Cosmology Project 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

270

Mining Chemical Reactions Using Neighborhood Behavior and Condensed Graphs of Reactions Approaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. Similarity-driven searches for analogue reactions are performed, starting from multiple queries of several reaction types, and assessed in terms of their specificity to retrieve processes of the same class. ... Since LNB focuses, by definition, on a particular class, LNB results are applied to class-specific similarity searches (optimized searching for analogous processes when the class of the query is known beforehand i.e. tackling questions like What is the best CS to search for analogues of a DielsAlder process?, in contrast to What default CS to use, when the nature of the query is not predefined?). ... Therefore, the inter-DA reaction dissimilarity scores are systematically higher with IIAB-type fragments, thus there are relatively less DA/DA pairs entering the list of selected true similar at optimal dissimilarity cutoff. ...

Aurlie de Luca; Dragos Horvath; Gilles Marcou; Vitaly Solovev; Alexandre Varnek

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Reclamation and groundwater remediation at a hydrocarbon site in Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a joint hydrocarbon cleanup project between Unocal and Marathon, we have initiated the use of constructed wetlands for restoration of the 40-acre Poppy Lane gravel pit located near Kenai, Alaska. Gravel excavated from this site was used to construct roads and drilling pads in the 1960`-70`s. During this period it was also used as a refuse dump for waste from the Kenai gas field and from local residents. The bulk wastes were removed and pockets of oily sand were removed, treated and returned to a stockpile on the site. This left the site with residual pockets of hydrocarbon-impacted sand (<1000 TPH) plus traces of hydrocarbon contamination in the uppermost shallow groundwater flowing through the outwash gravels. The final part of the cleanup will be land restoration and bioremediation of the final traces of hydrocarbons, which are predominantly diesel-range. High resolution gas chromatography analysis indicated that common plants already growing on the site (willow, cottonwood, and alder) did not concentrate diesel-range petroleum hydrocarbons in their foliage when growing in soils containing these contaminants. As part of the planned restoration and shallow groundwater remediation, two 1/3 acre test plots were constructed to promote in-situ biodegradation processes. In spring 1995, the first test, a tree root-barrier plot, was planted with dormant cuttings of four native wetland tree and shrub species, which were planted to depths up to five feet. Alder and elderberry did not succeed under any conditions, nor did any species planted in standing water. For cottonwood and willow species, approximately one half of each rooted and survived. When the water table dropped the second year, the willow cuttings rooted deeper in the vadose zone, while cottonwood did not. As a result of these findings, a tree root-barrier wetland is not considered to be a viable option for groundwater treatment at Poppy Lane.

Ririe, G.T. [Unocal, Brea, CA (United States); Drake, L.D. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Olson, S.S. [Marathon Oil, Tyler, TX (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Rahnella victoriana sp. nov., Rahnella bruchi sp. nov., Rahnella woolbedingensis sp. nov., classification of Rahnella genomospecies 2 and 3 as Rahnella variigena sp. nov. and Rahnella inusitata sp. nov., respectively and emended description of the genus Rahnella  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Isolations from oak symptomatic of Acute Oak Decline, alder and walnut log tissue, and buprestid beetles in 20092012 yielded 32 Gram-negative bacterial strains showing highest gyrB sequence similarity to Rahnella aquatilis and Ewingella americana. Multilocus sequence analysis (using partial gyrB, rpoB, infB and atpD gene sequences) delineated the strains into six MLSA groups. Two MLSA groups contained reference strains of Rahnella genomospecies 2 and 3, three groups clustered within the Rahnella clade with no known type or reference strains and the last group contained the type strain of E. americana. DNADNA relatedness assays using both the microplate and fluorometric methods, confirmed that each of the five Rahnella MLSA groups formed separate taxa. Rahnella genomospecies 2 and 3 were previously not formally described due to a lack of distinguishing phenotypic characteristics. In the present study, all five Rahnella MLSA groups were phenotypically differentiated from each other and from R. aquatilis. Therefore we propose to classify the strains from symptomatic oak, alder and walnut and buprestid beetles as: Rahnella victoriana sp. nov. (type strain FRB 225T=LMG 27717T=DSM 27397T), Rahnella variigena sp. nov. (previously Rahnella genomosp. 2, type strain CIP 105588T=LMG 27711T), Rahnella inusitata sp. nov. (previously Rahnella genomosp. 3, type strain DSM 30078T=LMG 2640T), Rahnella bruchi sp. nov. (type strain FRB 226T=LMG 27718T=DSM 27398T) and Rahnella woolbedingensis sp. nov. (type strain FRB 227T=LMG 27719T=DSM 27399T).

Carrie Brady; Gavin Hunter; Susan Kirk; Dawn Arnold; Sandra Denman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

FIRST DETECTIONS OF THE [N II] 122 {mu}m LINE AT HIGH REDSHIFT: DEMONSTRATING THE UTILITY OF THE LINE FOR STUDYING GALAXIES IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first detections of the [N II] 122 {mu}m line from a high-redshift galaxy. The line was strongly (>6{sigma}) detected from SMMJ02399-0136, and H1413+117 (the Cloverleaf QSO) using the Redshift (z) and Early Universe Spectrometer on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The lines from both sources are quite bright with line to far-infrared (FIR) continuum luminosity ratios that are {approx}7.0 x 10{sup -4} (Cloverleaf) and 2.1 x 10{sup -3} (SMMJ02399). With ratios 2-10 times larger than the average value for nearby galaxies, neither source exhibits the line-to-continuum deficits seen in nearby sources. The line strengths also indicate large ionized gas fractions, {approx}8%-17% of the molecular gas mass. The [O III]/[N II] line ratio is very sensitive to the effective temperature of ionizing stars and the ionization parameter for emission arising in the narrow-line region (NLR) of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Using our previous detection of the [O III] 88 {mu}m line, the [O III]/[N II] line ratio for SMMJ02399-0136 indicates that the dominant source of the line emission is either stellar H II regions ionized by O9.5 stars, or the NLR of the AGN with ionization parameter log(U) = -3.3 to -4.0. A composite system, where 30%-50% of the FIR lines arise in the NLR also matches the data. The Cloverleaf is best modeled by a superposition of {approx}200 M82-like starbursts accounting for all of the FIR emission and 43% of the [N II] line. The remainder may come from the NLR. This work demonstrates the utility of the [N II] and [O III] lines in constraining properties of the ionized medium.

Ferkinhoff, Carl; Brisbin, Drew; Nikola, Thomas; Parshley, Stephen C.; Stacey, Gordon J. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Phillips, Thomas G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Falgarone, Edith [LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris and ENS (France); Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes G. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory (Code 665), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tucker, Carol E., E-mail: cferkinh@astro.cornell.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

C:\Eco-SSLs\Check of Attachment 4-1\Draft Final December 2004\Text\Eco-SSL Attachment 4-1 v5.wpd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSLs) Exposure Factors and Bioaccumulation Models for Derivation of Wildlife Eco-SSLs OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 Issued November 2003 Revised February 2005 This page intentionally left blank i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 1.1 Basic Equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 1 1.2 Dealing with Variability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 2 2.0 CALCULATION OF GROUP-SPECIFIC ECO-SSLs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.1 Food Ingestion Rate (FIR) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 1 2.2 Soil Intake (P s ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 - 2 3.0 ESTIMATING BIOACCUMULATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

275

litawr It. Booklet No. 56096 Booklet Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

371-47t eft RFT 374 *1749. el VV.t. tf47 Wt7T 3't 1 9F4T 947.I77 '#,37.V* et Tt wr-gr wti rer cArdia f-{ VU e161 tgig fttrw1 2. crtirmilt 3fhT 5tIc6) (ha Rift WTI 3. srt1ra-41t, ''fir 3it7 6+4, daac 4. SitilWatt .44414 .B4 ,4-44 AT Act) Trair , 2.t·r4 uIM5I4ld ?WTI Tiny r t? 1. BUT trait 2. tAc 3

Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

276

Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of cold dust and molecular gas in starbursting quasar host galaxies at z ~ 4.5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-arcsecond imaging of this cold molecular gas in these targets would be complemented by higher resolution imaging of the (rest-frame) FIR continuum and [CII] line emission with ALMA in order to infer the ionizing radiation field and gas density on kpc scales. 6... code 13A-012). This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00006.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA) and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA (Taiwan...

Wagg, J.; Carilli, C. L.; Aravena, M.; Cox, P.; Lentati, L.; Maiolino, R.; McMahon, R. G.; Riechers, D.; Walter, F.; Andreani, P.; Hills, R.; Wolfe, A.

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

277

THE AMERICAN AGRICULTURE MOVEMENT: MANIFEST AND LATENT PARTICIPANT ATTRACTIONS IN A SOCIAL MOVEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

members, interviews with . MM :leaders and'rIlem~ers, participant observation .in district offices, and'S()()n)~dier~",e certain..advantages inherent in. the sources'ofdatautillZed~.it~ .. ~ . paper. Fir.;t" mchdata seem sufficientf..., Arkansas.. . ~~', ~.tmd: l"i.pset, S.M., Prejudice and Society t in 'Rose, A~M. and Rese, ~B. {eds.], Minority Problems, New York 1965~ 361-371. (fttst published hil9S9j~ Sherif~M .., and Sherif. c..w..,Social Psycholegy, NewYork-Bvanston-London Tokyo...

Foster, Gary S.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A comparative study of the conventional diamond and cloverleaf interchanges with respect to ramp capacity and vehicular delay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and relative'y free f'o-. rin General Criteria 1. Tr ff'ic volu . es aad patterns 2. Costs Topography 4. Consistency of' type 5. Isaac use in vicinity cf' interse ticn 6. R~p graces Ca 0 III. Consulting Fines A. Type Use 1. Number o fir a usia... Crane count Since the fi', . hau 'oecn oxp sc? . b rate of 10 frames per second, equcticn 1 was used to deterc6ne the tr vel tiaie for each left turninC vehicle. In addition? the queue y&o iti n of e-ch vehicle was recorded. Final Frame Count...

Barnett, James David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

U.S. Homeowner of Perceptions of Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 4.5 Resale value 4.6 4.7 4.6 4.6 4.5 Resistance to wood destroying insects 4.4 4.5 4.2 4.4 4.6 Resistance to wind damage 4.2 3.9 4.2 4.3 4.3 Resistance to flooding 4.2 3.8 4.0 4.3 4.3 Free from as many products (pine, spruce, fir) 84% 14% 1% Perception of the Number of Years Materials Last in Weather Exposed

280

Original articles: Intelligent multichannel sensors for pulse wave analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aortic pulse wave velocity is an independent predictive indicator for all cause mortality and cardiovascular morbidity. Unfortunately it is only invasively accessible and thus the A. carotis-A. femoralis pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is recommended as ... Keywords: Arterial stiffness, BP, Cardiovascular risk, ECG, Electrocardiography, FIR, ICA, INA, Idxao, Idxo, Idxs, LED, PTT, PW, PWV, Pulse transit time, Pulse wave velocity, SD, cfPWV, dBP, p'(Idxo), p'(Idxs), p(Idxo), p(Idxs), sBP

S. Rosenkranz; C. Mayer; J. Kropf; S. Wassertheurer

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Historical conditions in mixed-conifer forests on the eastern slopes of the northern Oregon Cascade Range, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Historical forest conditions in frequent-fire forests may be increasingly useful in guiding contemporary forest management given (1) projections for increased drought stress associated with climate change and (2) increases in vertical and horizontal fuel connectivity related to changes in land use over the past 150years. Records from a 192225 timber inventory reveal historical variability at the landscape-level on mixed-conifer habitats on the eastern slopes of the Cascade Range in northern Oregon. Live conifers >15cm dbh (diameter at breast height) were tallied by species and diameter class in a 20% sample of over 50,000hectares (ha). Forests were predominantly low density (66tph, standard deviation=32, range=0289) relative to current conditions (312245, 01643tph). Historical basal area averaged 147 (070)m2ha?1. Total stand density, large tree (>53cm dbh) density, and ponderosa pine density were relatively stable across a wide moisture gradient (42187cm annual precipitation). Large trees dominated total basal area (7316%) and comprised 4217% of total trees per hectare (tph). Ponderosa pine contributed 6227% of basal area. Together, ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir constituted 9115% of basal area. Large ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir were nearly ubiquitous across the landscape in this historical data set, occurring on 94% and 83% of transects respectively. Large grand fir occurred on 20% of transects but contributed only 26% to large tree basal area. Higher-density values (>120tph), although rare, were distributed throughout the mixed-conifer habitat while large (>1.6ha) treeless (no conifers >15cmdbh) areas were almost entirely restricted to higher elevation, colder, wetter habitat types. Currently ponderosa pine no longer dominates large tree basal area, large trees no longer dominate total basal area, and Douglas-fir is now the dominant species across the landscape. Current mean tree densities are more than four times greater than values recorded in the historical cruise, and current basal area is approximately two times greater. Currently, large trees dominate basal area on only 29% of area inventoried compared to 91% in 192225. This systematic sample of a large landscape provides information about variability in species composition, densities, and structures at multiple spatial scales, which are highly relevant to management activities to restore and conserve desired ecosystem functions. Forest conditions comparable to those in this historical record have demonstrated resilience and resistance to fire and drought-related stressors in other frequent-fire forests.

R. Keala Hagmann; Jerry F. Franklin; K. Norman Johnson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Modeling localized properties of E-rated laminating lumber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grading Machines 94 VI. 5 Future Research 94 REFERENCES 95 APPENDIX A EXPERIMENTAL DATA . 98 B PROGRAM FOR CONVERTING RA%V CLT DATA . . 171 VITA 184 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1 Grades and sample sizes for Douglas-fir lumber in the study. 2... this study. . 19 5 Relative frequency histograms for average, center, minimum CLT MOE, and static bending MOE for C14. . 27 6 Relative frequency histogrsms for average, center, minimum CLT MOE, and static bending MOE for 2. 3 1/6. 28 7 Relative frequency...

Richburg, Brent Allen

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A linear, temperature compensated, high frequency salinity measuring device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:zsle tube is ohunteLL by n Eeriec con~Lenser-reaisto; cor. bin;. tian, C6, ;:. z'. 0 R3, ta maintop. in a relstively constant load. l. 't . 'On the aecillntor, The 3F ener', 'y trF nef SvrecL tbroujg. the solution and the x eaistor shunt ~asses... deter@in d, by 3ein, Fir se~orn, and. (5) '?loller (1/$5) sho;rs that it h; ?;a cz inverse curvature . . "th concentration (. 'ioure XI). The ainilcrity of these curves and the curves for sodium chlorMa aolu'tiona (. 'iCure 111) led...

Kelly, Minton Jones

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutron scattering shows magnetic excitation neutron scattering shows magnetic excitation mechanism at work in new materials. I n 2008, tHe totally unexpecteD discov- erY oF A New clAss oF suPercoNductors, the iroN PNictides, set oFF A Feverish international effort to understand them. the instruments and scientists at hFir and sNs are leaders in exploring these exotic materials, scan- ning the subatomic details of their structures and

285

LAI References and Summaries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cart Sign In/Register Quick Data Search Help icon Go NASA Meatball Cart Sign In/Register Quick Data Search Help icon Go NASA Meatball No JAVASCRIPT Capabilities. This site will not function without JavaScript. Please use the Web Product Tree. or anonymous FTP at ftp://daac.ornl.gov/data. Global Leaf Area Index Data from Field Measurements, 1932-2000 References and summaries for literature on leaf area index (reviews, methodology, etc.) Barclay, H. J. (1998) Conversion of total leaf area to projcted leaf area in lodgepole pine and Douglas-fir. Tree PHysiology 18, 185-193. Summary It is noted that three distinct definitions of leaf area index (LAI) in the literature have no predictable relationship with each other. Conversion factors were derived, from total LAI to projected LAI of horizontal leaves and to projected LAI for inclined leaves of lodgepole pine and coastal Douglas-fir, enabling comparison of results from different studies. An algorithm was derived to allow determination of these factors based on twig angles and the angles that the foliage subtends with the twig. The conversion factor was more sensitive to differences in vertical angles of the twigs than to twig rotation or foliar arrangement on the twig.

286

Star formation in z>1 3CR host galaxies as seen by Herschel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Herschel (PACS and SPIRE) far-infrared (FIR) photometry of a complete sample of z>1 3CR sources, from the Herschel GT project The Herschel Legacy of distant radio-loud AGN (PI: Barthel). Combining these with existing Spitzer photometric data, we perform an infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of these landmark objects in extragalactic research to study the star formation in the hosts of some of the brightest active galactic nuclei (AGN) known at any epoch. Accounting for the contribution from an AGN-powered warm dust component to the IR SED, about 40% of our objects undergo episodes of prodigious, ULIRG-strength star formation, with rates of hundreds of solar masses per year, coeval with the growth of the central supermassive black hole. Median SEDs imply that the quasar and radio galaxy hosts have similar FIR properties, in agreement with the orientation-based unification for radio-loud AGN. The star-forming properties of the AGN hosts are similar to those of the general popul...

Podigachoski, P; Haas, M; Leipski, C; Wilkes, B; Kuraszkiewicz, J; Westhues, C; Willner, S P; Ashby, M L N; Chini, R; Clements, D L; Fazio, G G; Labiano, A; Lawrence, C; Meisenheimer, K; Peletier, R F; Siebenmorgen, R; Kleijn, G Verdoes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Prediction of the heat release rate of wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for the heat release rate of wood during flaming combustion was developed during this research. It includes the effects of char shrinkage, multiple chemical components, adsorbed moisture, internal convective cooling and the variation of the thermophysical and thermochemical properties with temperature and the mass retention fraction of the char. It does not include char oxidation or diffusion of moisture and volatile pyrolysis products toward the rear surface. It calculates the time to ignition, mass burning rate, heat release rate, heat of combustion, heat of gasification and depth of char. An important part of this research was the determination of the thermochemical and thermophysical properties required by the model. An apparatus was developed for determining the kinetic parameters and the heat of combustion of the volatiles under conditions similar to those in the interior of a flaming slab of wood. Data were obtained on each of the four major chemical components present in Douglas fir. Thermal diffusivity measurements on Douglas fir and its char yielded an average value of 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} s{sup 2}/s which was nearly independent of temperature and mass retention fraction of the char for temperature sup to 500{degree}C and for mass-retention fractions above 0.30.

Parker, W.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An upper limit to [C II] emission in a z ~= 5 galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-ionization-state far-infrared (FIR) emission lines may be useful diagnostics of star-formation activity in young galaxies, and at high redshift may be detectable from the ground. In practice, however, very little is known concerning how strong such line emission might be in the early Universe. We attempted to detect the 158 micron [C II] line from a lensed galaxy at z = 4.926 using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. This source is an ordinary galaxy, in the sense that it shows high but not extreme star formation, but lensing makes it visible. Our analysis includes a careful consideration of the calibrations and weighting of the individual scans. We find only modest improvement over the simpler reduction methods, however, and the final spectrum remains dominated by systematic baseline ripple effects. We obtain a 95 per cent confidence upper limit of 33 mJy for a 200 km/s full width at half maximum line, corresponding to an unlensed luminosity of 1x10^9 L_sun for a standard cosmology. Combining this with a marginal detection of the continuum emission using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, we derive an upper limit of 0.4 per cent for the ratio of L_CII/L_FIR in this object.

Gaelen Marsden; Colin Borys; Scott C. Chapman; Mark Halpern; Douglas Scott

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

THE STAR FORMATION LAW AT LOW SURFACE DENSITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the nature of the star formation law at low gas surface densities using a sample of 19 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with existing H I maps in the literature, UV imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer satellite, and optical images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. All of the LSB galaxies have (NUV - r) colors similar to those for higher surface brightness star-forming galaxies of similar luminosity indicating that their average star formation histories are not very different. Based upon four LSB galaxies with both UV and far-infrared (FIR) data, we find FIR/UV ratios significantly less than 1, implying low amounts of internal UV extinction in LSB galaxies. We use the UV images and H I maps to measure the star formation rate (SFR) and hydrogen gas surface density within the same region for all the galaxies. The LSB galaxy star formation rate surface densities lie below the extrapolation of the power law fit to the SFR surface density as a function of the total gas density for higher surface brightness galaxies. Although there is more scatter, the LSB galaxies also lie below a second version of the star formation law in which the SFR surface density is correlated with the gas density divided by the orbital time in the disk. The downturn seen in both star formation laws is consistent with theoretical models that predict lower star formation efficiencies in LSB galaxies due to the declining molecular fraction with decreasing density.

Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D. [California Institute of Technology, MC 278-17, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP 8, Traverse du Siphon, 13376 Marseille Cedex 12 (France); Heckman, Timothy M.; Szalay, Alex S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lee, Young-Wook; Yi, Sukyoung K. [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Rich, R. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

Fung, Inez

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

291

Strong C+ emission in galaxies at z~1-2: Evidence for cold flow accretion powered star formation in the early Universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have recently detected the [CII] 157.7 micron line in eight star forming galaxies at redshifts 1 to 2 using the redshift(z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS). Our sample targets star formation dominant sources detected in PAH emission. This represents a significant addition to [CII] observations during the epoch of peak star formation. We have augmented this survey with observations of the [OI] 63 micron line and far infrared photometry from the PACS and SPIRE Herschel instruments as well as Spitzer IRS spectra from the literature showing PAH features. Our sources exhibit above average gas heating efficiency, many with both [OI]/FIR and [CII]/FIR ~1% or more. The relatively strong [CII] emission is consistent with our sources being dominated by star formation powered PDRs, extending to kpc scales. We suggest that the star formation mode in these systems follows a Schmidt-Kennicutt law similar to local systems, but at a much higher rate due to molecular gas surface densities 10 to 100 times that of local s...

Brisbin, Drew; Nikola, Thomas; Parshley, Stephen; Stacey, Gordon J; Spoon, Henrik; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Verma, Aprajita

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey. XVIII. Star-forming dwarfs in a cluster environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To assess the effects of the cluster environment on the different components of the interstellar medium, we analyse the FIR-submm properties of a sample of star-forming dwarf (SFD) galaxies detected by the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We determine dust masses and dust temperatures by fitting a modified black body (MBB) function to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Stellar and gas masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and metallicities are obtained from the analysis of a set of ancillary data. Dust is detected in 49 out of 140 optically identified dwarfs covered by the HeViCS field; considering only dwarfs brighter than $m_B$ = 18 mag, this gives a detection rate of 43%. After evaluating different emissivity indices, we find that the FIR-submm SEDs are best-fit by $\\beta$=1.5, with a median dust temperature $T_d$ = 22.4 K. Assuming $\\beta$=1.5, 67% of the 23 galaxies detected in all five Herschel bands show emission at 500 $\\mu$m in excess of the MBB model. The excess is inversely correlated ...

Grossi, M; Madden, S C; Hughes, T M; Auld, R; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Bianchi, S; Bizzocchi, L; Boquien, M; Boselli, A; Clemens, M; Corbelli, E; Cortese, L; Davies, J; De Looze, I; Alighieri, S di Serego; Fritz, J; Pappalardo, C; Pierini, D; Rmy-Ruyer, A; Smith, M W L; Verstappen, J; Viaene, S; Vlahakis, C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

Mansfield, Dennis K. (E. Windsor, NJ); Vocaturo, Michael (Columbus, NJ); Guttadora, Lawrence J. (Iselin, NJ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thirty year change in lodgepole and lodgepole/mixed conifer forest structure following 1980s mountain pine beetle outbreak in western Colorado, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current mortality in lodgepole pine caused by mountain pine beetle (MPB) throughout much of western North America has resulted in concern about future forest structure. To better understand the long-term effects of the current mortality, and how it might differ depending on forest species composition, we measured forest vegetation and woody fuel accumulations in forest affected by a MPB outbreak in the late 1970s and early 1980s and compared conditions to 1980s USDA Forest Service data to quantify changes in the approximately 30years following tree mortality. Stands were classified into two forest type groups based on species composition prior to 1970s/1980s MPB mortality: lodgepole pine and mixed conifer. In the 30years after MPB mortality, lodgepole pine stands overstory recovered to 91% of pre-mortality total basal area and 93% of overstory treesha?1. Mixed conifer stands basal area and overstory treesha?1 remained significantly reduced. In both forest types relative basal area and treesha?1 of non-pine species increased, and understory treesha?1 increased roughly fivefold. In lodgepole pine stands, the most abundant species in the 1980s understory was subalpine fir, followed by lodgepole pine. By the 2010s, subalpine fir and aspen were the most abundant understory tree species. In mixed conifer stands, subalpine fir and Engelmann spruce dominated all understory size classes in the 1980s and the 2010s. Total down woody fuels were greater in mixed conifer (103Mgha?1) than lodgepole pine stands (60Mgha?1) due to higher rotten fuel accumulation in mixed conifer than lodgepole pine stands. Overall, our results suggest that long-term forest recovery trajectories are dependent on pre-outbreak species composition, though understory densities are likely to increase regardless of non-pine species abundances. These shifts in species and size composition by 30years after outbreak likely have substantial impacts on forest health, potential fire behavior and ecosystem processes. We speculate that forest recovery following the current MPB outbreak in these areas will be similar to observed changes following the 1970s/1980s outbreak.

Kristen A. Pelz; Frederick W. Smith

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.Jq. 3 .Jq. 3 8.5 J Hr. Mark Finkelstein . . State Street Associates L.P. II Ithaca, New York 14GSO Dear Fir. Flnkelstein: .' This Is a followup letter to your telephone discussion on September 30, 1994, with Dr. Y. Alexander Yilliams of my staff. As you discussed, the Department of Energy (DOE) Is tmplementfng a radiological survey,program to determine the radiological conditions at.sites that were formerly used by DOE predecessor agencies. One such slte is the former Ithaca Gun Company facility in Ithaca, New,York. This site perfonsed experimental machining of uranium during the 1960s in support of Atomic Energy Comnlssion operations. Ye understand that the Ithaca site is now owned by your company. The uranium forging experiments were conducted in 1961 and 1962 and Involved

297

Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

60 Federal Register 60 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 235 / Friday, December 5, 2008 / Notices use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339. [FR Doc. E8-28765 Filed 12-4-08; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request AGENCY: Department of Education. SUMMARY: The IC Clearance Official, Regulatory Information Management Services, Office of Management invites comments on the submission for OMB review as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Interested persons are invited to submit comments on or before January 5, 2009. ADDRESSES: Written comments should be addressed to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs,

298

Federal Register Volume 75 Number 240; Wednesday, December 15, 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Dec 14, 2010 0 Dec 14, 2010 Jkt 223001 PO 00000 Frm 00029 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\15DEN1.SGM 15DEN1 hsrobinson on DSK69SOYB1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 240 / Wednesday, December 15, 2010 / Notices 78231 Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. [FR Doc. 2010-31503 Filed 12-14-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Management of Energy and Water Efficiency in Federal Buildings: Availability of Guidance AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: This notice of availability announces that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Federal Energy Management

299

Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287) (11/28/06)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

811 Federal Register 811 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 28, 2006 / Notices Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339. [FR Doc. E6-20124 Filed 11-27-06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Amended Record of Decision. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its Record of Decision (ROD) published December 19, 2005 (70 Federal Register [FR] 75165), pursuant to the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE/EIS-0287, September 2002). The Final EIS analyzed two sets of alternatives for accomplishing DOE's

300

Notices  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Federal Register 1 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 102 / Friday, May 25, 2012 / Notices be addressed to U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW., LBJ, Washington, DC 20202-4537. Requests may also be electronically mailed to ICDocketMgr@ed.gov or faxed to 202-401-0920. Please specify the complete title of the information collection and OMB Control Number when making your request. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 3506 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35) requires that Federal agencies provide interested parties an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. The Director, Information Collection

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301

Why Sequence Rhizopogon salebrosus?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rhizopogon salebrosus? Rhizopogon salebrosus? On October 3, 1995, smoke from the remains of an illegal campfire was spotted at Point Reyes National State Park in northern California. Over the next week, just over 12,000 acres burned, most of it concentrated at Mt. Vision in Point Reyes National Seashore, and several dozen homes were razed. Some 70 percent of the plant life in the area ranging from northern coastal scrub and salt marsh to Bishop pines and Douglas firs was lost. By the time the fire was declared under control on October 16, over 2,000 firefighters had been involved in the effort to quash the flames. Point Reyes National Park after 1995 fire Copyright Bruce Farnsworth/NPS Mycorrhizal fungi such as Rhizopogon salebrosus play a key role in maintaining various ecosystems. R. salebrosus is usually among the fungi

302

Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program (DOE/EIS-0353) (05/12/06)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

714 Federal Register 714 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 92 / Friday, May 12, 2006 / Notices 6623. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be electronically mailed to IC DocketMgr@ed.gov. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339. [FR Doc. E6-7288 Filed 5-11-06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Special Education-Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities-Access to Emerging Technologies (CFDA No. 84.327C) ACTION: Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2006;

303

Appendix A - Acronyms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A - ACRONYMS A - ACRONYMS AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials CNG Compressed Natural Gases CVO Commercial Vehicle Operation DOE Department of Energy DOT Department of Transportation E85 85% Ethanol, 15% Gasoline EPA Environmental Protection Agency ExFIRS Excise Files Information Retrieval System ExSTARS Excise Summary Terminal Activity Reporting System FHWA Federal Highway Administration FTA Federation of Tax Administrators GAO General Accounting Office HTF Highway Trust Fund IFTA International Fuel Tax Agreement IM Interstate Maintenance IRS Internal Revenue Service LNG Liquid Natural Gases LPG Liquefied Petroleum Gases M85 85% Methanol, 15% Gasoline MTBE Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether NHS National Highway System ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory STP Surface Transportation Program

304

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Economics of an Economics of an Integrated World Oil Market William Nordhaus Sterling Professor of Economics Yale University Plenary Address Energy Information Administration 2009 Energy Conference: A New Climate for Energy April 7, 2009 This is not a bathtub. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 Price ($ per barrel) Weekly oil prices for 15 sources around the world. Source: EIA. The Integrated World Oil Market 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Sidi Kerir Iran Light Libya Es Sider Libyan and Iranian Prices [$ per barrel, 1979 - 2009 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1,000 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 Year Region 1 Region 2 Region 3 Region 4 Region 5 Region 6 Price of sawlogs ($ per 1000 board-feet) A Not-So-Integrated Market: Douglas Fir Log #2 in Pacific Northwest

305

Amended Record of Decision; Savannah River Site Waste Management, Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina (DOE/EIS-0217)(6/28/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

431 431 Federal Register / Vol. 66, No. 125 / Thursday, June 28, 2001 / Notices Avenue, SW., Room 4050, Regional Office Building 3, Washington, DC 20202-4651. Requests may also be electronically mailed to the internet address OCIO_IMG_Issues@ed.gov or faxed to 202-708-9346. Please specify the complete title of the information collection when making your request. Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Joseph Schubart at (202) 708-9266 or via his internet address Joe.Schubart@ed.gov. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. [FR Doc. 01-16231 Filed 6-27-01; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-U DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION National Board of the Fund for the

306

Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sweet Smell Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.06.11 Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel Office of Science researchers borrowed from a fir tree to create a fuel that could leave diesel in the dust. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Tractor trailer driving down road flanked by fields Department of Transportation Commercial trucks in the U.S. burned approximately 22 billion gallons of diesel fuel in 2010. Replacing diesel with a clean, green and renewable biofuel could substantially reduce the industry's carbon footprint.

307

Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07 Federal Register 07 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 192 / Wednesday, October 5, 2005 / Notices Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. [FR Doc. 05-19963 Filed 10-4-05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Public Hearing AGENCY: National Assessment Governing Board; Education SUMMARY: The National Assessment Governing Board is announcing a public hearing on October 25, 2005 to obtain comment on the draft 2009 Science Framework for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Public and private parties and organizations are invited to present written and/or oral testimony. The forum will be held at the Phoenix Park Hotel, 520 North Capitol Street, NW., Washington, DC from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. Background: Under Public Law 107-

308

State  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ment of Co ment of Co nsiderations REQUEST BY MOSSEY CREEK ENERGY FOR DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS S-124,118 AND S-124,156 MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER UT-BATTELLE PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-000R22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKETS: W (l) 2011-009 AND W( l) 2011 -010 (COMBINED) Mossey Creek Energy (Petitioner) has made a timely request for a waiver to worldwide undivided rights in two subject inventio ns (the subject inventions) made in the course of or under UT-Battelle, Prime Contract No . DE-AC05-000R22725. The fir st invention( S-124,118) is entitled, " Thermally Conduct ive Ele ctrically In sulating Sil icon Cc_:ntaining Epoxy Molding Co mpo und ." The second invention (S-124,156) is "Sintered Polycrystalline Silicon Based Thermo electrics,

309

Notice of Intent to prepare Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (08/05/99)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 81 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 150 / Thursday, August 5, 1999 / Notices Programs Service, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW., Suite 600 Portals Building Washington, DC 20202-5331. Telephone: (202) 401-9774. The e-mail address for Ms. Ver Bryck Block is karla verbryckblock@ed.gov. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. Individuals with disabilities may obtain this document in an alternate format (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the appropriate contact persons listed in the preceding paragraphs. Individuals with disabilities may obtain a copy of the application package in an alternate format, also, by contacting that person. However, the

310

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement; NRG Energy, Inc.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

109 109 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 206 / Monday, October 26, 1998 / Notices internet address Pat Sherrill@ed.gov, or should be faxed to 202-708-9346. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patrick J. Sherrill (202) 708-8196. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 3506 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35) requires that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. OMB may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public

311

Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

50 50 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 33 / Friday, February 18, 2005 / Notices Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. [FR Doc. E5-663 Filed 2-17-05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P ELECTION ASSISTANCE COMMISSION Sunshine Act Notice; Meeting AGENCY: United States Election Assistance Commission. ACTION: Notice of public meeting for the Technical Guidelines Development Committee. DATE & TIME: Wednesday, March 9, 2005, 8:30 am to 5:30 pm. PLACE: National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Building 101, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8900. STATUS: This meeting will be open to the public. There is no fee to attend, but, due to security requirements, advance registration is required. Registration information is available at: https:// rproxy.nist.gov/CRS/

312

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Conveyance and Transfer of Certain Land Tracts Located at LANL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22 22 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 87 / Wednesday, May 6, 1998 / Notices Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern time, Monday through Friday. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 3506 of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35) requires that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. OMB may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public participation in the approval process would defeat the purpose of the information collection, violate State or Federal law, or substantially interfere with any agency's ability to perform its statutory obligations. The Acting Deputy Chief Information Officer, Office of the

313

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2))  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-148- McNary Wildlife (McNary-Santiam #2)) Mark Newbill - TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Joint project with US Forest Service for vegetation control for the McNary- Santiam #2 230 kV transmission line that enhances wildlife habitat under powerlines. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region within Marion County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) in cooperation with US Forest Service. Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way by hand cutting or machine mowing. The overall goal is to remove small fir trees, brushy

314

Record of Decision; Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

89 89 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 70 / Wednesday, April 12, 1995 / Notices who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 7705. Dated: April 5, 1995. Thomas W. Payzant, Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education. [FR Doc. 95-8927 Filed 4-11-95; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-M Advisory Council on Education Statistics; Meeting AGENCY: Advisory Council on Education Statistics. ACTION: Teleconference. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the schedule and proposed agenda of a forthcoming meeting of the Advisory Council on Education Statistics. This notice also describes the functions of the Council. Notice of this meeting is

315

BNL | BBOP Newsletters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Newsletters June 28, 2013 Principal Investigators Larry Kleinman, 631.344.3796 Art Sedlacek, 631.344.2404 BBOP Presentations from DOE ASR Spring Meeting 2013 BBOP Overview - Sedlacek (PDF) BBOP Plan B - Kleinman (PDF) BBOP Instrument Suite - Schmid (PDF) Satellite Products for BBOP - Ichoku and Kahn (PDF) BBOP Instrument Suite Instrument Suite List (PDF) BBOP Resources BNL BBOP proposal (PDF file) MACC Project - FIR Global Fire Monitoring Interdisciplinary Biomass Burning Initiative (IBBI) Monthly Seasonal Outlook issued June 1, 2013 Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook - August & September 2013 - July 2013 - June 2013 BBOP Newsletters BBOP In the News Smoke Signals: Tracking the Rapid Changes of Wildfire Aerosols (BNL

316

ARM - Events Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19, 2011 [Events] 19, 2011 [Events] 2011 Far-Infrared Remote Sensing Workshop Bookmark and Share The 2011 Workshop on Far-Infrared Remote Sensing (FIRS) will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, on November 8-9, 2011. The two-day meeting will include invited speakers, a full poster session, time for discussions, and a workshop dinner. Topics to be discussed include: instrumentation, radiative transfer model development and validation, thermodynamic profiling, cloud property remote sensing, and climate studies. Attendees are invited to participate in the workshop by submitting a poster presentation. There are a limited number of oral presentation positions available; these will be selected from the submitted poster presentations. Registration deadline is October 6, 2011. For program and registration information, visit the workshop

317

Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

Luxmoore, R.J.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

A taxonomic study of scale insects of the family Diaspididae in Texas (Homoptera - Coccoidea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENSKAE ( ISTOCK) (Fig, 2) de{id t t0 cae tock, kddli }40 0. . 0, 1, fN 1800 R, 305, ioat 1 ~ 0 {co took}, Rerri, 1941. dtd f Ro& 1 aoi, Ser. Ills 3320 Type locclity{ Florida Type host". Parsee carolinensi s TCKas records: Yiontgonery Co, s Conroea...?CIL&';T'I*) lellov scale (r"if. 6) (alt& s&. r )? 239 2&), Aoni. d61a citrine (Co=uillctt)? 1&cKenoie? 195GA ~ Ar, or&d . male Iiisects of C&iif. u. )&l. 'J'ypc loc;liby: ':an "t". ' rl &. 1 Valliy? Loa Anplcs? C-"! 1 fort&is 33 go~. , tL ~) Fir. 6. Aonidiclla...

McDaniel, Burruss

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }) in the interstellar medium compared to CO ({approx}0.4 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }). We have ruled out photodissociation regions, X-ray-dominated regions, and cosmic rays as likely sources of excitation of this warm molecular gas, and found that only a non-ionizing source can heat this gas; the mechanical energy from supernovae and stellar winds is able to satisfy the large energy budget of {approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }. Analysis of the very high-J lines of HCN strongly indicates that they are solely populated by infrared pumping of photons at 14 {mu}m. This mechanism requires an intense radiation field with T > 350 K. We detect a massive molecular outflow in Arp 220 from the analysis of strong P Cygni line profiles observed in OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 2}O. The outflow has a mass {approx}> 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} and is bound to the nuclei with velocity {approx}< 250 km s{sup -1}. The large column densities observed for these molecular ions strongly favor the existence of an X-ray luminous AGN (10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in Arp 220.

Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 1255 38th street, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Rykala, Adam [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Isaak, Kate [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, George J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boselli, Alessandro [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Bradford, Charles M. [JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter [Blue Sky Spectroscopy Inc, Suite 9-740 4th Avenue South, Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0N9 (Canada); Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sacchi, Nicola [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); and others

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Net energy for production of feed mixtures containing various levels of cottonseed hulls and coastal bermudagrass hay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!'er 16&]966) I3zeT(s'1! 2d I' f. lect r I !, cve1 o Cotto'i. ee ' Hu]! I r v!1s on Dai ly Yr'crl In I ai:u (d!i . 13 t o 0c tone 10 & 19r&6) Br. e&r le, Te;ras ?5 fir:eac ariel Cl aclraLic Ile irr . sion for id!e Ef tc;!ts of travel of li &ur&hage re...!ci sc o&1s 'or tji. 6 f -;!! s of (oas! r!I Be& ai!d; . ass Bay I rvel or! Inc. gy 6 . i! Cos Treat&!, ent Gi oiips (du e 13 ? Ceto! er . ' 6. 1966 ? Ber v' i Le) . B5 IC! I&i!se!r e&nr! Clued&cetic Renre. , sions fo" tlie Eff acts of Cot& t...

Mark, William Howard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Existence of solution to an evolution equation and a justification of the DSM for equations with monotone operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An evolution equation, arising in the study of the Dynamical Systems Method (DSM) for solving equations with monotone operators, is studied in this paper. The evolution equation is a continuous analog of the regularized Newton method for solving ill-posed problems with monotone nonlinear operators $F$. Local and global existence of the unique solution to this evolution equation are proved, apparently for the firs time, under the only assumption that $F'(u)$ exists and is continuous with respect to $u$. The earlier published results required more smoothness of $F$. The Dynamical Systems method (DSM) for solving equations $F(u)=0$ with monotone Fr\\'echet differentiable operator $F$ is justified under the above assumption apparently for the first time.

N. S. Hoang; A. G. Ramm

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

322

Triple effect absorption chiller utilizing two refrigeration circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a heat absorption method for an absorption chiller. It comprises: providing a firs absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range, providing a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range; heat exchanging refrigerant and absorber solution; thermal communication with an external heat load. This patent describes a heat absorption apparatus for use as an absorption chiller. It includes: a first absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range; a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range which has a lower maximum temperature relative to the first temperature range; the first circuit having generator means, condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operatively connected together; the second circuit having generator means condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operative connected together; and the first circuit condenser means and the first circuit absorber means being in heat exchange communication with the second circuit generator means.

DeVault, R.C.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

An investigation of the variability of rainfall statistics over a small area with varying rain-gage density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& k for hi= valuab! e assf ~ ! ance ai d ai!vice during the preparation of This the is. Appl sciatica al u is extinded ta Dr. Uani. ' f!oyer anJ D& . W. S. f'Ir u! Iay far their review eno s u g rg e s t i a n e Thanks a- . a i!ue ti. Hr. IJsl ter... Distributions 24 24 26 U. CONCLU IGNS AND RECGYil'IENDATIOliiS 35 Conclusions Rec mmendatioi s 35 35 APPEIUDIX R E F ER E NL" F 5 37 47 LIS f 0F TABLES Table Number of gages used and corresooncing gage densities Page 13 2. Hourly precipitation...

Heaton, Larry Royce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

324

Overview of the SPring-8 Diagnostics Beamlines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the two SPring-8 diagnostics beamlines, the beamline I (dipole magnet source) and II (insertion device source). At the beamline I, synchrotron radiation (SR) in both the X-ray and the visible bands is exploited for characterizations of the electron beam. At the beamline II, by observing the spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of X-ray SR of the insertion device (ID), new techniques for accelerator diagnostics are investigated. Irradiation experiments with the ID to develop accelerator components such as photon absorbers, and production of intensive 10 MeV {gamma}-rays by backward Compton scattering of external far infrared (FIR) laser photons are being prepared at the beamline II.

Takano, S.; Masaki, M.; Tamura, K.; Mochihashi, A.; Nakamura, T.; Suzuki, S.; Oishi, M.; Shoji, M.; Taniuchi, Y.; Okayasu, Y.; Ohkuma, H. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Okajima, S. [Center of Advanced Metrology, Chubu University, Kasugai, Aichi, 487-8501 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Comparative Survey of the Sting of Aculeate Hymenoptera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s a s &-s a s a s s f ! 8 i s s aas s CO 00 4* ! mm m mm mR i S s : d ti PT4& P*4F GI PF-P g * s* I M O S O 8>O too 1 1 1 s i . CO i I l 0 3 1 5 H 3 ' if < TH ft HI IS 03 i l J 1 I Specimens for dissection... Rietache1 (1937) observed low rasp-like ridges subapteally on the fir at valvulae in the Ichneumonld. Ophlon, and en both 23, valvulae In Palthyrue vsstslls (Four er or) end Jfyxmsjia. This survsy adde Trypoxylon nd Psoudomyrac %o -thle lat ter...

Daly, Howell V.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fuzzy predictive control of district heating network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a concept for controlling the supply temperature in district heating networks (DHNs) using model predictive control. Due to the inherent non-linearity in the response characteristics caused by varying flow rates the use of fuzzy dynamic matrix control (DMC) is proposed. The fuzzy partitions of the local finite impulse response (FIR) models are constructed by an axis-orthogonal, incremental partitioning scheme. Furthermore, a novel approach for determining future fuzzy trajectory based on heat load forecasts is implemented. It is demonstrated that the fuzzy DMC performs well for the case study considered. In addition, different set point strategies are applied and the results are evaluated with respect to operational costs. In this context it is shown that the trade-off between pumping and heat loss cost plays an important role in minimising overall costs.

S. Grosswindhager; M. Kozek; Andreas Voigt; Lukas Haffner

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Notice of Availability and Public Hearings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project (DOE/EIS-0357) (12/08/05)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

03 Federal Register 03 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 235 / Thursday, December 8, 2005 / Notices Comments regarding burden and/or the collection activity requirements should be directed to Kathy Axt at her e-mail address Kathy.Axt@ed.gov. Individuals who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. [FR Doc. E5-7035 Filed 12-7-05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Special Education-Training and Information for Parents of Children With Disabilities-Parent Training and Information Centers ACTION: Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2006; Correction. SUMMARY: On November 8, 2005, we published in the Federal Register (70

328

Index of /research/alcator/documentation/2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [DIR] 20100310 pol lift/ 27-Oct-2010 10:09 - [DIR] 20100323 driver#2 fil/ 03-Dec-2013 11:18 - [DIR] 20100326 cryo leaks/ 27-Oct-2010 10:10 - [DIR] 20100405 PEI water/ 27-Oct-2010 10:10 - [DIR] 20100610 GPC/ 27-Oct-2010 10:10 - [DIR] 20100929 cryostat tunnel repair/ 27-Oct-2010 10:10 - [DIR] 20101001 cryo repair/ 27-Oct-2010 10:10 - [DIR] 20101029 FIR polarimeter/ 30-Oct-2010 17:31 - [DIR] 20101115 LH pr.reg/ 15-Nov-2010 10:10 - [DIR] 20101122 DNB Cath. heater/ 22-Nov-2010 10:47 - [DIR] Klystron Test Results 0609/ 27-Oct-2010 10:11 - [DIR] Klystron Test Results 101 to 103B/ 27-Oct-2010 10:11 - [DIR] orphans/ 03-Dec-2013 11:17 -

329

Adaptive noise filtering based on artificial hydrocarbon networks: An application to audio signals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many audio signal applications are corrupted by noise. In particular, adaptive filters are frequently applied to white noise reduction in audio. Recent work provides that there exist some insights on using an artificial intelligence method called artificial hydrocarbon networks (AHNs) for filtering audio signals. Thus, the scope of this paper is to design and implement a novel approach of artificial hydrocarbon networks on adaptive filtering for audio signals. Three experiments were developed. Results demonstrate that \\{AHNs\\} can reduce noise from audio signals. A comparison between the proposed algorithm and a FIR-filter is also provided. The short-time objective intelligibility value (STOI) and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were used for evaluation. At last, the proposed training method for finding the parameters involved in the AHN-filter can also be used in other fields of application.

Hiram Ponce; Pedro Ponce; Arturo Molina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

RESOLVING THE RADIO SOURCE BACKGROUND: DEEPER UNDERSTANDING THROUGH CONFUSION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image one primary beam area at 3 GHz with 8'' FWHM resolution and 1.0 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise near the pointing center. The P(D) distribution from the central 10 arcmin of this confusion-limited image constrains the count of discrete sources in the 1 < S({mu}Jy) < 10 range. At this level, the brightness-weighted differential count S {sup 2} n(S) is converging rapidly, as predicted by evolutionary models in which the faintest radio sources are star-forming galaxies; and Almost-Equal-To 96% of the background originating in galaxies has been resolved into discrete sources. About 63% of the radio background is produced by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the remaining 37% comes from star-forming galaxies that obey the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation and account for most of the FIR background at {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 160 {mu}m. Our new data confirm that radio sources powered by AGNs and star formation evolve at about the same rate, a result consistent with AGN feedback and the rough correlation of black hole and stellar masses. The confusion at centimeter wavelengths is low enough that neither the planned Square Kilometre Array nor its pathfinder ASKAP EMU survey should be confusion limited, and the ultimate source detection limit imposed by 'natural' confusion is {<=}0.01 {mu}Jy at {nu} = 1.4 GHz. If discrete sources dominate the bright extragalactic background reported by ARCADE 2 at 3.3 GHz, they cannot be located in or near galaxies and most are {<=}0.03 {mu}Jy at 1.4 GHz.

Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Fomalont, E. B.; Kellermann, K. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Miller, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Perley, R. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Scott, D.; Vernstrom, T.; Wall, J. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1C1 (Canada)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

Spatial patch patterns and altered forest structure in middle elevation versus upper ecotonal mixed-conifer forests, Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the American Southwest, mixed-conifer forest experienced altered disturbance regimes with the exclusion of fire since the early 1900s. This research analyzes patch development and tree spatial patterns in the middle versus upper mixed-conifer forests at Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona (USA). The methods used include: (1) sizestructure analyses, to compare species patch development; (2) dendrochronological dating of tree establishment and fire history; (3) tree ring master chronology, to determine periods of suppressed growth, compared to a palmer drought severity index; (4) spatial analyses by size and age, with univariate and bivariate analyses of spatial association as well as spatial autocorrelation. Results show that unlike the lower ecotone of the mixed-conifer zone, both the middle elevation and upper ecotone were mixed-conifer forests before Euro-American settlement. At the upper ecotone, two decades (1870s and 1880s) had no successful conifer establishment but instead aspen cohorts, corresponding to the fire history of synchronized fires. Overall, the upper ecotone has shifted in composition in the absence of surface fires from mixed conifer to encroachment of subalpine species, particularly Engelmann spruce. Spatial patterns of tree sizes and tree ages imply development of a size hierarchy in an aging patch. In addition, shifts in species composition from ponderosa pine and white fir overstory to Engelmann spruce and Douglas-fir understory affected within-patch spatial patterns. These results provide quantitative evidence of past and present forest conditions for the development of restoration strategies for Southwestern mixed-conifer forests.

Joy Nystrom Mast; Joy J. Wolf

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

Baldova, D.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, Dresden, 01314 (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Oct  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

510447 510447 v1 14 Oct 2005 Astronomy & Astrophysics manuscript no. cosmo October 14, 2005 (DOI: will be inserted by hand later) The Supernova Legacy Survey: Measurement of Ω M , Ω Λ and w from the First Year Data Set ⋆ P. Astier 1 , J. Guy 1 , N. Regnault 1 , R. Pain 1 , E. Aubourg 2,3 , D. Balam 4 , S. Basa 5 , R.G. Carlberg 6 , S. Fabbro 7 , D. Fouchez 8 , I.M. Hook 9 , D.A. Howell 6 , H. Lafoux 3 , J.D. Neill 4 , N. Palanque-Delabrouille 3 , K. Perrett 6 , C.J. Pritchet 4 , J. Rich 3 , M. Sullivan 6 , R. Taillet 1,10 , G. Aldering 11 , P. Antilogus 1 , V. Arsenijevic 7 , C. Balland 1,2 , S. Baumont 1,12 , J. Bronder 9 , H. Courtois 13 , R.S. Ellis 14 , M. Filiol 5 , A.C. Gonc ¸alves 15 , A. Goobar 16 , D. Guide 1 , D. Hardin 1 , V. Lusset 3 , C. Lidman 12 , R. McMahon 17 , M. Mouchet 15,2 , A. Mourao 7 , S. Perlmutter 11,18 , P. Ripoche 8 , C. Tao 8 , N. Walton 17 1 LPNHE, CNRS-IN2P3 and Universit´ es Paris VI & VII, 4 place Jussieu, 75252

334

hst-2001_arXiv.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to to ApJ: April 9, 2010 Preprint typeset using L A T E X style emulateapj v. 2/16/10 SPECTRA AND HST LIGHT CURVES OF SIX TYPE IA SUPERNOVAE AT 0.511 < Z < 1.12 AND THE Union2 COMPILATION ∗ R. Amanullah 1,2 , C. Lidman 2 , D. Rubin 4,6 , G. Aldering 4 , P. Astier 5 , K. Barbary 4,6 , M. S. Burns 7 , A. Conley 8 , K. S. Dawson 24 , S. E. Deustua 9 , M. Doi 10 , S. Fabbro 11 , L. Faccioli 4,12 , H. K. Fakhouri 4,6 , G. Folatelli 13 , A. S. Fruchter 9 , H. Furusawa 26 , G. Garavini 1 , G. Goldhaber 4,6 , A. Goobar 1,2 , D. E. Groom 4 , I. Hook 14,25 , D. A. Howell 3,22 , N. Kashikawa 26 , A. G. Kim 4 , R. A. Knop 15 , M. Kowalski 23 , E. Linder 12 , J. Meyers 4,6 , T. Morokuma 26,27 , S. Nobili 1,2 , J. Nordin 1,2 , P. E. Nugent 4 , L. ¨ Ostman 1,2 , R. Pain 5 , N. Panagia 9,17,18 , S. Perlmutter 4,6 , J. Raux 5 , P. Ruiz-Lapuente 16 , A. L. Spadafora 4 , M. Strovink 4,6 , N. Suzuki 4 , L. Wang 19 , W. M. Wood-Vasey 20 , N. Yasuda 21 (The Supernova Cosmology Project)

335

collab meeting-5-1_split.xls  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zeroth order agenda Zeroth order agenda SNAP Collaboration Meeting 6, 7, and 8 June, 2005 Plenary 9:00am SNAP Progress (30) Saul/Levi Project Status (30) Heetderks CCD development Holland 10:30am Break (30) 11:00am CCD assembly Baltay NIR development Tarle Focal Plane Bebek Telescope/ TMA-68 Lampton 12:30pm Lunch (90) 2:00pm Dark Energy Task Force (15) Cahn SDT Panel Discussion (30) Baltay SN Factory (30) Aldering Computing (30) McKee 3:30pm Break (30) 4:00pm Electronics Hvd Lippe Calibration Deustua Spectrograph Demo Ealet 6:00pm reception @ Henry's Monday Tuesday Parallel 1 Parallel 2 Parallel 3 NIR 1 Tarle W / L, Simulation, & LSST Sim Team Rhodes Tests of Raytheon HgCdTe SRA #141(15+3) Brown Tests of Rockwell Banded Array FPA#25 (15+3) Schubnell NIR Detector Noise (15+3) Smith GSFC (10+2) Woodgate Status of InGaAs Testing at JPL(10+2)

336

LBNL-41172 Discovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1172 1172 Discovery of a Supernova Explosion at Half the Age of the Universe and its Cosmological Implications S. Perlmutter, G. Aldering, M. Della Valle, S. Deustua, R. S. Ellis, S. Fabbro, A. Fruchter, G. Goldhaber, A. Goobar, D. E. Groom, 1. M. Hook, A. G. Kim, M. Y. Kim, R.A. Knop, C. Lidman, R. G. McMahon, P. Nugent, R. Pain, N. Panagia, C. R. Pennypacker, P. Ruiz-Lapuente, B. Schaefer & N. Walton (The Supernova Cosmology Project) This work was supported in part by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their

337

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3, 2012 3, 2012 CX-008412: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alabama-County-Calhoun CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Alabama Offices(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 3, 2012 CX-008576: Categorical Exclusion Determination Feasibility of Tidal and Ocean Current Energy in False Pass, Aleutian Islands, Alaska CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.25 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Alaska Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 3, 2012 CX-008597: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alder Stream Wind Project Feasibility Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office July 3, 2012 CX-008430: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas-City-Grapevine CX(s) Applied: A9, B1.32, B2.5, B3.6, B5.1, B5.16, B5.17

338

Study of improved methods for predicting chemical equilibria. Progress report, January 1, 1990--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research has been to develop computational methods that have the capability of accurately predicting equilibrium constants of typical organic reactions in gas and liquid solution phases. We have chosen Diels-Alder reactions as prototypic systems for the investigation, chiefly because there are an adequate number of reported equilibrium constants for the candidate reactions in both gas and solution phases, which data provides a suitable basis for tests of the developed computational methods. Our approach has been to calculate the standard enthalpies of formation ({Delta}H{sub f}{sup 0}) at 298.15K and the standard thermodynamic functions (S{sup 0}, Cp{sup 0}, and (H{sup 0}-H{sub 0}{sup 0})/T) for a range of temperatures for reactants and products, and from these properties to calculate standard enthalpies, entropies, Gibbs free energies, and equilibrium constants ({Delta}H{sub T}{sup 0}, {Delta}S{sub T}{sup 0}, and K{sub a}) at various temperatures for the chosen reaction.

Lenz, T.G.; Vaughan, J.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Study of improved methods for predicting chemical equilibria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of our research has been to develop computational methods that have the capability of accurately predicting equilibrium constants of typical organic reactions in gas and liquid solution phases. We have chosen Diels-Alder reactions as prototypic systems for the investigation, chiefly because there are an adequate number of reported equilibrium constants for the candidate reactions in both gas and solution phases, which data provides a suitable basis for tests of the developed computational methods. Our approach has been to calculate the standard enthalpies of formation ({Delta}H{sub f}{sup 0}) at 298.15K and the standard thermodynamic functions (S{sup 0}, Cp{sup 0}, and (H{sup 0}-H{sub 0}{sup 0})/T) for a range of temperatures for reactants and products, and from these properties to calculate standard enthalpies, entropies, Gibbs free energies, and equilibrium constants ({Delta}H{sub T}{sup 0}, {Delta}S{sub T}{sup 0}, and K{sub a}) at various temperatures for the chosen reaction.

Lenz, T.G.; Vaughan, J.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Supercritical fluid reactions for coal processing. Quarterly progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to design benign solvent/cosolvent systems for reactions which will achieve optimum desulfurization and/or denitrogenation in the pre-treatment of coal or coal liquids. Supercritical fluids present excellent opportunities for the pretreatment of coal, hence we shall utilize supercritical fluids as a reaction medium. A number of possible Diels-Alder reactive systems involving anthracene (diene) in supercritical solvent were proposed at the outset of research. Scouting experiments designed to select out the optimum reactive system from among the candidate dienophiles and solvents have been completed. The nitrogen bearing compound 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) has demonstrated superior reactivity and sensitivity to cosolvent additions and has been selected as dienophile. A convenient half-life of reaction between PTAD and anthracene is obtained at temperatures in the neighborhood of 50{degree}C. Carbon dioxide has been selected as the solvent because of its convenient critical properties, and also to optimize the safety of the experiments. In the process of completing these scouting experiments, the experimental apparatus that will be used to obtain kinetic data for calculation of partial molar volumes of the reaction transition state has also been optimized.

Eckert, C.A

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Internal conversion coefficients of high multipole transitions: Experiment and theories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compilation of the available experimental internal conversion coefficients (ICCs), {alpha}{sub T}, {alpha}{sub K}, {alpha}{sub L}, and ratios K/L and K/LM of high multipole (L > 2) transitions for a number of elements in the range 21 {<=} Z {<=} 94 is presented. Our listing of experimental data includes 194 data sets on 110 E3 transitions, 10 data sets on 6 E4 transitions, 11 data sets on 7 E5 transitions, 38 data sets on 21 M3 transitions, and 132 data sets on 68 M4 transitions. Data with less than 10% experimental uncertainty have been selected for comparison with the theoretical values of Hager and Seltzer [R.S. Hager, E.C. Seltzer, Nucl. Data Tables A 4 (1968) 1], Rosel et al. [F. Roesel, H.M. Fries, K. Alder, H.C. Pauli, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 21 (1978) 91], and BRICC. The relative percentage deviations (%{delta}) have been calculated for each of the above theories and the averages (%{delta}-bar) are estimated. The Band et al. [I.M. Band, M.B. Trzhaskovskaya, C.W. Nestor Jr., P.O. Tikkanen, S. Raman, At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 81 (2002) 1] tables, using the BRICC interpolation code, are seen to give theoretical ICCs closest to experimental values.

Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, GSI, Planck Strasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Vijay Sai, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai University, Prasanthinilayam 515134 (India)], E-mail: vjsai.phy.psn@sssu.edu.in; Sainath, M.; Gowrishankar, R.; Venkataramaniah, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai University, Prasanthinilayam 515134 (India)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Charcoal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charcoal Charcoal Nature Bulletin No. 310 June 9, 1984 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CHARCOAL The use of charcoal is as old as the written history of mankind. There are many folk tales about the queer lonely men who lived in the forests, cutting wood and converting it into charcoal. In Europe it is still an important fuel for such purposes, for heating homes and, in some countries, for special motors on small automobiles. As late as our Civil War, gunpowder was made from a mixture of saltpeter, charcoal and sulfur -- the charcoal being specifically prepared from the wood of such trees as willow, alder and soft maple. Until 1337, when the hotblast process was discovered, using coke made from coal, charcoal was the only fuel that could be used in the smelting of iron ore. Charcoal burning was an important industry and the "colliers" who supervised the process were respected as craftsmen. Iron making flourished in early New England but by 1750, Pennsylvania, with its wealth of iron ore, limestone, water power and hardwood timber for charcoal. took the lead and became the richest of the thirteen colonies. It supplied most of the pig iron for the armies of General Washington, and rusting cannonballs are still to be found at the remains of some of those old charcoal-fired furnaces. In those days the woodlands of Pennsylvania were always covered with the thin blue haze of smoke from burning charcoal "pits" and the colliers' huts.

343

Stabilities and structures in cluster ions of five-membered heterocyclic compounds containing O, N, and S atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clustering and hydration reactions of protonated and radical cations of heterocyclic compounds, e.g., furan, tetrahydrofuran, pyrrole, pyrrolidine, thiophene, and tetrahydrothiophene, have been studied using a pulsed electron beam mass spectrometer. The bond energies of proton-held dimer cations for furan, pyrrole, and thiophene are much smaller than those for tetrahydrofuran, pyrrolidine, and tetrahydrothiophene, respectively. This result suggests that not the heteroatoms but the ..cap alpha.. carbon atoms are protonated for furan, pyrrole, and thiophene. The hydrogen-bond site for the protonated furan and thiophene is calculated to be the unprotonated ..cap alpha.. hydrogen (C-H/sub ..cap alpha../ adjacent to the heteroatom) which is the most acidic one. On the other hand, the N-H hydrogen is the best hydrogen-bond site for the protonated pyrrole. It was found that the radical-cations dimers have greater bond energies than the proton-held dimer cations for furan and thiophene. This suggests that the bonds of the former have more covalent nature. Some unique reactions of C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O/sup .+/ and C/sub 4/H/sub 5/O/sup +/ with a furan molecule were observed. With an increase of temperature, the ions with m/z which are the same as those for (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O)/sub 2//sup .+/ and H/sup +/(C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O)/sub 2/ are found to be formed at the expense of C/sup 4/H/sub 4/O/sup .+/ and C/sub 4/H/sub 5/O/sup +/ ions, respectively. It is suggested that the reactions observed are Diels-Alder type condensation reactions.

Hiraoka, K.; Takimoto, H.; Yamabe, S.

1987-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

Cassirer, E. Frances

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The influence of tree species mixture on ecosystem-level carbon accumulation and water use in a mixed boreal plantation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Throughout the world, huge areas have been occupied by monospecific tree plantations in order to fulfil the increasing demand for industrial wood products. The use of mixed-species plantations has recently been advocated as a potential compromise between maintaining high-volume wood production and conserving other ecosystem services. Yet little is known about the impact of tree species mixture on species- and ecosystem-level carbon accumulation and water use in mixed plantations. We combined data on above-ground biomass, xylem sap flux density, and the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of leaves and needles in a boreal plantation to test whether different levels of species mixture would impact tree- and plot-level biomass production, transpiration and water use efficiency. Data were recorded in 22 20-x-20-m plots (7 for transpiration) randomly allocated to either monocultures or to two-, three-, and five-species mixtures of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), Norway spruce (Picea abies), Silver birch (Betula pendula), Common alder (Alnus glutinosa) and Siberian larch (Larix sibirica). At tree level, for a given species, we found significant differences among mixtures in transpiration and water use efficiency, though species mixture had no impact on above-ground biomass. At plot level, a large variability in functioning among mixtures was observed, but increasing the number of species in the mixture did not enhance productivity, transpiration or water use efficiency. The presence in mixtures of a high performing species like birch brought about changes in the canopy structure which in turn may have led to changes in micro-environmental conditions. Such changes could have contributed to explain differences in transpiration and water use efficiency among mixtures. We concluded that mixing locally-adapted species under non-limiting soil water conditions did not provide any benefit for ecosystem-level carbon accumulation and water use at this young ontogenic stage, but our study does not preclude that some benefits might arise at older stages.

Charlotte Grossiord; Andr Granier; Arthur Gessler; Martina Pollastrini; Damien Bonal

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Gas-Expanded Liquids: Synergism of Experimental and Computational Determinations of Local Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focuses on the characterization of a new class of solvent systems called gas-expanded liquids (GXLs), targeted for green-chemistry processing. The collaboration has adopted a synergistic approach combining elements of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and spectroscopic experiments to explore the local solvent behavior that could not be studied by simulation or experiment alone. The major accomplishments from this project are: Applied MD simulations to explore the non-uniform structure of CO2/methanol and CO2/acetone GXLs and studied their dynamic behavior with self-diffusion coefficients and correlation functions Studied local solvent structure and solvation behavior with a combination of spectroscopy and MD simulations Measured transport properties of heterocyclic solutes in GXLs through Taylor-Aris diffusion techniques and compared these findings to those of MD simulations Probed local polarity and specific solute-solvent interactions with Diels-Alder and SN2 reaction studies The broader scientific impact resulting from the research activities of this contract have been recognized by two recent awards: the Presidential Green Chemistry Award (Eckert & Liotta) and a fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Hernandez). In addition to the technical aspects of this contract, the investigators have been engaged in a number of programs extending the broader impacts of this project. The project has directly supported the development of two postdoctoral researcher, four graduate students, and five undergraduate students. Several of the undergraduate students were co-funded by a Georgia Tech program, the Presidential Undergraduate Research Award. The other student, an African-American female graduated from Georgia Tech in December 2005, and was co-funded through an NSF Research and Education for Undergraduates (REU) award.

Charles A. Eckert; Charles L. Liotta; Rigoberto Hernandez

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

347

Turbulence Considerations for Comparing Ecosystem Exchange over Old-Growth and Clear-Cut Stands For Limited Fetch and Complex Canopy Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide, water vapor and energy fluxes were measured using eddy covariance (EC) methodology over three adjacent forests in southern Washington State to identify stand-level age-effects on ecosystem exchange. The sites represent Douglas-fir forest ecosystems at two contrasting successional stages: old-growth (OG) and early seral (ES). Here we present eddy flux and meteorological data from two early seral stands and the Wind River AmeriFlux old-growth forest during the growing season (March-October) in 2006 and 2007. We show an alternative approach to the usual friction velocity (u*) method for determining periods of adequate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) mixing based on the ratio of mean horizontal ({bar u}) and vertical ({bar w}) wind flow to a modified turbulent kinetic energy scale (uTKE). This new parameter in addition to footprint modeling showed that daytime CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE}) in small clear-cuts (< 10 hectares) can be measured accurately with EC if micrometeorological conditions are carefully evaluated. Peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -14.0 to -12.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) at OG were measured in April in both 2006 and 2007 before bud break when air and soil temperatures and vapor pressure deficit were relatively low, and soil moisture and light levels were favorable for photosynthesis. At the early seral stands, peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -11.0 to -8.7 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were measured in June and July while spring-time CO{sub 2} fluxes were much smaller (F{sub NEE} = -3.8 to -3.6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}). Overall, we measured lower evapotranspiration (OG = 230 mm; ES = 297 mm) higher midday F{sub NEE} (OG F{sub NEE} = -9.0 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}; ES F{sub NEE} = -7.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and higher Bowen ratios (OG {beta} = 2.0. ES {beta} = 1.2) at the old-growth forest than at the ES sites during the summer months (May-August). Eddy covariance studies such as ours add critical land-atmosphere exchange data for an abundant, but rarely studied Douglas-fir age class.

Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Paw U, K T; Falk, M; Bible, K

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

St  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

St St at ement of Co nside ration s RE QU EST BY MOSSE Y CREE K ENERGY FOR DO MESTIC A ND FOREI GN RIGHTS IN SU BJECT INVENTIONS S-124, 118 AND S- 124,156 M ADE IN THE CO URS E OF OR U ND ER UT-BATTELLE PRIME CONTRACT NO . DE-AC05 -000 R227 2 5; DO E WAIVER DOCKETS: W (l ) 2011-009 AND W(l) 2011-010 {COMBIN ED) Mossey Creek Energy (Pet itioner) has m ade a tim ely req uest for a waiver t o wo rldw ide undivided rights in two subject invent ions (th e subject inve ntio ns) made in the cou rs e of or und er UT-Battel le, Prime Contract No . DE-AC05-000R22725 . The fir st invention ( S-12 4,118) is entitled, "Therma lly Conducti ve Electri cally Insulati ng Sil icon Cont ain ing Ep oxy Mo ld ing Compound.'' The secon d invention (S-124, 156) is "Si nt ered Po lycrystalline Sili con Base d Ther rn oe lectric

350

L  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1 iar tri tn t:~ ject wprk, ixsistzd in iGtntiPyiy involved blant arms. Foll~Anp SW- ¶s d szatment of fin4intjs: &arhtir;fts tijs toi4. Tne cmpqr, known as Al leyhany-ludlxa at ttw tin or' tse contract, rolled uranic oillets +to solId t-o&. Tile cf)cratiofh

351

Blog Feed: Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

December 12, 2011 December 12, 2011 John Ferrell (center -- 4th from left) participates in a ribbon cutting ceremony marking the grand opening of a cellulosic ethanol demonstration facility in Tennessee. | Photo by Amy Smotherman Burgess. Biomass for the Nation: How One Energy Department Expert Has Helped Lead the Way A look at one Energy Department employee's impact on the biofuels industry. December 12, 2011 Rajit Sapar analyzes samples at the Joint BioEnergy Institute's lab. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel Researchers at the Office of Science's Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have tapped an unlikely source to help create a renewable alternative to diesel fuel. December 12, 2011 Dr. Riccardo Signorelli, CEO of FastCAP Systems meets with Secretary Chu. Signorelli founded a startup focused on researching and developing carbon nanotube ultracapacitors and was chosen by Technology Review as a "35 Under 35" innovator along with Foro Energy's Dr. Joel Moxely (another ARPA-E performer). | Courtesy of ARPA-E.

352

PLJ3ASE RUSH ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

+-L3-+. I +-L3-+. I PLJ3ASE RUSH -- ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HULTH AND SAFETY DIVISIDN 1956 lnd&rial Hyglono or Mediul Dept. I. H.# 929 Sample Nor-ato Colloctod-6/14byARouto to- ' a Location @kUEN WWH CO- 1~ : Jypo Alphau Rama& NUWOOD. WI0 "' of Samplo_nirduslf__Analyzed for F U Beta Stamping wrahor8.fm jqtip6 of U heated in 900° P salt No Ro 5 bath. ' :,.a r ' .. ? ' ). ;..- *fhv 11 $- n _... .I < Oil 3 PH kmph No. . . , r, . Hour *- SImplr Description Be Th jR(T(Q 6375 1144 GA Pre66 area durinn stamina of 14 I a .16 I I I wa8her8. I I I 1 fl&ed off very rapidly. One waahcr mug& fir I + 1.: $. (! ., I I I~NJA~WICAL UBORATORY MPAII' IMENT (RCCOaD COW) 3.MEDICAL DEPARTMENT Z.INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE DEPARTMENT 4-DIRECTOR OF WEALTH b

353

V, Ii. Pat-SC&~, Ciructor, Elvision of Techdcal Jkitiseru  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

V, Ii. Pat-SC&~, Ciructor, Elvision of Techdcal V, Ii. Pat-SC&~, Ciructor, Elvision of Techdcal Jkitiseru I?. J. !%.Ltl2, Jr., chief, 5isC81bleDU3 Cperstions jw;ta, Prodcc' s.on Giviaion S-A-fiCi : PC: 3JS:?dl please '& advised that zrrangezkenta ?a-Je hem mde M.ti All.e~~ny ~~IWZI ta roll a% *Qdr %tcrylLct, 3. Y. plant on tkx3 firsC, xeclr4z.i of ZY&I m .nLh, %I=& shro*sgh June 1352, and -nil& !Sethlehe:a Stotl to roll at +,hai.r T~ckaxinna, 3. Y. plan% on the second n;ze:tznd of tk23 -IFx-xlth. 3: aould suaost, hcesvcr, thak you TZZE~ d.+A L!r. ?.. 2. Stenazt Ql' F]LO ti;e date or" csch xonth' s rollings a nee' r;. or so prfor to the s~eci?l' 3d ciara3 to yovids -for uiiorzsee2 cmtingencias, _ _ cc: 2~.3Snj, Tile (2) R. s. Stewart, YILI ;....-A. - - ..; ' , , *- .: _- -'

354

Herschel Far-Infrared Spectral-mapping of Orion BN/KL Outflows: Spatial distribution of excited CO, H2O, OH, O and C+ in shocked gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present ~2'x2' spectral-maps of Orion BN/KL outflows taken with Herschel at ~12'' resolution. For the first time in the far-IR domain, we spatially resolve the emission associated with the bright H2 shocked regions "Peak 1" and "Peak 2" from that of the Hot Core and ambient cloud. We analyze the ~54-310um spectra taken with the PACS and SPIRE spectrometers. More than 100 lines are detected, most of them rotationally excited lines of 12CO (up to J=48-47), H2O, OH, 13CO, and HCN. Peaks 1/2 are characterized by a very high L(CO)/L(FIR)~5x10^{-3} ratio and a plethora of far-IR H2O emission lines. The high-J CO and OH lines are a factor ~2 brighter toward Peak 1 whereas several excited H2O lines are ~50% brighter toward Peak 2. A simplified non-LTE model allowed us to constrain the dominant gas temperature components. Most of the CO column density arises from Tk~200-500 K gas that we associate with low-velocity shocks that fail to sputter grain ice mantles and show a maximum gas-phase H2O/CO~10^{-2} abundance r...

Goicoechea, Javier R; Cernicharo, Jose; Neufeld, David A; Vavrek, Roland; Bergin, Edwin A; Cuadrado, Sara; Encrenaz, Pierre; Etxaluze, Mireya; Melnick, Gary J; Polehampton, Edward

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Large and small-scale structures and the dust energy balance problem in spiral galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The interstellar dust content in galaxies can be traced in extinction at optical wavelengths, or in emission in the far-infrared. Several studies have found that radiative transfer models that successfully explain the optical extinction in edge-on spiral galaxies generally underestimate the observed FIR/submm fluxes by a factor of about three. In order to investigate this so-called dust energy balance problem, we use two Milky Way-like galaxies produced by high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We create mock optical edge-on views of these simulated galaxies (using the radiative transfer code SKIRT), and we then fit the parameters of a basic spiral galaxy model to these images (using the fitting code FitSKIRT). The basic model includes smooth axisymmetric distributions along a S\\'ersic bulge and exponential disc for the stars, and a second exponential disc for the dust. We find that the dust mass recovered by the fitted models is about three times smaller than the known dust mass of the hydrodynamical in...

Saftly, W; De Geyter, G; Camps, P; Renaud, F; Guedes, J; De Looze, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Submm-bright X-ray absorbed QSOs at z~2: insights into the co-evolution of AGN and star-formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have assembled a sample of 5 X-ray-absorbed and submm-luminous type 1 QSOs at $z \\sim 2$ which are simultaneously growing their central black holes through accretion and forming stars copiously. We present here the analysis of their rest-frame UV to submm Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs), including new Herschel data. Both AGN (direct and reprocessed) and Star Formation (SF) emission are needed to model their SEDs. From the SEDs and their UV-optical spectra we have estimated the masses of their black holes $M_{BH}\\sim 10^{9}-10^{10}\\,M_{\\odot}$, their intrinsic AGN bolometric luminosities $L_{BOL}\\sim(0.8 - 20)\\times 10^{13} L_{\\odot}$, Eddington ratios $L_{BOL}/L_{Edd}\\sim 0.1 - 1.1$ and bolometric corrections $L_{BOL}/L_{X,2-10}\\sim 30 - 500$. These values are common among optically and X-ray-selected type 1 QSOs (except for RX~J1249), except for the bolometric corrections, which are higher. These objects show very high far-infrared luminosities $L_{FIR}\\sim$ (2 - 8)$\\times10^{12}\\,M_{\\odot}$ and Star...

Khan-Ali, A; Page, M J; Stevens, J A; Mateos, S; Symeonidis, M; Orjales, J M Cao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effects of Hydrothermal Aging on NH3-SCR reaction over Cu/zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of hydrothermal treatment on model Cu/zeolite catalysts were investigated to better understand the nature of Cu species for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3}. After hydrothermal aging at 800 C for 16 h, the NO{sub x} reduction performance of Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta were significantly reduced at low temperatures, while that of Cu-SSZ-13 was not affected. When the zeolite framework aluminum species were probed using solid state {sup 27}Al-NMR, significant reduction in the intensities of the tetrahedral aluminum peak was observed for Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, although no increase in the intensities of the octahedral aluminum peak was observed. When the redox behavior of Cu species was examined using H{sub 2}-TPR, it was found that Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} and to Cu{sup 0} fir Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta catalysts, while Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} only for Cu-SSZ-13. After hydrothermal aging, CuO and Cu-aluminate species were found to form in Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, while little changes were observed for Cu-SSZ-13.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Tran, Diana N.; Burton, Sarah D.; Szanyi, Janos; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

358

Discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula 3C 58 by MAGIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) 3C 58 is energized by one of the highest spin-down power pulsars known (5% of Crab pulsar) and it has been compared to the Crab Nebula due to their morphological similarities. This object was detected by Fermi-LAT with a spectrum extending beyond 100 GeV. We analyzed 81 hours of 3C 58 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes and we detected VHE gamma-ray emission for the first time at TeV energies with a significance of 5.7 sigma and an integral flux of 0.65% C.U. above 1 TeV. The differential energy spectrum between 400 GeV and 10 TeV is well described by a power-law function $d\\Phi/dE=f_{o}(E/1TeV)^{-\\Gamma}$ with $f_{o}=(2.0\\pm0.4stat\\pm0.6sys) 10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}$ and $\\Gamma=2.4\\pm0.2sta\\pm0.2sys$. This leads 3C 58 to be the least luminous PWN ever detected at VHE and the one with the lowest flux at VHE to date. According to time-dependent models in which electrons up-scatter photon fields, the best representation favors a distance to the PWN of 2 kpc and FIR comparable...

Bigas, O Blanch; Carmona, E; Prez-Torres, M A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Constraining the properties of AGN host galaxies with Spectral Energy Distribution modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[abridged] We use the latest release of CIGALE, a galaxy SED fitting model relying on energy balance, to study the influence of an AGN in estimating both the SFR and stellar mass in galaxies, as well as the contribution of the AGN to the power output of the host. Using the galaxy formation SAM GALFORM, we create mock galaxy SEDs using realistic star formation histories (SFH) and add an AGN of Type 1, Type 2, or intermediate type whose contribution to the bolometric luminosity can be variable. We perform an SED fitting of these catalogues with CIGALE assuming three different SFHs: a single- and double-exponentially-decreasing, and a delayed SFH. Constraining thecontribution of an AGN to the LIR (fracAGN) is very challenging for fracAGN<20%, with uncertainties of ~5-30% for higher fractions depending on the AGN type, while FIR and sub-mm are essential. The AGN power has an impact on the estimation of $M_*$ in Type 1 and intermediate type AGNs but has no effect for galaxies hosting Type 2 AGNs. We find that i...

Ciesla, L; Georgakakis, A; Bernhard, E; Mitchell, P D; Buat, V; Elbaz, D; Floc'h, E Le; Lacey, C G; Magdis, G E; Xilouris, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Models comparison for JET polarimeter data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete comparison between the theory and the measurements in polarimetry was done by using the Far Infrared Polarimeter at JET. More than 300 shots were analyzed, including a wide spectrum of JET scenarios in all critical conditions for polarimetry: high density, high and very low fields, high temperatures.This work is aimed at the demonstration of the robustness of the theoretical models for the JET polarimeter measurements in the perspective of using these models for ITER like plasma scenarios . In this context, an assessment was performed on how the line-integrated plasma density along the central vertical chord of FIR polarimeter could be evaluated using the Cotton-Mouton effect and its possible concrete use to correct fringe jumps of the interferometer.The models considered are: i) the rigorous numerical solution of the Stokes propagation equations, using dielectric tensor evaluated from JET equilibrium and Thomson scattering [1,2]; ii) two types of approximated solutions [2,3] and iii) the Guenther empirical model [4] that considers the mutual effect between Cotton-Mouton and Faraday rotation angle. The model calculations have been compared with polarimeter measurements for the Cotton-Mouton phase shift.The agreement with theory is satisfactory within the limits of experimental errors [3].

Mazzotta, C.; Orsitto, F. P.; Giovannozzi, E. [Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati, Euratom-ENEA Association, Frascati (Italy); Boboc, A.; Tudisco, O.; Zabeo, L. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA Culham Science Centre Abingdon 0X14 3DB (UK) (United Kingdom); Brombin, M.; Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Padova (Italy)

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The earliest phases of star formation observed with Herschel (EPoS): The dust temperature and density distributions of B68  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abriged) In the framework of the Herschel GTKP "The earliest phases of star formation", we have imaged B68 between 100 and 500 um. Ancillary (sub)mm data, spectral line maps of the 12/13CO(2-1) transitions as well as a NIR extinction map were added to the analysis. We employed a ray-tracing algorithm to derive the 2D mid-plane dust temperature and volume density distribution without suffering from LoS averaging effects of simple SED fitting procedures. Additional 3D radiative transfer calculations were employed to investigate the connection between the external irradiation and the peculiar crescent shaped morphology found in the FIR maps. For the first time, we spatially resolve the dust temperature and density distribution of B68. We find T_dust dropping from 16.7 K at the edge to 8.2 K in the centre, which is about 4 K lower than the result of the simple SED fitting approach. N_H peaks at 4.3x10^22 cm^-2 and n_H at 3.4x10^5 cm^-3 in the centre. B68 has a mass of 3.1 M_sun of material with A_K > 0.2 mag for...

Nielbock, M; Steinacker, J; Stutz, A M; Balog, Z; Beuther, H; Bouwman, J; Henning, Th; Hily-Blant, P; Kainulainen, J; Krause, O; Linz, H; Lippok, N; Ragan, S; Risacher, C; Schmiedeke, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Dust Properties of Bubble HII Regions as seen by Herschel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because of their relatively simple morphology, "bubble" HII regions have been instrumental to our understanding of star formation triggered by HII regions. With the far-infrared (FIR) spectral coverage of the Herschel satellite, we can access the wavelengths where these regions emit the majority of their energy through their dust emission. At Herschel wavelengths 70 micron to 500 micron, the emission associated with HII regions is dominated by the cool dust in their photodissociation regions (PDRs). We find average dust temperatures of 26K along the PDRs, with little variation between the HII regions in the sample, while local filaments and infrared dark clouds average 19K and 15K respectively. Higher temperatures lead to higher values of the Jeans mass, which may affect future star formation. The mass of the material in the PDR, collected through the expansion of the HII region, is between ~300 and ~10,000 Solar masses for the HII regions studied here. These masses are in rough agreement with the expected ma...

Anderson, L D; Deharveng, L; Abergel, A; Motte, F; Andre, Ph; Bernard, J -P; Bontemps, S; Hennemann, M; Hill, T; Rodon, J A; Roussel, H; Russeil, D

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Acoustic Performance of an Installed Real-Time Three-Dimensional Audio System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Exterior Effects Room (EER) located at the NASA Langley Research Center is a facility built for psychoacoustic studies of aircraft community noise. Recently the EER was significantly upgraded to allow for simulation of aircraft flyovers in a three-dimensional audio and visual environment. The upgrade included installation of 27 satellite and 4 subwoofer loudspeakers that are driven by a real-time audio server. The audio server employs an implementation of the Vector Base Amplitude Panning (VBAP) method to position virtual sources at arbitrary azimuth and elevation angles in the EER. Real-time application of filters time delays and gains are required to compensate for installation effects including those associated with the irregular room geometry colorization due to varying loudspeaker installations and crossover filtering. The authors previously showed [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127 1969 (2010)] that color compensation and crossover filtering could be achieved for satellite and subwoofer loudspeakers. However the resulting FIR filters were too long (32 768 taps) to implement in real-time. The focus of this work is on development of reduced-length surrogate IIR filters and on measurement of the acoustic performance of the installed real-time system.

Kenneth Faller II; Stephen A. Rizzi; Noah Schiller; Randolph Cabell; Jacob Klos; William L. Chapin; Aric R. Aumann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Acoustic performance of an installed real?time three?dimensional audio system.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Exterior Effects Room (EER) located at the NASA Langley Research Center is a facility built for psychoacoustic studies of aircraft community noise. Recently the EER was significantly upgraded to allow for simulation of aircraft flyovers in a 3?D audio and visual environment. The upgrade included installation of 27 satellite and 4 subwooferloudspeakers that are driven by a real?time audio server. The audio server employs an implementation of the vector base amplitude panning method to position virtual sources at arbitrary azimuth and elevation angles in the EER. Real?time application of filters time delays and gains are required to compensate for installation effects including those associated with the irregular room geometry colorization due to varying loudspeaker installations and crossover filtering. The authors previously showed [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127 1969 (2010)] that color compensation and crossover filtering could be achieved for satellite and subwooferloudspeakers. However the resulting FIR filters were too long (32?768 taps) to implement in real?time. The focus of this work is on the development of reduced?length surrogate IIR filters and on the measurement of the acoustic performance of the installed real?time system.?

Kenneth J. Faller II; Stephen A. Rizzi; Noah Schiller; Randolph H. Cabell; Jacob Klos; William L. Chapin; Fahri Surucu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Acoustic performance of an installed real?time three?dimensional audio systemPart II.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exterior effects room (EER) located at the NASA Langley Research Center was recently upgraded to allow for simulation of aircraft flyovers in a three?dimensional (3?D) audio and visual environment. The 3?D audio server employs an implementation of the vector base amplitude panning (VBAP) method to position virtual sources at arbitrary azimuth and elevation angles in the EER. Recent work focused on the development of loudspeaker equalization first using high order FIR filters [POMA 9 015004 (2010)] and later using low order IIR filters [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128 2482 (2010)]. The latter in conjunction with full?path time delay compensation and relative gain compensation were implemented in real?time and shown to reproduce the desired sound field to within about 5 dB over an extended frequency range for stationary and moving sources. In the present work the performance is further characterized both objectively and subjectively. Addressed are calibration of the system for absolute sound pressure level reproduction and measurement of the spatial uniformity of the generatedsound field. Further localization of sound sources will be subjectively measured to assess the efficacy of the VBAP implementation in the EER.

Kenneth J. Faller II; Stephen A. Rizzi; Aric R. Aumann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Molecular tendrils feeding star formation in the Eye of the Medusa - The Medusa merger in high resolution 12CO 2-1 maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying molecular gas properties in merging galaxies gives us important clues to the onset and evolution of interaction-triggered starbursts. NGC4194 is particularly interesting to study since its FIR-to-CO luminosity ratio rivals that of ULIRGs,despite its lower luminosity compared to ULIRGs, which indicates a high star formation efficiency that is relative to even most spirals and ULIRGs.We study the molecular medium at an angular resolution of 0.65"x .52" through our observations of CO2-1 emission using the SMA. We compare our CO2-1 maps with optical HST and high angular resolution radio continuum images to study the relationship between molecular gas and other components of the starburst region. The molecular gas is tracing the complicated dust lane structure of NGC4194 with the brightest emission being located in an off-nuclear ring-like structure with ~320pc radius, the Eye of the Medusa. The bulk CO emission of the ring is found south of the kinematical center of NGC4194. The northern tip of the ring ...

Knig, S; Lindroos, L; Muller, S; Gallagher, J S; Beswick, R J; Petitpas, G; Jtte, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Star formation in the cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 and its large-scale environment: the infrared perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The galaxy cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 is one of the most distant galaxy clusters known, with a rich muti-wavelength data set that confirms a mature galaxy population already in place. Using very deep, wide area (20x20 Mpc) imaging by Spitzer/MIPS at 24um, in conjunction with Herschel 5-band imaging from 100-500um, we investigate the dust-obscured, star-formation properties in the cluster and its associated large scale environment. Our galaxy sample of 693 galaxies at z=1.62 detected at 24um (10 spectroscopic and 683 photo-z) includes both cluster galaxies (i.e. within r projected clustercentric radius) and field galaxies, defined as the region beyond a radius of 3 Mpc. The star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from the measured infrared luminosity range from 18 to 2500 Ms/yr, with a median of 55 Ms/yr, over the entire radial range (10 Mpc). The cluster brightest FIR galaxy, taken as the centre of the galaxy system, is vigorously forming stars at a rate of 256$\\pm$70 Ms/yr, and the total cluster ...

Santos, Joana S; Tanaka, Masayuki; Valtchanov, Ivan; Saintonge, Amelie; Dickinson, Mark; Foucaud, Sebastien; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rawle, Tim D; Tadaki, Ken-ichi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

N /A

2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Steady-state and transient results on insulation materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Unguarded Thin-Heater Apparatus (UTHA, ASTM C 1114) was used to determine the thermal conductivity (k), specific heat (C), and thermal diffusivity ({alpha}) of selected building materials from 24 to 50{degree}C. Steady-state and transient measurements yielded data on four types of material: gypsum wall board containing 0, 15, and 30 wt % wax; calcium silicate insulations with densities ({rho}) of 307, 444, and 605 kg/m{sup 3}; three wood products: southern yellow pine flooring (575 kg/m{sup 3}), Douglas fir plywood (501 kg/m{sup 3}), and white spruce flooring (452 kg/m{sup 3}); and two cellular plastic foams: extruded polystyrene (30 kg/m{sup 3}) blown with HCFC-142b and polyisocyanurate rigid board (30.2 kg/m{sup 3}) blown with CFC-11. The extruded polystyrene was measured several times after production (25 days, 45 days, 74 days, 131 days, and 227 days). The UTHA is an absolute technique that yields k with an uncertainty of less than {plus minus}2% as determined by modeling, by determinate error analyses, and by use of Standard Reference Materials SRM-1450b and SRM-1451. 37 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Graves, R.S.; Yarbrough, D.W.; McElroy, D.L.; Fine, H.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Impacts of nitrogen on forests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 directed EPA to establish standards for use and disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids). This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in non-agricultural ecosystems. Ecological risk assessments rarely focus on nutrients as stressors. The nutrient components of municipal sewage sludge may impact tree community composition, growth and production, habitat and forage quality for wildlife, and nutrient cycling. The focus here is on three forest ecosystems: northwestern Douglas-fir forest (Pack Forest, WA), southeastern loblolly pine plantation (Athens, GA), and eastern deciduous forest (Hubbard Brook, NH). A model called LINKAGES has been developed at ORNL to examine the relationships between nitrogen cycling and long-term forest stand dynamics, limited by climate and soil water status. Plant-available nitrogen from biosolids is added in several application scenarios and compared to the no-amendment case. All changes are noted, even if they may be viewed as benefits rather than risks. Model outputs include: above-ground biomass, individual species biomass, net above-ground production, leaf litter, evapotranspiration, available nitrogen, and dead trunks. The changes in plant community composition and production are dependent on the rate, frequency, and duration of sludge application and on the age of the stand at the time of application. Model outputs are compared to empirical studies of forests where biosolids have been applied.

Efroymson, R.A.; Tharp, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Sample, B.E.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Direct detector for terahertz radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Shaner, Eric A. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Plan for integrated testing for NNWSI [Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations] non EQ3/6 data base portion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purposes of the Integrated Testing Task are to develop laboratory data on thermodynamic properties for actinide and fission product elements for use in the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling code; to determine the transport properties of radionuclides in the near-field environment; and develop and validate a model to describe the rate of release of radionuclides from the near-field environment. Activities to achieve the firs item have been described in the Scientific Investigation Plan for EQ3/6, where quality assurance levels were assigned to the acitivities. This Scientific Investigation Plan describes activities to achieve the second and third purposes. The information gathered in these activities will be used to assess compliance with the performance objective for the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) to control the rate of release of radionuclides if the repository license application includes part of the host rock; to provide a source term for release of radionuclides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in showing compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency requirements; and to provide a source term for release of radionculides from the waste package near-field environment to the system performance assessment task for use in doing calculations of cumulative releases of radionuclides from the repository over 100,000 years as required by the site evaluation process. 5 refs.

Oversby, V.M.

1987-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

373

Performance prediction for short plant length systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plant length dependent performance is commonly observed when performing feedforward active noise control for broadband disturbances. This is primarily due to high levels of low?frequency noise and limited coherence between input and error sensors. These types of systems present trade?offs in choosing between performance output power requirements and plant length. An additional design opportunity exists in terms of balancing the levels of cancellation achieved over frequency. The selection of an error signal emphasis filter determining the frequency dependence of the cost function being minimized by the controller adaptation can be of critical importance. While several explanations for this type of behavior have been offered little work has been presented for quantifying performance limitations. A method based on calculation of Lagrange multipliers is presented for determining the optimal power limited solution of an FIR filter?based controller. This provides a useful tool for predicting the effects of emphasis filter design actuator limitations and plant length on performance. This prediction method and the associated trade?offs are illustrated using data from an HVAC fan.

Steven R. Popovich

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Field evaluation of composite crossarms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1982 the Institute of Wood Research manufactured 200 composite wood crossarms (COMARMS) for a field evaluation of their performance in service. Four different types of COMARMS were fabricated using wood flake panels to test how long term load carrying capacity is affected by varying wood furnish, wood preservatives and adhesive system. After placement with utilities in Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Texas and Washington, field inspections were carried out on over 120 COMARMS after 3 years of exposure and 6 years exposure. After 6 years of exposure, most of the COMARMS were removed at random and returned to the Institute for destructive mechanical testing and evaluation. Half of the controls were mechanically tested soon after fabrication, the other half were tested with the exposed COMARMS after six years of inside storage. Tests of insulating performance in weathered and unweathered arms were carried out by Detroit Edison Company. Results of the mechanical tests and field inspections showed a wide variety of performance strongly correlated to the formulation type. Results of the mechanical and electrical testing indicate that performance similar to that observed in the best formulations would be comparable to Douglas-fir crossarms. 24 refs.

Diebel, J.F.; Charneski, M.D.; Bulleit, W.A.; Pickens, J.M. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Inst. of Wood Research)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Study of morphology and stellar content of the Galactic HII region IRAS 16148-5011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation of the IRAS 16148-5011 region - a cluster at a distance of 3.6 kpc - is presented here, carried out using multiwavelength data in near-infrared (NIR) from the 1.4m Infrared Survey Facility telescope, mid-infrared (MIR) from the archival Spitzer GLIMPSE survey, far-infrared (FIR) from the Herschel archive, and low-frequency radio continuum observations at 1280 and 843 MHz from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and Molonglo Survey archive, respectively. A combination of NIR and MIR data is used to identify 7 Class I and 133 Class II sources in the region. Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) analysis of selected sources reveals a 9.6 Msolar, high-mass source embedded in nebulosity. However, Lyman continuum luminosity calculation using radio emission - which shows a compact HII, region - indicates the spectral type of the ionizing source to be earlier than B0-O9.5. Free-free emission SED modelling yields the electron density as 138 cm^{-3}, and thus the mass of the ionized hydrogen as ~16...

Mallick, K K; Tamura, M; Linz, H; Samal, M R; Ghosh, S K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

DIGITAL AUDIO SIGNAL PROCESSING AND NDE: AN UNLIKELY BUT VALUABLE PARTNERSHIP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Digital Signal Processing (DSP) group within the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at The University of Manchester research is conducted into two seemingly distinct and disparate subjects: instrumentation for nondestructive evaluation and DSP systems & algorithms for digital audio. We have often found that many of the hardware systems and algorithms employed to recover extract or enhance audio signals may also be applied to signals provided by ultrasonic or magnetic NDE instruments. Furthermore modern DSP hardware is so fast (typically performing hundreds of millions of operations per second) that much of the processing and signal reconstruction may be performed in real time. Here we describe some of the hardware systems we have developed together with algorithms that can be implemented both in real time and offline. A next generation system has now been designed which incorporates a processor operating at 0.55 Giga MMACS six input and eight output analogue channels digital input/output in the form of S/PDIF a JTAG and a USB interface. The software allows the user with no knowledge of filter theory or programming to design and run standard or arbitrary FIR IIR and adaptive filters. Using audio as a vehicle we can demonstrate the remarkable properties of modern reconstruction algorithms when used in conjunction with such hardware; applications in NDE include signal enhancement and recovery in acoustic ultrasonic magnetic and eddy current modalities.

Patrick Gaydecki

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effects of Mine Waste Contamination on Fish and Wildlife Habitat at Multiple Levels of Biological Organization in the Methow River, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-year multidisciplinary study was conducted on the relationship between mine waste contamination and the effects on aquatic and terrestrial habitats in the Methow River below abandoned mines near Twisp in Okanogan County, Washington (U.S.A.). Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to study potentially impacted sites. Although the dissolved metal content of water in the Methow River was below the limits of detection, eleven chemicals of potential environmental concern were identified in the tailings, mine effluents, groundwater, streamwater and sediments (Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn). The potential for ecosystem level impacts was reflected in the risk of contamination in the mine waste to communities and populations that are valued for their functional properties related to energy storage and nutrient cycling. Dissolved and sediment metal contamination changed the benthic insect community structure in a tributary of the Methow River below Alder Mine, and at the population level, caddisfly larval development in the Methow River was delayed. Arsenic accumulation in bear hair and Cd in fish liver suggest top predators are effected. In situ exposure of juvenile triploid trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to conditions at the downstream site resulted in reduced growth and increased mortality among exposed individuals. Histopathological studies of their tissues revealed extensive glycogen inclusions suggesting food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body. Subcellular observations revealed mitochondrial changes including a decrease in the number and increase in the size of electron-dense metrical granules, the presence of glycogen bodies in the cytoplasm, and glycogen nuclei in exposed trout hepatocytes, which are signs that Type IV Glycogen Storage disease is occurring. GSD IV is caused by either a deficiency or inactivation of the glycogen branching enzyme that results in the synthesis of an abnormal glycogen molecule that is insoluble and has decreased branch points and increased chain length. These results show that the effects of mine waste contaminants can be expressed at all levels of organization from molecular to ecosystem-level responses.

Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

BASELINE MEMBRANE SELECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN SDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In FY05 and FY06, testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) explored a low temperature fuel cell design concept for the SDE. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint that are crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. A key component of the SDE is the ion conductive membrane through which protons produced at anode migrate to the cathode and react to produce hydrogen. An ideal membrane for the SDE should have both low ionic resistivity and low sulfur dioxide transport. These features allow the electrolyzer to perform at high currents with low potentials, along with preventing contamination of both the hydrogen output and poisoning of the catalysts involved. Another key component is the electrocatalyst material used for the anode and cathode. Good electrocatalysts should be chemically stable and have a low overpotential for the desired electrochemical reactions. This report summarizes results from activities to evaluate commercial and experimental membranes for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for sulfur dioxide transport as a function of acid strength including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated poly-etherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membranes. Experimental membranes from the sulfonated diels-alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) and modified Nafion{reg_sign} 117 were evaluated for SO{sub 2} transport as well. These membranes exhibited reduced transport coefficient for SO{sub 2} transport without the loss in ionic conductivity. The use of Nafion{reg_sign} with EW 1100 is recommended for the present SDE testing due to the limited data regarding chemical and mechanical stability of experimental membranes. Development of new composite membranes by incorporating metal particles or by forming multilayers between PFSA membranes and hydrocarbon membranes will provide methods that will meet the SDE targets (SO{sub 2} transport reduction by a factor of 100) while decreasing catalyst layer delamination and membrane resistivity.

Colon-Mercado, H; David Hobbs, D

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

380

FY08 MEMBRANE CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results from all of the membrane testing completed to date at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE). Several types of commercially-available membranes have been analyzed for ionic resistance and sulfur dioxide transport including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated polyether-ketone-ketone (SPEKK), and polybenzimidazole membranes (PBI). Of these membrane types, the poly-benzimidazole membrane, Celtec-L, exhibited the best combination of characteristics for use in an SDE. Several experimental membranes have also been analyzed including hydrated sulfonated Diels-Alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) membranes from Sandia National Laboratory, perfluorosulfonimide (PFSI) and sulfonated perfluorocyclobutyl aromatic ether (S-PFCB) prepared by Clemson University, hydrated platinum-treated PFSA prepared by Giner Electrochemical Systems (GES) and Pt-Nafion{reg_sign} 115 composites prepared at SRNL. The chemical stability, SO{sub 2} transport and ionic conductivity characteristics have been measured for several commercially available and experimental proton-conducting membranes. Commercially available PFSA membranes such as the Nafion{reg_sign} series exhibited excellent chemical stability and ionic conductivity in sulfur dioxide saturated sulfuric acid solutions. Sulfur dioxide transport in the Nafion{reg_sign} membranes varied proportionally with the thickness and equivalent weight of the membrane. Although the SO{sub 2} transport in the Nafion{reg_sign} membranes is higher than desired, the excellent chemical stability and conductivity makes this membrane the best commercially-available membrane at this time. Initial results indicated that a modified Nafion{reg_sign} membrane incorporating Pt nanoparticles exhibited significantly reduced SO{sub 2} transport. Reduced SO{sub 2} transport was also measured with commercially available PBI membrane and several experimental membranes produced at SNL and Clemson. These membranes also exhibit good chemical stability and conductivity in concentrated sulfuric acid solutions and, thus, serve as promising candidates for the SDE. Therefore, we recommend further testing of these membranes including electrolyzer testing to determine if the reduced SO{sub 2} transport eliminates the formation of sulfur-containing films at the membrane/cathode interface. SO{sub 2} transport measurements in the custom built characterization cell identified experimental limitations of the original design. During the last quarter of FY08 we redesigned and fabricated a new testing cell to overcome the previous limitations. This cell also offers the capability to test membranes under polarized conditions as well as test the performance of MEAs under selected electrolyzer conditions.

Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT, NHI WORK PACKAGE N-SR07TC0301, FY07 FIRST QUARTER REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proof of concept of SO2 electrolysis for the hybrid sulfur (HyS) process is the second priority research target of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative's thermochemical program for FY07. The proof of concept of the liquid-phase option must be demonstrated at the single cell level for an extended run times (>100 hours). The rate of development of HyS will depend on the identification of a promising membrane or an alternative means for controlling sulfur formation. Once successful long-duration operation has been demonstrated, SRNL will develop a multi-cell stack that can be connected to the H2SO4 decomposer being developed by SNL for the S-I ILS for a Hybrid Sulfur Integrated Laboratory-Scale Experiment during FY 2008. During the first quarter of FY07, SRNL continued the component development and membrane development activities with the goal of identifying and characterizing improved electrodes, electrocatalysts, membranes and MEA configurations which could then be tested at larger scale in the SDE test facility. A modified glass cell was fabricated to allow measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) transport across membrane samples at elevated temperatures (up to 70 C). This testing also includes evaluating SO2 transport in different sulfuric acid concentrations (30-70 wt%). A new potentiostat/frequency analyzer was installed for determining ionic conductivity of membranes. This instrument enhances our capabilities to characterize membrane, electrocatalyst and MEA properties and performance. Continuing work from FY06, evaluations were preformed on various commercial and experimental membranes and electrocatalyst materials for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for sulfur dioxide transport as a function of acid strength including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated polyetherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membranes. Experimental membranes from the sulfonated diels-alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) and modified Nafion{reg_sign} 117 were evaluated for SO{sub 2} transport as well. These membranes exhibited reduced transport coefficient for SO{sub 2} transport without the loss in ionic conductivity.

Summers, W

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

Multimodality Imaging with Silica-Based Targeted Nanoparticle Platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives: To synthesize and characterize a C-Dot silica-based nanoparticle containing 'clickable' groups for the subsequent attachment of targeting moieties (e.g., peptides) and multiple contrast agents (e.g., radionuclides with high specific activity) [1,2]. These new constructs will be tested in suitable tumor models in vitro and in vivo to ensure maintenance of target-specificity and high specific activity. Methods: Cy5 dye molecules are cross-linked to a silica precursor which is reacted to form a dye-rich core particle. This core is then encapsulated in a layer of pure silica to create the core-shell C-Dot (Figure 1) [2]. A 'click' chemistry approach has been used to functionalize the silica shell with radionuclides conferring high contrast and specific activity (e.g. 64Cu and 89Zr) and peptides for tumor targeting (e.g. cRGD and octreotate) [3]. Based on the selective Diels-Alder reaction between tetrazine and norbornene, the reaction is bioorthogonal, highyielding, rapid, and water-compatible. This radiolabeling approach has already been employed successfully with both short peptides (e.g. octreotate) and antibodies (e.g. trastuzumab) as model systems for the ultimate labeling of the nanoparticles [1]. Results: PEGylated C-Dots with a Cy5 core and labeled with tetrazine have been synthesized (d = 55 nm, zeta potential = -3 mV) reliably and reproducibly and have been shown to be stable under physiological conditions for up to 1 month. Characterization of the nanoparticles revealed that the immobilized Cy5 dye within the C-Dots exhibited fluorescence intensities over twice that of the fluorophore alone. The nanoparticles were successfully radiolabeled with Cu-64. Efforts toward the conjugation of targeting peptides (e.g. cRGD) are underway. In vitro stability, specificity, and uptake studies as well as in vivo imaging and biodistribution investigations will be presented. Conclusions: C-Dot silica-based nanoparticles offer a robust, versatile, and multi-functional platform to enhance in vivo detection sensitivity and non-invasively assay receptor expression/status of tumor cellular targets, including those of low abundance, using nuclear-NIR fluorescence imaging approaches [2]. Improvements in molecular diagnostics, refined by the availability of nanotechnology platforms, will be a key determinant in driving early-stage disease detection and prevention, ultimately leading to decreases in mortality.

Jason S. Lewis

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

NGC 4656UV: A UV-SELECTED TIDAL DWARF GALAXY CANDIDATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of a UV-bright tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidate in the NGC 4631/4656 galaxy group, which we designate NGC 4656UV. Using survey and archival data spanning from 1.4 GHz to the ultraviolet, we investigate the gas kinematics and stellar properties of this system. The H I morphologies of NGC 4656UV and its parent galaxy NGC 4656 are extremely disturbed, with significant amounts of counterrotating and extraplanar gas. From UV-FIR photometry, computed using a new method to correct for surface gradients on faint objects, we find that NGC 4656UV has no significant dust opacity and a blue spectral energy distribution. We compute a star formation rate of 0.027 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} from the far-ultraviolet flux and measure a total H I mass of 3.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} for the object. Evolutionary synthesis modeling indicates that NGC 4656UV is a low-metallicity system whose only major burst of star formation occurred within the last {approx}260-290 Myr. The age of the stellar population is consistent with a rough timescale for a recent tidal interaction between NGC 4656 and NGC 4631, although we discuss the true nature of the object-whether it is tidal or pre-existing in origin-in the context of its metallicity being a factor of 10 lower than its parent galaxy. We estimate that NGC 4656UV is either marginally bound or unbound. If bound, it contains relatively low amounts of dark matter. The abundance of archival data allows for a deeper investigation into this dynamic system than is currently possible for most TDG candidates.

Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Hess, Kelley M., E-mail: andrew@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: hess@ast.uct.ac.za [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

384

AzTEC Millimetre Survey of the COSMOS Field: I. Data Reduction and Source Catalogue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a 1.1 mm wavelength imaging survey covering 0.3 sq. deg. in the COSMOS field. These data, obtained with the AzTEC continuum camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), were centred on a prominent large-scale structure over-density which includes a rich X-ray cluster at z = 0.73. A total of 50 millimetre galaxy candidates, with a significance ranging from 3.5-8.5 sigma, are extracted from the central 0.15 sq. deg. area which has a uniform sensitivity of 1.3 mJy/beam. Sixteen sources are detected with S/N > 4.5, where the expected false-detection rate is zero, of which a surprisingly large number (9) have intrinsic (de-boosted) fluxes > 5 mJy at 1.1 mm. Assuming the emission is dominated by radiation from dust, heated by a massive population of young, optically-obscured stars, then these bright AzTEC sources have FIR luminosities > 6 x 10^12 L(sun) and star formation-rates > 1100 M(sun)/yr. Two of these nine bright AzTEC sources are found towards the extreme peripheral region of the X-ray cluster, whilst the remainder are distributed across the larger-scale over-density. We describe the AzTEC data reduction pipeline, the source-extraction algorithm, and the characterisation of the source catalogue, including the completeness, flux de-boosting correction, false-detection rate and the source positional uncertainty, through an extensive set of Monte-Carlo simulations. We conclude with a preliminary comparison, via a stacked analysis, of the overlapping MIPS 24 micron data and radio data with this AzTEC map of the COSMOS field.

K. S. Scott; J. E. Austermann; T. A. Perera; G. W. Wilson; I. Aretxaga; J. J. Bock; D. H. Hughes; Y. Kang; S. Kim; P. D. Mauskopf; D. B. Sanders; N. Scoville; M. S. Yun

2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

1994 Northern Goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) are large forest dwelling hawks. They are the largest species of the Accipiter genus which also includes sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus) and the Cooper`s hawk (A. cooperii). Goshawks are holarctic in distribution and nest in coniferous, deciduous, and mixed species forests. In the southwest they primarily nest in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), mixed species, and spruce-fir forests. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. In 1982 the USDA-Forest Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}sensitive species{close_quotes} and in 1992 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}Category 2 species{close_quotes} in accordance with the Endangered Species Act. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Goshawk inventory was conducted during the 1993 nesting season with no adult goshawk responses detected within the LANL survey area. As noted by Sinton and Kennedy, these results may be interpreted in several ways: (1) no goshawk territory(ies) occur in the inventoried area; (2) goshawk territory(ies) exist but have failed prior to the survey and thus were not detected; or (3) territory(ies) exist and were successful but the goshawks did not respond to tapes or their responses were undetected by the observer. For those reasons, a goshawk inventory was conducted in 1994. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Salvage logging and forest renewal affect early aspen stand structure after catastrophic wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Among the major natural disturbances that occur in the North American boreal forest, the effects of catastrophic wind are the least studied due to its infrequent occurrence, often in inaccessible areas, and lack of rapid research response. Most documented studies have been conducted in conifer or mixedwood forests and generally have not considered follow up forest renewal operations such as salvage logging followed by planting and tending. In 2006 after a severe wind disturbance in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forest in northeastern Ontario, we established an operational study to investigate the effects of post-wind disturbance treatments on stand structure (residual live trees, snags, and downed wood) and early forest regeneration. The treatments were blowdown (B), blowdown followed by salvage logging (BS), blowdown followed by salvage logging, windrowing and planting (BSP), BSP followed by aerial spray (tending) with glyphosate 1year after planting (BSPT), and clearcut (C). The operational salvage logging removed about 55% of the 60 m3 ha?1 of the snags and 15% of the 390 m3 ha?1 of the coarse downed wood. The relatively low rate of salvage removal increased the abundance (density and stocking) of aspen regeneration and reduced moss cover, but did not affect average height of aspen suckers or the abundance (cover) of other vegetation types. The mechanical operations damaged much of the advanced growth of conifers (mostly black spruce and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) released by the wind. However, these stems were not sufficiently abundant to contribute significantly to the regenerating forest. Windrowing before planting slightly reduced the amount of area covered by downed wood, while the tending reduced broadleaf regeneration and the abundance of shrubs and increased conifer regeneration and the abundance of grasses. If the management objective is to renew aspen forests lost to catastrophic wind, salvage logging is a viable option to clear the site for regeneration. Forest renewal treatments, including planting and tending, are required when the management objective is conifer regeneration.

Rongzhou Man; Han Y.H. Chen; Andrew Schafer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Thermal decomposition of charring materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental techniques and methods were developed to investigate the transient process of wood pyrolysis under different levels of external radiation, moisture content of the wood sample, and oxygen concentration of the ambient atmosphere. A unique small-scale combustion-wind tunnel was constructed to conduct the pyrolysis experiments and to obtain the time dependent gasification mass flux, surface and in-depth temperatures, and evolved products of pyrolysis (CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and total hydrocarbons (THC)) for thermally thick samples of Douglas-fir. Experiments were performed both in inert atmosphere (nitrogen), and in air at several different heat fluxes and three different moisture contents of wood. Time dependent empirical chemical composition, char yield, and the heat of combustion of the pyrolysis products were determined. The experimental results indicate that the presence of moisture reduces the pyrolysis mass flux and delays the occurrence of its maxima. Presence of oxygen drastically increases the pyrolysis mass flux but its effect specially at lower temperatures depends on the experimental conditions such as the boundary layer thickness over the wood surface. Char yield, chemical composition of the volatiles, and the heat of combustion were found to vary during the pyrolysis process and with changes in the environmental conditions and wood moisture content. The pyrolysis temperature assumption often used for the simplified modeling of wood pyrolysis was examined in detail by considering two otherwise identical models; one with infinitely fast decomposition kinetics and the other with finite rate chemistry. It was concluded that the pyrolysis temperature is not a material property and different pyrolysis temperatures are needed for every problem.

Nurbakhsh, S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

SAC Availability for the IRIS Community  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SAC (also known as SAC2000) is a signal processing and analysis code that has been developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) over the past 20+ years for a variety of seismic and geophysical research projects. SAC has evolved into a general purpose interactive program designed for the study of sequential signals, especially time-series data. Emphasis has been placed on analysis tools used by research seismologists in the detailed study of seismic events. Analysis capabilities include general arithmetic operations, Fourier transforms, three spectral estimation techniques, IIR and FIR filtering, signal stacking, decimation, interpolation, correlation, and seismic phase picking. SAC also contains an extensive graphics capability. SAC is used extensively by the seismic community because: (1) it has a broad range of well-tested, efficient data analysis capabilities (examples include: data inspection, phase picking, signal correction, quality control, unary and binary data operations, travel-time analysis, spectral analysis including high-resolution spectral estimation, spectrograms and binary sonograms, and array and three-component analysis), (2) it is easy to use and reliable, (3) it has a macro programming language that allows users to develop innovative new analysis techniques, (4) it has interfaces to the Unix operating system, Matlab (www.mathworks.com), and the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) software (Wessel and Smith, 1991, 1998 and gmt.soest.hawaii.edu) that make it very flexible, allowing researchers to solve many research problems innovatively with minimal programming effort, and (5) the suite of analysis capabilities are integrated so that innovative processing schemes are easily implemented. SAC is also widely used because of its user oriented development philosophy, which has led to consistent, easy to use capabilities that are backward compatible. A sample of some of SAC's capabilities is displayed in Figure 1.

Goldstein, P; Snoke, A

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

A DUAL-BAND MILLIMETER-WAVE KINETIC INDUCTANCE CAMERA FOR THE IRAM 30 m TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) is a fully integrated measurement system based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) currently being developed for millimeter wave astronomy. The instrument includes dual-band optics allowing simultaneous imaging at 150 GHz and 220 GHz. The imaging sensors consist of two spatially separated arrays of KIDs. The first array, mounted on the 150 GHz branch, is composed of 144 lumped-element KIDs. The second array (220 GHz) consists of 256 antenna-coupled KIDs. Each of the arrays is sensitive to a single polarization; the band splitting is achieved by using a grid polarizer. The optics and sensors are mounted in a custom dilution cryostat, with an operating temperature of {approx}70 mK. Electronic readout is realized using frequency multiplexing and a transmission line geometry consisting of a coaxial cable connected in series with the sensor array and a low-noise 4 K amplifier. The dual-band NIKA was successfully tested in 2010 October at the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (IRAM) 30 m telescope at Pico Veleta, Spain, performing in-line with laboratory predictions. An optical NEP was then calculated to be around 2 x 10{sup -16} W Hz{sup -1/2} (at 1 Hz) while under a background loading of approximately 4 pW pixel{sup -1}. This improvement in comparison with a preliminary run (2009) verifies that NIKA is approaching the target sensitivity for photon-noise limited ground-based detectors. Taking advantage of the larger arrays and increased sensitivity, a number of scientifically relevant faint and extended objects were then imaged including the Galactic Center SgrB2 (FIR1), the radio galaxy Cygnus A, and the NGC1068 Seyfert galaxy. These targets were all observed simultaneously in the 150 GHz and 220 GHz atmospheric windows.

Monfardini, A.; Benoit, A.; Bideaud, A.; Swenson, L.; Cruciani, A.; Camus, P.; Hoffmann, C. [Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier (UJF), Grenoble F-38042 (France); Desert, F. X. [Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique, UJF and CNRS-INSU, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Doyle, S.; Ade, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Tucker, C. [Cardiff School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Roesch, M.; Leclercq, S.; Schuster, K. F. [Institut de RadioAstronomie Millimetrique (IRAM), Saint Martin d'Heres F-38406 (France); Endo, A. [Kavli Institute of NanoScience, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Baryshev, A.; Baselmans, J. J. A.; Ferrari, L.; Yates, S. J. C, E-mail: monfardini@grenoble.cnrs.fr [SRON, Netherlands Institute for Space Research, 3584 CA Utrecht and 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fire regimes and forest structure in a sky island mixed conifer forest, Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fire is a key disturbance agent in the fire-prone mixed conifer and ponderosa pine forests of the southwestern United States. Human activities (i.e., livestock grazing, logging, and fire suppression) have resulted in the exclusion of fire from these forests for the past century and fire exclusion has caused changes in forest structure and composition. This study quantifies spatial and temporal variability in fire regimes and forest change in a 1000-ha area of mixed conifer forest in Guadalupe Mountains National Park (GMNP), an area with an uncommon history of grazing and fire suppression. Dendroecological methods were used to quantify fire frequency, season, severity, and extent, as well as forest structural and compositional change. The mean composite fire return interval (CFI) for the study area was 4 years. Widespread fires were less frequent. The mean CFI for fires recorded in at least 10% of the samples collected was 9.2 years, and mean CFI for fires scarring at least 25% of samples was 16.3 years. Many of these widespread fires occurred in the 19th century. The mean point fire return interval (PFI) was longer at 24 years. Fire scars were primarily formed in the earliest portion of earlywood in annual rings, indicating that fires burned mainly in the spring, at the beginning of the growing season. The onset of grazing in the 1920s dramatically reduced fire frequency. An increase in tree density and a compositional shift from southwestern white pine (Pinus strobiformis Engelm.) to Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] Franco) coincides with the grazing era. In addition, the pre-ranching era was characterized by low-severity fires, while structural changes have resulted in a contemporary forest that is prone to high severity fire, as evidenced by two stand-replacing wildfires in GMNP in the 1990s.

John Sakulich; Alan H. Taylor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Infrared Properties of Close Pairs of Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss spectroscopy and infrared photometry for a complete sample of ~ 800 galaxies in close pairs objectively selected from the CfA2 redshift survey. We use 2MASS to compare near infrared color-color diagrams for our sample with the Nearby Field Galaxy Sample and with a set of IRAS flux-limited pairs from Surace et al. We construct a basic statistical model to explore the physical sources of the substantial differences among these samples. The model explains the spread of near infrared colors and is consistent with a picture where central star formation is triggered by the galaxy-galaxy interaction before a merger occurs. For 160 galaxies we report new, deep JHK photometry within our spectroscopic aperture and we use the combined spectroscopic and photometric data to explore the physical conditions in the central bursts. We find a set of objects with H-K >= 0.45 and with a large F(FIR)/F(H). We interpret the very red H-K colors as evidence for 600-1000 K dust within compact star-forming regions, perhaps similar to super-star clusters identified in individual well-studied interacting galaxies. The galaxies in our sample are candidate ``hidden'' bursts or, possibly, ``hidden'' AGN. Over the entire pair sample, both spectroscopic and photometric data show that the specific star formation rate decreases with the projected separation of the pair. The data suggest that the near infrared color-color diagram is also a function of the projected separation; all of the objects with central near infrared colors indicative of bursts of star formation lie at small projected separation.

Margaret J. Geller; Scott J. Kenyon; Elizabeth J. Barton; Thomas H. Jarrett; Lisa J. Kewley

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

392

Exploratory Technology Research Program for electrochemical energy storage: Annual report for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an Electrochemical Energy Storage Program, that includes research and development (R&D) on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The DOE Electrochemical Energy Storage Program is divided into two projects: the Electric Vehicle Advanced Battery Systems (EVABS) Development Program and the Exploratory Technology Research (ETR) Program. The EVABS Program management responsibility has been assigned to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is responsible for management of the ETR Program. The EVABS and ETR Programs include an integrated matrix of R&D efforts designed to advance progress on selected candidate electrochemical systems. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), a tripartite undertaking between DOE, the U.S. automobile manufacturers and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), was formed in 1991 to accelerate the development of advanced batteries for consumer EVs. The role of the FIR Program is to perform supporting research on the advanced battery systems under development by the USABC and EVABS Program, and to evaluate new systems with potentially superior performance, durability and/or cost characteristics. The specific goal of the ETR Program is to identify the most promising electrochemical technologies and transfer them to the USABC, the battery industry and/or the EVABS Program for further development and scale-up. This report summarizes the research, financial and management activities relevant to the ETR Program in CY 1993.

Kinoshita, K. [ed.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Carbonates in space - The challenge of low temperature data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonates have repeatedly been discussed as possible carriers of stardust emission bands. However, the band assignments proposed so far were mainly based on room temperature powder transmission spectra of the respective minerals. Since very cold calcite grains have been claimed to be present in protostars and in Planetary Nebulae such as NGC 6302, the changes of their dielectric functions at low temperatures are relevant from an astronomical point of view. We have derived the IR optical constants of calcite and dolomite from reflectance spectra - measured at 300, 200, 100 and 10K - and calculated small particle spectra for different grain shapes, with the following results: i) The absorption efficiency factors both of calcite and dolomite are extremely dependent on the particle shapes. This is due to the high peak values of the optical constants of CaCO3 and CaMg[CO3]2. ii) The far infrared properties of calcite and dolomite depend also very significantly on the temperature. Below 200K, a pronounced sharpening and increase in the band strengths of the FIR resonances occurs. iii) In view of the intrinsic strength and sharpening of the 44 mum band of calcite at 200-100K, the absence of this band -- inferred from Infrared Space Observatory data -- in PNe requires dust temperatures below 45K. iv) Calcite grains at such low temperatures can account for the '92' mum band, while our data rule out dolomite as the carrier of the 60-65 mum band. The optical constants here presented are publicly available in the electronic database http://www.astro.uni-jena.de/Laboratory/OCDB

Th. Posch; A. Baier; H. Mutschke; Th. Henning

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

Biggs, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992-January 1993)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on December 27, 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa, on January 31, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section A10 included pressure, temperature, and salinity [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-1 1 , CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, TALK, and underway pCO{sub 2}. The TCO{sub 2} was measured by using two Single-Operator Multiparameter Metabolic Analyzers (SOMMAs) for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples that were coupled to a coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for TALK were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-}2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by infrared photometry with a precision of {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. The work aboard the R/V Meteor was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-76CHOO016, and the Bundesministerium fir Forschung und Technologies through grants 03F0545A and MPG 099/1.

Kozyr, A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The flash pyrolysis and methanolysis of biomass (wood) for production of ethylene, benzene and methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} and with the non-reactive gases He and N{sub 2} is being determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000{degrees}C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000{degrees}C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 25% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH{sub 4} and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates a potentially economical competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 10 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT NEEDS FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiscal year 2008 studies in electrolyzer component development have focused on the characterization of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) after performance tests in the single cell electrolyzer, evaluation of electrocatalysts and membranes using a small scale electrolyzer and evaluating the contribution of individual cell components to the overall electrochemical performance. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies of samples taken from MEAs testing in the SRNL single cell electrolyzer test station indicates a sulfur-rich layer forms between the cathode catalyst layer and the membrane. Based on a review of operating conditions for each of the MEAs evaluated, we conclude that the formation of the layer results from the reduction of sulfur dioxide as it passes through the MEA and reaches the catalyst layer at the cathode-membrane interface. Formation of the sulfur rich layer results in partial delamination of the cathode catalyst layer leading to diminished performance. Furthermore we believe that operating the electrolyzer at elevated pressure significantly increases the rate of formation due to increased adsorption of hydrogen on the internal catalyst surface. Thus, identification of a membrane that exhibits much lower transport of sulfur dioxide is needed to reduce the quantity of sulfur dioxide that reaches the cathode catalyst and is reduced to produce the sulfur-rich layer. Three candidate membranes are currently being evaluated that have shown promise from preliminary studies, (1) modified Nafion{reg_sign}, (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI), and (3) sulfonated Diels Alder polyphenylene (SDAPP). Testing examined the activity for the sulfur dioxide oxidation of platinum (Pt) and platinum-alloy catalysts in 30 wt% sulfuric acid solution. Linear sweep voltammetry showed an increase in activity when catalysts in which Pt is alloyed with non-noble transition metals such as cobalt and chromium. However when Pt is alloyed with noble metals, such as iridium or ruthenium, the kinetic activity decreases. We recommend further testing to determine if these binary alloys will provide the increased reaction kinetic needed to meet the targets. We also plan to test the performance of these catalyst materials for both proton and sulfur dioxide reduction. The latter may provide another parameter by which we can control the reduction of sulfur dioxide upon transport to the cathode catalyst surface. A small scale electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2}) has been fabricated and successfully installed as an additional tool to evaluate the effect of different operating conditions on electrolyzer and MEA performance. Currently this electrolyzer is limited to testing at temperatures up to 80 C and at atmospheric pressure. Selected electrochemical performance data from the single cell sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer were analyzed with the aid of an empirical equation which takes into account the overpotential of each of the components. By using the empirical equation, the performance data was broken down into its components and a comparison of the potential losses was made. The results indicated that for the testing conditions of 80 C and 30 wt% sulfuric acid, the major overpotential contribution ({approx}70 % of all losses) arise from the slow reaction rate of oxidation of sulfur dioxide. The results indicate that in order to meet the target of hydrogen production at 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 0.6 V and 50 wt% sulfuric acid, identification of a better catalyst for sulfur dioxide oxidation will provide the largest gain in electrolyzer performance.

Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single, combined analysis, with sensitivity to lower-energy interactions, careful control of data quality and stability, and further development of techniques for reconstructing event location and rejecting near-surface interactions from beta decays. They also present a revision to the previously published Run 119 analysis, a demonstration of the feasibility of a low-threshold (1 or 2 keV) analysis of Soudan data, and a review of the literature on charge generation and quenching relevant to the ionization signal.

Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The JLab high power ERL light source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new THz/IR/UV photon source at Jefferson Lab is the first of a new generation of light sources based on an Energy-Recovered, (superconducting) Linac (ERL). The machine has a 160 MeV electron beam and an average current of 10 mA in 75 MHz repetition rate hundred femtosecond bunches. These electron bunches pass through a magnetic chicane and therefore emit synchrotron radiation. For wavelengths longer than the electron bunch the electrons radiate coherently a broadband THz {approx} half cycle pulse whose average brightness is > 5 orders of magnitude higher than synchrotron IR sources. Previous measurements showed 20 W of average power extracted[1]. The new facility offers simultaneous synchrotron light from the visible through the FIR along with broadband THz production of 100 fs pulses with >200 W of average power. The FELs also provide record-breaking laser power [2]: up to 10 kW of average power in the IR from 1 to 14 microns in 400 fs pulses at up to 74.85 MHz repetition rates and soon will produce similar pulses of 300-1000 nm light at up to 3 kW of average power from the UV FEL. These ultrashort pulses are ideal for maximizing the interaction with material surfaces. The optical beams are Gaussian with nearly perfect beam quality. See www.jlab.org/FEL for details of the operating characteristics; a wide variety of pulse train configurations are feasible from 10 microseconds long at high repetition rates to continuous operation. The THz and IR system has been commissioned. The UV system is to follow in 2005. The light is transported to user laboratories for basic and applied research. Additional lasers synchronized to the FEL are also available. Past activities have included production of carbon nanotubes, studies of vibrational relaxation of interstitial hydrogen in silicon, pulsed laser deposition and ablation, nitriding of metals, and energy flow in proteins. This paper will present the status of the system and discuss some of the discoveries we have made concerning the physics performance, design optimization, and operational limitations of such a first generation high power ERL light source.

G.R. Neil; C. Behre; S.V. Benson; M. Bevins; G. Biallas; J. Boyce; J. Coleman; L.A. Dillon-Townes; D. Douglas; H.F. Dylla; R. Evans; A. Grippo; D. Gruber; J. Gubeli; D. Hardy; C. Hernandez-Garcia; K. Jordan; M.J. Kelley; L. Merminga; J. Mammosser; W. Moore; N. Nishimori; E. Pozdeyev; J. Preble; R. Rimmer; Michelle D. Shinn; T. Siggins; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G.P. Williams and S. Zhang

2005-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

400

Current and future effects of ozone and atmospheric nitrogen deposition on Californias mixed conifer forests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixed conifer forests in southern California are exposed to elevated levels of ozone (O3) and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. Growing season 12-h daily average O3 levels are 0.060.09ppm, and N deposition rates are 545kg N/ha per year. However, N deposition rates have high spatial variability due to the heterogeneous and open-patchy characteristics of these stands. Annual deposition fluxes are greatest to canopy-covered areas with high pollution exposure. The harmful effects of O3 on sensitive pines are well documented, and selected areas in the San Bernardino and San Gabriel mountains have reached N-saturation as demonstrated by high nitrate (NO3?) export in streams, and a suite of plant and edaphic indicators. The adverse effects of O3 culminate at the community level as a result of chronic effects on pine needle structure, retention, and physiology. Alterations in whole-tree biomass occur after several years due to higher carbon retention in the shoot for O3 detoxification, and lower carbon allocation to roots, as a result of O3 and N deposition. As a consequence, tree susceptibility to drought, windthrow, and root diseases could be exacerbated. Changes in forest community structure may occur due to the death of O3-sensitive pines and fire suppression, and pine replacement by faster-growing, O3-tolerant cedar and fir species. The negative impact of atmospheric N deposition occurs at the ecosystem-level as an alteration of biogeochemical nutrient cycling. For trees growing on N-deficient soils, increased supplies of N could moderate harmful O3 effects on growth for several decades. Over time, levels of soil N rise due to sustained inputs from the atmosphere, and the accelerated production and senescence of N-rich foliage by O3. The increase in soil N is expected to favor the proliferation of nitrophilous overstory and understory species relative to pines. At this stage, N-limitation of forest productivity would be partially alleviated, and N emissions from soil and NO3? leaching losses elevated as a result of high soil N availability. In the western San Bernardino Mountains and in low-elevation chaparral watersheds in the San Gabriel Mountains, NO3? levels in streams are as high or higher than in any other undisturbed montane watersheds in North America, and NO3? contamination of domestic water supplies is of near-term concern. The effects of chronic O3 exposure and N deposition are expected to become more prevalent in the southern Sierra Nevada as human populations and influences in adjacent areas increase in the coming years.

Brent K. Takemoto; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Mark E. Fenn

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fir hemlock alder" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG, ULIRG, and total infrared contributions. This work significantly increased the number of spectroscopically confirmed infrared-luminous galaxies at z >> 0 and demonstrates the growing importance of dusty starbursts for galaxy evolution studies and the build-up of stellar mass throughout cosmic time.

Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bock, J.; Bridge, C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgarella, D. [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille - LAM, Universite d'Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France); Chapin, E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Chapman, S. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Conselice, C. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hatziminaoglou, E. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

403

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

NGC 2207/IC 2163: A GRAZING ENCOUNTER WITH LARGE-SCALE SHOCKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radio continuum, Spitzer infrared, optical, and XMM-Newton X-ray and ultraviolet observations (UVW1 and UVM2) are used to study large-scale shock fronts, young star complexes, and the galactic nuclei in the interacting galaxies NGC 2207/IC 2163. There are two types of large-scale shock fronts in this galaxy pair. The large-scale shock front along the rim of the ocular oval in IC 2163 has produced vigorous star formation in a dusty environment, bright in the Spitzer 8 {mu}m and 24 {mu}m images. In the outer part of the companion side of NGC 2207, a large-scale front attributed to halo scraping is particularly bright in the {lambda}6 cm and {lambda}20 cm radio continuum but not in any tracers of recent star formation (H{alpha}, 8 {mu}m, 24 {mu}m, or ultraviolet emission) or in X-rays. This radio-continuum front may be from compression of the halo magnetic field on the back side of NGC 2207, between the two galaxies. The X-ray emission sets an upper limit to the gas density in the halo. Values of the flux density ratio S{sub {nu}}(8 {mu}m)/S{sub {nu}}(6 cm) of prominent, kiloparsec-size, Spitzer/IRAC star-forming clumps in NGC 2207/IC 2163 are compared with those of giant radio H II regions in M81. For the bright clumps in NGC 2207, the mean value of this ratio is the same as for the M81 H II regions, whereas for the bright clumps on the rim of the IC 2163 ocular oval, the mean value is nearly a factor of two greater. Possible explanations for this are discussed. The galaxy pair has global values of the ratios of infrared-to-radio continuum flux density in the Spitzer 8 {mu}m, 24 {mu}m, and 70 {mu}m bands, and the IRAS FIR significantly below the medians/means for large samples of galaxies. Feature i, a mini-starburst on an outer arm of NGC 2207 on its anti-companion side, is the most luminous 8 {mu}m, 24 {mu}m, 70 {mu}m, radio continuum, and H{alpha} source in the galaxy pair. We find evidence that a radio supernova was present in the core of feature i in 2001. X-ray emission is detected from the nucleus of NGC 2207 and from nine discrete sources whose X-ray luminosities make them possible candidates for Ultraluminous X-ray sources. One of these corresponds with the Type Ib SN 1999ec, which is also bright in the ultraviolet, and another may be a radio supernova or a background quasar. The X-ray luminosity of the NGC 2207 nucleus is log L{sub 0.3-10.0keV} = 40.6 erg s{sup -1}, which, together with its X-ray spectrum, suggests that this is a highly absorbed, low-luminosity, active galactic nucleus.

Kaufman, Michele [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Grupe, Dirk [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, Debra M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, 124 Raymond Ave., Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Struck, Curtis [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Brinks, Elias, E-mail: rallis.1@osu.edu, E-mail: dxg35@psu.edu, E-mail: bge@us.ibm.com, E-mail: elmegreen@vassar.edu, E-mail: curt@iastate.edu, E-mail: E.Brinks@herts.ac.uk [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Predicting the impacts of climate change on animal distributions: the importance of local adaptation and species' traits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geographic range limits of many species are strongly affected by climate and are expected to change under global warming. For species that are able to track changing climate over broad geographic areas, we expect to see shifts in species distributions toward the poles and away from the equator. A number of ecological and evolutionary factors, however, could restrict this shifting or redistribution under climate change. These factors include restricted habitat availability, restricted capacity for or barriers to movement, or reduced abundance of colonists due the perturbation effect of climate change. This research project examined the last of these constraints - that climate change could perturb local conditions to which populations are adapted, reducing the likelihood that a species will shift its distribution by diminishing the number of potential colonists. In the most extreme cases, species ranges could collapse over a broad geographic area with no poleward migration and an increased risk of species extinction. Changes in individual species ranges are the processes that drive larger phenomena such as changes in land cover, ecosystem type, and even changes in carbon cycling. For example, consider the poleward range shift and population outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle that has decimated millions of acres of Douglas fir trees in the western US and Canada. Standing dead trees cause forest fires and release vast quantities of carbon to the atmosphere. The beetle likely shifted its range because it is not locally adapted across its range, and it appears to be limited by winter low temperatures that have steadily increased in the last decades. To understand range and abundance changes like the pine beetle, we must reveal the extent of adaptive variation across species ranges - and the physiological basis of that adaptation - to know if other species will change as readily as the pine beetle. Ecologists tend to assume that range shifts are the dominant response of species to climate change, but our experiments suggest that other processes may act in some species that reduce the likelihood of geographic range change. In the first part of our DOE grant (ending 2008) we argued that the process of local adaptation of populations within a species range, followed by climatic changes that occur too quickly for adaptive evolution, is an underappreciated mechanism by which climate change could affect biodiversity. When this process acts, species ranges may not shift readily toward the poles, slowing the rate of species and biome change. To test this claim, we performed an experiment comparing core and peripheral populations in a series of field observations, translocation experiments, and genetic analyses. The papers in Appendix A were generated from 2005-2008 funding. In the second part of the DOE grant (ending 2011) we studied which traits promote population differentiation and local adaptation by building genomic resources for our study species and using these resources to reveal differences in gene expression in peripheral and core populations. The papers in Appendix B were generated from 2008-2011 funding. This work was pursued with two butterfly species that have contrasting life history traits (body size and resource specialization) and occupy a common ecosystem and a latitudinal range. These species enabled us to test the following hypotheses using a single phylogenetic group.

HELLMANN, J. J.; LOBO, N. F.

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z