Sample records for fir hemlock alder

  1. www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience/ Poison Hemlock The Toxic Parsnip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience/ Poison Hemlock ­ The Toxic Parsnip We often get questions about wild carrot (Daucus carota L.) only to find out that the question is actually about poison hemlock (Conium maculatum L.). Although these two plants may look similar, poison hemlock is toxic to cattle

  2. Poison hemlock, Conium maculatum, (Figure 1) is a member of the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Poison hemlock, Conium maculatum, (Figure 1) is a member of the plant family Apiaceae, which, cilantro, chervil, fen- nel, anise, dill, and caraway. It is a tall, invasive, highly poisonous weed that is sometimes mistaken for one of its crop relatives. Poison hemlock was introduced from Europe as an ornamental

  3. Initial and continued effects of a release spray in a coastal Oregon douglas-fir plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Obermeyer, E.L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of a 4-year-old Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) plantation were sprayed with herbicide. Five years after spraying the authors established 18 plots and used several means to determine retrospectively that six plots probably received full spray treatment and six others received no spray. Various portions of the remaining six plots were sprayed. Herbicide reduced number and size of red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.), increased number and size of planted Douglas-fir, damaged terminal shoots of Douglas-fir resulting in more abnormal boles and branching, and increased number of volunteer conifers. Fifteen of the eighteen plots were thinned, in the subsequent 6 years, thinned plots that had received full release at age 4 averaged 9 percent more volume growth (all species) than plots not released.

  4. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in douglas-fir: Report No. 13. The Francis study, 1963-90. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, G.E.; Andersen, N.A.; Marshall, D.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The levels-of-growing-stock studies in Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), were designed to test the influence of treatment regimes by using a wide range of retained growing stock on the development of forest growth, yield, and stand structure. Results of the Francis installation located in the headwaters of the Willapa River in Pacific County, Washington, are summarized from calibration at age 15 through age 42 (completion of 60 feet of height growth from calibration, and the planned course of the experimental thinnings plus 5 years). In addition to the eight basic treatments and control common to the other eight study installations in the region, five additional treatments were added at Francis; four late first thinnings (at age 25), which matched the level of growing stock of four standard fixed treatments, and an unthinned western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.). Estimated Douglas-fir site index (50-year base) of this plantation is 124, a mid site II.

  5. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Christopher (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Adzima, Brian J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  6. Effects of Alder Mine on the Water, Sediments, and Benthic Macroinvertebrates of Alder Creek, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peplow, Dan

    1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alder Mine, an abandoned gold, silver, copper, and zinc mine in Okanogan County, Washington, produces heavy metal-laden effluent that affects the quality of water in a tributary of the Methow River. The annual mass loading of heavy metals from two audits at the Alder Mine was estimated to exceed 11,000 kg per year. In this study, water samples from stations along Alder Creek were assayed for heavy metals by ICP-AES and were found to exceed Washington State's acute freshwater criteria for cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn).

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric hetero-diels-alder reactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Correction Paper No. b927076k Summary: . The classic hetero-Diels Alder reaction of acrolein with methyl vinyl ketone (Scheme 3) was examined in great... is unsymmetrically...

  8. Probing substituent effects in aryl-aryl interactions using stereoselective diels-alder cycloadditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Steven E.

    Stereoselective Diels?Alder cycloadditions that probe substituent effects in aryl?aryl sandwich complexes were studied experimentally and theoretically. Computations on model systems demonstrate that the stereoselectivity ...

  9. Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin SeikiandAlcopar Jump to:Alden, New York: EnergyAlder

  10. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  11. Ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret fertilizers increase volume growth of 57-year-old douglas-fir trees within a gradient of nitrogen deficiency. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Reukema, D.L.; Hazard, J.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a nitrogen-deficient plantation in southwest Washington, the authors (1) compared effects of 224 kg N/ha as ammonium nitrate, urea, and biuret on volume growth of dominant and codominant Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco); (2) determined how 8-year response of these trees to fertilization was related to their distance from a strip of the plantation interplanted with nitrogen-fixing red alder (alnus rubra Bong.); and (3) observed effects of biuret on understory vegetation. On both sides of the strip centerline, the authors grouped subject trees into 30 plots of 4 trees each, based on slope position and distance from alder. The authors randomly assigned three fertilizers and a control within each plot. They analyzed separately data from east and west of the mixed stand certerline. Initial volume differed greatly among the 120 trees on each side, so they used covariance analysis to adjust observed treatment means. Adjusted mean volume growth was increased (p equal to or less than 0.10) by 22 to 28 percent on the east side and by 11 to 14 percent on the west side, with no significant difference in response to the three fertilizers.

  12. Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

  13. Dependence of the Rate of an Interfacial Diels-Alder Reaction on the Steric Environment of the Immobilized Dienophile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrksich, Milan

    Dependence of the Rate of an Interfacial Diels-Alder Reaction on the Steric Environment for an interfacial Diels-Alder reaction and the steric environment around the reacting molecules. The study used that the quinone groups that were positioned below the interface (and in a crowded environment) reacted

  14. The FIR-Radio Correlation & Implications for GLAST Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Energy Argument (synchrotron emission) · Rapid Electron Cooling in Starbursts ­ The Failure tsyn supplied by SN shocks Clean explanation for linear FIR supplied to CR e's consistent w/ inferences from SN shocks tesc > tsyn requires tremendous fine tuning

  15. Does red alder (Alnus rubra) in upland riparian forests elevate macroinvertebrate and detritus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    negative effects of timber harvest (such as sedimentation and loss of coarse woody debris) on downstream-growth alder sites exported significantly greater count (mean = 9.4 individuals·m­3 water, standard error (SE) = 3.7) and biomass (mean = 3.1 mg dry mass·m­3 water, SE = 1.2) densities of macroinvertebrates than

  16. Design of Efficient FIR Filters with Cyclotomic Polynomial Prefilters Using Mixed Integer Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yong Hoon

    savings can be significant especiallyin designingnarrowband filters. One approachto efficientFIR filter efficientFIR filters, the design method is ad hoc and is not able to find "best

  17. Natural regeneration in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural regeneration of five conifer species was surveyed in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. The habitat types range from warm, dry (grand fir/white spirea) to mesic (Grand fir/Mountain Maple). Four harvest-regeneration methods and four site preparation techniques were sampled. Recommendations for obtaining natural regeneration vary primarily by habitat type. Conifer seedlings in the warm, dry grand fir white spirea habitat type require site protection for establishment. In the mesic grand fir/mountain maple habitat type, tall shrub potential can reduce the opportunity to establish early seral conifer species.

  18. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Eun, E-mail: minho@kasi.re.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  19. Breaking FIR-Radio Correlation: The Case of Interacting Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donevski, Darko

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Far-infrared (FIR)--radio correlation is a well-established empirical connection between continuum radio and dust emission of star-forming galaxies, used as a tool in determining star-formation rates. Here we point out that in the case of interacting star-forming galaxies this tool might break. Galactic interactions and mergers have been known to give rise to tidal shocks and disrupt morphologies especially in the smaller of the interacting components. Moreover, these shocks can also heat the gas and dust and accelerate particles leading to tidal cosmic-ray population in addition to standard galactic cosmic rays. Both heating and additional non-thermal radiation will obviously affect the FIR-radio correlation of these systems. To test this hypothesis we have analyzed a sample of 43 infrared bright star-forming interacting galaxies at different merger stages. We have found that their FIR-radio correlation parameter and radio emission spectral index vary over different merger stages and behave as it would be ex...

  20. Plasmon Enhancements for FIR Detection A. G. U. Perera, S. G. Matsik, P. V. V. Jayaweera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perera, A. G. Unil

    Plasmon Enhancements for FIR Detection A. G. U. Perera, S. G. Matsik, P. V. V. Jayaweera Department Council-Canada Ont. CANADA Abstract--The use of plasmons to improve the response of FIR and THz detectors is generating extensive interest. Increased absorption due to the plasmonic absorption in a GaAs wafer

  1. G. AussenacEcophysiology of circum-Mediterranean firs Original article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of circum-Mediterranean firs in the context of climate change Gilbert Aussenac* UMR �cologie, �cophysiologie / circum-Mediterranean firs / climate change / ecology / ecophysiology Résumé ­ �cologie et écophysiologie) Abstract ­ In the expected climatic change scenario (with increased temperatures and water deficits

  2. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spera, D.A. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center) [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center; Esgar, J.B. (Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (USA)) [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Cleveland, OH (USA); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. (Gougeon Bros., Bay City, MI (USA)) [Gougeon Bros., Bay City, MI (USA)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  3. ISO observations of spirals: modelling the FIR emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Bianchi; Paul B. Alton; Jonathan I. Davies

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISO observations at 200 micron have modified our view of the dust component in spiral galaxies. For a sample of seven resolved spirals we have retrieved a mean temperature of 20K, about 10K lower than previous estimates based on IRAS data at shorter wavelengths. Because of the steep dependence of far-infrared emission on the dust temperature, the dust masses inferred from ISO fluxes are a factor of 10 higher than those derived from IRAS data only, leading to gas-to-dust ratios close to the value observed in the Galaxy. The scale-length of the 200 micron emission is larger than for the IRAS 100 micron emission, with colder dust at larger distances from the galactic centre, as expected if the interstellar radiation field is the main source of dust heating. The 200 micron scale-length is also larger than the optical, for all the galaxies in the sample. This suggests that the dust distribution is more extended than that of the stars.A model of the dust heating is needed to derive the parameters of the dust distribution from the FIR emission. Therefore, we have adapted an existing radiative transfer code to deal with dust emission. Simulated maps of the temperature distribution within the dust disk and of the dust emission at any wavelength can be produced. The stellar spectral energy distribution is derived from observations in the ultraviolet, optical and near infrared. The parameters of the dust distribution (scale-lengths and optical depth) are chosen to reproduce the observed characteristics of the FIR emission, i.e. the shape of the spectrum, the flux and the spatial distribution. We describe the application of the model to one of the galaxies in the sample, NGC 6946.

  4. Nucleotide diversity and neutrality testing in genes involved in adaptation in Douglas-fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucleotide diversity and neutrality testing in genes involved in adaptation in Douglas-fir B. Pande-Oregon region, and 684 SNPs were identified in total. We report the estimation of nucleotide diversity and tests

  5. Radio Observations of the Star Formation Activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Minho; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 region were studied by imaging centimeter continuum sources and water maser sources using several archival data sets from the Very Large Array. The continuum source VLA 9 is elongated in the northwest-southeast direction, consistent with the FIR 4 bipolar outflow axis, and has a flat spectrum in the 6.2-3.6 cm interval. The three water maser spots associated with FIR 4 are also distributed along the outflow axis. One of the spots is located close to VLA 9, and another one is close to an X-ray source. Examinations of the positions of compact objects in this region suggest that the FIR 4 cloud core contains a single low-mass protostar. VLA 9 is the best indicator of the protostellar position. VLA 9 may be a radio thermal jet driven by this protostar, and it is unlikely that FIR 4 contains a high-mass young stellar object (YSO). A methanol 6.7 GHz maser source is located close to VLA 9, at a distance of about 100 AU. The FIR 4 protostar must be responsible for the ...

  6. Quantification and comparison of terpene concentrations in various balsam fir growth forms and foliage ages, and a simulation of moose browsing on balsam fir trees at Isle Royale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terra-Berns, Mary Helen

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) and twigs (T) of growth form samples collected from Windigo and Beaver Island. . . . . . . . . . 10 Table 2. Means and standard deviations for foliage age samples (means followed by the same letter are not significantly different... terpene compounds from the needles and twigs of balsam fir samples collected by Risenhoover (unpubl. data) at 2 sites in the Washington Harbor area of Isle Royale during late February of 1985 (Windigo) and 1986 (Beaver Island). The following classes...

  7. Blind Identification of MIMO FIR Systems Driven by Quasi-Stationary Sources Using Second Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, James P.

    1 Blind Identification of MIMO FIR Systems Driven by Quasi-Stationary Sources Using Second Order This paper discusses a frequency domain method for blind identification of MIMO convolutive channels driven are presented to demonstrate the performance of the new algorithm1 . I. Introduction Blind identification

  8. Blind identification of MISO-FIR channels Carlos Est^ev~ao R. Fernandes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Blind identification of MISO-FIR channels Carlos Est^ev~ao R. Fernandes , Pierre Comon , G, vol.90 Abstract In this paper, we address the problem of determining the order of MISO channels to false alarm. Afterwards, we introduce the concept of MISO channel nested detectors based on a deflation

  9. Characteristics of subalpine fir susceptible to attack by western balsam bark beetle (Coleoptera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Staffan

    Characteristics of subalpine fir susceptible to attack by western balsam bark beetle (Coleoptera beetle (Dryocoetes confusus Swaine) predominately attacked trees from the three to four largest diameter classes at each site. However, the mean diameter of attacked trees was significantly different among sites

  10. Fungal endophytes in woody roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal endophytes in woody roots of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus baseline data for future surveys of fungal endophytes. Examination of internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 evidence of host species or plant association effects on total recovery of fungal endophytes or recovery

  11. Architectural trade-offs in the design of low power FIR filtering cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Tughrul

    Architectural trade-offs in the design of low power FIR filtering cores A.T. Erdogan, E. Zwyssig and T. Arslan Abstract: There is a continuous drive for methodologies and approaches of low power design. This is mainly driven by the surge in portable computing. On the other hand, the design of low power systems

  12. A DESIGN FLOW FOR MULTIPLIERLESS LINEAR-PHASE FIR FILTERS: FROM SYSTEM SPECIFICATION TO VERILOG CODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, Shih-Hao

    , National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC *Department of Electrical Engineering, National Central-phase FIR filter synthesizer, which combines several research efforts. We propose a local search algorithm in decreasing the design cycle time and accurately simulating the correctness of the circuit design

  13. Oyamel fir forest trunks provide thermal advantages for overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Ernest H.

    Oyamel fir forest trunks provide thermal advantages for overwintering monarch butterflies in Mexico, UniversidadNacionalAutonomadeMexico,AntiguaCarreteraaPa´ tzcuaro,Morelia,Michoacan,Mexico,5 InstitutodeGeografi´aCiudad Universitaria,UniversidadNacionalAutonomadeMexico,Coyoacan,MexicoD.F.,Mexico,6 Departmentof

  14. Submm/FIR astronomy in Antarctica: Potential for a large telescope facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Minier; V. Minier; L. Olmi; P. -O. Lagage; L. Spinoglio; G. A. Durand; E. Daddi; D. Galilei; H. Gallee; C. Kramer; D. Marrone; E. Pantin; L. Sabbatini; N. Schneider; N. Tothill; L. Valenziano; C. Veyssiere

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary site testing datasets suggest that Dome C in Antarctica is one of the best sites on Earth for astronomical observations in the 200 to 500 micron regime, i.e. for far-infrared (FIR) and submillimetre (submm) astronomy. We present an overview of potential science cases that could be addressed with a large telescope facility at Dome C. This paper also includes a presentation of the current knowledge about the site characterics in terms of atmospheric transmission, stability, sky noise and polar constraints on telescopes. Current and future site testing campaigns are finally described.

  15. Resistance of fast-and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone-induced attack by western balsam bark beetle (Coleoptera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Staffan

    Resistance of fast- and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone- induced attack by western balsam the resistance of fast- and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone-induced attack by western balsam bark beetle at two sites in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. 2 Attack success by the beetle and subsequent

  16. LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO-FIR CORRELATION IN NORMAL GALAXIES AT {approx}1 kpc SCALES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Aritra; Roy, Subhashis; Mitra, Dipanjan, E-mail: aritra@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: roy@ncra.tifr.res.in, E-mail: dmitra@ncra.tifr.res.in [National Center for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind Road, Pune-411007 (India)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the radio-FIR correlation between the nonthermal (synchrotron) radio continuum emission at {lambda}90 cm (333 MHz) and the far-infrared emission due to cool ({approx}20 K) dust at {lambda}70 {mu}m in spatially resolved normal galaxies at scales of {approx}1 kpc. The slope of the radio-FIR correlation significantly differs between the arm and interarm regions. However, this change is not evident at a lower wavelength of {lambda}20 cm (1.4 GHz). We find the slope of the correlation in the arm to be 0.8 {+-} 0.12 and we use this to determine the coupling between equipartition magnetic field (B{sub eq}) and gas density ({rho}{sub gas}) as B{sub eq}{proportional_to}{rho}{sup 0.51{+-}0.12}{sub gas}. This is close to what is predicted by magnetohydrodynamic simulations of turbulent interstellar medium, provided the same region produces both the radio and far-infrared emission. We argue that at 1 kpc scales this condition is satisfied for radio emission at 1.4 GHz and may not be satisfied at 333 MHz. The change of slope observed in the interarm region could be caused by propagation of low energy ({approx}1.5 GeV) and long-lived ({approx}10{sup 8} yr) cosmic-ray electrons at 333 MHz.

  17. Treatment duration and time since disturbance affect vegetation development in a young California red fir plantation. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The density and development of greenleaf manzanita, snowbrush, goldenbush (rabbitbrush), and graminoids were evaluated in a young California red fir plantation in northern California from 1986 through 1995. Manual grubbing and herbicides created treatments regimes that lasted for 3 to 6 years and vegetation recovery times of 4 to 10 years. The duration and timing of the grubbing and spraying operations constituted the treatments. Species response was mixed: greenleaf manzanita had higher average values of density, foliar cover, and height when time since disturbance was longest, snowbrush density was lowest but cover and height were highest, and values for goldenbrush and graminoids in general showed no trend. In the control at the end of the study, graminoids numbered 82,350 per acre, greenleaf manzanita 10,850, goldenbrush 10,800, and snowbrush 1,850 plants per acre. Foliar cover of manzanita at 7,300 square feet per acre was more than that of all other naturally estblished species combined. Survival of red fir over all teatments after one growing season was 98 percent and after 10 seasons was 89 percent. Average height of red fir seedlings ranged from 3.2 feet with intensive release to 1.7 feet with no release. No release allowed greenleaf manzanita plants to be slightly taller than red fir seedlings and to place the seedlings in danger of being overtopped.

  18. Development of a mixed shrub-tanoak-douglas-fir community in a treated and untreated condition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On a medium site in northern California, a tanoak-mixed shrub community was given several treatments (manual release two and three times, a combination chainsaw and cut surface herbicide treatment, two foliar herbicides, and a tank mix of the two herbicides) to study its development in both a natural (control) and treated condition. The herbicides were 2,4-D, Garlon 3A, and Garlon 4, each applied two times. Survival of planted Douglas-fir seedlings was recorded for 11 years and growth was quantified for 9 years after the last treatment application. In addition to Douglas-fir, data are presented individually for the two most abundant species (tanoak and snowbrush), for greenleaf manzanita, and for the hardwood tree and shrubs combined. The treatment response data, cost information, and plant community relationships provides the forest land manager with knowledge on how to attain some specific plant communities in the future, and their developmental potentials.

  19. Predicting height increment of young-growth red fir in California and southern Oregon. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolph, K.L.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An equation is given to estimate 10-year height increment for young-growth red fir trees in California and Southern Oregon. The independent variables are the individual tree, stand, and site characteristics significantly related to a tree's height growth. Data used to develop the equation came from stem analysis of 492 trees sampled from 56 stands in the study area. Parameter estimates for the predictive equation were obtained using least-squares linear regression.

  20. [)r PAR1 rMF.Nr o Dr (.FIrMr( A .IF]CNC)I,OGIi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    [)r PAR1 rMF.Nr o Dr (.FIrMr( A E .IF]CNC)I,OGIi, f)Ă?]I I-ARMACo @ ;^.*r.l-EN,.m BANDO Dl SELEZIONE n. 17 PER lL CONFERIMENTO Dt N. 1 ASSEGNO PER LO SVOLGIMENTO Dl ATTIVITA DI RICERCA DI CATEGORIA B riunita la Commissione esaminatrice per il bando di selezione n. 17 relativo al conferimento di n. 1

  1. Energy Input and Quality of Pellets Made from Steam-Exploded Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Lim, C. Jim [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground softwood Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) was treated with pressurized saturated steam at 200-220 C (1.6-2.4 MPa) for 5-10 min in a sealed container. The contents of the container were released to the atmosphere for a sudden decompression. The steam-exploded wood particles were dried to 10% moisture content and pelletized in a single-piston-cylinder system. The pellets were characterized for their mechanical strength, chemical composition, and moisture sorption. The steamtreated wood required 12-81% more energy to compact into pellets than the untreated wood. Pellets made from steam-treated wood had a breaking strength 1.4-3.3 times the strength of pellets made from untreated wood. Steam-treated pellets had a reduced equilibrium moisture content of 2-4% and a reduced expansion after pelletization. There was a slight increase in the high heating value from 18.94 to 20.09 MJ/kg for the treated samples. Steam-treated pellets exhibited a higher lengthwise rigidity compared to untreated pellets.

  2. The SCUBA HAlf Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES) - IV: Radio-mm-FIR photometric redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itziar Aretxaga; David H. Hughes; Kristen Coppin; Angela M. J. Mortier; Jeff Wagg; James S. Dunlop; Edward L. Chapin; Stephen A. Eales; Enrique Gaztanaga; Mark Halpern; Rob J. Ivison; Eelco van Kampen; Douglas Scott; Stephen Serjeant; Ian Smail; Thomas Babbedge; Andrew J. Benson; Scott Chapman; David L. Clements; Loretta Dunne; Simon Dye; Duncan Farrah; Matthew J. Jarvis; Robert G. Mann; Alexandra Pope; Robert Priddey; Steve Rawlings; Marc Seigar; Laura Silva; Chris Simpson; Mattia Vaccari

    2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the redshift distribution of the SHADES galaxy population based on the rest-frame radio-mm-FIR colours of 120 robustly detected 850um sources in the Lockman Hole East (LH) and Subaru XMM-Newton Deep Field (SXDF). The redshift distribution derived from the full SED information is shown to be narrower than that determined from the radio-submm spectral index, as more photometric bands contribute to a higher redshift accuracy. The redshift distribution of sources derived from at least two photometric bands peaks at z ~ 2.4 and has a near-Gaussian distribution, with 50 per cent (interquartile range) of sources at z=1.8-3.1. We find a statistically-significant difference between the measured redshift distributions in the two fields; the SXDF peaking at a slightly lower redshift (median z ~ 2.2) than the LH (median z ~ 2.7), which we attribute to the noise-properties of the radio observations. We demonstrate however that there could also be field-to-field variations that are consistent with the measured differences in the redshift distributions, and hence, that the incomplete area observed by SHADES with SCUBA, despite being the largest sub-mm survey to date, may still be too small to fully characterize the bright sub-mm galaxy population. Finally we present a brief comparison with the predicted, or assumed, redshift distributions of sub-mm galaxy formation and evolution models, and we derive the contribution of these SHADES sources and the general sub-mm galaxy population to the star formation-rate density at different epochs.

  3. Genetic variation and seed zones of douglas-fir in the Siskiyou National Forest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.K.; Sugano, A.I.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The provisional seed zones and breeding zones were developed for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in the Siskiyou National Forest in southwestern Oregon. Zones were based on maps of genetic variation patterns obtained by evaluating genotypes of trees from 260 locations in the region. Genotypes controlling growth vigor and growth rhythm were assessed in the common garden. Within the Forest, three breeding blocks were recommended, with different numbers of elevational bands in each block: from 0 to 610 meters, from 611 to 838 meters, and then a series of bands 152 meters wide at higher elevations.

  4. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  5. Repeated manual release in a young plantation: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, hardwoods, shrubs, forbs, and grasses. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata Resource Area, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were released by chain sawing and grubbing competing vegetation around them at different frequencies (0, 2, and 3 grubbings) over a 5-year period. After 5 years, average Douglas-fir stem diameter (measured at 12 inches above mean groundline) of seedlings grubbed at ages 1, 2, and 5 was 0.91 inches, and of seedlings grubbed after the first and fifth growing season was 0.95 inches. Both were significantly larger than counterparts in the control (0.57 inches).

  6. Age-class structure of old growth ponderosa pine/douglas-fir stands and its relationship to fire history. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arno, S.F.; Scott, J.H.; Hartwell, M.G.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes age structure of nine old growth ponderosa pine/Douglas-fir stands in western Montana. Interprets the influence of past fires and 20th century five exclusion on stand structure. Gives implications for management to restore and maintain these forests for multiple resource values.

  7. Variation in phenology and monoterpene patterns of defoliated and nondefoliated douglas-fir ( pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca'). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muzika, R.M.; Engle, J.; Parks, C.; Wickman, B.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Foliage was collected from paired Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees characterized as either resistant' or susceptible' to western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attack. Resistant trees produced more foliage monoterpenes and broke bud 7 to 10 days earlier than susceptible trees.

  8. Extended rotations and culmination age of coast douglas-fir: Old studies speak to current issues. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, R.O.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends of mean annual increment and periodic annual increment were examined in 17 long-term thinning studies in Douglas-fir (Pseuditsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) in western Washington, western Oregon, and British Columbia. Problems in evaluating growth trends and culmination ages are discussed. None of the stands had clearly reached culmination of mean annual increment, although some seemed close. The observed trends seem generally consistent with some other recent comparisons. These comparisons indicate that rotations can be considerably extended without reducing long-term timber production; value production probably would increase. A major problem in such a strategy is design of thinning regimes that can maintain a reasonable level of timber flow during the transition period while producing stand conditions compatible with other management objectives. The continuing value of long-term permanent plot studies is emphasized.

  9. Hemlock Semiconductor Corp HSC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefei SungrowHelukabel GmbH Jump to:

  10. Hemlock, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|InformationInformation Station - SouthEntry

  11. Ecological impacts of using chloropicrin to control laminated root rot in northwest conifer forests: Growth and mycorrhiza formation of planted douglas-fir seedlings after two growing seasons. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castellano, M.A.; McKay, D.; Thies, W.G.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barefoot Douglas-fir seedlings inoculated with Rhizopogon sp. and processed by standard nursery and reforestation procedures performed equally well whether planted near Douglas-fir stumps previously fumigated with two dosages of choloropicrin to control Phellinus weirri infection or near stumps not fumigated. Before stump fumigation can be generally recommended for Phellinus-rehabilitation sites, the fate of the chemical and its derivates must be directly assessed under various conditions of stand age, soil, and weather.

  12. Early survival and height growth of douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedling and variations in site factors following treatment of logging residues. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopushinsky, W.; Zabowski, D.; Anderson, T.D.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Logging residues were (1) broadcast burned, (2) piled and burned, (3) removed, or (4) left in place after clearcutting in a high elevation subalpine fir/lodgepole pine forest in north-central Washington. Survival, height growth, and nutrient content of foliage of planted Douglas-fir and lodgepole pine seedlings, and variations in soil factors (nutrients, temperature, moisture, and compaction) and air temperature were compared for the four treatments. Little height growth occurred the first year, and it was similar for all treatments, probably due to transplant shock. Height growth the second year increased the most in the burned treatments, and the least in the slash-left treatment. Levels of nutrients in foliage were similar for all treatments and above threshold-deficiency levels except for sulfur. Extractable soil nutrients increased with burn treatments but returned to levels in other treatments within 3 years, best performance of seedlings during the first 2 years was in burn treatments.

  13. Ten-year development of douglas-fir and associated vegetation after different site preparation on coast range clearcuts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.I.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-years results are presented from an operational-sized, replicated experiment in the Coast Ranges of Oregon to determine the effects of six site-preparation methods on the subsequent survival and growth of Douglas-fir and associated species. Site preparation and seedling protection with plastic mesh tubing significantly enhanced tree development. Site preparation also produced large differences in frequency and cover of associated species but only minor differences in the species represented.

  14. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative studies in douglas-fir: Report No. 10. The Hoskins study. 1963-83. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, D.D.; Bell, J.F.; Tappeiner, J.C.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of the Hoskins levels-of-growing-stock (LOGS) study in western Oregon are summarized and management implications discussed through the fifth and final planned treatment period. To age 40 thinnings in this low site I Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) stand resulted in large increases in diameter growth with reductions in basal area and volume growth and yield. Growth was strongly related to the level of growing stock. Culmination of cubic-foot mean annual increment does not appear to be near for any of the treatments.

  15. Abies lasiocarpa subalpine fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    narrowleaf cottonwood · Leaves lanceolate · Buds terminal with overlapping scales · Catkins drooping #12 nearly circular · Buds with overlapping scales · Catkins drooping #12;Prunus virginiana chokecherry

  16. (1) Determine how topography is related to the spatial distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and cool dry summers. Dominant tree species include Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western hemlock and 3). Terrain is rugged and steep, with a dense network of streams and a climate with warm wet winters-fire salvage b. Stand Basal Area vs Dead Wood Volume 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 Volume

  17. Investigation of Temperature Dependent Optical Modes in GexAs35-xSe65 Thin Films: Structure Specific Raman, FIR and Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Pritam; Joshy, Abin; Sathe, Vasant; Deshpande, Uday; Adarsh, K V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we present a comprehensive study of temperature and composition dependent Raman spectroscopy of GexAs35-xSe65 thin films to understand different structural units responsible for optical properties. Strikingly, our experimental results uncover the ratio of GeSe4/2 tetrahedral and AsSe3/2 pyramidal units in GexAs35-xSe65 thin films and their linear scaling relationship with temperature and x. An important notable outcome of our study is the formation of Se8 rings at lower temperatures. Our experimental results further provide interesting optical features, thermally and compositionally tunable optical absorption spectra. Detailed structure specific FIR data at room temperature also present direct information on the structural units in consistent with Raman data. We foresee that our studies are useful in determining the lightinduced response of these films and also for their potential applications in optics and optoelectronics.

  18. Historical patterns of western spruce budworm and douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks in the northern Blue Mountains, Oregon, since a.d. 1700. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swetnam, T.W.; Wickman, B.E.; Paul, H.G.; Baisan, C.H.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tree-ring samples from 21 mixed-conifer stands in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon were analyzed for evidence of past western spruce budworm and Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks. Comparison of host and nonhost tree-ring growth provided an objective basis for distinguishing climatic effects from insect defoliation effects. Our reconstruction shows that since ca. A.D. 1700 at least eight regional budworm outbreaks occurred at intervals of about 21 to 53 years. Reduced radial growth periods caused by defoliation lasted from 13 to 17 years. Two regional budworm out-breaks occurred in the 19th century (ca. 1806 to 1822 and ca. 1851 to 1867), three outbreaks occurred in the northern Blue Mountains in the 20th century (ca. 1898 to 1910, ca. 1946 to 1958, and ca. 1980 to present), and an additional outbreak occurred in the Eagle Cap Wilderness (ca. 1925 to 1939). These findings generally lend support to the hypothesis that budworm outbreaks have increased in frequency and severity in the 20th century in northeastern Oregon.

  19. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  20. Highly stocked coniferous stands on the Olympic Peninsula: chemical composition and implications for harvest strategy. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, S.N.; Waddell, D.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an assessment of macronutrients and their distribution within highly stocked, stagnant stands of mixed conifers on the Quilcene Ranger District, Olympic National Forest, northwest Washington. These stands consisted of predominantly three species: western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla), coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menzeisii), and western redcedar (Thuja plicata). Preliminary investigation suggests that the living crown contains a small portion of the nutrient capital on the site. Extracting this material from the site during harvest or site preparation should not pose a threat to future production of biomass. Bioassays suggested that no macronutrients were deficient for growth of Douglas-fir seedlings.

  1. Stand characteristics of 65-year-old planted and naturally regenerated stands near Sequim, Washington. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Anderson, H.W.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tree numbers, height, and volume were determined in six 63- to 66-year-old plantations of coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsunga menziesii) (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii in northwest Washington. These stands resulted from the first extensive plantings of this species in the Pacific Northwest. Data from 0.25-acre plots in these plantations were compared to those from matched plots in adjacent, naturally regenerated stands with the same history of logging, wildfire, and absence of further siviculture after regeneration. Planting resulted in well-stocked Douglas-fir stands with volunteers of other tree species. Natural seeding resulted in similarly stocked stands of western hemlock (Tsunga heterophylla) (Raf.) (Sarg.) with Douglas-fir in the dominant crown class.

  2. SEED SOURCE ASSESSMENTS--DOUGLAS-FIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    (TGC, RGC) just after lifting and after cold storage, and for survival and growth on cleared planting extent are TGC and RGC at lifting altered by seedling cold storage to spring planting time? · When during the winter season can seedlings in the nursery be safely lifted for cold storage and spring planting? · How

  3. andean alder alnus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de Santander (D. klagesi): ICN35570, Colombia, Norte de Santander, Ocaa, Agua de la Virgen, -73.40, 08.23. 4. hellmayri (D. hellmayri): ANDES-BT994, Colombia Cuervo,...

  4. alder-winter theory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and mutlilinear algebra. George Svetlichny 1999-03-12 450 Benchmarking Nuclear Fission Theory Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We suggest a small set of fission observables...

  5. alder alnus incana: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fixation in the watershed soils and the associated N flux to the lake Hu, Feng Sheng 13 Multivariate analysis of allozymic and quantitative trait variation in Alnus rubra...

  6. alder alnus acuminata: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fixation in the watershed soils and the associated N flux to the lake Hu, Feng Sheng 10 Multivariate analysis of allozymic and quantitative trait variation in Alnus rubra...

  7. alder alnus glutinosa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of leaf acclimation for whole plant growth. functional-structural growth Boyer, Edmond 15 Multivariate analysis of allozymic and quantitative trait variation in Alnus rubra...

  8. alder receives national: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    through frequency detuning in a coupled set of local obtainedby detuning the end elements of the local oscillator array. It is possible to increasethe York, Robert A. 228...

  9. alder stands budgets: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oriented synthesis of PPAPs scaffold via sequential one pot (more) Sow, Boubacar 2013-01-01 87 2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES Physics Websites Summary: , we can also write c f...

  10. alder blumer eugenics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by declination: Divide the catalog objects into "buckets" by declination, where each bucket 214 A Digital Humanities Approach to the History of Science Eugenics revisited in...

  11. Geographic variation in red alder. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, D.T.; DeBell, D.S.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test of 10 provenances was established in 1969 on the central coast of Oregon. The provenances tested included Juneau, Alaska, and Sandpoint, Idaho, in addition to eight well-spaced locations in Oregon, Washington, and in the southern end of Vancouver island, British Columbia. Periodic measurements through 15 years of plantation development revealed differences among provenances in height, diameter, and height/diameter ratio. The calculated variables, bole volume and aboveground biomass, showed large differences among provenances. Two provenances from northwestern Washington consistently were the most vigorous, two (Juneau, Alaska, and Sandpoint, Idaho) were the least vigorous, and the remaining six provenances shifted somewhat in ranking over time.

  12. Electronic effects in the Diels-Alder reactions of vinylboranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Jose Vernon

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &H NMR spectrum of the oxidized products in the competitive reaction of 4a and 4b with vinyl-9-BBN 10 tH NMR spectrum of the oxidized products in the competitive reaction of 4b and 4c with vinyl-9-BBN 11 tH NMR spectrum of trivinylborane. 12 t...~C NMR spectrum of trivinylborane . 13 Plot of the reaction ratio versus time 17 21 22 26 27 in the reaction of 4a with trivinylborane 31 LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) 14 Plot of the reaction ratio versus time in the reaction of cyclopentadiene...

  13. alder tree labiate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the case of the complete graph, where we prove that two random spanning trees give an expander. The construction of the splicer is elementary -- each spanning tree can be...

  14. MHK Projects/White Alder Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to:Vicksburg Bend <WavegenPassage1

  15. Dictionary of Upriver Halkomelem, Volume I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galloway, Brent Douglas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    yc lč//, ABDF ['to poison'], SOC, root possibly related to poison fern that grows in swampyprob. water hemlock, poison hemlock):: welékwsa. sword

  16. 108 Raupp et al.: Mites on Hemlocks Following Applications of Imidacloprid Systemic insecticides have gained widespread use in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eubanks, Micky

    beetles (Sclar and Cranshaw 1996), lace bugs (Gill et al. 1999), aphids (Sclar and Cranshaw 1996), scales reports and one empirical study (Sclar et al. 1998) indicated that spider mite populations and attendant such as elm and honeylocust (Sclar et al. 1998). These reports parallel similar observations in agricultural

  17. Development of Three Reaction Methodologies En Route to Nitrogen Containing Heterocycles: a Diels-Alder/Schmidt, a DIels-Alder/Acylation and a Catalytic Intramolecular Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirt, Erin Elaine

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    or DMSO 8% N 3 5 An activated azido diene, (E)-(6-azidohexa-1,3-dien-2-yloxy)trimethylsilane (10), was also prepared for investigation in this study (Scheme 8). The Michael addition of sodium azide to acrolein provided the azido aldehyde 7 in nearly... acyclic azido enones as starting materials (Scheme 9). Thus, 9 and 12 were synthesized in two steps from acrolein in a similar manner to silyloxydiene 10. This synthesis began with a Michael addition into acrolein and was followed by a Horner...

  18. A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, Michelle D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

  19. appalachian spruce fir: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sprayed with a surfactant M Borghetti Istituto whether the water relations of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst) seedlings are affected by repeated, during which water...

  20. Virtual Field Trip: Temperate Rain Forest Douglas Fir and Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Disturbance Cascade Creek fire on the southwest flank of Mount Adams. Sept 2012 #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs Severity: high Size: large Frequency: 50-90 yrs Severity: low Size: small Fire in the PNW Natural Disturbance #12;Vegetation Succession #12;Species and Trophic relationships Pacific Giant

  1. JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 4 VERSION 1 Conjugation, Diels-Alder, Aromaticity, Aromatic Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasperse, Craig P.

    byproducts). (21 points, 3 points each) SO3HHO HNO3, H 2SO4 O + 1. HNO3, H 2SO4 2. Cl2, AlCl 3 3. Fe, HCl 1

  2. Vinylboranes as trans-dihydroxyethylene equivalents in Diels-Alder reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Aniko Maria

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Dienophile 7 trans-4-tert-Butyl-6-(dimethylphenylsil yl)- 3-cyclohexen- I-ol (9) . tr ans-4-Phenyl-6-(dimethylphenylsilyl)- 3-cyclohexen-I-ol (10) and trans-3-Phenyl-6-(dimethylphenylsilyl)- 3-cyclohexen-I-ol (11). trans-3, 4-Dimethyl-6...)-3-cyclohexen-I-ol (15) and trans-3-(4-methyl-3-pentenyl)- 6-(dimethylphenylsilyl)-3-cyclohexen- I-ol (16) (I et, 3', 4', 6[))- I-Acetoxy-3, 4-epoxy-3, 4-dimethyl- 6-(dimcthylphenylsilyl)-cyclohexane (21) Page 57 57 58 58 59 59 60 61 62...

  3. Theory of gated hemicarcerands and Diels-Alder reactions of tetrazines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, FANG

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consistent reaction field (SCRF) using the CPCM model, [9]consistent reaction field (SCRF) using the CPCM model, whereconsistent reaction field (SCRF) using the CPCM model, [26-

  4. ALDER, COTTONWOOD, AND SYCAMORE DISTRIBUTION AND REGENERATION ALONG THE NACIMIENTO RIVER, CALIFORNIAI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . It and the San Antonio River have parallel courses, and each is a major tributary to the north-flowing Salinas-1977 drought, cattle concentra tions were excessively high and the range condi tion deteriorated. However

  5. A woodchuck mows down an entire row of new cabbage transplants... A porcupine is destroying a hedge of hemlocks...Flyingsquirrelsarekeepingfamilymembersawake,chatteringandracingthroughthewallsallnight.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    virus can survive in saliva and central nervous tissue for hours after a rabid animal has died. Also or bird seed, bird feeders, bags of garbage. · Do not attempt to manage a wild bear on your own. Contact

  6. The Relative Abundance of the Juvenile Phase of the Eastern Red-Spotted Newt at Harvard Forest Prior to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    a great percentage of Eastern Hemlock's range via a number of dispersal agents including wind, birds, deer cause mortality in all age classes of Eastern Hemlock within 4­10 years of infestation (McClure 1991). In central Massachusetts, cold winter temperatures have slowed mortality of Eastern Hemlock in infested

  7. Highly Enantioselective Syntheses of Functionalized r-Methylene--butyrolactones via Rh(I)-catalyzed Intramolecular Alder Ene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xumu

    the utility of our methodology, we introduced various functional groups at the allylic position (Table 3). If R2 is an acetyl group, the desired product is a vinyl acetate-substituted -lactone. If R2 is an alkyl group, a vinyl ether is the corresponding product. Due to the wide applications of vinyl acetates

  8. A convergent intermolecular Diels-Alder approach to the spirocycles found in the marine neurotoxic agents, the gymnodimines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohn, Stephen Todd

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structural features of gymnodimine include the highly functionalized 15-membered macrocyclic ether, the trisubstituted tetrahydrofuran, the butenolide and especially the rare spirocyclic imine-containing ring system. The two dimensional structure... yield. The racemic synthesis of intermediate 6, which is the most advanced (longest linear sequence) imine-spirocycle precursor prepared in this study, was accomplished in 12 steps and 6. 4% overall yield from PMB ether 4. The intramolecular Diels...

  9. Distribution of Fine Roots of Ponderosa Pine and Douglas-Fir in a Central Idaho Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    at a study site in a central Idaho forest. Concentration and content of fine roots extracted from soil cores of exotic dis- eases, heavy grazing, and timber harvest has altered forest structure, stand composition(SwezyandAgee1991,Dumm2003).Finerootsarecritical structures for water and nutrient absorption from the soil

  10. Original article The physiological status of Douglas fir seedlings and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    November to December/January. Following cold storage until June, field performance was acceptable quality / plant handling / cold hardiness / mitotic index / cold storage / Pseudotsuga meuziesii Résumé

  11. A Multiple Detector Approach to Low-resolution FIR Pedestrian Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    comprises the simultaneous harmonized use of three powerful detection algorithms, the hyper permutation of the detection results is performed by a particle filter approach. I. INTRODUCTION A. Motivation Driver assistance systems supporting the driver at night are of increasing interest in the car market. The first

  12. Modeling to discern nitrogen fertilization impacts on carbon sequestration in a Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling to discern nitrogen fertilization impacts on carbon sequestration in a Pacific Northwest A R K J O H N S O N } *LREIS Institute of Geographic Sciences & Nature Resources Research, Chinese of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6T 1Z4, zBiometeorology and Soil Physics

  13. Glacial populations and postglacial migration of Douglas-fir based on fossil pollen and macrofossil evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugger, Paul F.

    and Europe, and provide a context for interpreting new molecular datasets from modern forests. In western, Italian and Balkan peninsulas during the LGM and expanded to their present distributions at rates up

  14. The 7-channel FIR HCN Interferometer on J-TEXT Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chen; L. Gao; J. Chen; Q. Li; Z. J. Wang; G. Zhuang

    2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A seven-channel far-infrared hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer has been established aiming to provide the line integrated plasma density for the J-TEXT experimental scenarios. A continuous wave glow discharge HCN laser designed with a cavity length 3.4 m is used as the laser source with a wavelength of 337 {\\mu}m and an output power up to 100 mW. The system is configured as a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer. Phase modulation is achieved by a rotating grating, with a modulation frequency of 10 kHz which corresponds to the temporal resolution of 0.1 ms. The beat signal is detected by TGS detector. The phase shift induced by the plasma is derived by the comparator with a phase sensitivity of 0.06 fringe. The experimental results measured by the J-TEXT interferometer are presented in details. In addition, the inversed electron density profile done by a conventional approach is also given. The kinematic viscosity of dimethyl silicone and vibration control is key issues for the system performance. The laser power stability under different kinematic viscosity of silicone oil is presented. A visible improvement of measured result on vibration reduction is shown in the paper.

  15. Intensive Silviculture of Planted Douglas-fir Forests -Feb 15, 2011 Net Value Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capture technologyNew value capture technology Stand Value $$$ Log Product Yields Above Ground Carbon

  16. Douglas-fir plantation productivity: effects of organic matter retention, competing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sand silt loamsoils MolallaMatlockFall River Grove soil series near Matlock #12;Precipitation(mm) 20 25 30 35 control compacted Fall River Matlock Molalla Height(cm) 100 120 140 160 Third-year size

  17. ADAPTIVE FLUT FI.R SUPPRES; II.)N J. B. Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    of weight reduction and flight env+>lope expansion. However, the model lng of th~ aircraft structural dynamics Is oniy approximate. The uncertainty in the model increases with increasing frequency. Ibis l using some form ,! plant Identification scheme can alleviate sc!!T,eof the difficulties. It will change

  18. Analog FIR Filter Used for Range-Optimal Pulsed Radar Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Eric Chen

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Matched filter is one of the most critical block in radar applications. With different measured range and relative velocity of a target we will need different bandwidth of the matched filter to maximize the radar signal to noise ratio (SNR...

  19. Michael.Gensch @ DESY.DE (First) Photondiagnostic of the FIR Undulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powermeter (currently under development by HASYLAB in collaboration with external groups: BESSY, FELBE, DLR under development in collaboration with external groups: BESSY, FELBE, DLR, PTB and DESY-FLA) } ONLINE

  20. Michael.Gensch @ DESY.DE Light at the FLASH FIR beamline second coming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), Wolfgang Seidel (FZ Rossendorf), Ullrich Schade, Jongseok Lee (BESSY), Heinz-Wilhelm Hübers, Alexei Semenov central on delay translational stage! Synchrotron beamline #12;9Michael Gensch FLASH Seminar 19

  1. Overstory/understory relationships in old growth Grand fir habitat types of northeast Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreder, Peter Todd

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    closure was obtained from PMR output that classified all overstory on the allotment into an index of crown closure present at different stands. Spatial variability within the stand was determined through variable plot measurements of tree diameter, live... soil types. Classifications of overstory cover obtained &om PMR maps of each allotment were assigned to forested stands in each cluster group. Overstory cover classifications were 0-25'/0 canopy cover, 26-55 10 canopy cover, and &55 10 canopy cover...

  2. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for| DepartmentReduce Hot Water UseComplex |

  3. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuickEnergyfor aDepartmentSimulators

  4. Purpose: To focus a select group of upper-level undergraduate students and firs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery, and Storage of Gases Print

  5. EAST 17TH AVENUE AGATESTREET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cina, Jeff

    of Art Prince Lucien Campbell (PLC) Condon Chapman Johnson Collier House Lokey Education Alder Building

  6. 122 2010 USDA Research Forum on Invasive Species GTR-NRS-P-75 COMPARISON OF FECUNDITY AND SURVIVAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID (HEMIPTERA: ADELGIDAE) IN NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN POPULATIONS Artemis Roehrig), Adelges tsugae Annand (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), is an introduced species first reported in the eastern

  7. arsenic poisoning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Description: Poison hemlock is a member of the parsnip or carrot family (umbelliferae). This species is a biennial, producing large rosette leaves during the...

  8. Phenylseleno Acrylate As A Novel Ethylene Equivalent for Diels-Alder Reactions And An ortho-Benzoquinone Cycloaddition Strategy Toward Morphine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Felix Rene

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed a one pot, catalytic process from acrolein (25).13 The less reactive acrolein 25 was activated by boronthe activating auxiliary. Acrolein was the most successful

  9. Nickel-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura reactions of unactivated halides with alkyl boranes and planar-chiral borabenzene catalysts for Diels-Alder reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhe

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part I describes the expansion in scope of a nickel-catalyzed coupling reaction of unactivated alkyl bromides and alkyl boranes to include unactivated alkyl chlorides. The new method is adapted for use outside of a glove ...

  10. Retro Diels-Alder Reactions of 5,6-Disubstituted-7-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-enes: Experimental and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaszynski, Piotr

    , the * Author for correspondence: Phone/fax: 615-898-2071/5182. Department of Chemistry, Middle Tennessee State

  11. DownloadedBy:[UniversidadGranada]At:20:0622November2007 Learning fuzzy partitions in FIR methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granada, Universidad de

    Departament de Llenguatges i Sistemes Informa`tics, Universitat Polite`cnica de Catalunya 08034, Barcelona §Departament d'Enginyeria de Sistemes, Automa`tica i Informa`tica Industrial, Universitat Polite`cnica de of this research is the development of a hybrid genetic fuzzy system (GFS), composed by the fuzzy inductive

  12. Forecasting outbreaks of the douglas-fir tussock moth from lower crown cocoon samples. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.R.; Scott, D.W.; Paul, H.G.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A predictive technique using a simple linear regression was developed to forecast the midcrown density of small tussock moth larvae from estimates of cocoon density in the previous generation. The regression estimator was derived from field samples of cocoons and larvae taken from a wide range of nonoutbreak tussock moth populations. The accuracy of the predictions was demonstrated on an operational basis in an independent tussock moth outbreak.

  13. Genotype environmental interaction: A case study for douglas-fir in Western Oregon. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, R.K.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unrecognized genotype x environment interactions can bias genetic-gain predictions and models for predicting growth dynamics or species perturbations by global climate change. The study tested six sets of families in 10 plantation sites in a 78-thousand-hectare breeding zone. Plantation differences accounted for 71 percent of sums of squares (15-year heights), replications an additional 4.4 percent, families 1.9 percent, the first principal component of interaction effects 3.5 percent, and the second principal component 1.2 percent. Results in the study in a larger survey (87 sets in 10 breeding zones) were similar: 51 percent of sets indicated significant g star e.

  14. Optimal FiniteComplexity Transmit Filters for Packet Data Transmission on Dispersive Channels with Application to the FIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Dhahir, Naofal

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 15 6 A flow chart of the symbol rate optimization procedure : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 17 7 Optimizing the number of usable input dimensions subject to a flat input energy constraint

  15. BLAST OBSERVATIONS OF RESOLVED GALAXIES: TEMPERATURE PROFILES AND THE EFFECT OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI ON FIR TO SUBMILLIMETER EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiebe, Donald V.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Pascale, Enzo [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica, Aptdo. Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Martin, Peter G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Olmi, Luca [Istituto di Radioastronomia, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Patanchon, Guillaume [Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France)

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of two flights, the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) made resolved maps of seven nearby (<25 Mpc) galaxies at 250, 350, and 500 mum. During its 2005 June flight from Sweden, BLAST observed a single nearby galaxy, NGC 4565. During the 2006 December flight from Antarctica, BLAST observed the nearby galaxies NGC 1097, NGC 1291, NGC 1365, NGC 1512, NGC 1566, and NGC 1808. We fit physical dust models to a combination of BLAST observations and other available data for the galaxies observed by Spitzer. We fit a modified blackbody to the remaining galaxies to obtain total dust mass and mean dust temperature. For the four galaxies with Spitzer data, we also produce maps and radial profiles of dust column density and temperature. We measure the fraction of BLAST detected flux originating from the central cores of these galaxies and use this to calculate a 'core fraction', an upper limit on the 'active galactic nucleus fraction' of these galaxies. We also find our resolved observations of these galaxies give a dust mass estimate 5-19 times larger than an unresolved observation would predict. Finally, we are able to use these data to derive a value for the dust mass absorption coefficient of kappa = 0.29 +- 0.03 m{sup 2} kg{sup -1} at 250 mum. This study is an introduction to future higher-resolution and higher-sensitivity studies to be conducted by Herschel and SCUBA-2.

  16. DataONE currently holds a collection of over 125,000 metadata records linked to data sets in 10 environmental and earth science data reposito-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    analysis cover set analysis cover set forest hemlock species forest hemlock species m biomass cm m biomass discoverable through DataONE.org a t c a l i f o r n i a drinking assessment supply drinking assessment supply nitrogen co2 nitrogen co2 biomass primary biomass primary soil n organic soil n organic river marsh island

  17. Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldering, Greg

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-61879 Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of California. Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and

  18. anticholinesterase poisoning annual: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may and speech Make it hard to pay attention and learn FACT Most children get lead poisoning from paint 19 NOXIOUS WEED FACT SHEET Poison Hemlock CiteSeer Summary:...

  19. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Ashby, M. L. N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T. [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai 9808578 (Japan); Miyazaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  20. Some simulation estimates of mean annual increment of douglas-fir: Results, limitations, and implications for management. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, R.O.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns of development of mean annual increment in relation to age predicted by the widely used DFSM, SPS, TASS, and ORGANON simulators were examined. Although predictions differ considerably among simulators for portions of the range of sites, ages, and treatments, comparisons indicated that (1) culmination is relatively late, (2) the curve is relatively flat in the vicinity of culmination, and (3) systematic thinning tends to delay culmination. Harvest ages of 40 to 50 years reduce volume production relative to potential by amounts ranging from moderate to large according to site, treatment regime, and simulator. Within unknown upper limits, moderate extension of rotations to minimize conflicts among timber production and environmental, aesthetic, and wildlife values would not materially reduce long-term volume production and might increase value production.

  1. Levels-of-growing-stock cooperative study in douglas-fir: Report No. 12. The Iron Creek study. 1966-89. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, R.O.; Clendenen, G.W.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes results of Iron Creek levels-of-growing-stock (LOGS) installation. To age 42, volume growth has been strongly related to growing stock and partially offsets the decrease in growth percent expected with increasing growing stock. Basal area growth-growing stock relations were much weaker. Marked differences in size distributions resulted from thinning. Periodic annual volume increments were two to three times greater than mean annual increment at age 42; this stand is far from culmination. Results are generally similar to those from other installations in the LOGS series.

  2. The Nearby Supernova FactoryThe Nearby Supernova Factory W.M. Wood-Vasey, G. Aldering, B. C. Lee, S. Loken, P. Nugent, S. Perlmutter, R. Quimby, J. Siegrist, L. Wang Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 0.45 0.5 SupernovaeDiscovered/year/0.02 MagnitudeError Redshift Redshift distribution for Various

  3. EUROPHYSICS LETTERS Europhys. Lett., 25 (3), pp. 231-236 (1994)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andelman, David

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Awiv University, Ramat Awiv, Tel Awiv 69978, Israel (**) Institut fir Theoretische' Physik, WE2, Freie

  4. Climate Variability of the Sierra Nevada Over the Last Millennium: Reconstructions from Annually Laminated Sediments in Swamp Lake, Yosemite National Park, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cayan, Daniel R; Charles, Christopher D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bean black oak ponderosa pine insense cedar watershield swaying bulrush Robbin's pondweed douglas fir water

  5. [4 + 2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : synthesis of highly substituted tetrahydropyridines and indolizidine alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumidajski, Stephanie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iminoacetonitriles participate as activated imino dienophiles in intermolecular and intramolecular aza Diels-Alder reactions affording tetrahydropyridines and indolizidines. The [alpha]-amino nitrile cycloadducts are ...

  6. Enantioselective [4 + 2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : application to the total synthesis of (-)-quinolizidine 2071

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Shaun D. (Shaun David)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iminoacetonitriles participate as reactive dienophiles in intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions affording quinolizidines and indolizidines. The resulting a-amino nitrile cycloadducts are versatile intermediates that ...

  7. Exploring Dark Energy with SNAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldering, G.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weak lensing survey. The planned dark energy program forthe Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) will produce a treasureLBNL- 58276 Exploring Dark Energy with SNAP G. Aldering

  8. [4+2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : a general strategy for the synthesis of quinolizidines, indolizidines, and piperidines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Kevin M. (Kevin Matthew)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iminoacetonitriles participate as reactive dienophiles in intermolecular and intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions leading to quinolizidines, indolizidines, and piperidines. The resultant a-amino nitrile cycloadducts ...

  9. Hardwood price reporting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohngen, B.L.; Haynes, R.W.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prices for red alder (Alnus rubra) hardwood logs are published and analyzed for reliability, consistency, and robustness. Timberland managers can use these prices to make decisions about land management. They show that values for red alder logs have been increasing steadily for the last 11 years.

  10. Great price spike of '93: An analysis of lumber and stumpage prices in the pacific northwest. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohngen, B.L.; Haynes, R.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes prices for red alder hardwood logs which are published and analyzed for reliability consistency, and robustness. Timberland managers can use these prices to make decisions regarding land management. They show that values for red alder logs have been increasing steadily for the past 11 years.

  11. CATALOGUE OF PLANTS LIVING COLLECTION JANUARY 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, Kim

    , Birdsboro, PA seedling Balkan Peninsula 2000-209*B M6 Abies borisii-regis King Boris fir G T. Stokes, Birdsboro, PA seedling Balkan Peninsula 1932-0696*A J19 Abies cephalonica Greek fir G Morris Estate, PA

  12. Lodgepole Pine Management Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decades or even centuries ago. Others are mixed with pine, Douglas-fir, and aspen at lower elevations. subalpine species such as Engelmann spruce, subalpine fir, and aspen at higher elevations, or with mixed

  13. MixedConifer Forests in Southwest Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -moist zone (upper elevations dominated by white fir, but including Douglas-fir, aspen, and spruce), fire older-aged stands and relatively few younger stands, and susceptibility to insect infestations. Aspen and the presence of Sudden Aspen

  14. Changes in forest structure and the understory plant community of a dry mixed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -fir, white fir, and aspen) for reconstructed 1870, 2003 and 2009 data. Source d.f. SS MS F p, and aspen) for reconstructed 1870, 2003 and 2009 data. Source d.f. SS MS F p

  15. The influence of distance to refuge on flight initiation distance in the gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    , with Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziezii) the dominant species. The ground surface was packed soil, fine gravel

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

  17. The effects of in vitro and greenhouse irradiance, fertility, and media on the growth of a hybrid Phalaenopsis orchid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konow, Elise Ann

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 2ON-8.6-P-16.6K], DynaGro, and Wilder's, was applied to Phalaenopsis Atien Kaala 'TSC 22' plants grown in either fir bark alone or 70% fir bark and 3 0% Canadian sphagnum peat (bark/peat). Plants grown in the fir bark medium with 2ON-2.2P-I 5.8K...

  18. Colorado State University Cooperative Extension. 4/02.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    necessary for good germination. Aspen is unique among Colorado forest trees in its ability to sprout new types are pinon pine-juniper; ponderosa pine-Douglas-fir; lodgepole pine; spruce-fir; and aspen. Fire lower in elevation and dryer than the spruce-fir forest types of the subalpine zone. Aspen is Colorado

  19. Spatial variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas fir forest stand Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 363374 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of Environmental Sciences, Energy Research and Process Innovation (TNO-MEP), P.O. Box 342, NL-7300 AH Apeldoorn a field plot. Such studies have not been designed to sample the spatial heterogeneity that normally exists overlook a rich abundance of information found at a higher resolution. For example, individual plants may

  20. North Landing (can also deck along

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on bike trails. A6 - Aspen A8/M6 - Aspen/Hardwoods AM6 - Aspen/Hardwoods C6 - Cedar H8 - Hemlock K9 - Oak M6 - Hardwoods M6/WP7 - Hardwoods/Pine MK9/MK6 - Oak/Hardwoods MKA8/M6 - Oak/Aspen/Hardwoods Mixed

  1. 2011 ISRP Retrospective Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but is there competition ­ hatchery vs wild? · Possible density dependent factors as stock size rebuilds. The ISRP sees Time Frames for Results How long will it take to measure the effects of habitat actions? #12;Some improvements will be almost immediate... Hemlock Dam before removal After removal #12;Some will take decades

  2. Texas Range Plants Poisonous to Livestock. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperry, Omer Edison

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    College Staiion, Texas CONTENTS Page Pap INTRODUCTION ........................... .------------------ , 3 PART 11. PLANTS LESS COMMONLY TOXIC TO LIVESTOCK THE PROBLEM --------.--------.----------.------------------ 3 Aloysia lycioides, Whitebrush... ------.-.-------... ... 35 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 3 Amaranthzts spp., Careless weed ----------.-.... 3.5 PART 1. IPLAKTS MOST COMMONLY TOXIC TO LIVESTOCK A pocynum canna binum, Dogbane, Indian hemp 35 Cicuta curtissii. Water hemlock -_--------.-...... 36 Acacia berlandieri...

  3. Proceedings of the Symposium on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    F AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL Hemlock Dwarf MistletoeREPORT PSW- 31 #12;Proceedings Robert F. Scharpf J o h n R. Parmeter, Jr. Technical Coordinators CONTENTS Page Introduction Opening Records ...... 45 CharlesI,. Bolsinger Approaches to Determining Volume Losses Due to Dwarf Mistletoe ona

  4. Total Synthesis of (?)-Himandrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movassaghi, Mohammad

    We describe the first total synthesis of (?)-himandrine, a member of the class II galbulimima alkaloids. Noteworthy features of this chemistry include a diastereoselective Diels?Alder reaction in the rapid synthesis of the ...

  5. The enantioselective total synthesis of (+)-Symbioimine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Born, Stephen Christopher

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C 10 unit 45, a C 3 unit (acrolein), and tryptophan. The key3 H H NH 3 O N N H O O acrolein -H + N N Diels-Alder N N [

  6. Cyclobutadiene–C[subscript 60] Adducts: N-Type Materials for Organic Photovoltaic Cells with High V[subscript OC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Ggoch Ddeul

    New tetraalkylcyclobutadiene–C[subscript 60] adducts are developed via Diels–Alder cycloaddition of C[subscript 60] with in situ generated cyclobutadienes. The cofacial ?-orbital interactions between the fullerene orbitals ...

  7. akari-galex all-sky surveys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    We have established formulae to convert FIR luminosity from AKARI bands to the total infrared (IR) luminosity LTIR. With these formulae, we calculated the star formation directly...

  8. Microsoft Word - Luke_Robinson_Thesis_Revision

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIR Finite Impulse Response FFT Fast Fourier Transform LPC Linear Predictive Coding NDE Non Destructive Evaluation PFA Probability of False Alarm PD Probability of Detection PSD...

  9. Assessment of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office Conduct of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Quality CR Condition Report CONOPS Conduct of Operations DOE U.S. Department of Energy DUF6 Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride FIR Field Inspection Report FPD Federal Project Director...

  10. abies alba larix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so podobne kot pri smreki (Picea abies Karst.). Jelovina ima prednost predvsem tam of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.). Fir is favoured where resin is not desired, where...

  11. abies abies alba: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so podobne kot pri smreki (Picea abies Karst.). Jelovina ima prednost predvsem tam of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.). Fir is favoured where resin is not desired, where...

  12. abies alba stands: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so podobne kot pri smreki (Picea abies Karst.). Jelovina ima prednost predvsem tam of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.). Fir is favoured where resin is not desired, where...

  13. abies alba mill: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so podobne kot pri smreki (Picea abies Karst.). Jelovina ima prednost predvsem tam of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.). Fir is favoured where resin is not desired, where...

  14. airborne respirable dust: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Interstellar Medium: dust Interstellar dust Dust grains (silicatecarbon cores, ice mantles , 1-2 Thermal emission: mm, submm, FIR (optically thin) 12;Interstellar...

  15. Copyright 2008, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology) 0883-1351/08/0023-0421/$3.00 PALAIOS, 2008, v. 23, p. 421423

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    or C-S-R triangle (Grime, 1977). Importantly, the interrelation- ships among leaf economic traits fossil leaf eco- nomics. The fir

  16. Index des mots-cls Keywords index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , 445 circum-Mediterranean firs, 823 climate, 439 climate change, 823 climate gradient, 1 climatic maximal light driven electron flow, 163 mechanical property, 317 mechanical strength, 129 Mediterranean

  17. Physica E 2 (1998) 3943 Full-spectrum optically detected resonance (ODR) spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Benard.A.

    , Bu alo, NY 14260, USA Abstract Resonant magneto-absorption of far-infrared (FIR) laser radiation that do not involve carrier heating. At high FIR laser intensities, carrier heating e ects dominate; Photoluminescence; Impurities Optically detected resonance (ODR) spectroscopy combines visible=near-infrared

  18. Ecosystem CO2/H2O fluxes are explained by hydraulically limited gas exchange during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Dendroctonus rufipennis) is the major insect disturbance in the subalpine spruce-fir forests of North America of eddy covariance flux data collected throughout the progression of a spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemic in a Wyoming Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii)­subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa

  19. ENG EC516 Digital Signal Processing 2008-2009 Catalog Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and their properties in relation to application requirements such as real-time, low bandwidth, and low-power operation. Optimal FIR filter design; time-dependent Fourier transform and filterbanks; Hilbert transform relations this course, students should be able to design DSP solutions involving the following topics: 1. Optimal FIR

  20. Signs of Recovery for Colorado Forests in the Wake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and quaking aspen are common in the understory of these study areas. In other locations, lodgepole pine-infested Stands Since 2008, lodgepole pine and subalpine fir seedlings and aspen sprouts have become established and aspen recruits were three times more abundant in harvested stands. Subalpine fir trees were the most

  1. Human detection with a multi-sensors stereovision system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Human detection with a multi-sensors stereovision system Y. Benezeth1 , P.M. Jodoin2 , B. Emile3 Far-Infrared (FIR) and daylight cameras mounted on a stereovision setup. Although daylight or FIR together. In order to gauge performances, a quantitative evaluation based on an annotated dataset

  2. Ann. For. Sci. 67 (2010) 805 Available online at: c INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010 www.afs-journal.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to summer water shortage. In a central European context we define drought as a day or a sequence of days of days when the tree water demand exceeded the soil water supply was higher for Douglas-fir than-fir's high sensitivity to limited water supply. · Simulated climate change does not substantially alter

  3. Original article Predicted global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Predicted global warming and Douglas-fir chilling requirements DD McCreary1 DP to predicted global warming. Douglas-fir / chilling / global warming / bud burst / reforestation Résumé offer evidence that mean global warming of 3-4 °C could occur within the next century, particularly

  4. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  5. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  6. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  7. New strategies for the synthesis of azepine-containing alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tallant, Matthew David

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dimethyltritylsilyl ether 35. . . . . . . . . . Diels-Alder cyclization of 18 with dimethyl fumarate. . . . . Intramolecular Heck cyclization of enamide 32. . . . . . . , . . . . . Page 23 24 26 27 28 28 30 30 32 33 34 43 xn1 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1.... 11: Diels-Alder cyclization of 27 with dimethyl fumarate and X-ray structure of dimethyltritylsilyl ether 35. Iicc Or Me Me or C LiBHe, Beo, PhH, gg 'C, 24h ~ "CO Me H 27 87% CO, Me 61% 32 OH Ph, CSiMe2Br DMF, rl, 24 h AgNO3, Iree Ofr...

  8. High Spatial Resolution KAO Far-Infrared Observations of the Central Regions of Infrared-Bright Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly J. Smith; P. M. Harvey

    1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new high spatial resolution Kuiper Airborne Observatory 50 micron and/or 100 micron data for 11 infrared-bright galaxies. We also tabulate previously published KAO data for 11 other galaxies, along with the IRAS data for the bulges of M 31 and M 81. We find that L(FIR)/L(B) and L(FIR)/L(H) correlate with CO (1 - 0) intensity and tau(100). Galaxies with optical or near-infrared signatures of OB stars in their central regions have higher values of I(CO) and tau(100), as well as higher far-infrared surface brightnesses and L(FIR)/L(B) and L(FIR)/L(H) ratios. L(FIR)/L(H(alpha)) does not correlate strongly with CO and tau(100). These results support a scenario in which OB stars dominate dust heating in the more active galaxies and older stars are important in quiescent bulges.

  9. A POPULATION OF DUST-RICH QUASARS AT z {approx} 1.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Y. Sophia; Elvis, Martin; Huang Jiasheng; Fazio, Giovanni; Trichas, Markos [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR7095, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bock, Jamie; Vieira, Joaquin D. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-4575 (United States); Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Ibar, Edo [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, Dimitra [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Oliver, Seb J. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Page, Mathew J.; Symeonidis, Myrto [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Perez-Fournon, Ismael [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Roseboom, Isaac G. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Scott, Douglas, E-mail: ydai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); and others

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report Herschel SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 {mu}m) detections of 32 quasars with redshifts 0.5 {<=}z < 3.6 from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). These sources are from a MIPS 24 {mu}m flux-limited sample of 326 quasars in the Lockman Hole Field. The extensive multi-wavelength data available in the field permit construction of the rest-frame spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from ultraviolet to the mid-infrared for all sources, and to the far-infrared (FIR) for the 32 objects. Most quasars with Herschel FIR detections show dust temperatures in the range of 25-60 K, with a mean of 34 K. The FIR luminosities range from 10{sup 11.3} to 10{sup 13.5} L{sub Sun }, qualifying most of their hosts as ultra- or hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. These FIR-detected quasars may represent a dust-rich population, but with lower redshifts and fainter luminosities than quasars observed at {approx}1 mm. However, their FIR properties cannot be predicted from shorter wavelengths (0.3-20 {mu}m, rest frame), and the bolometric luminosities derived using the 5100 A index may be underestimated for these FIR-detected quasars. Regardless of redshift, we observed a decline in the relative strength of FIR luminosities for quasars with higher near-infrared luminosities.

  10. Diversity of xylariaceous symbionts in Xiphydria woodwasps: role of vector and a host tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mycological Society. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.funeco.2010.07.002 f u n g a l e c o l o g y 3 ( 2 0 1 (Acer), alder (Alnus), birch (Betula verrucosa), cherry (Prunus), pear (Pyrus), and elm (Ulmus

  11. Facult des arts et des sciences Dpartement de chimie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Lael

    -Alder (IEDDA) Methodology in the Synthesis of Designed Pi Systems and Heteroaromatic Natural Products" Salle G of Victoria "Dynamics of Guest Binding with Rigid and Soft Supramolecular Systems" Salle G-715, Pavillon Framework for Biological Systems" Salle 1035, Pavillon J.-A. Bombardier 27 PROFESSEUR SHANNON STAHL

  12. Energy use by biological protein transport pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Tassos

    Energy use by biological protein transport pathways Nathan N. Alder1 and Steven M. Theg2 1 of metabolic energy, using the free energy of ATP and GTP hydrolysis and/or a transmembrane protonmotive force provided insights into the mechanisms of energy transduction, force generation and energy use by different

  13. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    MILLER THEATRE COMPLEX Beall Concert Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields Mc Military Science Moss Street Children's Center Knight Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Innovation Center Rainier Romania Warehouse Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District

  14. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields McClure Morton Sheldon Stafford Young Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Campus Graduate Village Ford Alumni Center Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District Northwest Christian University Pioneer Cemetery

  15. All UC Campuses -Astronomers and Researchers Campus/LAB Name Observational Obs/Theory/Physics Email Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Theory/Physics Email Address LBNL Aldering, Greg Optical/IR Obs galdering@lbl.gov LBNL Bailey, Steve BOSS Obs StephenBailey@lbl.gov LBNL Bebek, Chris SNAP Inst CJBebek@lbl.gov LBNL Borrill, Julian CMB computational jdborrill@lbl.gov LBNL Cahn, Robert Theory RNCahn@lbl.gov LBNL Carithers, Bill SNAP Physics WCCarithers@lbl.gov LBNL Kim

  16. Professor Clive Brasier, Forest Research UK Scientific and operational flaws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    circinatum, recently reported from Spain, Italy; now spread to Portugal? .. Photos: Joan Webber Forest and mortality of cork oaks and holm oaks in Spain and Portugal. Origin: Pacific-Celebes area. Phytophthora cinnamomi root disease of Q. ilex, Spain Photo Forest Research UK #12;Phytophthora alni sp. nov. on alder

  17. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--II: ANALOG AND DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 46, NO. 8, AUGUST 1999 1035 An Improved Weighted Least-Squares Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wu-Sheng

    , AUGUST 1999 1035 An Improved Weighted Least-Squares Design for Variable Fractional Delay FIR Filters Wu, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada V8W 3P6. T.-B. Deng is with the Department of Information

  18. The Astrophysical Journal, 751:144 (16pp), 2012 June 1 doi:10.1088/0004-637X/751/2/144 C 2012. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draine, Bruce T.

    of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia Received 2011 November 28; accepted 2012 energy distribution (SED) modeling indicates that at most 25% of the FIR power in the ring and Enuc

  19. Updated 9/18/13 Jeremy Scott Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of genomics on ecological biogeography. Progress in Physical Geography Maps: "Figure 1. Our water project area genetics and genomics into ecological biogeography: A case study using Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii

  20. Journal of Applied Ecology 2009, 46, 511515 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2664.2009.01641.x 2009 The Author. Journal compilation 2009 British Ecological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Fangliang

    . Keywords: Baiji, Beshanzu fir, biodiversity conservation, China, economic growth, environmental protection The Author. Journal compilation © 2009 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd FORUM Priceof prosperity:economicdevelopmentandbiological conservation in China ( ) Fangliang He Department of Renewable

  1. 190 Frederic Y. M. Wan and Keith Anderson 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    and to the forest industry, albeit for different reasons. Private logging companies are keenly interested Columbia Douglas fir was worth $1000 (after harvesting cost) for timber production in 1967, while a 30-year

  2. 190 USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-63. 2011. Abstract--Bark beetle-caused tree mortality in conifer forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the genus Dendroctonus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) are native insects that play an important beetle (D. rufipennis Kirby) in Engelmann spruce, Douglas-fir beetle (D. pseudotsugae Hopkins) in Douglas

  3. POPULATION ECOLOGY Bjrn kland Andrew M. Liebhold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erbilgin, Nadir

    time series for six tree-killing bark beetle species: Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmer- mann (the Southern fir beetle), D. rufipennis (Kirby) (the North American spruce beetle), Ips perturbatus (Eichhoff

  4. fire & fuels management Spruce Beetle-Induced Changes to Engelmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engelmannii Parry ex Engelm) stands affected by the spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) represent agents of distur- bance in spruce-fir forests are fire and the spruce beetle (Dendrocto- nus rufipennis

  5. analog signal transfer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40-48, Jan. 1994. 8 C. D. Mc from the ECG by an efficient FIR filter with reduced number of taps," IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng., volIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--II:...

  6. Appendix 33 Forest Resources of the Flathead National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ponderosa pine, and aspen forest types also occur. #12;2 Figure 3--Area by forest type and habitat type Grand fir Aspen Ponderosa pine Forest type refers to the predominant tree species in a stand, based

  7. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaranthus, M.P.; Page-Dumroese, D.; Harvey, A.; Cazares, E.; Bednar, L.F.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings following outplanting. Moderate and severe soil compaction significantly reduced nonmycorrhizal root tip abundance on both Douglas-fir and western white pine seedlings (p less than or equal to 0.05). Ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in severely compacted areas with bole and crowns and bole, crowns, and forest floor removed. Ectomycorrhizal diversity also was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in all severely compacted areas.

  8. adaptive equalization algorithm: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equalizers can be used to remove this ISI and recover the transmitted information. Fast (FBE) to remove ISI. Such a DFE requires many FIR taps for long cable lengths, increasing...

  9. adaptive iir notch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equalizers can be used to remove this ISI and recover the transmitted information. Fast (FBE) to remove ISI. Such a DFE requires many FIR taps for long cable lengths, increasing...

  10. From channel modeling to signal processing for Bit patterned media recording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karakulak, Seyhan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with FIR f (D) and with a 1-D target g(D) for BPM recordingof timing window for BPM recording. . . . . . . . Figure 3.1for bit-patterned me- dia (BPM) recording channels. The

  11. Fundamentals of Laser Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    ) Helium neon (NIR) Erbium (NIR) Helium neon (NIR) Hydrogen fluoride (NIR) Carbon dioxide (FIR) Carbon. These three properties of laser light are what can make it more hazardous than ordinary light. Laser light can dioxide (FIR) 0.594 0.610 0.627 0.633 0.647 0.570-0.650 0.694 0.840 1.064 1.

  12. Spitzer Quasar and ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST): II. The Spectral Energy Distributions of Palomar-Green Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagai Netzer; Dieter Lutz; Mario Schweitzer; Alessandra Contursi; Eckhard Sturm; Linda J. Tacconi; Sylvain Veilleux; D. -C. Kim; David Rupke; Andrew J. Baker; Kalliopi Dasyra; Joseph Mazzarella; Steven Lord

    2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second paper studying the QSOs in the spitzer QUEST sample. Previously we presented new PAH measurements and argued that most of the observed far infrared (FIR) radiation is due to star-forming activity. Here we present spectral energy distributions (SEDs) by supplementing our data with optical, NIR and FIR observations. We define two sub-groups of ``weak FIR'' and ``strong FIR'' QSOs, and a third group of FIR non-detections. Assuming a starburst origin for the FIR, we obtain ``intrinsic'' AGN SEDs by subtracting a starburst template from the mean SEDs. The resulting SEDs are remarkably similar for all groups. They show three distinct peaks corresponding to two silicate emission features and a 3mic bump that we interpret as the signature of the hottest AGN dust. They also display drops beyond 20mic that we interpret as the signature of the minimum temperature (about 200K) dust. This component must be optically thin to explain the silicate emission and the slope of the long wavelength continuum. We discuss the merits of an alternative model where most of the FIR emission is due to AGN heating. Such models are unlikely to explain the properties of our QSOs but they cannot be ruled out for more luminous objects. We also find correlations between the luminosity at 5100A and two infrared starburst indicators: L(60mic) and L(PAH 7.7mic). The correlation of L(5100A) with L(60mic) can be used to measure the relative growth rates and lifetimes of the black hole and the new stars.

  13. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A panel of Lab scientists ? including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering ? along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  14. Think You Know Ketchup, Think Again

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Sarah; Merckling, Jason; Lane, Darius

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    , Habanero Heat and Thai Ginger top the list of preferred flavors. Alder Wood, Lemon Twist and Lime Fresco are the least likely to use. Roasterie Coffee is a huge seller for Fine Vines, althought maybe the perception of ketchup mixing with coffee... Communications at the University of Kansas in May 2014. Jason Merckling is a Hospital District Sales Manager for Daiichi Sankyo, a mid-sized pharmaceutical company based in Tokyo, Japan. United States headquarters is in Parsippany, NJ. Jason’s responsibilities...

  15. Generation and characterization of superradiant undulator radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocek, D.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power, pulsed, coherent, far-infrared (FIR) radiation has many scientific applications, such as pump-probe studies of surfaces, liquids, and solids, studies of high-T{sub c} superconductors, biophysics, plasma diagnostics, and excitation of Rydberg atoms. Few sources of such FIR radiation currently exist. Superradiant undulator radiation produced at the SUNSHINE (Stanford UNiversity SHort INtense Electron-source) is such a FIR source. First proposed in the mm-wave spectral range by Motz, superradiant undulator radiation has been realized in the 45 {micro}m to 300 {micro}m spectral range by using sub-picosecond electron bunches produced by the SUNSHINE facility. The experimental setup and measurements of this FIR radiation are reported in this thesis. In addition, to being a useful FIR source, the superradiant undulator radiation produced at SUNSHINE is an object of research in itself. Measured superlinear growth of the radiated energy along the undulator demonstrates the self-amplification of radiation by the electron bunch. This superlinear growth is seen at 47 {micro}m to 70 {micro}m wavelengths. These wavelengths are an order of magnitude shorter than in previous self-amplification demonstrations.

  16. Common Nesting Bird Species Common Name Latin Name AOU Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Thomas E.

    -25 m Aspen/Maple AUWA 4 2 14 14 2-16 m Maple/Fir BHGR 3.5 1 12.5 12 2-5 m Maple/Fir WETA 3.5 1 13 10 4 Excavators ACWO 4.5 1 11.5 31 0 % Aspen WISA 5.5 1 13 31.5 28 % Aspen RNSA 5.5 1 13 27 12 % Aspen DOWO 4.5 1.5 12 22.5 0 % Aspen HAWO 4 1 14 29 0 % Aspen RSFL 7.5 1.5 11.5 26.5 56 % Aspen/Fir PYNU 7 1 15.5 22 57

  17. Highly tunable quantum Hall far-infrared photodetector by use of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As-graphene composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a highly tunable, narrow band far-infrared (FIR) photodetector which utilizes the characteristic merits of graphene and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As heterostructure in the Quantum Hall states (QHS). The heterostructure surface is covered with chemical vapor-deposited graphene, which functions as a transparent top-gate to vary the electron density of the 2DEG. FIR response observed in the vicinity of integer QH regime can be effectively tuned in a wide range of 27–102?cm{sup ?1} with a bias voltage less than ?1?V. In addition, we have found that the presence of graphene can genuinely modulate the photoresponse. Our results demonstrate a promising direction for realizing a tunable long-wavelength FIR detector using QHS in GaAs 2DEG/ graphene composite material.

  18. The emission spectra of radioweak quasars. I. The farinfrared emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martina Niemeyer; Peter L. Biermann

    1993-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We model farinfrared (FIR) spectra of radioweak quasars with the assumption that the emission is from heated dust, and that the heating is due to the central engine via energetic particles. These energetic particles are diffusing from a postulated source near the central engine through a tenuous galactic halo to arrive at the dust which is taken to be in molecular clouds in a disk configuration. This picture does not depend on a particular geometry of the disk such as warps. This concept can readily reproduce the range of observed mm/submm/FIR/IR spectra.

  19. Optical Spectra of Dusty Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Poggianti

    2000-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution presents the optical spectral properties of FIR-luminous galaxies, whose distinctive feature is often the simultaneous presence in the spectra of a strong $\\rm H\\delta$ line in absorption and of emission lines (e(a) spectra). A discrepancy between the star formation rate estimated from the FIR luminosity and that derived from the $\\rm H\\alpha$ luminosity persists even after having corrected the $\\rm H\\alpha$ flux for dust according to the observed Balmer decrement. It is shown that the e(a) spectrum can be reproduced assuming a current starburst and dust extinction affecting the youngest stellar populations much more than the older stars.

  20. Optical layout and mechanical structure of polarimeter-interferometer system for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Z. Y.; Liu, H. Q., E-mail: hqliu@ipp.ac.cn; Jie, Y. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Shen, J. S.; An, Z. H.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Li, G. S.; Zhu, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Lan, T. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Far-InfaRed (FIR) three-wave POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system for measurement current density profile and electron density profile is under development for the EAST tokamak. The FIR beams are transmitted from the laser room to the optical tower adjacent to EAST via ?20 m overmoded dielectric waveguide and then divided into 5 horizontal chords. The optical arrangement was designed using ZEMAX, which provides information on the beam spot size and energy distribution throughout the optical system. ZEMAX calculations used to optimize the optical layout design are combined with the mechanical design from CATIA, providing a 3D visualization of the entire POINT system.

  1. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS; Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  2. Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Seungjin CHOI x1 and Andrzej CICHOCKI y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Seungjin

    Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Separation Seungjin CHOI x1, RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi Saitama 351-0198, JAPAN Abstract Blind equalization of single input multiple output (SIMO) FIR channels can be refor- mulated as the problem of blind source separation

  3. RECURSIVE BLIND EQUALIZATION WITH AN OPTIMAL BOUNDING ELLIPSOID M. Pouliquen, M. Frikel, M. Denoual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RECURSIVE BLIND EQUALIZATION WITH AN OPTIMAL BOUNDING ELLIPSOID ALGORITHM M. Pouliquen, M. Frikel.pouliquen@unicaen.fr ABSTRACT In this paper, we present an algorithm for blind equalization i.e. equalization without training some simulations are performed. Index Terms-- Blind Equalization, FIR equalizer. 1. INTRODUCTION

  4. Bibliography [AB94] M. Alencar and I. Blake. The capacity for a discrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdú, Sergio

    , 1995. [AC97] S. Amari and J. Cardoso. Blind source separation­ semiparametric statistical approach­Spectrum communication systems. PhD thesis, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass, Sept. 1996. [AD62] E. Arthurs. Moulines. Sub­ space blind identification of multichannel FIR with un­ known spatial covariance. IEEE

  5. Original article Micronutrients in biomass fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Micronutrients in biomass fractions of holm oak, beech and fir forests biomass fractions in individual monospecific stands of holm oak (Quercus ilex L), beech (Fagus sylvatica L in different biomass fractions of the holm oak forest studied. This can be related to the low soil pH values

  6. Far-Infrared Dielectric Properties of Polar Liquids Probed by Femtosecond Terahertz Pulse Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the microwave and the FIR regions; the motions that are probed at these frequencies bridge the gap between bulk to study gases,2 semiconductors,3 super- conductors,4 dielectrics,5 nonpolar liquids,6 and water.7 We are generated by the excitation of charge carriers in a semiconductor material with ultrashort pulses of above

  7. Sponsored by FRidAY JulY 22, 2o11 at 8pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    l l e Sa i n t- Sa ë n S (1835 ­1921) Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 78, "Organ" I. Adagio--Allegro moderato--Poco adagio II. Allegro moderato--Presto--Maestoso--Allegro FirSt violin Susanna Ogata

  8. Combination of Fixed and Mobile Cameras for Automatic Pedestrian Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierlaire, Michel

    in the shape, pose, color distribution, and behavior affect the robustness of the detection process. A novel the rest is dark. Nonetheless, since FIR images depend on the temperature of the objects, an outdoor scene has a number of factors that affect the images. Strong sun heating can introduce texture due

  9. B.S. Computer Science (CS 26): Major Checklist Completed Lower Division (52 units)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    . to Probability & Statistics Completed Upper Division (76 units) Upper-Division (Core) Computer Science CSE 100 Mathematics Math 20A, Calculus for Science and Engineering Math 20B, Calculus fir Science and Engineering Math 20C, Calculus and Analytical Geometry for Science and Engineering Math 20F, Linear Algebra General

  10. metalsa, epri, and John Deere are among the partners in these high-impact studies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , or a pressur- ized water nuclear reactor, the materials from which they are made contain hidden stresses that affect safety, longevity, even energy efficiency and the environment. camden hubbard and his residual-generation Neutron residual stress Facility (NrsF-2) at hFir, along with complementary x-ray diffraction

  11. PACIFIC SOUTHWESTt (-A FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the National Resources Management Corporation, Lafayette, Calif. A native of Ellenville, N.Y., he earned., he earned three degrees at the University of California, Berkeley: a bachelor's in forestry (1959- variate analysis. To assess their value as predictors, fluctuations in growth of white fir (Abies concolor

  12. Phytopathol. Mediterr. (2005) 44, 0000 This review describes in chronological order the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    that has captured the imagination of tree lovers and tim- ber companies alike. Costal forests of Northern California also include several additional timber- producing species such as Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga difficulties for re- generating coniferous timber species. However, tanoak plays important ecological roles

  13. Original article Belowground biomass and nutrient content in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    useful when using estimates of the aerial biomass of a stand to calculate the carbon storage content of the belowground compartment. Douglas-fir / root system / C sequestration / nutrient content carbone dans le compartiment souterrain, connaissant la biomasse aérienne d'un peuplement. Pour ce qui

  14. Interaction of far-infrared and mid-infrared laser transitions in the ammonia laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, L.Y.; Buchwald, M.I.; Jones, C.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mid-infrared laser emission in ammonia is usually observed on a P(J + 2) transition when a CO/sub 2/ laser is used to optically pump a near resonant R(J) absorption feature. However, by generating simultaneous FIR ammonia laser emission in the same optical cavity, mid-infrared emission is obtained exclusively on the P(J) transition.

  15. An Electron Bunch Compressor Based on an FEL Interaction in the Far Infra Red

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaupp, Andreas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note an electron bunch compressor is proposed based on FEL type interaction of the electron bunch with far infrared (FIR) radiation. This mechanism maintains phase space density and thus requires a high quality electron beam to produce bunches of the length of a few ten micrometer.

  16. Study on optical finite impulse response filter Guangjie Zeng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study on optical finite impulse response filter Ying Zhou Guangjie Zeng Feihong Yu Zhejiang University State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation Optical Engineering Department Hangzhou Kong Abstract. We present an optical finite impulse response (FIR) filter de- sign method. Based

  17. Picosecond time-resolved cyclotron resonance in semiconductors A. H. Chin, and A. P. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kono, Junichiro

    the evolution of far-infrared FIR absorption induced by photoexcited carriers. By monitoring the photoinduced of InSb has been well studied.6 The TRCR experiment allows us to directly monitor the time evolution laser pulses. The NIR 800 nm laser source is a Spectra Physics Tsunami Ti:sapphire laser seeding

  18. Effects of long-term water stress on net photosynthesis, growth and water-use efficiency of conifers in the field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects of long-term water stress on net photosynthesis, growth and water-use efficiency the highest net photosynthesis PICEA and thus also 'the fastest growth. Douglas fir was superior to spruce into consideration. Thus, the reduction in net photosynthesis was always greater on long and sunny summer days

  19. www.afm-journal.de 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 3785

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (3,5-difluoro-2-(2-pyridyl)phenyl)-(2-carbox- ypyridyl)iridium(III) (FIrPic), a sky-blue emitter efficiency of 63 cd A-1 (16.3% and 36.6 lm W-1) at a luminance of 100 cd m-2. By combinin

  20. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qi-Bin

    's personal copy Evidence of solar signals in tree rings of Smith fir from Sygera Mountain in southeast Tibet of Forestry, Northeast Forestry University, 26 Hexing Road, Harbin 150040, China c DendroLab, Department: Solar activity Tree rings Schwabe cycle Wavelet analysis Tibetan Plateau a b s t r a c t Solar activity

  1. Far-infrared laser vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the propane-water compkx: Torsional dynamics of the hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Far-infrared laser vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the propane-water compkx: Torsional 1993) The far-infrared laservibration-rotation-tunneling (FIR-VRT) spectrumof the propane-water complex calculations. In the present paper and in its counterpart,13we present our results for the water-propane

  2. Genetic diversity enhances the resistance of a seagrass ecosystem to disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachowicz, Jay

    , nutrient cycling, or resistance to disturbance or invasion relative to systems with fewer species of declining species richness on short-term processes such as pro- duction, community respiration, and nutrient). Nevertheless, many important ecosystems, such as kelp forests, cattail marshes, and fir forests, are dominated

  3. American Journal of Botany: e253e255. 2011. American Journal of Botany: e253e255, 2011; http://www.amjbot.org/ 2011 Botanical Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Lee

    succession forests of pine, fir, or oak and is distributed throughout Mexico and the entire United States that the orchid exploits is narrow (Taylor and Bruns, 1999). Using three single nucleotide polymorphisms, Taylor of prospective loci were deter- mined via amplification from seven DNAs (three of which were individuals of C

  4. Root dipping of conifer seedlings shows little benefit in the northern Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, J.P.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the growth chamber, in the greenhouse, and in field studies, root dipping of bareroot lodgepole pine, ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and Engelmann spruce seedlings did not improve seedling survival, shoot growth, or root growth under dry soil conditions. Seedling root growth varied with tree species, soil type, and type of rood dip.

  5. The ULIRG NGC 6240: Luminous extended Xray emission and evidence for an AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greiner, Jochen

    spectrum can be well fit by emission from two components in roughly equal proportions: a thermal optically for the formation of this AGN. However, the lu­ minosity in the remaining extended thermal component is still et al. 1997). Within this core most of the ulti­ mate enigmatic power source of the FIR radiation

  6. Characterization of bending loss in hollow flexible terahertz waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    and metal/dielectric coated polycarbonate waveguides were investigated using an optically pumped far infrared (FIR) laser at 215 µm. The bending loss of silver coated polycarbonate waveguides were measured. Pedersen, and E. Mueller, "Hollow polycarbonate waveguides with inner Cu coatings for delivery of terahertz

  7. State of Industrial Fluidized Bed Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesko, J. E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is expectOO. Direct combustion of oil shale, combustion of wxxi ani municipil refuse also has been deron stratOO, either as primary fuels or as additives in units primarily firOO with coal. Combustion of liquid fuels, such as residual oils containing...

  8. An Adaptive DFE using an IIR Feedback Equalizer for 100BASE-TX Ethernet*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurst, Paul J.

    (FBE) to remove ISI. Such a DFE requires many FIR taps for long cable lengths, increasing the size and a 12-tap FBE. This paper describes a reduced complexity DFE structure for equalizing data transmitted, the new DFE structure using an infinite-impulse response (IIR) FBE is simpler than a conventional DFE

  9. A Reliable method for Blind Channel Identification using Burst Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphaeli, Dan

    1 A Reliable method for Blind Channel Identification using Burst Data Dan Raphaeli, Senior Member Output (MISO) FIR channels with nonminimum phase. The approach is based on mini- mizing a cost function of identification success when consider- ing statistical channels, its ability to obtain reliable channel estimates

  10. Technical Report -DTU -Informatics and Mathematical Modeling (May 31, 2007) Temperature Prediction in District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prediction in District Heating Systems with cFIR models Pierre Pinson , Torben S. Nielsen, Henrik Aa. Nielsen, Lyngby, Denmark Abstract Current methodologies for the optimal operation of district heating systems regularization. Results are given for the test case of the Roskilde district heating system, over a period

  11. Insights from Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Bruce A. McCarl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University, College Station TX This work benefited from support largely from of the Energy Modeling Forum activities that are partially supported by EPRI. #12;Insights from Agricultural favorable to production of southern pine, while others allow production of redwoods and douglas fir

  12. From Z-Machines to ALMA: (Sub)millimeter Spectroscopy of Galaxies ASP Conference Series, Vol. TBD, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aretxaga, Itziar

    , 2006 A. J. Baker, J. Glenn, A. I. Harris, J. G. Mangum, and M. S. Yun, eds. Radio-mm-FIR Photometric Redshifts for (sub-)mm Galaxies Itziar Aretxaga1, David H. Hughes1, James S. Dunlop2 1Instituto Nacional de can be used to provide photometric-redshifts (Hughes et al. 1 #12;2 Aretxaga, Hughes, Dunlop 1998

  13. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kono, Junichiro

    evolution of the transmission and reflection of a FIR probe pulse after near-infrared (NIR) excitation, TX 77005, USA Abstract Ultrashort pulses of intense, coherent, and tunable far-infrared and mid-infrared and quantum-confined semiconductors using such radiation. These experiments include: far-infrared spectroscopy

  14. Infrared reflectance and transmission spectra in II-VI alloys and superlattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talwar, Devki N.

    Room temperature measurements of the far-infrared (FIR) reflectance spectra are reported for the polar optical phonons in a series of bulk Cd[subscript x]Zn[subscript 1?x]Te (0 ? x ? 1) and CdSe[subscript x]Te[subscript ...

  15. Herschel Survey of the Palomar-Green QSOs at Low Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petric, Andreea O; Flagey, Nicolas J M; Scoville, Nicholas Z

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the global cold dust properties of 85 nearby (z energy distributions and estimate their rest-frame luminosities by combining Herschel data from 70 to 500 microns with near-infrared and mid-infrared measurements from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). In most sources the far-infrared (FIR) emission can be attributed to thermally heated dust. Single temperature modified black body fits to the FIR photometry give an average dust temperature for the sample of 33~K, with a standard deviation of 8~K, and an average dust mass of 7E6 Solar Masses with a standard deviation of 9E6 Solar Masses. Estimates of star-formation that are based on the FIR continuum emission correlate with those based on the 11.3 microns PAH feature, however, the star-formation rates estimated from the FIR continuum are higher than those estimated from the ...

  16. In: Forest Decline: Causes and Impacts ISBN 978-1-61470-002-9 Editor: Joshua A. Jenkins, pp. 2011 Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    the response of several tree species from the Mediterranean Basin to recent climate change. We summarize, distribution shifts in Mediterranean mountains attribute the majority of observed changes to either climate-growth and regional climatic trends in four tree species from western Mediterranean Mountains: Silver fir (Abies alba

  17. The 1999 Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, New Mexico State University, Aug. 1999 Random-Process Formulation of Computationally Efficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbei, Robert J.

    The 1999 Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, New Mexico State University, Aug. 1999 Random formulation of design con- straints in such an optimization setting and illustrates the concepts through dimensions of an approach developed earlier for the design of FIR digital filters in one dimension [4

  18. Ultrafast and Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Solids with Small Energy Photons Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice Quantum Institute, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kono, Junichiro

    -infrared (FIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) radiation, achievable with free- electron lasers (FELs) and optical and sample damage, lead- ing to extreme nonlinear optical behavior in semiconduc- tors.23,24) Furthermore. This paper reviews our recent experiments on bulk and quantum-confined semiconductors using such radiation

  19. product platforms Marc H. Meyer, Olivier de Weck and Tucker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    FIR ST PAG E PR O O FS wiem05025 product platforms Marc H. Meyer, Olivier de Weck and Tucker Marion across existing products as well as new market appli- cations (Meyer, Tertzakian, and Utterback, 1997 that end (Meyer and Lehnerd, 1997). We first define the meaning and context for product platforms in new

  20. Derivatives of the adduct between 1,2,3,4-tetrachloro-5,5-dimethoxycyclopentadiene and substituted quinones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miles, Brad Howard

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Derivative of the Dione V Into a 250 ml. flask were placed 2 g. (0. 0054 mole) of the dione (V) and 25 mls. of ethyl alcohol. To this was added an excess of a 224-dinitrophenylhydrazine reagent (H P04 ? ethyl alcohol) . The bright yellow precipitate 9... of these three adducts yields the same compound, 5, 6, 7, 8-tetrachloro-9, 9-di- methoxy-2, $, 4a, 5, 8, 8a-hexahydro-5, 8-methaneonaphthalene- 1, 4-dione. These Diels-Alder adducts form their enol isomers (or tautomers) in both acidic and basic solutions...

  1. Toward the Total Synthesis of Norzoanthamine: The Development of a Transannular Michael Reaction Cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Haoran

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    .28 was treated with dimethyl carbonate in the presence of t-BuOLi followed by methylation to form 11 lactone 1.29, presumably through C-acylation to form the lactone followed by O- methylation to give the methyl ether. The methyl group at C9... ester 1.21. Subsequent silyl enol ether formation provided the key intermediate 1.22 for the intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction. Scheme 1.4. Miyashita?s synthesis of the ABC ring system of norzoanthamine O + LiCu OTIPS 2 1. TMSCl, THF 2. Bu...

  2. Nucleophilic Additions to 3-Azido-hexanal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Chad E.

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    , the Aub? group was able to quickly convert ?-azido propanal into an azido diene, and submit it to a tandem Diels-Alder/Schmidt reaction, thus producing a tricyclic lactam diastereoselectively. 7 Another common intramolecular reaction used with linear... and butanal (Scheme 3). 12,13 The authors propose the boat transition state 5 D, in which the nucleophile is reacting with the carbonyl at the B?rgi/Dunitz angle of atack and is relatively fre of strain, as a plausible explanation for the observed...

  3. Ecology of the predator assemblage affecting nest success of passerines in Sierra Nevada, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocimano, Maria C.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    were surveyed since 1997 (15 from 1997 to 2006, plus 6 added in 2003). My study areas were located in montane meadows in central Sierra Nevada, California, USA, including El Dorado, Placer, Nevada, and Sierra counties. The area presents a... the line intercept method (Bonham 1989), using a pole (200 cm tall ? 1.25 cm diameter). I took measurements every 3 meters, including vegetation type, as each species of plant that touched the pole (willow, other shrub species, grass/forbs, aspen, alder...

  4. Photochemistry of 1 and 2-(2-methylphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene. [4a-methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, R.D.; Hornback, J.M.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an attempt to synthesize partially saturated phenanthrene derivatives by an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction between a photochemically produced o-xylylene (diene) and a tethered dienophile, it was found that 1 and 2 underwent a photochemically allowed (2 + 2) cycloaddition. Irradiation of 1 gave 6-(2-methylphenyl)bicyclo(3.2.0)heptane in 86% yield. Upon irradiation of 2, a benzvalene rearrangement of 2 first took place, producing the meta isomer 2-(3-methylphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene, followed by a (2 + 2) photocycloaddition giving 1-(3-methylphenyl)bicyclo(3.2.0)heptane in 15% yield. Direct irradiation of 2-(3-methylphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene gave the same bicyclo derivative as 2 in 34% yield. Examination of the fluorescence spectra of 1 and 2 in comparison with 1-(2-methylphenyl)propene and 2-(2-methylphenyl)-1-butene, respectively, has shown that 1 may be biased toward (2 + 2) cycloaddition where 2 is not biased toward (2 + 2) photocycloization. Attempts to produce 4a-methyl-1,2,3,4,4a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene by an intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction of the o-xylylene produced by irradiation of 3 will also be described.

  5. Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

  6. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  7. Figure 3. Area of timberland by stand-size class (based on small, medium, and large trees) and year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of growing- stock trees (1,000 ft3/year) 13,626 30.7 -51.6 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Maple/beech/birch Oak/hickory Aspen/birch Spruce/fir Elm/ash/cottonwood White/red/jack pine Oak/pine Forest Land

  8. Riparian mammals in Big Bend National Park and their interrelationships with visitor usages and impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boeer, William Jacob

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , 1944; McDougall and Sperry, 1951; Denyes, 1956; and Warnock and Kittams, 1970). The Chisos Mountains support dense stands of Mexican Pinyon-Oak-Juniper and Ponderosa Pine- Douglas Fir woodlands (for a list of scientific names of all plants... research work. Studies involving mammals of the Big Bend area began with gene. al surveys (Bailey, 1905; Johnson, 1936; Borell and Bryant, 1942; and Taylor et al. , 1944) designed to identify and document the varied fauna of the area. After the park...

  9. l (multipole) l (multipole) k (h Mpc-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wayne

    10 100 20 40 60 80 100 l (multipole) l (multipole) T CMB MAP Planck LSS Lensing k (h Mpc-1) P(k) P 40 60 80 100 l (multipole) (degrees) T(µK) W. Hu ­ May 1999 FIRS BAM SP91 IABPyth MSAM WD OVRO Su Errors 10 100 110 20 40 60 80 100 l (multipole) (degrees) T(µK) W. Hu ­ Feb. 1998 #12;Projected Planck

  10. l (multipole) l (multipole) k (h Mpc-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wayne

    10 100 20 40 60 80 100 l (multipole) l (multipole) T CMB MAP Planck LSS Lensing k (h Mpc-1) P(k) P 40 60 80 100 l (multipole) (degrees) T(µK) FIRS BAM SP91 IABPyth MSAM WD OVRO SuZIE Tene SP94 MSAM Errors 10 100 110 20 40 60 80 100 l (multipole) (degrees) T(µK) W. Hu ­ Feb. 1998 #12;Projected Planck

  11. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, Sukanya [School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester Institute of Technology, 84 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Magnelli, Benjamin; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Popesso, Paola [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); McKee, Christopher F. [Physics and Astronomy Departments, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pozzi, Francesca, E-mail: chakrabarti@astro.rit.edu [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the photometric redshift method of Chakrabarti and McKee to infer photometric redshifts of submillimeter galaxies with far-IR (FIR) Herschel data obtained as part of the PACS Evolutionary Probe program. For the sample with spectroscopic redshifts, we demonstrate the validity of this method over a large range of redshifts (4 {approx}> z {approx}> 0.3) and luminosities, finding an average accuracy in (1 + z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec}) of 10%. Thus, this method is more accurate than other FIR photometric redshift methods. This method is different from typical FIR photometric methods in deriving redshifts from the light-to-gas mass (L/M) ratio of infrared-bright galaxies inferred from the FIR spectral energy distribution, rather than dust temperatures. To assess the dependence of our photometric redshift method on the data in this sample, we contrast the average accuracy of our method when we use PACS data, versus SPIRE data, versus both PACS and SPIRE data. We also discuss potential selection effects that may affect the Herschel sample. Once the redshift is derived, we can determine physical properties of infrared-bright galaxies, including the temperature variation within the dust envelope, luminosity, mass, and surface density. We use data from the GOODS-S field to calculate the star formation rate density (SFRD) of submillimeter bright sources detected by AzTEC and PACS. The AzTEC-PACS sources, which have a threshold 850 {mu}m flux {approx}> 5 mJy, contribute 15% of the SFRD from all ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} {approx}> 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }), and 3% of the total SFRD at z {approx} 2.

  12. MFR PAPER 1107 Some Marketing Considerations with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION rhere I, Ilne lh lng \\\\e ca n ,a) ahoul lhe Cllnlcl1lpllran li,h mar\\...el lng ,cene Illlhll i,h IIltll a realll) MARKETING PRO BLEMS \\\\ hat th:n .lrL the mar\\...el lng Pfllh- 11111, \\\\ Ith 'c\\...e end prllduct )' Hrnaull ,pea\\...lng \\Ie can Idellt!l, I'ur ul'>llnct pfl)hlcm, FIr,t. there I

  13. Energy Savings Performance Contract- Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edge, J. S.

    was not going to be easily achieved. Natural gas supplies were already being competed yearly between a local municipality and a nearby gas supply company. Robins purchased the gas consumed under two different tariff structures. Fir gas could be purchased... around the base. In 1994 Robins switched a main portion f its natural gas load from the firm tariff to e interruptible tariff. A small propane mixing plant w constructed to provide the required backup under t e interruptible tariff. The two steam...

  14. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURES AND TURBULENT COMPONENTS IN THE STAR-FORMING MOLECULAR CLOUDS OMC-2 AND OMC-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poidevin, Frederick [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e CIencas Atmosfericas, Rua do Matao 1226, Butanta, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Bastien, Pierre [Departement de Physique and Observatoire du Mont-Megantic, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Matthews, Brenda C., E-mail: Poidevin@astro.iag.usp.b, E-mail: Bastien@astro.umontreal.c, E-mail: brenda.matthews@nrc-cnrc.gc.c [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The SCUBA polarized 850 {mu}m thermal emission data of the OMC-2 region in Orion A are added to and homogeneously reduced with data already available in the OMC-3 region. The data set shows that OMC-2 is a region generally less polarized than OMC-3. Where coincident, most of the 850 {mu}m polarization pattern is similar to that measured in 350 {mu}m polarization data. Only 850 {mu}m polarimetry data have been obtained in and around MMS7, FIR1 and FIR2, and in the region south of FIR6. A realignment of the polarization vectors with the filament can be seen near FIR1 in the region south of OMC-3. An analysis shows that the energy injected by CO outflows and H{sub 2} jets associated with OMC-2 and OMC-3 does not appear to alter the polarization patterns at a scale of the 14'' resolution beam. A second-order structure function analysis of the polarization position angles shows that OMC-2 is a more turbulent region than OMC-3. OMC-3 appears to be a clear case of a magnetically dominated region with respect to the turbulence. However, for OMC-2 it is not clear that this is the case. A more in-depth analysis of five regions displayed along OMC-2/3 indicates a decrease of the mean polarization degree and an increase of the turbulent angular dispersion from north to south. A statistical analysis suggests the presence of two depolarization regimes in our maps: one regime including the effects of the cores, the other one excluding it.

  15. STAR FORMATION IN LINER HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tommasin, Silvia; Netzer, Hagai; Sternberg, Amiel [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Nordon, Raanan; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Magnelli, Benjamin [MPE, Postfach 1312, 85741 Garching (Germany); Bongiorno, Angela [INAF-Oservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Roma) (Italy); Le Floc'h, Emeric; Riguccini, Laurie [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d'Astrophysique, Bat 709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Pozzi, Francesca [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a Herschel-PACS study of a sample of 97 low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) at redshift z {approx} 0.3 selected from the zCOSMOS survey. Of these sources, 34 are detected in at least one PACS band, enabling reliable estimates of the far-infrared L{sub FIR} luminosities, and a comparison to the FIR luminosities of local LINERs. Many of our PACS-detected LINERs are also UV sources detected by GALEX. Assuming that the FIR is produced in young dusty star-forming regions, the typical star formation rates (SFRs) for the host galaxies in our sample are {approx}10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than in many local LINERs. Given stellar masses inferred from optical/NIR photometry of the (unobscured) evolved stellar populations, we find that the entire sample lies close to the star-forming 'main sequence' for galaxies at redshift 0.3. For young star-forming regions, the H{alpha}- and UV-based estimates of the SFRs are much smaller than the FIR-based estimates, by factors {approx}30, even assuming that all of the H{alpha} emission is produced by O-star ionization rather than by the active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These discrepancies may be due to large (and uncertain) extinctions toward the young stellar systems. Alternatively, the H{alpha} and UV emissions could be tracing residual star formation in an older, less obscured population with decaying star formation. We also compare L{sub SF} and L(AGN) in local LINERs and in our sample. Finally, we comment on the problematic use of several line diagnostic diagrams in cases with an estimated obscuration similar to that in the sample under study.

  16. On the Approximation of Distributed-Delay Control Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirkin, Leonid

    -dimensional internal feedback of the form P -P e-sh (here P is the delay-free plant and h is the loop delay) that aims can be replaced with . = Pa -P e-sh (modified/generalized Smith predictor), where Pa is a rational e-Agh (sI - Ag)-1 Bg. The finite impulse response (FIR) com- pletion h{G e-sh } of G e-sh is defined

  17. Radio--Far infrared correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies with 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Aritra; Beelen, Alexandre; Singh, Veeresh; Archana, K N; Sirothia, Sandeep; Ishwara-Chandra, C H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the radio--far infrared (FIR) correlation in "blue cloud" galaxies chosen from the PRism MUltiobject Survey (PRIMUS) up to redshift ($z$) of 1.2 in the XMM-LSS field. We use rest-frame emission at 1.4 GHz in the radio and both monochromatic (at 70$\\mu$m) and bolometric (between $8-1000~\\mu$m) emission in the FIR. To probe the nature of the correlation up to $z\\sim1.2$, where direct detection of blue star-forming galaxies is impossible with current technology, we employ the technique of image stacking at 0.325 and 1.4 GHz in the radio and in six infrared bands, viz. 24, 70, 160, 250, 350 and $500~\\mu$m. For comparison, we also study the correlation for more luminous galaxies that are directly detected. The stacking analysis allows us to probe the radio--FIR correlation for galaxies that are up to 2 orders of magnitude fainter than the ones detected directly. The $k-$correction in the infrared wavebands is obtained by fitting the observed spectral energy distribution (SED) with a composite mid-IR power...

  18. Star formation and the interstellar medium in z>6 UV-luminous Lyman-break galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willott, Chris J; Wagg, Jeff; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) detections of atomic carbon line and dust continuum emission in two UV-luminous galaxies at redshift 6. The far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of these galaxies are substantially lower than similar starbursts at later cosmic epochs, indicating an evolution in the dust properties with redshift, in agreement with the evolution seen in ultraviolet (UV) attenuation by dust. The [CII] to FIR ratios are found to be higher than at low redshift showing that [CII] should be readily detectable by ALMA within the reionization epoch. One of the two galaxies shows a complex merger nature with the less massive component dominating the UV emission and the more massive component dominating the FIR line and continuum. Using the interstellar atomic carbon line to derive the systemic redshifts we investigate the velocity of Lyman alpha emission emerging from high-z galaxies. In contrast to previous work, we find no evidence for decreasing Lyman alpha velocity shifts at high-redshift...

  19. Incidence and effects of endemic populations of forest pests in young mixed-conifer forests of the Sierra Nevada. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.B.; Azuma, D.L.; Ferrell, G.T.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 3,200 trees in young mixed-conifer stands were examined for pest activity and human-caused or mechanical injuries, and approximately 25 percent of these trees were randomly selected for stem analyses. The examination of trees felled for stem analyses showed that 409 (47 percent) were free of pests and 466 (53 percent) had one or more pest categories. Incense-cedar contained the fewest number of pests with 133 out of 193 trees (69 percent) free of pests, and 60 trees or .31 percent with one or more pests. White fir and ponderosa pine trees had the highest percentage of pests and mechanical injuries: 64 percent (252 trees out of 395), and 62 percent (93 trees out of 151), respectively. Top injury and disease were the two most frequent pest/damage categories recorded among all tree species. White fir blister rust and cedar rust were the most frequent disease recorded on sugar pine and incense-cedar. Bark beetles were an important pest category for white fir, ponderosa pine, and incense-cedars.

  20. On the role of interfacial hydrogen bonds in "on-water" catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristof Karhan; Rustam Z. Khaliullin; Thomas D. Kühne

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated that many classes of organic reactions exhibit increased reaction rates when performed in heterogeneous water emulsions. Despite enormous practical importance of the observed "on-water" catalytic effect and several mechanistic studies, its microscopic origins remains unclear. In this work, the second generation Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method is extended to self-consistent charge density-functional based tight-binding in order to study "on-water" catalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction between dimethyl azodicarboxylate and quadricyclane. We find that the stabilization of the transition state by dangling hydrogen bonds exposed at the aqueous interfaces plays a significantly smaller role in "on-water" catalysis than has been suggested previously.

  1. Near-Infrared Imaging Polarimetry of M42: Aperture Polarimetry of Point-like Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuhiko Kusakabe; Motohide Tamura; Ryo Kandori; Jun Hashimoto; Yasushi Nakajima; Tetsuya Nagata; Takahiro Nagayama; Jim Hough; Phil Lucas

    2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted aperture polarimetry of ~500 stars of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) in M42 based on our wide-field (~8'\\times 8') $JHKs$ band polarimetry. Most of the near-infrared (NIR) polarizations are dichroic, with position angles of polarization agreeing, both globally and locally, with previous far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter observations, having taken into account the 90$^\\circ $ difference in angles between dichroic absorption and emission. This is consistent with the idea that both NIR dichroic polarizations and FIR/submillimeter thermal polarizations trace the magnetic fields in the OMC-1 region. The magnetic fields inferred from these observations show a pinch at scales less than 0.5 pc with a centroid near IRc2. The hourglass-shaped magnetic field pattern is explained by the models in which the magnetic field lines are dragged along with the contracting gas and then wound up by rotation in a disk. The highly polarized region to the northwest of IRc2 and the low-polarized region near the bright bar are also common among NIR and FIR/submillimeter data, although a few regions of discrepancy exist. We have also discerned ~50 possible highly polarized sources whose polarizations are more likely to be intrinsic rather than dichroic. Their polarization efficiencies ($P(H)/A(H)$) are too large to be explained by the interstellar polarization. These include 10 young brown dwarfs that suggest a higher polarization efficiency, which may present geometrical evidence for (unresolved) circumstellar structures around young brown dwarfs.

  2. Radio-Excess IRAS Galaxies: IV. Optical Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catherine L. Buchanan; Peter J. McGregor; Geoffrey V. Bicknell; Michael A. Dopita

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth in our series of papers investigating radio-excess galaxies, which have radio emission associated with an active nucleus but which do not fit into the traditional categories of either radio-loud or radio-quiet active galaxies. In this paper, we present optical spectra of our sample of FIR-luminous radio-excess galaxies. Optical emission line diagnostics are used to determine the dominant source of the ionizing radiation. We find that radio excess is an excellent indicator of the presence of an active nucleus: the radio-excess sample contains a much higher fraction of AGN than samples selected on FIR luminosity alone, or using other criteria such as warm FIR colors. Several objects have ambiguous classifications and are likely to be composite objects with mixed excitation. The type of optical spectrum appears to be associated with the radio-loudness: radio-loud objects may be more `pure' AGN than radio-intermediate objects. We find strong evidence for interaction between the radio plasma and the surrounding gas. The jet energy fluxes of the radio-excess objects, inferred from the [O III] luminosities, are lower than in powerful radio sources, consistent with our previous results. We conclude that the jets of radio-intermediate sources are intrinsically weaker than those in sources with more powerful radio emission. A significant fraction of the sample spectra show post-starburst stellar continuum, with A-star absorption lines, consistent with the large fraction of merging or disturbed host galaxies in the sample. The ages of the radio sources are significantly less than those of A stars indicating that, if the radio sources are associated with merging activity, there is a delay between the interaction and the initiation of the radio activity. (Abridged.)

  3. A Chandra Snapshot Survey of IR-bright LINERs: A Possible Link Between Star Formation, AGN Fueling, and Mass Accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Dudik; S. Satyapal; M. Gliozzi; R. M. Sambruna

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a high resolution X-ray imaging study of nearby LINERs observed by Chandra. This study complements and extends previous X-ray studies of LINERs, focusing on the under-explored population of nearby dust-enshrouded infrared-bright LINERs. The sample consists of 15 IR-bright LINERs (L_FIR/L_B > 3), with distances that range from 11 to 26 Mpc. Combining our sample with previous Chandra studies we find that ~ 51% (28/55) of the LINERs display compact hard X-ray cores. The nuclear 2-10 keV luminosities of the galaxies in this expanded sample range from ~ 2 X 10^38 ergs s^-1 to ~ 2 X 10^44 ergs s^-1. We find an intriguing trend in the Eddington ratio vs. L_FIR and L_FIR/L_B for the AGN-LINERs in the expanded sample that extends over seven orders of magnitude in L/L_Edd. This correlation may imply a link between black hole growth, as measured by the Eddington ratio, and the star formation rate (SFR), as measured by the far-IR luminosity and IR-brightness ratio. If the far-IR luminosity is an indicator of the molecular gas content in our sample of LINERs, our results may further indicate that the mass accretion rate scales with the host galaxy's fuel supply. We discuss the potential implications of our results in the framework of black hole growth and AGN fueling in low luminosity AGN. (Abridged)

  4. Page 1 of 1 NWPPC. 1990. Protected areas summary and response to comments (90-10; Supp. C). FR01: !D'f-O FISH 8. GFr'E TO: J~ 5, 1'3'30 3: 5Cf'M lI63! P. W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : !D'f-O FISH 8. GFr'E TO: J~ 5, 1'3'30 3: 5Cf'M lI63! P. W Applicant: Representing: Addras: City: Prat: 170501110 Dl.1QQ. p() JDb"stTD Co,ts O1rrent Value 1L Q ~ed~ae 3 'n,'jq; . Q ~ 3 · Pi 'oct"''' CDdIa Coda M b, C. M ' . A ~ JI1Ih ~ · Belid8llt FiR u4 WIk!IIr. C Ara' III _ l_daDI _ WIIcIIIf. J) Mad III

  5. Experimental ferrite core circuit analysis and design applied to an analog/digital converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert William

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPKRflIENTAL FERRITE CORE CIRCUIT ANALYSIS A/4i) CESIGN APPLI ED' TO AN ANALOG+I QITAL -CCWERTER I I 'O' Thaaka RCSERT, NI. LL'I AN HQQAKS:-. , ";, , '. . :. . '. -:. '"":, , ':-. ', . -' ". ' t, . I I I' I, ' . Sobalttad, ta tb ~ Qra... , Na'fir. Sabjaat& ' Eiaktr leal EnCInaaring . EXPERIIIENTAL FERRITE CORE CIRCUIT ANALYSIS AND DESIGN APPLIED TO 'AN AMALGG/DIGITAL CONVERTER f 1 A, . Thea I'a t ROBERT Wl LI. I Al'Jl. HUGHES (Goober, ) ' (Me@bar) ' A'yprived . a'o . . to a4...

  6. The small firm enters international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steelquist, Laura McDowell

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be & ditcd for ~ 6] information of benefit to the, smaller fir?& engaged i;& internationai trade. ~ The Small Business Adm inis Lrat ion ' s Fx~&&rt Marl' . t ', n n' for S. &ai 3 cr &'3 rms- provides a discussion of i oreigr I 3P] market analysis... for the small business firm and is useful in this field. However, this book does not cover the foreign cultux al environment, which may be the decisive factor in marketing, and provides no information con- cerning shipp. ', ng and finance. Many trade...

  7. T-Negative Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -3 ' T--Nesative 1 comes from Ruth Berman; 5620 Edgewater Boulevard, Minneapo1is,Minnesota 55417. June, 1969. Reprint: April, 1973. Cover by Tim Courtney. Bacover by Alicia Austin. "Pro1ogue" by Ruth 'Bermanj "Bright Alpha II by Dorothy Jones.... - --- - ------ -------- -----_ .... ------------------------.. ---------------------------.. - jjThe._g.E~~_~ Ca rbuncle ": a S I Herloc kholmes story "Bcight Alpha," by Dorothy Jones and Astrid Anderson, is the :first (by in ternal chronology; not the firs t written) of the Orloff-and-Conway stories. Hyfamvy? Orloff and Dorothy Comlay...

  8. Commercial Feeding Stuffs, from September 1, 1941, to August 31, 1942.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, F. D.; Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs)

    1942-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1942* F. D. Fuller, Chief, and F. D. Brock, Assistant Chief, Division of Feed Control Servicel. This Bulletin is a report on the work performed by the Texas Agricul- itiral Experiment Station in the inspection of feeding stuffs sold in Texas during....51 2Hegari Meal 11.01 7 Hominv Feed 10.85 l~ornin? Feed, S'ub-Standard 10.32 3 fir Chop 10.81 1 Itafir Head Chop 9.36 1 Ground Dried Kelp _._--.-.- i 4.68 4 37V0 Pnotein Linseed Meal 36.84 1 36% Protein Linseed Meal 37.10 6 34y0 Protein Linseed...

  9. Aerial 8-14 micron imagery applied to mapping thermal effect mixing boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Norman Gray

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was limited to det' rmining water 'emperatures and calculating a steady-state ene, gy baI anc, of a fos ' l-fueled pow' r plan: E ' fir tnt both from airborne iimagery and from ground observations, and the comparison of the rwo calculations. The results... enhance the practical applic 'tions of remote imagery to aquatic ecology studies Airborne g-l?' micron wavelength imagery was cb- tained over discrete locations long heated water ef- fluent canals, coincident with subsurface water tem- perature...

  10. Managing coarse woody debris in forests of the Rocky Mountains. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.T.; Harvey, A.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Jain, T.B.; Tonn, J.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recommendations for managing coarse woody debris after timber harvest were developed for 14 habitat types, ranging from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) habitat types of Arizona to subalpine fir (Abis lasiocarpa) habitat types of western Montana. Ectomycorrhizae were used as a bioindicator of health, productive forest soils. Undisturbed stands were studied to determine the optimum amounts of organic material for ectomycorrhizal activity. The management recommendations are intentionally conservative to ensure that enough organic matter is left after timber harvest to maintain long-term forest productivity.

  11. DFSP - a data flow signal processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartimo, I.; Simula, O.; Skytta, J.; Kronlof, K.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of data flow computing is applied to digital signal processing (DSP). A data flow signal processor (DFSP) architecture is presented. The principles of data flow computing are carefully considered in order to conform with the special properties of DSP. The bus oriented architecture is easily configured to meet various performance requirements. The DFSP architecture is most suitable for nonrecursive algorithms. Typical tasks of this nature are transforms and FIR filters. A simulation model of the DFSP architecture has been developed. Simulation results of two application examples are given. 24 references.

  12. Depositional environment of Upper Devonian gas producing sandstones, Westmoreland County, southwestern Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Work, Rebecca Miller

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for each sandstone; for each thin section, 100 monocrystalline quartz grains were counted. 37 LLOYDSVILLE SPORTSMAN ASSOCIATION I GRAIN SIZE mm 2. 0 I. O 0. 5 0. 25 O. I2 COMPOSITION /o CEM % 0 50 100 0 30 I 3I95 C Ep I I I I 3I97 FIRS T BRA... or polycrystalline as determined by the number of crystals within the quartz grain. Monocrystalline quartz is composed of a single crystal, and has simple or wavy extinction. Polycrystalline quartz contains more than one crystal within the grain. If crystals...

  13. litawr It. Booklet No. 56096 Booklet Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    371-47t eft RFT 374 *1749. el VV.t. tf47 Wt7T 3't 1 9F4T 947.I77 '#,37.V* et Tt wr-gr wti rer cArdia f-{ VU e161 tgig fttrw1 2. crtirmilt 3fhT 5tIc6) (ha Rift WTI 3. srt1ra-41t, ''fir 3it7 6+4, daac 4. SitilWatt .44414 .B4 ,4-44 AT Act) Trair , 2.t·r4 uIM5I4ld ?WTI Tiny r t? 1. BUT trait 2. tAc 3

  14. Insights into gas heating and cooling in the disc of NGC 891 from Herschel far-infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, T M; Schirm, M R P; Parkin, T J; De Looze, I; Wilson, C D; Bendo, G J; Baes, M; Fritz, J; Boselli, A; Cooray, A; Cormier, D; Karczewski, O ?; Lebouteiller, V; Lu, N; Madden, S C; Spinoglio, L; Viaene, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel PACS and SPIRE spectroscopy of the most important far-infrared cooling lines in the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 891: [CII] 158 $\\mu$m, [NII] 122, 205 $\\mu$m, [OI] 63, 145 $\\mu$m, and [OIII] 88 $\\mu$m. We find that the photoelectric heating efficiency of the gas, traced via the ([CII]+[OII]63)/$F_{\\mathrm{TIR}}$ ratio, varies from a mean of 3.5$\\times$10$^{-3}$ in the centre up to 8$\\times$10$^{-3}$ at increasing radial and vertical distances in the disc. A decrease in ([CII]+[OII]63)/$F_{\\mathrm{TIR}}$ but constant ([CII]+[OI]63)/$F_{\\mathrm{PAH}}$ with increasing FIR colour suggests that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may become important for gas heating in the central regions. We compare the observed flux of the FIR cooling lines and total IR emission with the predicted flux from a PDR model to determine the gas density, surface temperature and the strength of the incident far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field, $G_{0}$. Resolving details on physical scales of ~0.6 kpc, a p...

  15. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  16. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Dennis K. (E. Windsor, NJ); Vocaturo, Michael (Columbus, NJ); Guttadora, Lawrence J. (Iselin, NJ)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  17. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model for Skagit River Estuary for Estuarine Restoration Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Hedong; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Skagit River is the largest river in the Puget Sound estuarine system. It discharges about 39% of total sediment and more than 20% of freshwater into Puget Sound. The Skagit River delta provides rich estuarine and freshwater habitats for salmon and many other wildlife species. Over the past 150 years, economic development in the Skagit River delta has resulted in significant losses of wildlife habitat, particularly due to construction of dikes. Diked portion of the delta is known as Fir Island where irrigation practices for agriculture land over the last century has resulted in land subsidence. This has also caused reduced efficiency of drainage network and impeded fish passages through the area. In this study, a three-dimensional tidal circulation model was developed for the Skagit River delta to assist estuarine restoration in the Fir Island area. The hydrodynamic model used in the study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The hydrodynamic model was calibrated using field data collected from the study area specifically for the model development. Wetting and drying processes in the estuarine delta are simulated in the hydrodynamic model. The calibrated model was applied to simulate different restoration alternatives and provide guidance for estuarine restoration and management. Specifically, the model was used to help select and design configurations that would improve the supply of sediment and freshwater to the mudflats and tidal marsh areas outside of diked regions and then improve the estuarine habitats for salmon migration.

  18. Neutral carbon and CO in 76 (U)LIRGs and starburst galaxy centers A method to determine molecular gas properties in luminous galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israel, F P; van der Werf, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present fluxes in both neutral carbon [CI] lines at the centers of 76 galaxies with FIR luminosities between 10^{9} and 10^{12} L(o) obtained with Herschel-SPIRE and with ground-based facilities, along with the J=7-6, J=4-3, J=2-1 12CO and J=2-1 13CO line fluxes. We investigate whether these lines can be used to characterize the molecular ISM of the parent galaxies in simple ways and how the molecular gas properties define the model results. In most starburst galaxies, the [CI]/13CO flux ratio is much higher than in Galactic star-forming regions, and it is correlated to the total FIR luminosity. The [CI](1-0)/CO(4-3), the [CI](2-1) (2-1)/CO(7-6), and the [CI] (2-1)/(1-0) flux ratios are also correlated, and trace the excitation of the molecular gas. In the most luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), the ISM is fully dominated by dense and moderately warm gas clouds that appear to have low [C]/[CO] and [13CO]/[12CO] abundances. In less luminous galaxies, emission from gas clouds at lower densities becomes prog...

  19. The nature of the [CII] emission in dusty star-forming galaxies from the SPT-survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullberg, Bitten; Vieira, Joaquin; Weiss, Axel; Aguirre, James; Aravena, Manuel; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bradford, C Matt; Bothwell, Matt; Carlstrom, John; Chapman, Scott; Fassnacht, Chris; Gonzalez, Anthony; Greve, Thomas; Hezavah, Yashar; Holtzapfel, William L; Husband, Kate; Ma, Jingzhe; Malkan, Matt; Marrone, Dan; Menten, Karl; Murphy, Eric; Reichardt, Chris; Spilker, Justin; Stark, Anthony; Strandet, Maria; Welikala, Niraj

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present [CII] observations of 20 strongly lensed dusty star forming galaxies at 2.1 20 mJy) from the South Pole Telescope survey, with far-infrared (FIR) luminosities determined from extensive photometric data. The [CII] line is robustly detected in 17 sources, all but one being spectrally resolved. Eleven out of 20 sources observed in [CII] also have low-J CO detections from ATCA. A comparison with mid- and high-J CO lines from ALMA reveals consistent [CII] and CO velocity profiles, suggesting that there is little differential lensing between these species. The [CII], low-J CO and FIR data allow us to constrain the properties of the interstellar medium. We find [CII] to CO(1-0) luminosity ratios in the SPT sample of 5200 +- 1800, with significantly less scatter than in other samples. This line ratio can be best described by a medium of [CII] and CO emitting gas with a higher [CII] than CO excitation temperature, high CO optical depth tau_CO >> 1, and low to moderate [CII] optical depth tau_CII ~< 1. T...

  20. New polymorphous computing fabric.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolinski, C. (Christophe); Gokhale, M. (Maya); McCabe, K. P. (Kevin P.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a new polymorphous computing Fabric well suited to DSP and Image Processing and describes its implementation on a Configurable System on a Chip (CSOC). The architecture is highly parameterized and enables customization of the synthesized Fabric to achieve high performance for a specific class of application. For this reason it can be considered to be a generic model for hardware accelerator synthesis from a high level specification. Another important innovation is the Fabric uses a global memory concept, which gives the host processor random access to all the variables and instructions on the Fabric. The Fabric supports different computing models including MIMD, SPMD and systolic flow and permits dynamic reconfiguration. We present a specific implementation of a bank of FIR filters on a Fabric composed of 52 cells on the Altera Excalibur ARM running at 33 MHz. The theoretical performance of this Fabric is 1.8 GMACh. For the FIR application we obtain 1.6 GMAC/s real performance. Some automatic tools have been developed like the tool to provide a host access utility and assembler.

  1. Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Inez

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

  2. Astrophysics of Dust in Cold Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Draine

    2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine lectures reviewing the astrophysics of dust in interstellar clouds. Topics include: (1) Summary of observational evidence concerning interstellar dust: broadband extinction, scattering of starlight, polarization of starlight, spectroscopy of dust, IR and FIR emission, and depletions of grain-forming elements. (2) Optics of interstellar dust grains: dielectric functions of nonconducting and conducting materials, calculational techniques, formulae valid in the Rayleigh limit, Kramers-Kronig relations, microwave emission mechanisms, and X-ray scattering. (3) IR and FIR emission: heating of interstellar dust, including single-photon heating, and resulting IR emission spectrum. (4) Charging of dust grains: collisional charging, photoelectric emission, and resulting charge distribution functions. (5) Dynamics: gas drag, Lorentz force, forces due to anisotropic radiation, and resulting drift velocities. (6) Rotational dynamics: brownian rotation, suprathermal rotation, and effects of starlight torques. (7) Alignment of interstellar dust: observations and theories. (8) Evolution of the grain population: dust formation in outflows, grain growth in the ISM, photodesorption, and grain destruction in shock waves. (9) Effects of dust grains: photoelectric heating, H2 formation, ion recombination, coupling of gas to magnetic fields, and dust grains as indicators of magnetic field direction.

  3. The far-infrared--submm spectral energy distribution of high-redshift quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert S. Priddey; Richard G. McMahon

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine submm photometric data of z>4 quasars, to obtain a mean far-infrared (FIR) (rest-frame) spectral energy distribution (SED) of thermal emission from dust, parameterised by a single temperature (T) and power-law emissivity index (beta). Best-fit values are T=41+/-5K, beta=1.95+/-0.3. The redshift spread of this set of quasars is exploited to allow us to sample the SED at a greater number of rest wavelengths than is possible for a single object. This parameterisation is of use to any study that extrapolates from a flux at a single submm wavelength, for example to infer dust masses and FIR luminosities. We then interpret the submm component as arising from dust heated by star-formation in the quasar's host galaxy, and investigate a simple scheme of AGN--host coevolution, in which the timescale for formation of the host galaxy is c.0.5-1.0Gyr, with star formation proceeding at a constant rate c.1000Msol/yr. The luminous quasar phase occurs towards the end of the star-forming period, just before the galaxy's reservoir of cold gas is depleted. Given the youth of the Universe at z=4 (1.6Gyr), the coexistence of a massive black hole and a luminous starburst can be a powerful constraint on models of quasar host-galaxy formation.

  4. The application of soft X-ray microscopy to the in-situ analysis of sporopollenin/sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, G.D.; Botto, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Ade, H. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Wirick, S. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft X-ray imaging and carbon near edge absorption fine structure spectroscopy (C-NEXAFS) has been used for the in-situ analysis of sporinite in a rank variable suite of organic rich sediments extending from recent up to high volatile A bituminous coal. The acquisition of chemically based images (contrast based on the 1s - 1{pi}* transition of unsaturated carbon), revealed a homogeneous chemical structure in the spore exine. C-NEXAFS microanalysis indicates chemical structural evolution in sporopollenin/sporinite with increases in maturation. The most significant change in the C-NEXAFS spectrum is an increase in unsaturated carbon, presumably aromatic, with rank. The rate of aromatization in sporinite exceeds that of the surrounding vitrinite. Increases in the concentration of unsaturated carbon are compensated by losses of aliphatic and hydroxylated aliphatic carbon components. Carboxyl groups are present in low and variable concentrations. Absorption due to carboxyl persists in the most mature specimen in this series, a high volatile A rank coal. The reactions which drive sporopollenin chemical structural evolution during diagenesis presumably involve dehydration, Diels-Alder cyclo-addition, and dehydrogenation reactions which ultimately lead to a progressively aromatized bio/geopolymer.

  5. Novel Diblock Copolymer-Grafted Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes via a combination of Living and Controlled/Living Surface Polymerizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priftis, Dimitrios [ORNL; Sakellariou, Georgios [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hadjichristidis, Nikos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diels Alder cycloaddition reactions were used to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with 1-benzocylcobutene-10-phenylethylene (BCB-PE) or 4-hydroxyethylbenzocyclobutene (BCB-EO). The covalent functionalization of the nanotubes with these initiator precursors was verified by FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). After appropriate transformations/additions, the functionalized MWNTs were used for surface initiated anionic and ring opening polymerizations of ethylene oxide and e-caprolactone (e-CL), respectively. The OH-end groups were transformed to isopropylbromide groups by reaction with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide, for subsequent atom transfer radical polymerization of styrene or 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate to afford the final diblock copolymers. 1H NMR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), TGA, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for the characterization of the nanocomposite materials. TEM images showed the presence of a polymer layer around the MWNTs as well as the dissociation of MWNT bundles. Consequently, this general methodology, employing combinations of different polymerization techniques, increases the diversity of diblocks that can be grafted from MWNTs.

  6. Surface-Initiated Titanium-Mediated Coordination Polymerization from Catalyst-Functionalized Single and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priftis, Dimitrios [ORNL; Petzetakis, Nikolaos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Sakellariou, Georgios [ORNL; Pitsikalis, Marinos [ORNL; Baskaran, Durairaj [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Hadjichristidis, Nikos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single (SWNTs) and multiwalled (MWNTs) carbon nanotubes were functionalized with a titanium alkoxide catalyst through a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. The catalyst-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used for the surface initiated titanium-mediated coordination polymerizations of L-lactide (L-LA), -caprolactone (-CL) and n-hexyl isocyanate (HIC) employing the grafting from technique. 1H NMR, IR and Raman spectra showed that the precursor catalyst was successfully synthesized and covalently attached on the CNTs surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the grafted poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) content could be controlled with time. The final polymer-grafted CNTs were readily dissolved in organic solvents as compared to the insoluble pristine and catalyst-functionalized CNTs. The presence of thick layers of polymers around the CNTs was observed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) proved that the glass transition (Tg) and melting (Tm) temperatures of the PLLA are affected by the presence of the CNTs, while PLLA R-helix conformation remains intact, as revealed by the circular dichroism (CD) spectra.

  7. Polymer Grafted Janus Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priftis, Dimitrios [ORNL; Sakellariou, Georgios [ORNL; Baskaran, Durairaj [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mays, Jimmy [ORNL; Hadjichristidis, Nikos [University of Athens, Athens, Greece

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel and facile strategy to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with two chemically different polymer brushes utilizing the grafting from technique. A [4 + 2] Diels Alder cycloaddition reaction was used to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with two different precursor initiators, one for ring opening polymerization (ROP) and one for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The binary functionalized MWNTs were used for the simultaneous surface initiated polymerizations of different monomers resulting in polymer grafted MWNTs that can form Janus type structures under appropriate conditions. 1H NMR, FTIR and Raman spectra showed that the precursor initiators were successfully synthesized and covalently attached on the CNT surface. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the grafted polymer content varies when different monomer ratios and polymerization times are used. The presence of an organic layer around the CNTs was observed through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) proved that the glass transition (Tg) and melting (Tm) temperatures of the grafted polymers are affected by the presence of the CNTs, while circular dichroism (CD) spectra indicated that the PLLA ahelix conformation remains intact.

  8. Infrared Emission of Normal Galaxies from 2.5 to 12 Microns: ISO Spectra, Near-Infrared Continuum and Mid-Infrared Emission Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanyao Lu; George Helou; Michael W. Werner; Harriet L. Dinerstein; Daniel A. Dale; Nancy A. Silbermann; Sangeeta Malhotra; Charles A. Beichman; Thomas H. Jarrett

    2003-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ISO-PHOT spectra of the regions 2.5-4.9um and 5.8-11.6um for a sample of 45 disk galaxies from the U.S. ISO Key Project on Normal Galaxies. The spectra can be decomposed into three spectral components: (1) continuum emission from stellar photospheres, which dominates the near-infrared (2.5- 4.9um; NIR) spectral region; (2) a weak NIR excess continuum, which has a color temperature of ~ 1000K, carries a luminosity of a few percent of the total far-infrared luminosity L(FIR), and most likely arises from the ISM; and (3) the well-known broad emission features at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6 and 11.3 um, which are generally attributed to aromatic carbon particles. These aromatic features in emission (AFEs) dominate the mid-infrared (5.8-11.6 um; MIR) part of the spectrum, and resemble the so-called Type-A spectra observed in many non-stellar sources and the diffuse ISM in our own Galaxy. The relative strengths of the AFEs vary by 15-25% among the galaxies. However, little correlation is seen between these variations and either IRAS 60um-to-100um flux density ratio R(60/100) or the FIR-to-blue luminosity ratio L(FIR)/L(B), suggesting that the observed variations are not a direct consequence of the radiation field differences among the galaxies. We demonstrate that the NIR excess continuum and AFE emission are correlated, suggesting that they are produced by similar mechanisms and similar (or the same) material. On the other hand, as the current star-formation activity increases, the overall strengths of the AFEs and the NIR excess continuum drop significantly with respect to that of the far-infrared emission from large dust grains. This is likely a consequence of the preferential destruction in intense radiation fields of the small carriers responsible for the NIR/AFE emission.

  9. He I vector magnetic field maps of a sunspot and its superpenumbral fine-structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schad, T A; Lin, H; Tritschler, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced inversions of high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of the He I triplet at 1083 nm are used to generate unique maps of the chromospheric magnetic field vector across a sunspot and its superpenumbral canopy. The observations were acquired by the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST) on 29 January 2012. Multiple atmospheric models are employed in the inversions, as superpenumbral Stokes profiles are dominated by atomic-level polarization while sunspot profiles are Zeeman-dominated but also exhibit signatures perhaps induced by symmetry breaking effects of the radiation field incident on the chromospheric material. We derive the equilibrium magnetic structure of a sunspot in the chromosphere, and further show that the superpenumbral magnetic field does not appear finely structured, unlike the observed intensity structure. This suggests fibrils are not concentrations of magnetic flux but rather distinguished by individualized thermalization. We also dire...

  10. OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 1255 38th street, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States); Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Rykala, Adam [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Isaak, Kate [ESA Astrophysics Missions Division, ESTEC, PO Box 299, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Baes, Maarten [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, George J. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boselli, Alessandro [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, UMR6110 CNRS, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille (France); Bradford, Charles M. [JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, Asantha [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter [Blue Sky Spectroscopy Inc, Suite 9-740 4th Avenue South, Lethbridge, Alberta T1J 0N9 (Canada); Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sacchi, Nicola [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); and others

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }) in the interstellar medium compared to CO ({approx}0.4 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }). We have ruled out photodissociation regions, X-ray-dominated regions, and cosmic rays as likely sources of excitation of this warm molecular gas, and found that only a non-ionizing source can heat this gas; the mechanical energy from supernovae and stellar winds is able to satisfy the large energy budget of {approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }. Analysis of the very high-J lines of HCN strongly indicates that they are solely populated by infrared pumping of photons at 14 {mu}m. This mechanism requires an intense radiation field with T > 350 K. We detect a massive molecular outflow in Arp 220 from the analysis of strong P Cygni line profiles observed in OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 2}O. The outflow has a mass {approx}> 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} and is bound to the nuclei with velocity {approx}< 250 km s{sup -1}. The large column densities observed for these molecular ions strongly favor the existence of an X-ray luminous AGN (10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in Arp 220.

  11. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumpel, Michael (Naperville, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  12. Mortality of regeneration during skyline logging of a shelterwood overstory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesch, S.D.; Lysne, D.H.; Mann, J.W.; Helgerson, O.T.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overstorey was felled in July and August 1980 on a 9-ha site on a 65% slope near Medford, Oregon, where a single regeneration cut was made in 1977 and the area was underplanted with Douglas fir and ponderosa pine in 1978. Before logging, seedlings (height 5-400 cm) were found on 35% of sample plots. Felling killed 22% of seedlings. Yarding using a running skyline yarder with a mechanical slack-pulling carriage killed 28% of seedlings that survived felling. Mortality was least in the 61-100 cm height class. It is concluded that a logging plan that minimizes corridor width and number of corridors converging at a single landing gives the best distribution of seedlings after the final cut. 2 references.

  13. Discrete time robust control systems under structured perturbations: stability manifolds and extremal properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tin, Marie-Lyne Appoline

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rit irlrrl thrff thr ar rrrfq is cegnlnr, i. rf. , d?g 0 7/ 7. fhf n Pj =) has nn Iftnf on fhr cff'r'le, affd there nic h rvot. Inifrle and n ? h r'ovfs out'i de flic unit rlfsl jc ( 1. Ic'? fe I' r. ' f fir nu7fibe'I' fif nrf/I'Ifll'r pl'(7rfncf... v, liole I'a?&il& i& e&lu&&al& n& to ih& stability of i ape& ial subs&& of it?xpo?cl &dg& s. & sile&i t lic 1. '-& d & ~ l "&: i. /& = 1. . . . /l. Ifarl&ab and J&ir& &'I& & x&& &id?l &l&i~ i&sul& to line? i&i&& rval ??i&&el s, -&n?s. Co?- 21...

  14. The nearby universe observed in far-infrared and in ultraviolet: an analysis of the dust attenuation and the star formation activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Buat

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the dust attenuation and the star formation rates in the nearby universe obtained from a comparison of far-infrared (IRAS) and ultraviolet (GALEX) observations. The ratio of the dust to UV flux ratio is used to derive the dust attenuation: this dust attenuation is found to increase with the luminosity of the galaxies and from z=0 to z=1. The slope of the UV continuum is found to be a very poor tracer of the dust attenuation in "normal" galaxies. Galaxies selected by their UV emission are found to be rather quiescent with a recent star formation rate equal to only 25-30% of the past averaged one. Galaxies selected in FIR appear slightly more active in star formation.

  15. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  16. Abies concolor growth responses to vegatation changes following shrub removal, northern Sierra Nevada, California. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conard, S.G.; Sparks, S.R.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conifer productivity in western North America is often severely inhibited by competing vegetation. Abies concolor (Gord, and Glendl.) Lindl. (white fir) is an important species over much of this area, yet little information is available on response of A. concolor to vegetation management treatments. We revisited two sites in the northern Sierra Nevada to assess the responses of naturally regenerated A. concolor saplings to vegetation recovery 8-9 years after release treatments. Treatments caused major and persistent shifts in vegetation structure and composition on both sites. Differences in individual tree growth within treatments were strongly correlated with structure and composition of neighboring vegetation, even where no treatment effects were observed. Great variability in response between sites illustrates the strong effect of site characteristics on response to release treatments and the importance to managers of anticipating such differences before making treatment decisions.

  17. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  18. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  19. On the prediction of far field computational aeroacoustics of advanced propellers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaeger, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the following expressions: 10 4. P, (?, t) = ? J' . drd. cI f p a V? at Jt=o It sin vR g=g (4) 4 P, '(, , t) = ? J, dl'd + J, dpd (5) f lR f a lR ot Jt=o RsinvR Jt=o fir sin vR O=O g=g where r is the source time, t, is the observer time and vR is the angle.... : r)P e ? = ? 7' P. cits p (28) This equation describes the propagation of small amplitude pressure waves. By comparing Equation (28) to the wave equation in terms of 4, it is noted that the equations are analogous if a = e/p. This will be true...

  20. Status: State Possibly Extirpated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tauschia Tenuissima; Rank Gsx

    when less than 4 inches tall; bulb-like root, 1/2 inch in diameter; leaves few, glabrous, divided three or more times into 3-13 narrow, linear segments up to 2 inches long and 1/2 inch wide. The flowers are white- to cream colored; rays of the umbel mostly 4-8, elongating unequally, the longer ones 2-6 inches long; pedicels very short, less than 1/8 inch long. The fruits are somewhat elliptic and lacking side wings. Identification Tips: The most distinctive features of this species are its early flowering, preference for meadowy habitats, and irregular umbels (see general description above). The species is difficult to locate unless it is found in rather dense patches. When growing in this manner, the distinctive creamy-white flowers are possible to identify, even from a distance. The genus Tauschia can easily be confused with the much larger genus Lomatium. Fortunately, no Lomatium species are found flowering in the same meadowy habitats in early spring. Mature fruits of Lomatium are flattened and winged, while those of Tauschia are cylindrical and lack wings. Phenology: Flowering occurs in early spring (April) often when the plant is only 1 inch tall. As the season continues (through May) the flower stems eventually elongate up to about 6 inches. Range: Regional endemic; currently known from northern ID and historically known from Spokane County, WA in the Columbia Basin physiographic province. Habitat: The species occupies grassy openings in moist to wet habitats. This includes meadows, river floodplains, and streambanks. Generally the areas are flat, although a few sites in Idaho were found on moderate slopes with perched water tables. Elevations range between 2580 to 3200 feet. The substrates tend to be productive silt/loams (loess) or alluvium. Some sites are known from the Palouse region in Idaho, however, the best sites are known from areas where meadows are surrounded by mixed coniferous forests of grand fir, Douglas fir,

  1. High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldova, D.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, Dresden, 01314 (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

  2. THE NATURE OF THE SECOND PARAMETER IN THE IRX-{beta} RELATION FOR LOCAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Andrews, Jennifer E. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lee, Janice C. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dale, Daniel A., E-mail: kgrasha@astro.umass.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of 98 galaxies of low-dust content, selected from the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, aimed at examining the relation between the ultraviolet (UV) color and dust attenuation in normal star-forming galaxies. The IRX-{beta} diagram relates the total dust attenuation in a galaxy, traced by the far-IR (FIR) to UV ratio, to the observed UV color, indicated by {beta}. Previous research has indicated that while starburst galaxies exhibit a relatively tight IRX-{beta} relation, normal star-forming galaxies do not, and have a much larger spread in the total-IR to far-UV (FUV) luminosity for a fixed UV color. We examine the role that the age of the stellar population plays as the ''second parameter'' responsible for the observed deviation and spread of star-forming galaxies from the starburst relation. We model the FUV to FIR spectral energy distribution of each galaxy according to two broad bins of star formation history (SFH): constant and instantaneous burst. We find clear trends between stellar population mean age estimators (extinction-corrected FUV/NIR, U - B, and EW(H{alpha})) and the UV color {beta}; the trends are mostly driven by the galaxies best-described by instantaneous burst populations. We also find a significant correlation between {beta} and the mean age directly determined from the best-fit instantaneous models. As already indicated by other authors, the UV attenuation in star-forming galaxies may not be recovered with the UV color alone and is highly influenced by the stellar population's mean age and SFH. Overall, the scatter in the IRX-{beta} diagram is better correlated with {beta} than with the perpendicular distance, d{sub p}.

  3. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  4. Pyrite footprinting of RNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlatterer, Joerg C., E-mail: joerg.schlatterer@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Wieder, Matthew S. [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Jones, Christopher D.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)] [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Brenowitz, Michael [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNA structure is mapped by pyrite mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Repetitive experiments can be done in a powdered pyrite filled cartridge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High {sup {center_dot}}OH reactivity of nucleotides imply dynamic role in Diels-Alderase catalysis. -- Abstract: In RNA, function follows form. Mapping the surface of RNA molecules with chemical and enzymatic probes has revealed invaluable information about structure and folding. Hydroxyl radicals ({sup {center_dot}}OH) map the surface of nucleic acids by cutting the backbone where it is accessible to solvent. Recent studies showed that a microfluidic chip containing pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) can produce sufficient {sup {center_dot}}OH to footprint DNA. The 49-nt Diels-Alder RNA enzyme catalyzes the C-C bond formation between a diene and a dienophile. A crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulation and atomic mutagenesis studies suggest that nucleotides of an asymmetric bulge participate in the dynamic architecture of the ribozyme's active center. Of note is that residue U42 directly interacts with the product in the crystallized RNA/product complex. Here, we use powdered pyrite held in a commercially available cartridge to footprint the Diels-Alderase ribozyme with single nucleotide resolution. Residues C39 to U42 are more reactive to {sup {center_dot}}OH than predicted by the solvent accessibility calculated from the crystal structure suggesting that this loop is dynamic in solution. The loop's flexibility may contribute to substrate recruitment and product release. Our implementation of pyrite-mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting is a readily accessible approach to gleaning information about the architecture of small RNA molecules.

  5. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Huber, George W. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?–C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e.g., furan forms CO and allene), oligomerization (allene forms olefins and aromatics plus hydrogen), and alkylation (e.g., furan plus olefins). The product distribution was far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  6. DUST EMISSION AND STAR FORMATION IN STEPHAN'S QUINTET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natale, G.; Tuffs, R. J. [Max Planck Institute fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Xu, C. K.; Lu, N. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Popescu, C. C. [University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Fischera, J. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 Saint George Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Lisenfeld, U. [Department de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dopita, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Duc, P.-A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, Dapnia/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Gao, Y. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Reach, W. [Spitzer Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sulentic, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa, CSIC, Apdo. 3004, 18080, Granada (Spain); Yun, M., E-mail: giovanni.natale@mpi-hd.mpg.d, E-mail: richard.buffs@mpi-hd.mpg.d [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a comprehensive set of MIR/FIR observations of Stephan's Quintet (SQ), taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our study reveals the presence of a luminous (L{sub IR} {approx} 4.6 x 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1}) and extended component of infrared dust emission, not connected with the main bodies of the galaxies, but roughly coincident with the X-ray halo of the group. We fitted the inferred dust emission spectral energy distribution of this extended source and the other main infrared emission components of SQ, including the intergalactic shock, to elucidate the mechanisms powering the dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, taking into account collisional heating by the plasma and heating through UV and optical photons. Combining the inferred direct and dust-processed UV emission to estimate the star formation rate (SFR) for each source we obtain a total SFR for SQ of 7.5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, similar to that expected for non-interacting galaxies with stellar mass comparable to the SQ galaxies. Although star formation in SQ is mainly occurring at, or external to the periphery of the galaxies, the relation of SFR per unit physical area to gas column density for the brightest sources is similar to that seen for star formation regions in galactic disks. We also show that available sources of dust in the group halo can provide enough dust to produce up to L{sub IR} {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} powered by collisional heating. Though a minority of the total infrared emission (which we infer to trace distributed star-formation), this is several times higher than the X-ray luminosity of the halo, so could indicate an important cooling mechanism for the hot intergalactic medium (IGM) and account for the overall correspondence between FIR and X-ray emission. We investigate two potential modes of star formation in SQ consistent with the data, fueled either by gas from a virialized hot IGM continuously accreting onto the group, whose cooling is enhanced by grains injected from an in situ population of intermediate mass stars, or by interstellar gas stripped from the galaxies. The former mode offers a natural explanation for the observed baryon deficiency in the IGM of SQ as well as for the steep L{sub X}-T{sub X} relation of groups such as SQ with lower velocity dispersions.

  7. A STUDY OF HEATING AND COOLING OF THE ISM IN NGC 1097 WITH HERSCHEL-PACS AND SPITZER-IRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beirao, P.; Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Helou, G. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. N. [NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smith, J.-D. T.; Croxall, K. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Mail Drop 111, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Dale, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wolfire, M. G.; Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Sandstrom, K. M.; Groves, B.; Schinnerer, E.; Rix, H.-W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Brandl, B. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Crocker, A. F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Hinz, J. L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kennicutt, R. C., E-mail: pedro@ipac.caltech.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); and others

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NGC 1097 is a nearby Seyfert 1 galaxy with a bright circumnuclear starburst ring, a strong large-scale bar, and an active nucleus. We present a detailed study of the spatial variation of the far-infrared (FIR) [C II]158 {mu}m and [O I]63 {mu}m lines and mid-infrared H{sub 2} emission lines as tracers of gas cooling, and of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands as tracers of the photoelectric heating, using Herschel-PACS and Spitzer-IRS infrared spectral maps. We focus on the nucleus and the ring, and two star-forming regions (Enuc N and Enuc S). We estimated a photoelectric gas heating efficiency ([C II]158 {mu}m+[O I]63 {mu}m)/PAH in the ring about 50% lower than in Enuc N and S. The average 11.3/7.7 {mu}m PAH ratio is also lower in the ring, which may suggest a larger fraction of ionized PAHs, but no clear correlation with [C II]158 {mu}m/PAH(5.5-14 {mu}m) is found. PAHs in the ring are responsible for a factor of two more [C II]158 {mu}m and [O I]63 {mu}m emission per unit mass than PAHs in the Enuc S. spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling indicates that at most 25% of the FIR power in the ring and Enuc S can come from high-intensity photodissociation regions (PDRs), in which case G{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 2.3} and n{sub H} {approx} 10{sup 3.5} cm{sup -3} in the ring. For these values of G{sub 0} and n{sub H}, PDR models cannot reproduce the observed H{sub 2} emission. Much of the H{sub 2} emission in the starburst ring could come from warm regions in the diffuse interstellar medium that are heated by turbulent dissipation or shocks.

  8. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

  9. Dust emission in star-forming dwarf galaxies: General properties and the nature of the sub-mm excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Krugel, E; Henkel, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the global characteristics of dust emission in a large sample of emission-line star-forming galaxies. The sample consists of two subsamples. One subsample (SDSS sample) includes ~4000 compact star-forming galaxies from the SDSS, which were also detected in all four bands at 3.4, 4.6, 12, and 22 mum of the WISE all-sky survey. The second subsample (Herschel sample) is a sample of 28 compact star-forming galaxies observed with Herschel in the FIR range. Data of the Herschel sample were supplemented by the photometric data from the Spitzer observations, GALEX, SDSS, WISE, 2MASS, NVSS, and FIRST surveys, as well as optical and Spitzer spectra and data in sub-mm and radio ranges. It is found that warm dust luminosities of galaxies from the SDSS sample and cold and warm dust luminosities of galaxies from the Herschel sample are strongly correlated with Hbeta luminosities, which implies that one of the main sources of dust heating in star-forming galaxies is ionising UV radiation of young stars. Using the...

  10. Direct detector for terahertz radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Shaner, Eric A. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

  11. Infrared colour properties of nearby radio-luminous galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiao-hong; Huang, Yan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By combining the data of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Akari satellite, we study the infrared colour properties of a sample of 2712 nearby radio-luminous galaxies (RLGs). These RLGs are divided into radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGNs), mainly occurring at redshifts of $0.05$ 3.0. We also analyse the MIR colours of RL AGNs divided into low- and high-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs and HERGs, respectively). The ([3.4]-[4.6])$-$([4.6]-[12]) diagram clearly shows separate distributions of LERGs and HERGs and a region of overlap, which suggests that LERGs and HERGs have different MIR properties. LERGs are responsible for the double-core distribution of RL AGNs on the ([3.4]-[4.6])$-$([4.6]-[12]) diagram. In addition, we also suggest 90$-$140$\\mu$m band spectral index $\\alpha(90,140)<-1.4$ as a criterion of selecting nearby active galaxies with non-thermal emissions at FIR wavelengths.

  12. Star formation in the cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 and its large-scale environment: the infrared perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Joana S; Tanaka, Masayuki; Valtchanov, Ivan; Saintonge, Amelie; Dickinson, Mark; Foucaud, Sebastien; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rawle, Tim D; Tadaki, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The galaxy cluster CLG0218.3-0510 at z=1.62 is one of the most distant galaxy clusters known, with a rich muti-wavelength data set that confirms a mature galaxy population already in place. Using very deep, wide area (20x20 Mpc) imaging by Spitzer/MIPS at 24um, in conjunction with Herschel 5-band imaging from 100-500um, we investigate the dust-obscured, star-formation properties in the cluster and its associated large scale environment. Our galaxy sample of 693 galaxies at z=1.62 detected at 24um (10 spectroscopic and 683 photo-z) includes both cluster galaxies (i.e. within r <1 Mpc projected clustercentric radius) and field galaxies, defined as the region beyond a radius of 3 Mpc. The star-formation rates (SFRs) derived from the measured infrared luminosity range from 18 to 2500 Ms/yr, with a median of 55 Ms/yr, over the entire radial range (10 Mpc). The cluster brightest FIR galaxy, taken as the centre of the galaxy system, is vigorously forming stars at a rate of 256$\\pm$70 Ms/yr, and the total cluster ...

  13. Panchromatic Estimation of Star Formation Rates in BzK Galaxies at 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurczynski, Peter; Huynh, Minh; Ivison, Rob J; Treister, Ezequiel; Smail, Ian; Blanc, Guillermo A; Cardamone, Carolin N; Greve, Thomas R; Schinnerer, Eva; Urry, Meg; van der Werf, Paul; Walter, Fabian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine Star Formation Rates (SFRs) in a sample of color selected, star forming (sBzK) galaxies (K(AB)<21.8) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field - South (ECDF-S). To avoid AGN, we eliminate 12% of the original sample that have X-ray detections in Chandra catalogs. X-ray stacking, including in the 4 Ms CDF-S, shows that the remaining 597 sBzK galaxies are not dominated by obscured AGN. Photometric redshift binned, average flux densities are measured with stacking analyses in Chandra, Spitzer-MIPS, submillimeter, and radio data. We include averages of aperture fluxes in MUSYC UBVRIz'JHK images to determine UV-through-radio Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). We determine total IR luminosities, compare SFR calibrations from X-ray, UV, 24 micron, FIR and radio wavebands, and we find preferred calibrations for each waveband. We find consistency with our best estimator, SFR(IR+UV), to within a factor of two for dust corrected UV and the preferred radio SFR calibration. Our results show that 24 micron-only ...

  14. Discovery of TeV gamma-ray emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula 3C 58 by MAGIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigas, O Blanch; Carmona, E; Pérez-Torres, M A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN) 3C 58 is energized by one of the highest spin-down power pulsars known (5% of Crab pulsar) and it has been compared to the Crab Nebula due to their morphological similarities. This object was detected by Fermi-LAT with a spectrum extending beyond 100 GeV. We analyzed 81 hours of 3C 58 data taken with the MAGIC telescopes and we detected VHE gamma-ray emission for the first time at TeV energies with a significance of 5.7 sigma and an integral flux of 0.65% C.U. above 1 TeV. The differential energy spectrum between 400 GeV and 10 TeV is well described by a power-law function $d\\Phi/dE=f_{o}(E/1TeV)^{-\\Gamma}$ with $f_{o}=(2.0\\pm0.4stat\\pm0.6sys) 10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}TeV^{-1}$ and $\\Gamma=2.4\\pm0.2sta\\pm0.2sys$. This leads 3C 58 to be the least luminous PWN ever detected at VHE and the one with the lowest flux at VHE to date. According to time-dependent models in which electrons up-scatter photon fields, the best representation favors a distance to the PWN of 2 kpc and FIR comparable...

  15. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey XVI: a cluster inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, J I; Baes, M; Bendo, G J; Clemens, M; De Looze, I; Alighieri, S di Serego; Fritz, J; Fuller, C; Pappalardo, C; Hughes, T M; Madden, S; Smith, M W L; Verstappen, J; Vlahakis, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herschel FIR observations are used to construct Virgo cluster galaxy luminosity functions and to show that the cluster lacks the very bright and the numerous faint sources detected in field galaxy surveys. The far-infrared SEDs are fitted to obtain dust masses and temperatures and the dust mass function. The cluster is over dense in dust by about a factor of 100 compared to the field. The same emissivity (beta) temperature relation applies for different galaxies as that found for different regions of M31. We use optical and HI data to show that Virgo is over dense in stars and atomic gas by about a factor of 100 and 20 respectively. Metallicity values are used to measure the mass of metals in the gas phase. The mean metallicity is about 0.7 solar and 50% of the metals are in the dust. For the cluster as a whole the mass density of stars in galaxies is 8 times that of the gas and the gas mass density is 130 times that of the metals. We use our data to consider the chemical evolution of the individual galaxies,...

  16. Large and small-scale structures and the dust energy balance problem in spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saftly, W; De Geyter, G; Camps, P; Renaud, F; Guedes, J; De Looze, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interstellar dust content in galaxies can be traced in extinction at optical wavelengths, or in emission in the far-infrared. Several studies have found that radiative transfer models that successfully explain the optical extinction in edge-on spiral galaxies generally underestimate the observed FIR/submm fluxes by a factor of about three. In order to investigate this so-called dust energy balance problem, we use two Milky Way-like galaxies produced by high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations. We create mock optical edge-on views of these simulated galaxies (using the radiative transfer code SKIRT), and we then fit the parameters of a basic spiral galaxy model to these images (using the fitting code FitSKIRT). The basic model includes smooth axisymmetric distributions along a S\\'ersic bulge and exponential disc for the stars, and a second exponential disc for the dust. We find that the dust mass recovered by the fitted models is about three times smaller than the known dust mass of the hydrodynamical in...

  17. The earliest phases of star formation observed with Herschel (EPoS): The dust temperature and density distributions of B68

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielbock, M; Steinacker, J; Stutz, A M; Balog, Z; Beuther, H; Bouwman, J; Henning, Th; Hily-Blant, P; Kainulainen, J; Krause, O; Linz, H; Lippok, N; Ragan, S; Risacher, C; Schmiedeke, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abriged) In the framework of the Herschel GTKP "The earliest phases of star formation", we have imaged B68 between 100 and 500 um. Ancillary (sub)mm data, spectral line maps of the 12/13CO(2-1) transitions as well as a NIR extinction map were added to the analysis. We employed a ray-tracing algorithm to derive the 2D mid-plane dust temperature and volume density distribution without suffering from LoS averaging effects of simple SED fitting procedures. Additional 3D radiative transfer calculations were employed to investigate the connection between the external irradiation and the peculiar crescent shaped morphology found in the FIR maps. For the first time, we spatially resolve the dust temperature and density distribution of B68. We find T_dust dropping from 16.7 K at the edge to 8.2 K in the centre, which is about 4 K lower than the result of the simple SED fitting approach. N_H peaks at 4.3x10^22 cm^-2 and n_H at 3.4x10^5 cm^-3 in the centre. B68 has a mass of 3.1 M_sun of material with A_K > 0.2 mag for...

  18. GOODS-Herschel: the impact of galaxy-galaxy interactions on the far-infrared properties of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, H S; Dickinson, M; Charmandaris, V; Daddi, E; Borgne, D Le; Buat, V; Magdis, G E; Altieri, B; Aussel, H; Coia, D; Dannerbauer, H; Dasyra, K; Kartaltepe, J; Leiton, R; Magnelli, B; Popesso, P; Valtchanov, I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the impact of galaxy-galaxy interactions on the FIR properties of galaxies and its evolution at 099%. However, the SFR and the SSFR decrease or do not change much as it approaches an early-type neighbor. The bifurcations of SFRs and SSFRs depending on the neighbor's morphology seem to occur at R_n~0.5r_vir,nei, which is supported by K-S and MC tests with a significance level of >98%. For all redshift bins, the SSFRs of late-type galaxies interacting with late-type neighbors are increased by factors of about 1.8+/-0.7 and 4.0+/-1.2 compared to those of non-interacting galaxies when the pair separation is smaller than 0.5r_vir,nei and 0.1r_vir,nei, respectively. The Tdust of both local and high-z late-type galaxies strongly interacting with late-type neighbors (i.e. R_n nei) appears to be higher than that of non-interacting galaxies with a significance level of 96-99%. However, Tdust of local late-type galaxies strongly interacting with early-type neighbors seems to be lower than or simil...

  19. Test of four stand growth simulators for the northeastern United States. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuler, T.M.; Marquis, D.A.; Ernst, R.L.; Simpson, B.T.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SILVAH, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and OAKSIM simulators, commonly used in the northeastern United States, were evaluated by comparing predicted stand development with actual stand development records for periods ranging from 15 to 50 years. Results varied with stand parameter, forest type, projection length, and geographic area. Except in the spruce-fir forest type where FIBER stands out as the best simulator, no single simulator is clearly superior to the others for all locations within a forest type. In general, FIBER, NE-TWIGS, and SILVAH performed best in the northern hardwood (beech-birch-maple) forest type: NE-TWIGS and SILVAH performed best in the Allegheny hardwood (cherry-maple) forest type; SILVAH and OAKSIM performed best in the oak-hickory forest type; and SILVAH was most suitable in the transition hardwood (mixture of northern hardwoods and oaks) forest type. The results give growth and yield model users more information for selecting the simulator most suitable for their particular needs. The results also can be used as a diagnostic tool for growth and yield model development.

  20. The Contribution of Faint Blue Galaxies to the Sub-mm Counts and Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geoff S. Busswell; Tom Shanks

    2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in the submillimetre waveband have recently revealed a new population of luminous, sub-mm sources. These are proposed to lie at high redshift and to be optically faint due to their high intrinsic dust obscuration. The presence of dust has been previously invoked in optical galaxy count models which assume $\\tau=9$ Gyr Bruzual & Charlot evolution for spirals and these fit the count data well from U to K. We now show that by using either a 1/$\\lambda$ or Calzetti absorption law for the dust and re-distributing the evolved spiral galaxy UV radiation into the far infra-red(FIR), these models can account for all of the `faint'($\\leq1$mJy) $850\\mu$m galaxy counts, but fail to fit 'bright'($\\ge2$mJy) sources, indicating that another explanation for the sub-mm counts may apply at brighter fluxes(e.g. QSOs, ULIRGs). We find that the main contribution to the faint, sub-mm number counts is in the redshift range $0.5 < z < 3$, peaking at $z\\approx 1.8$. The above model, using either dust law, can also explain a significant proportion of the extra-galactic background at $850\\mu$m as well as producing a reasonable fit to the bright $60\\mu m$ IRAS counts.

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

  2. Mitsubishi Electric Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ex/)cri~~lenlral resul~s are presented for grease lubricaled gears. Firsl, the oil-Jilvtl formatio?ls were measured, using a power circii~l(~ling pnr muchine. The same tests were also performed ruitlt gear oils. The oil-film formation for grease was unstable compared lo oil. The res~alts show hat tile normal load a1 which lhe oil-film Sr,~-rttulion ofgrec~se becomes insufficient was about 60 percent of 1lrc~1fir oil. In addition, a life lest was carried out. Surface damage ofgec~r teeth was scoring rather than spalling. The gear lije was clo.sely related to the normal load. The results were also compared wilI ~ AGMA standards. I1 was suggested tltat lhe allowable surface r111.rcabilily of (L grechse lubricaled gear was 0.9 GPa in herlzian Pressi~re which was (about 60 percent that of an oil lubricaled gear. The (&(L were then used lo develop a design for grease lubricated gears.

  3. Compact, Low-power and Precision Timing Photodetector Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.; /Hawaii U.; Schwiening, Jochen; Vavra, Jaroslav; /SLAC

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and single-photon detection requires a digitizer capable of integrated recording of dense arrays of sensor elements with high analog bandwidth (precision timing) and large record depth, in a cost-effective, compact and low-power way. Simply stated, one cannot do better than having a high-fidelity 'oscilloscope on a chip' for every sensor channel. A firs version of the Buffered Large Analog Bandwidth (BLAB1) ASIC has been designed based upon the lessons learned from the development of the Large Analog Bandwidth Recorder and Digitizer with Ordered Readout (LABRADOR) ASIC. While this LABRADOR ASIC has been very successful and forms the readout basis of a generation of new, large-scale radio neutrino detectors, its limited sampling depth is a major drawback. To address this shortcoming, a prototype intended for photodetector readout has been designed and fabricated with 64k deep sampling at multi-GSa/s operation. An evaluation system has been constructed for instrumentation of Time-Of-Propagation (TOP) and focusing DIRC prototypes and test results will be reported.

  4. AzTEC Millimetre Survey of the COSMOS Field: I. Data Reduction and Source Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K S; Perera, T A; Wilson, G W; Aretxaga, I; Bock, J J; Hughes, D H; Kang, Y; Kim, S; Mauskopf, P D; Sanders, D B; Scoville, N; Yun, M S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1.1 mm wavelength imaging survey covering 0.3 sq. deg. in the COSMOS field. These data, obtained with the AzTEC continuum camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), were centred on a prominent large-scale structure over-density which includes a rich X-ray cluster at z = 0.73. A total of 50 millimetre galaxy candidates, with a significance ranging from 3.5-8.5 sigma, are extracted from the central 0.15 sq. deg. area which has a uniform sensitivity of 1.3 mJy/beam. Sixteen sources are detected with S/N > 4.5, where the expected false-detection rate is zero, of which a surprisingly large number (9) have intrinsic (de-boosted) fluxes > 5 mJy at 1.1 mm. Assuming the emission is dominated by radiation from dust, heated by a massive population of young, optically-obscured stars, then these bright AzTEC sources have FIR luminosities > 6 x 10^12 L(sun) and star formation-rates > 1100 M(sun)/yr. Two of these nine bright AzTEC sources are found towards the extreme peripheral region of the X-ray clu...

  5. PANCHROMATIC ESTIMATION OF STAR FORMATION RATES IN BzK GALAXIES AT 1 < z < 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurczynski, Peter; Gawiser, Eric [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Huynh, Minh [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia M468, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ivison, Rob J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Treister, Ezequiel [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Smail, Ian [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Cardamone, Carolin N. [Physics Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Greve, Thomas R.; Schinnerer, Eva; Van der Werf, Paul [MPI for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Urry, Meg [Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States)

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine star formation rates (SFRs) in a sample of color-selected, star-forming (sBzK) galaxies (K{sub AB} < 21.8) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. To identify and avoid active galactic nuclei, we use X-ray, IRAC color, and IR/radio flux ratio selection methods. Photometric redshift-binned, average flux densities are measured with stacking analyses in Spitzer-MIPS IR, BLAST and APEX/LABOCA submillimeter, VLA and GMRT radio, and Chandra X-ray data. We include averages of aperture fluxes in MUSYC UBVRIz'JHK images to determine UV-through-radio spectral energy distributions. We determine the total IR luminosities and compare SFR calibrations from FIR, 24 {mu}m, UV, radio, and X-ray wavebands. We find consistency with our best estimator, SFR{sub IR+UV}, to within errors for the preferred radio SFR calibration. Our results imply that 24 {mu}m only and X-ray SFR estimates should be applied to high-redshift galaxies with caution. Average IR luminosities are consistent with luminous infrared galaxies. We find SFR{sub IR+UV} for our stacked sBzKs at median redshifts 1.4, 1.8, and 2.2 to be 55 {+-} 6 (random error), 74 {+-} 8, and 154 {+-} 17 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively, with additional systematic uncertainty of a factor of {approx}2.

  6. THE EXTENT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AROUND GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J., E-mail: mbernet@astro.swin.edu.au, E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: simon.lilly@phys.ethz.ch [Physics Department, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio quasar sightlines with strong Mg II absorption lines display statistically enhanced Faraday rotation measures (RMs), indicating the presence of additional magneto-active plasma with respect to sightlines free of such absorption. In this Letter, we use multi-color optical imaging to identify the galaxies likely hosting the magneto-active plasma, and to constrain the location of the latter with respect to the putative parent halo. We find that all of the sightlines with high |RM| pass within 50 kpc of a galaxy and that the |RM| distribution for low impact parameters, D < 50 kpc, is significantly different than for larger impact parameters. In addition, we find a decrease in the ratio of the polarization at 21 cm and 1.5 cm, p{sub 21}/p{sub 1.5}, toward lower D. These two effects are most likely related, strengthen the association of excess |RM| with intervening galaxies, and suggest that intervening galaxies operate as inhomogeneous Faraday screens. These results are difficult to reconcile with only a disk model for the magnetic field, but are consistent with highly magnetized winds associated with Mg II systems. We infer strong magnetic fields of a few tens of {mu}G, consistent with the values required by the lack of evolution of the FIR-radio correlation at high redshifts. Finally, these findings lend support to the idea that the small-scale helicity bottleneck of {alpha}-{Omega} galactic dynamos can be significantly alleviated via galactic winds.

  7. Multimodality Imaging with Silica-Based Targeted Nanoparticle Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason S. Lewis

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives: To synthesize and characterize a C-Dot silica-based nanoparticle containing 'clickable' groups for the subsequent attachment of targeting moieties (e.g., peptides) and multiple contrast agents (e.g., radionuclides with high specific activity) [1,2]. These new constructs will be tested in suitable tumor models in vitro and in vivo to ensure maintenance of target-specificity and high specific activity. Methods: Cy5 dye molecules are cross-linked to a silica precursor which is reacted to form a dye-rich core particle. This core is then encapsulated in a layer of pure silica to create the core-shell C-Dot (Figure 1) [2]. A 'click' chemistry approach has been used to functionalize the silica shell with radionuclides conferring high contrast and specific activity (e.g. 64Cu and 89Zr) and peptides for tumor targeting (e.g. cRGD and octreotate) [3]. Based on the selective Diels-Alder reaction between tetrazine and norbornene, the reaction is bioorthogonal, highyielding, rapid, and water-compatible. This radiolabeling approach has already been employed successfully with both short peptides (e.g. octreotate) and antibodies (e.g. trastuzumab) as model systems for the ultimate labeling of the nanoparticles [1]. Results: PEGylated C-Dots with a Cy5 core and labeled with tetrazine have been synthesized (d = 55 nm, zeta potential = -3 mV) reliably and reproducibly and have been shown to be stable under physiological conditions for up to 1 month. Characterization of the nanoparticles revealed that the immobilized Cy5 dye within the C-Dots exhibited fluorescence intensities over twice that of the fluorophore alone. The nanoparticles were successfully radiolabeled with Cu-64. Efforts toward the conjugation of targeting peptides (e.g. cRGD) are underway. In vitro stability, specificity, and uptake studies as well as in vivo imaging and biodistribution investigations will be presented. Conclusions: C-Dot silica-based nanoparticles offer a robust, versatile, and multi-functional platform to enhance in vivo detection sensitivity and non-invasively assay receptor expression/status of tumor cellular targets, including those of low abundance, using nuclear-NIR fluorescence imaging approaches [2]. Improvements in molecular diagnostics, refined by the availability of nanotechnology platforms, will be a key determinant in driving early-stage disease detection and prevention, ultimately leading to decreases in mortality.

  8. Aster jessicae Jessica's aster Status: State Endangered, USFWS Species of Concern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank Gss; General Description Robust

    creeping rhizomes that tends to grow in large clumps. Plants grow to be 5 feet tall, but average about 3 feet. The herbage, particularly the upper portion, is covered with a dense, uniform, soft pubescence. Leaves are abundant, broadly lance-shaped and entire. Middle stem leaves generally partially clasp the stem and lower leaves tend to dry up and wither as the season progresses. Flowers are generally numerous, lavender in color, 1-1.5 inches in diameter, and form a broad cluster at the top of the plant. Identification Tips: A. jessicae is distinct in its unusually robust nature, dense pubescence, and cordate leaf bases. The only other aster found in the vicinity of Jessica’s aster is A. occidentalis var. intermedius. This species generally inhabits more mesic microhabitats, has smaller flowers, is less robust, possesses few to no hairs, and lacks cordate leaf bases. Phenology: Flowering occurs in late summer and early fall (from late July through mid September). Fruit and seed maturation occurs in September and early October, with seed dispersal likely in mid to late October. Range: Local endemic; southeastern WA (Whitman Co.) and adjacent ID. Occurs in the Columbia Basin physiographic province. Habitat: The species occurs in Palouse grasslands and prairie/ forest transition zones, often in association with small drainages, but above water level on dry ground, 2500-2800 feet in elevation. It occurs primarily in the following habitat types (Daubenmire 1970): ponderosa pine/snowberry, Idaho fescue/snowberry, black hawthorn/snowberry, Idaho fescue/Nootka rosa, and Douglas fir/ ninebark. Other associated species include bluebunch wheatgrass, balsamroot, and yarrow. ©1955 University of Washington Press. Illustration by John H. Rumely. Known distribution of

  9. SWIRE: The SIRTF Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carol J. Lonsdale; Harding E. Smith; Michael Rowan-Robinson; Jason Surace; David Shupe; Cong Xu; Seb Oliver; Deborah Padgett; Fan Fang; Alberto Franceschini; Nick Gautier; Matt Griffin; Frank Masci; Glenn Morrison; JoAnn O'Linger; Ismael Perez-Fournon; Marguerite Pierre; Richard Puetter; Gordon Stacey

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The SIRTF Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic survey (SWIRE), the largest SIRTF Legacy program, is a wide-area, imaging survey to trace the evolution of dusty, star-forming galaxies, evolved stellar populations, and AGN as a function of environment, from redshifts z~3 to the current epoch. SWIRE will survey 7 high-latitude fields, totaling 60 - 65 sq. deg. in all 7 SIRTF bands: IRAC 3.6, 4.5, 5.6, 8 microns and MIPS 24, 70, 160 microns. The Legacy Extragalactic Catalog may contain in excess of 2 million IR-selected galaxies, dominated by (1) ~150,000 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs: L{FIR}>10^11 L_sun), ~7000 of these with z>2; (2) 1 million early-type galaxies, ~10,000 with z>2; and (3) \\~20,000 classical AGN, plus significantly more dust-obscured QSO/AGN among the LIRGs. SWIRE will provide an unprecedented view of the evolution of galaxies, structure, and AGN. The key scientific goals of SWIRE are: (1) to determine the evolution of actively star-forming and passively evolving galaxies in order to understand the history of galaxy formation in the context of cosmic structure formation; (2) to determine the evolution of the spatial distribution and clustering of evolved galaxies, starbursts and AGN in the key redshift range, 0.5

  10. Exploratory Technology Research Program for electrochemical energy storage: Annual report for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, K. [ed.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an Electrochemical Energy Storage Program, that includes research and development (R&D) on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The DOE Electrochemical Energy Storage Program is divided into two projects: the Electric Vehicle Advanced Battery Systems (EVABS) Development Program and the Exploratory Technology Research (ETR) Program. The EVABS Program management responsibility has been assigned to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is responsible for management of the ETR Program. The EVABS and ETR Programs include an integrated matrix of R&D efforts designed to advance progress on selected candidate electrochemical systems. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), a tripartite undertaking between DOE, the U.S. automobile manufacturers and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), was formed in 1991 to accelerate the development of advanced batteries for consumer EVs. The role of the FIR Program is to perform supporting research on the advanced battery systems under development by the USABC and EVABS Program, and to evaluate new systems with potentially superior performance, durability and/or cost characteristics. The specific goal of the ETR Program is to identify the most promising electrochemical technologies and transfer them to the USABC, the battery industry and/or the EVABS Program for further development and scale-up. This report summarizes the research, financial and management activities relevant to the ETR Program in CY 1993.

  11. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  12. Near-infrared Spectroscopy and HST Imaging of a Dusty Starburst ERO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham P. Smith; Tommaso Treu; Richard Ellis; Ian Smail; Jean-Paul Kneib; Brenda Frye

    2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present near-IR spectroscopy and HST imaging of EROJ164023, an Extremely Red Object (ERO) with R-K=5.9 at z=1.05. EROJ164023 is a disk galaxy, with an optical/IR spectral energy distribution which is strongly reddened by dust (L_FIR/L_B<~200; A_V~5). The narrow emission lines (~300km/s) and the high [NII]/Halpha line ratio indicate that this is a ``composite'' starburst-Seyfert galaxy. Assuming that star formation dominates, we constrain the SFR to be 10-700Mo/yr from a variety of indicators. We compare EROJ164023 with the only other spectroscopically identified dusty EROs: HR10 (z=1.44) and ISOJ1324-2016 (z=1.50). EROJ164023 and HR10 have similar disk-like morphologies, and both exhibit a variation in the apparent dust obscuration depending upon the diagnostic used, suggesting that there is a complex spatial mix of stellar populations and dust in these galaxies. In contrast, the compact morphology and spectral properties of ISOJ1324-2016 indicate that it is a dusty quasar. Our results demonstrate that dusty galaxies identified using photometric ERO criteria include pure starbursts, composite systems such as EROJ164023 and dusty quasars. We suggest that the classification of EROs into these sub-classes cannot be reliably achieved from optical/near-IR photometry and instead requires mid/far-IR or sub-mm photometry and near-IR spectroscopy. The advent of efficient multi-object spectrographs working in the near-IR as well as the imminent launch of SIRTF therefore promise the opportunity of rapid progress in our understanding of the elusive ERO population. [Abridged

  13. Introducing GOLDMine: A new Galaxy Database on the WEB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Gavazzi; A. Boselli; A. Donati; P. Franzetti; M. Scodeggio

    2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The new World Wide Web site "GOLDMine" (Galaxy On Line Database Milano Network) (http://goldmine.mib.infn.it) contains a multiwavelength data-base of an optically selected sample of 3267 galaxies in the Virgo cluster and in the Coma Supercluster. It is designed for professional astronomers who wish to find data and images for these galaxies. Data, gathered in 15 years of observational campaigns by the authors or taken from the literature include general parameters (catalogue names, celestial coordinates, morphological type, recessional velocity etc.); multiwavelength continuum photometry (total UV, U, B, V, J, H, K, FIR and radio magnitudes/flux densities); line photometry (HI, H_2, H_alpha); dynamical parameters (rotational velocity from the HI and H_alpha lines, velocity dispersion) and structural parameters (light concentration index, effective radius and brightness, asymptotic magnitude) in the optical (B and V) and Near Infrared (H or K) bands. Images include finding charts, optical (B and V), H_alpha, Near Infrared (H and/or K) and true color RGB frames (when available). Radial light profiles obtained from the B, V, H or K band images are also available. Integrated optical spectra along with broad Spectral Energy Distributions (SED) from the UV to the radio domain are given. All images can be obtained in JPG format, but the original (reduced) FITS images can be downloaded as well. The database will be updated regularly and will be extended to other local clusters and superclusters. Astronomers who wish to have their images included in GOLDMine are strongly encouraged to send us their material.

  14. 1994 Northern Goshawk inventory on portions of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, D.T.; Kennedy, P.L. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) (hereafter referred to as goshawk) are large forest dwelling hawks. They are the largest species of the Accipiter genus which also includes sharp-shinned hawks (A. striatus) and the Cooper`s hawk (A. cooperii). Goshawks are holarctic in distribution and nest in coniferous, deciduous, and mixed species forests. In the southwest they primarily nest in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), mixed species, and spruce-fir forests. Goshawks may be declining in population and reproduction in the southwestern United States. In 1982 the USDA-Forest Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}sensitive species{close_quotes} and in 1992 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the goshawk as a {open_quotes}Category 2 species{close_quotes} in accordance with the Endangered Species Act. Reasons for the possible decline in goshawk populations include timber harvesting resulting in the loss of nesting habitat, toxic chemicals, and the effects of drought, fire, and disease. Thus, there is a need to determine their population status and assess impacts of management activities in potential goshawk habitat. Goshawk inventory was conducted during the 1993 nesting season with no adult goshawk responses detected within the LANL survey area. As noted by Sinton and Kennedy, these results may be interpreted in several ways: (1) no goshawk territory(ies) occur in the inventoried area; (2) goshawk territory(ies) exist but have failed prior to the survey and thus were not detected; or (3) territory(ies) exist and were successful but the goshawks did not respond to tapes or their responses were undetected by the observer. For those reasons, a goshawk inventory was conducted in 1994. This report summarizes the results of this inventory.

  15. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

  16. AzTEC Millimetre Survey of the COSMOS Field: I. Data Reduction and Source Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. S. Scott; J. E. Austermann; T. A. Perera; G. W. Wilson; I. Aretxaga; J. J. Bock; D. H. Hughes; Y. Kang; S. Kim; P. D. Mauskopf; D. B. Sanders; N. Scoville; M. S. Yun

    2008-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1.1 mm wavelength imaging survey covering 0.3 sq. deg. in the COSMOS field. These data, obtained with the AzTEC continuum camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT), were centred on a prominent large-scale structure over-density which includes a rich X-ray cluster at z = 0.73. A total of 50 millimetre galaxy candidates, with a significance ranging from 3.5-8.5 sigma, are extracted from the central 0.15 sq. deg. area which has a uniform sensitivity of 1.3 mJy/beam. Sixteen sources are detected with S/N > 4.5, where the expected false-detection rate is zero, of which a surprisingly large number (9) have intrinsic (de-boosted) fluxes > 5 mJy at 1.1 mm. Assuming the emission is dominated by radiation from dust, heated by a massive population of young, optically-obscured stars, then these bright AzTEC sources have FIR luminosities > 6 x 10^12 L(sun) and star formation-rates > 1100 M(sun)/yr. Two of these nine bright AzTEC sources are found towards the extreme peripheral region of the X-ray cluster, whilst the remainder are distributed across the larger-scale over-density. We describe the AzTEC data reduction pipeline, the source-extraction algorithm, and the characterisation of the source catalogue, including the completeness, flux de-boosting correction, false-detection rate and the source positional uncertainty, through an extensive set of Monte-Carlo simulations. We conclude with a preliminary comparison, via a stacked analysis, of the overlapping MIPS 24 micron data and radio data with this AzTEC map of the COSMOS field.

  17. ALIGNMENT BETWEEN FLATTENED PROTOSTELLAR INFALL ENVELOPES AND AMBIENT MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Novak, Giles [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Davidson, Jacqueline A. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 264-782, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Houde, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Li Zhiyun [Astronomy Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Matthews, Brenda [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Peng Ruisheng [Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Vaillancourt, John E. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-11, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); Volgenau, Nikolaus H. [California Institute of Technology, Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, CA 93513 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present 350 {mu}m polarization observations of four low-mass cores containing Class 0 protostars: L483, L1157, L1448-IRS2, and Serp-FIR1. This is the second paper in a larger survey aimed at testing magnetically regulated models for core-collapse. One key prediction of these models is that the mean magnetic field in a core should be aligned with the symmetry axis (minor axis) of the flattened young stellar object inner envelope (aka pseudodisk). Furthermore, the field should exhibit a pinched or hourglass-shaped morphology as gravity drags the field inward toward the central protostar. We combine our results for the four cores with results for three similar cores that were published in the first paper from our survey. An analysis of the 350 {mu}m polarization data for the seven cores yields evidence of a positive correlation between mean field direction and pseudodisk symmetry axis. Our rough estimate for the probability of obtaining by pure chance a correlation as strong as the one we found is about 5%. In addition, we combine together data for multiple cores to create a source-averaged magnetic field map having improved signal-to-noise ratio, and this map shows good agreement between mean field direction and pseudodisk axis (they are within 15 Degree-Sign ). We also see hints of a magnetic pinch in the source-averaged map. We conclude that core-scale magnetic fields appear to be strong enough to guide gas infall, as predicted by the magnetically regulated models. Finally, we find evidence of a positive correlation between core magnetic field direction and bipolar outflow axis.

  18. THE 3R ANTHRACITE CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY Economical Conversion of Browncoal to Anthracite Type Clean Coal by Low Temperature Carbonization Pre-Treatment Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Someus

    The pre ven tive pre-treat ment of low grade solid fu els is safer, faster, better, and less costly vs. the “end-of-the-pipe ” post treat ment so lu tions. The “3R ” (Re cy cle-Re duce-Re use) in te grated en vi ron-ment con trol tech nol ogy pro vides pre ven tive pre-treat ment of low grade solid fu els, such as brown coal and con tam i nated solid fu els to achieve high grade cleansed fu els with an thra cite and coke com-pa ra ble qual ity. The goal of the 3R tech nol ogy is to pro vide cost ef fi cient and en vi ron men tally sus-tain able so lu tions by pre ven tive pre-treat ment means for ex tended op er a tions of the solid fuel com-bus tion power plants with ca pac ity up to 300 MWe power ca pac i ties. The 3R An thra cite Clean Coal end prod uct and tech nol ogy may ad van ta geously be in te grated to the oxyfuel – oxy-fir ing, Fos ter Wheeler an thra cite arc-fired util ity type boiler and Heat Pipe Re former tech nol o gies in com bi na tion with CO2 cap ture and stor age pro grams. The 3R tech nol ogy is pat ented orig i nal so lu tion. Ad van tages. Feedstock flex i bil ity: ap pli ca tion of pre-treated multi fu els from wider fuel se lec tion and avail abil ity. Im proved burn ing ef fi ciency. Tech nol ogy flex i bil ity: ef fi cient and ad van ta geous inter-link to proven boiler tech nol o gies, such as oxyfuel and arc-fired boil ers. Near zero pol lut ants for haz ard ous-air-pol lut ants: pre ven tive sep a ra tion of halo gens and heavy met als into small vol ume streams prior uti li za tion of cleansed fu els. ?97 % or ganic sul phur re moval achieved by the 3R ther-

  19. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single, combined analysis, with sensitivity to lower-energy interactions, careful control of data quality and stability, and further development of techniques for reconstructing event location and rejecting near-surface interactions from beta decays. They also present a revision to the previously published Run 119 analysis, a demonstration of the feasibility of a low-threshold (1 or 2 keV) analysis of Soudan data, and a review of the literature on charge generation and quenching relevant to the ionization signal.

  20. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

  1. Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

  2. Predicting the impacts of climate change on animal distributions: the importance of local adaptation and species' traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HELLMANN, J. J.; LOBO, N. F.

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The geographic range limits of many species are strongly affected by climate and are expected to change under global warming. For species that are able to track changing climate over broad geographic areas, we expect to see shifts in species distributions toward the poles and away from the equator. A number of ecological and evolutionary factors, however, could restrict this shifting or redistribution under climate change. These factors include restricted habitat availability, restricted capacity for or barriers to movement, or reduced abundance of colonists due the perturbation effect of climate change. This research project examined the last of these constraints - that climate change could perturb local conditions to which populations are adapted, reducing the likelihood that a species will shift its distribution by diminishing the number of potential colonists. In the most extreme cases, species ranges could collapse over a broad geographic area with no poleward migration and an increased risk of species extinction. Changes in individual species ranges are the processes that drive larger phenomena such as changes in land cover, ecosystem type, and even changes in carbon cycling. For example, consider the poleward range shift and population outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle that has decimated millions of acres of Douglas fir trees in the western US and Canada. Standing dead trees cause forest fires and release vast quantities of carbon to the atmosphere. The beetle likely shifted its range because it is not locally adapted across its range, and it appears to be limited by winter low temperatures that have steadily increased in the last decades. To understand range and abundance changes like the pine beetle, we must reveal the extent of adaptive variation across species ranges - and the physiological basis of that adaptation - to know if other species will change as readily as the pine beetle. Ecologists tend to assume that range shifts are the dominant response of species to climate change, but our experiments suggest that other processes may act in some species that reduce the likelihood of geographic range change. In the first part of our DOE grant (ending 2008) we argued that the process of local adaptation of populations within a species range, followed by climatic changes that occur too quickly for adaptive evolution, is an underappreciated mechanism by which climate change could affect biodiversity. When this process acts, species ranges may not shift readily toward the poles, slowing the rate of species and biome change. To test this claim, we performed an experiment comparing core and peripheral populations in a series of field observations, translocation experiments, and genetic analyses. The papers in Appendix A were generated from 2005-2008 funding. In the second part of the DOE grant (ending 2011) we studied which traits promote population differentiation and local adaptation by building genomic resources for our study species and using these resources to reveal differences in gene expression in peripheral and core populations. The papers in Appendix B were generated from 2008-2011 funding. This work was pursued with two butterfly species that have contrasting life history traits (body size and resource specialization) and occupy a common ecosystem and a latitudinal range. These species enabled us to test the following hypotheses using a single phylogenetic group.