National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fir hemlock alder

  1. HEMLOCK

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-03-25

    HEMLOCK (Heterogeneous Ensemble Machine Learning Open Classification Kit) is a software tool for constructing, evaluating, and applying heterogeneous ensemble data models for use in solving supervised machine learning problems. Specifically, the main class of problems targeted by HEMLOCK is the problem of multiple-class classification (also called labeling or categorization) of data with continuous or discrete features. HEMLOCK consists of various data readers, machine learning algorithms, model combination and comparison routines, evaluation methods for model performancemore » testing, and interfaces to external, state-of-the-art machine learning software libraries.« less

  2. Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc Address: 52124 WA-7 Place: Eatonville, WA Zip: 98328 Service Territory: WA Phone Number:...

  3. AmeriFlux US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, William

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site. Site Description - The forest surrounding the Hemlock site has remained pristine with two exceptions. In the early to mid-1700s, European settlers cleared the majority of the forest for agricultural purposes. Selective harvesting of hemlock and chestnut trees occurred up until the early 1900s, when the chestnut blight killed all of the chestnut trees. In the current forest, about 83% of the total basal area of trees is hemlock. The remainder is equally divided between eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and deciduous species, including red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and black birch (Betula lenta). A very thick organic layer (10-20 cm or more) covers the soil surface, and highly decayed coarse woody debris is abundant.

  4. MHK Projects/White Alder Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMHKProjectsWhiteAlderProject&oldid679556...

  5. Covalently crosslinked diels-alder polymer networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Christopher; Adzima, Brian J.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2011-09-01

    This project examines the utility of cycloaddition reactions for the synthesis of polymer networks. Cycloaddition reactions are desirable because they produce no unwanted side reactions or small molecules, allowing for the formation of high molecular weight species and glassy crosslinked networks. Both the Diels-Alder reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) were studied. Accomplishments include externally triggered healing of a thermoreversible covalent network via self-limited hysteresis heating, the creation of Diels-Alder based photoresists, and the successful photochemical catalysis of CuAAC as an alternative to the use of ascorbic acid for the generation of Cu(I) in click reactions. An analysis of the results reveals that these new methods offer the promise of efficiently creating robust, high molecular weight species and delicate three dimensional structures that incorporate chemical functionality in the patterned material. This work was performed under a Strategic Partnerships LDRD during FY10 and FY11 as part of a Sandia National Laboratories/University of Colorado-Boulder Excellence in Science and Engineering Fellowship awarded to Brian J. Adzima, a graduate student at UC-Boulder. Benjamin J. Anderson (Org. 1833) was the Sandia National Laboratories point-of-contact for this fellowship.

  6. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  7. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2012-11-10

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  8. AmeriFlux US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Law, Bev [Oregon State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site. Site Description - The Marys River Fir site is part of the "Synthesis of Remote Sensing and Field Observations to Model and Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of Oregon and Northern California (ORCA)". Located in the western region of Oregon the Marys River site represents the western extent of the climate gradient that spans eastward into the semi-arid basin of central Oregon. The sites that make up the eastern extent of the ORCA climate gradient is the Metolius site network (US-Me1, US-ME2, US-ME4, US-Me5) all of which are part of the TERRA PNW project at Oregon State University.

  9. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  10. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that themore » diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.« less

  11. Characterization of vanadium ion uptake in sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawton, Jamie; Jones, Amanda; Tang, Zhijiang; Lindsey, Melanie; Zawodzinski, Thomas A

    2015-11-28

    Sulfonated diels alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP), alternative aromatic hydrocarbon membranes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) are characterized using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes soaked in sulfuric acid and vanadyl sulfate are analyzed to determine the membrane environment in which the vanadyl ion (VO2+) diffuses in the membranes. These results are compared to Nafion 117 membranes. In contrast to Nafion, the VO2+ in SDAPP membranes exists in two different environments. The results of analysis of rotational diffusion determined from fits the EPR spectral lineshapes in comparison with previously reported permeation studies and measurements of partitioning functions reported here suggest that the diffusion pathways in SDAPP are very different than in Nafion.

  12. Vanadium redox flow battery efficiency and durability studies of sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene)s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Kim, Soowhan; Stains, Ronald; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    Sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP) was examined for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) use. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied from 1.4, 1.6 and 2.0 meq/g in order to tune the proton conductivity and vanadium permeability. Coulombic efficiencies between 92 to 99% were observed, depending on IEC (lower IEC, higher coulombic efficiencies). In all cases the SDAPP displayed comparable energy efficiencies (88 - 90%) to Nafion 117 (88%) at 50mA/cm2. Membrane durability also was dependent on IEC; SDAPP with the highest IEC lasted slightly over 50 cycles while SDAPP with the lowest IEC lasted over 400 cycles and testing was discontinued only due to time constraints. Accelerated vanadium lifetime studies were initialed with SDAPP, by soaking films in a 0.1 M V5+ and 5.0 M total SO4-2 solution. The rate of degradation was also proportional with IEC; the 2 meq/g sample dissolved within 376 hours, the 1.6 meq/g sample dissolved after 860 hours, while the 1.4 meq/g sample broke apart after 1527 hours.

  13. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediate ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.

  14. Diels Alder polyphenylene anion exchange membrane for nonaqueous redox flow batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Small, Leo J.; Pratt, III, Harry D.; Fujimoto, Cy H.; Anderson, Travis M.

    2015-10-23

    Here highly conductive, solvent-resistant anionic Diels Alder polyphenylene (DAPP) membranes were synthesized with three different ionic contents and tested in an ionic liquid-based nonaqueous redox flow battery (RFB). These membranes display 3–10× increase in conductivity in propylene carbonate compared to some commercially available (aqueous) anion exchange membranes. The membrane with an ion content of 1.5 meq/g (DAPP1.5) proved too brittle for operation in a RFB, while the membrane with an ion content of 2.5 meq/g (DAPP2.5) allowed excessive movement of solvent and poor electrochemical yields (capacity fade). Despite having lower voltage efficiencies compared to DAPP2.5, the membrane with an intermediatemore » ion content of 2.0 meq/g (DAPP2.0) exhibited higher coulombic efficiencies (96.4% vs. 89.1%) and electrochemical yields (21.6% vs. 10.9%) after 50 cycles. Crossover of the electroactive species was the primary reason for decreased electrochemical yields. Analysis of the anolyte and catholyte revealed degradation of the electroactive species and formation of a film at the membrane-solution interface. Increases in membrane resistance were attributed to mechanical and thermal aging of the membrane; no chemical change was observed. As a result, improvements in the ionic selectivity and ionic conductivity of the membrane will increase the electrochemical yield and voltage efficiency of future nonaqueous redox flow batteries.« less

  15. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not play a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.

  16. Full cell study of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) anion and cation exchange membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pezeshki, Alan M.; Fujimoto, Cy; Sun, Che -Nan; Mench, Matthew M.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Tang, Z. J.

    2015-11-14

    In this paper, we report on the performance of Diels Alder poly(phenylene) membranes in vanadium redox flow batteries. The membranes were functionalized with quaternary ammonium groups to form an anion exchange membrane (QDAPP) and with sulfonic acid groups to form a cation exchange membrane (SDAPP). Both membrane classes showed similar conductivities in the battery environment, suggesting that the ion conduction mechanism in the material is not strongly affected by the moieties along the polymer backbone. The resistance to vanadium permeation in QDAPP was not improved relative to SDAPP, further suggesting that the polarity of the functional groups do not playmore » a significant role in the membrane materials tested. Both QDAPP and SDAPP outperformed Nafion membranes in cycling tests, with both achieving voltage efficiencies above 85% while maintaining 95% coulombic efficiency while at a current density of 200 mA/cm2.« less

  17. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Kayo, Issha; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 ?m and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ? (?L){sub 100} {sub ?m}/(?L) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  18. Aromatics and phenols from catalytic pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets in microwave with ZSM-5 as a catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lu; Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Bu, Quan; Liang, Jing; Wei, Yi; Liu, Yupeng; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.; Chen, Shulin; Tang, Juming; Zhang, Qin; Ruan, Roger

    2012-11-04

    Microwave assisted catalytic pyrolysis was investigated to convert Douglas fir pellets to bio-oils by a ZSM-5 Zeolite catalyst. A central composite experimental design (CCD) was used to optimize the catalytic pyrolysis process. The effects of reaction time, temperature and catalyst to biomass ratio on the bio-oil, syngas, and biochar yields were determined. GC/MS analysis results showed that the bio-oil contained a series of important and useful chemical compounds. Phenols, guaiacols, and aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant compounds which were about 50-82 % in bio-oil depending on the pyrolysis conditions. Comparison between the bio-oils from microwave pyrolysis with and without catalyst showed that the catalyst increased the content of aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols. A reaction pathway was proposed for microwave assisted catalyst pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets.

  19. Energy Input and Quality of Pellets Made from Steam-Exploded Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Bi, X.T.; Lim, C. Jim; Melin, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    Ground softwood Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) was treated with pressurized saturated steam at 200-220 C (1.6-2.4 MPa) for 5-10 min in a sealed container. The contents of the container were released to the atmosphere for a sudden decompression. The steam-exploded wood particles were dried to 10% moisture content and pelletized in a single-piston-cylinder system. The pellets were characterized for their mechanical strength, chemical composition, and moisture sorption. The steamtreated wood required 12-81% more energy to compact into pellets than the untreated wood. Pellets made from steam-treated wood had a breaking strength 1.4-3.3 times the strength of pellets made from untreated wood. Steam-treated pellets had a reduced equilibrium moisture content of 2-4% and a reduced expansion after pelletization. There was a slight increase in the high heating value from 18.94 to 20.09 MJ/kg for the treated samples. Steam-treated pellets exhibited a higher lengthwise rigidity compared to untreated pellets.

  20. Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho: Succession and management. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R.; Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-04-01

    The report describes a taxonomic system for classifying plant succession in the Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho. A total of 10 potential tree layer types, 35 shrub types, and 45 herb layer types are categorized. Diagonostic keys based on indicator species assist field identification of the types. Discussion of management implications includes pocket gopher populations, success of planted and natural tree seedlings, big-game and livestock forage preferences, and responses of major shrub and herb layer species to disturbances.

  1. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  2. Characterization of the products and comparison of the product yields from the flash pyrolysis of fir wood in hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    A seasoned sawdust of Douglas Fir wood was flash pyrolyzed in an entrained tubular reactor in the presence of hydrogen and helium at short residence times (less than 4 sec) at temperatures varying from 600/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/C and pressures of 50 to 500 psi. A significant quantity of gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and CO were produced. The liquid products were characterized via GC/MS and Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry. The composition of the liquid products and the influence of the processing conditions on the product yields are discussed. 2 references, 13 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  4. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux-gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C.

    2014-05-13

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes and variances above, within and beneath a tall closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime subcanopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at time scales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime subcanopy heat flux cospectra. The daytime momentum flux cospectra inside the canopy and in the subcanopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of a mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of themore » momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the subcanopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed mean wind speed profile. In the canopy at night at the smallest resolved scales, we find relatively large momentum fluxes (compared to at larger scales), and increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing time scale, consistent with very small eddies likely generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum but not heat. We find unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the canopy. The flux-gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the subcanopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately; however, single source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the subcanopy and above-canopy layers. Modeled sensible heat fluxes above dark warm closed canopies are likely underestimated using typical values of the Stanton number.« less

  5. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux–gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-09-16

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes, variances, and the bulk transfer parameterization for sensible heat above, within, and beneath a tall closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime sub-canopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at timescales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime sub-canopy heat flux co-spectra. The daytime momentum flux co-spectra in the upper bole space and in the sub-canopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of amore » mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of the momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the sub-canopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed sub-canopy secondary wind speed maximum. For the smallest resolved scales in the canopy at nighttime, we find increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing timescale, consistent with very small eddies possibly generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum, but not heat. Unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy were observed, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the very dense canopy. The flux–gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately in spite of the very small fluxes on the order of a few W m−2 in the sub-canopy. However, single-source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers. While sub-canopy Stanton numbers agreed well with values typically reported

  6. Integrated computer simulation on FIR FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furukawa, H.; Kuruma, S.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated computer simulation code has been developed to analyze the RF-Linac FEL dynamics. First, the simulation code on the electron beam acceleration and transport processes in RF-Linac: (LUNA) has been developed to analyze the characteristics of the electron beam in RF-Linac and to optimize the parameters of RF-Linac. Second, a space-time dependent 3D FEL simulation code (Shipout) has been developed. The RF-Linac FEL total simulations have been performed by using the electron beam data from LUNA in Shipout. The number of particles using in a RF-Linac FEL total simulation is approximately 1000. The CPU time for the simulation of 1 round trip is about 1.5 minutes. At ILT/ILE, Osaka, a 8.5MeV RF-Linac with a photo-cathode RF-gun is used for FEL oscillation experiments. By using 2 cm wiggler, the FEL oscillation in the wavelength approximately 46 {mu}m are investigated. By the simulations using LUNA with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the pulse shape and the energy spectra of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac has sharp rise-up and it slowly decays as a function of time. By the RF-linac FEL total simulations with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the dependencies of the start up of the FEL oscillations on the pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The coherent spontaneous emission effects and the quick start up of FEL oscillations have been observed by the RF-Linac FEL total simulations.

  7. A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, Michelle D.

    2013-05-31

    This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

  8. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    One of the best parts of the season - next to presents of course - is the hint of evergreen in the air. Yet the sweet smell doesn't last. It fades into forgotten corners, along ...

  9. Microsoft Word - TR11-18.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Scattered plants of poison hemlock occur throughout the site, and the primary infestations ... hemlock, which consisted of spraying the plants with herbicide, cutting the plants, ...

  10. AmeriFlux US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bible, Ken; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site. Site Description - Wind River Field Station flux tower site is located in the T.T. Munger Research Area of the Wind River Ranger District in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Protected since 1926, the T.T. Munger Research Natural Area (RNA) is administered by the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station and Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The Douglas-fir/western hemlock dominant stand is approximately 500 years old and represents end points of several ecological gradients including age, biomass, structural complexity, and density of the dominant overstory species. A complete stand replacement fire, approximately 450-500 years ago, resulted in the initial establishment. No significant disturbances have occurred since the fire aside from those confined to small groups of single trees, such as overturn from high wind activity and mechanical damage from winter precipitation.

  11. Characterization and possible origins of isolated douglas fir stands on the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, J.R.

    1995-09-01

    The floristic composition of several isolated stands of Pseudotsuga menziesii on the Colorado Plateau is compared. All occurred between 1700-2000 meters, which was about 300-500 meters below typical lower limits for the species. Most stands showed evidence of reproduction and recruitment. A small widespread group of species existed that was common to all stands, but beta diversity was high. A preliminary analysis of possible origins of the stands suggested that they are relictual from the late Wisconsin or early Holocene. Bird-dispersed species were less prevalent than expected compared with existing high elevation conifer forests. These stands represent important resources for Quaternary research, but are extremely vulnerable to human-caused disturbances. It is recommended that they be provided protection from disturbance through appropriate management activities of the various land management agencies.

  12. Final Report fir DE-SC0005507 (A1618): The Development of an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number ...

  13. Geological and Geothermal Investigation of the Lower Wind River Valley, Southwestern Washington Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berri, Dulcy A.; Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    The Wind River Valley, on the west slope of the Cascade Range, is a northwest-trending drainage that joins the Columbia River near Carson, Washington. The region has been heavily dissected by fluvial and glacial erosion. Ridges have sharp crests and deep subsidiary valleys typical of a mature topography, with a total relief of as much as 900 m. The region is vegetated by fir and hemlock, as well as dense, brushy ground-cover and undergrowth. The lower 8 km of the valley is privately owned and moderately populated. The upper reaches lies within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, and include several campgrounds and day parks, the Carson National Fish Hatchery, and the Wind River Ranger Station and Wind River Nursery of the US Forest Service. Logging activity is light due to the rugged terrain, and consequently, most valley slopes are not accessible by vehicle. The realization that a potential for significant geothermal resources exists in the Wind River area was brought about by earlier exploration activities. Geologic mapping and interpretation was needed to facilitate further exploration of the resource by providing a knowledge of possible geologic controls on the geothermal system. This report presents the detailed geology of the lower Wind River valley with emphasis on those factors that bear significantly on development of a geothermal resource.

  14. Dry-deposition measurements of sulfur dioxide to a spruce-fir forest in the Black Forest: a data report. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, R.T.; Matt, D.R.; Hicks, B.B.; Womack, J.D.

    1987-02-01

    Measurements of dry deposition of SO/sub 2/ are reported for a forested site in the Black Forest of West Germany. The measurements were made using the eddy-correlation method about 10 meters above the top of a spruce forest that was already affected by Waldsterben. These measurements were conducted as one component of TULLA, a large sulfur mass-balance experiment. The dry-deposition measurements were successful during times when SO/sub 2/ concentrations were greater than 5 micro grams/cu m.

  15. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. I. MULTI-WAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barro, Guillermo; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-03-15

    We present an IRAC 3.6+4.5 {mu}m selected catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) containing photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and stellar parameters derived from the analysis of the multi-wavelength data. In this paper, we describe the method used to build coherent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all the sources. In a forthcoming companion paper, we analyze those SEDs to obtain robust estimations of stellar parameters such as photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates. The catalog comprises 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 mag (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey in the EGS) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. For approximately 16% of this sample, we are able to deconvolve the IRAC data to obtain robust fluxes for the multiple counterparts found in ground-based optical images. Typically, the SEDs of the IRAC sources in our catalog count with more than 15 photometric data points, spanning from the ultraviolet wavelengths probed by GALEX to the far-infrared observed by Spitzer, and going through ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared data taken with 2-8 m class telescopes. Approximately 95% and 90% of all IRAC sources are detected in the deepest optical and near-infrared bands. These fractions are reduced to 85% and 70% for S/N > 5 detections in each band. Only 10% of the sources in the catalog have optical spectroscopy and redshift estimations. Almost 20% and 2% of the sources are detected by MIPS at 24 and 70 {mu}m, respectively. We also cross-correlate our catalog with public X-ray and radio catalogs. Finally, we present the Rainbow Navigator public Web interface utility, designed to browse all the data products resulting from this work, including images, spectra, photometry, and stellar parameters.

  16. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  17. Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Berni Alder, 2009 National Medal of Science Winner Berni Alder September 2009 National Medal of Science Winner President Obama has named Berni Alder, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory retired physicist, as a recipient of the National Medal of Science, the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on scientists,

  18. Energy Efficiency Post-2011 Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA Participants: Summer Goodwin Matt Tidwell Josh Warner (am only) Mark Ralston Darby Collins Dave Moody Anita Mertsching (am only) Kyna Alders (am only) Attendees (PPhone):...

  19. Washington's 8th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Companies in Washington's 8th congressional district GreenFoot Technologies Prometheus Energy Sunreps Utility Companies in Washington's 8th congressional district Alder...

  20. COMMENTS OF THE WESTERN PUBLIC AGENCIES GROUP IN RESPONSE TO...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Association, Tanner Electric Cooperative, the Cities of Port Angeles, Ellensburg and Milton, Washington, the Towns of Eatonville and Steilacoom, Washington; Alder Mutual Light...

  1. Penobscot Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With this award, the Penobscot Indian Nation will advance the preconstruction activities required to secure funding for the proposed 227-megawatt (MW) Alder Stream wind project.

  2. Madison County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Madison County, Montana Alder, Montana Big Sky, Montana Ennis, Montana Harrison, Montana Norris, Montana Sheridan, Montana Silver...

  3. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-06-19

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability

  4. 2014 Updated 1st Qtr Package

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hargin, Kyna Alders, Kathy Rehmer, Brenda Weller 11:00 30 How to interpret BPA's Revenue Detail Report Danny Chen, Mai Truong 11:30 30 Background on Debt Optimization and...

  5. Thermodynamic Data for Biomass Conversion and Waste Incineration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Woody and Tree Materials ALDER, EUROPEAN BLACK; AZnus gzutinosa; solid; Each tree was ... t h e weighted proportion of small (25%) and large (75%) material in t h e whole tree. ...

  6. A SEARCH FOR NEW CANDIDATE SUPER-CHANDRASEKHAR-MASS TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Scalzo, R. 1 ; Aldering, G. ; Aragon, C. ; Bailey, S. ; Childress, M. ; Fakhouri, H. K. ; Hsiao, E. Y. 2 ; Antilogus, P. ; Bongard, S. ; Canto, A. ; Cellier-Holzem, F. ...

  7. University of Delaware | Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Green Aromatics Transition state for the Diels-Alder reaction of 2,5-dimethylfuran and ethylene in zeolite LiY Most polymers and plastics require six-carbon ring structures. Sugars ...

  8. Benefits of Biofuel Production and Use in Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Primary product: Clean biomass cookstoves Feedstock: Multiple (woody crops: coconut, fir, oak, and wood pellets) Location: Fort Collins Stage: University of Colorado and C2B2 ...

  9. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on three dimensional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for MST's major diag- nostics, including Thomson scattering, 39 far infrared (FIR) interferometrypolarimetry, 40 and soft-x-ray (SXR) tomogra- phy. 41,42 The importance of ...

  10. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  11. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  12. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  13. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electronics Data is xor-ed with clock - Equalizing filter is difficult to design ... (FIR) filter - 25MHz sampling rate * The clock and data recovery block, which is also ...

  14. AmeriFlux US-UMB Univ. of Mich. Biological Station

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University; Gough, Christopher [Virginia Commonwealth University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-UMB Univ. of Mich. Biological Station. Site Description - The UMBS site is located within a protected forest owned by the University of Michigan. Arboreal composition of the forest consists of mid-aged northern hardwoods, conifer understory, aspen, and old growth hemlock. Logging of local white pines began in 1879. In successive years, several other species were harvested. Logging was discontinued in 1980 when the land became protected under the private ownership of the University of Michigan. Patchy low- to high-intensity wildfires occurred yearly from 1880 - 1920, essentially burning the entire region.

  15. AmeriFlux US-Ha1 Harvard Forest EMS Tower (HFR1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ha1 Harvard Forest EMS Tower (HFR1). Site Description - The Harvard Forest tower is on land owned by Harvard University. The site is designated as an LTER site. Most of the surrounding area was cleared for agrigulture during European settlement in 1600-1700. The site has been regrowing since before 1900 (based on tree ring chronologies) and is now predominantly red oak and red maple, with patches of mature hemlock stand and individual white pine. Overstory trees were uprooted by hurricane in 1938. Climate measurements have been made at Harvard Forest since 1964.

  16. 2012 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 2012 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources On their Allocation Year 2013 ERCAP Request Forms Principal Investigators reported 1,925 refereed publications (published or in press) for the preceding 12 months, based on using, at least in part, NERSC resources. Aldering | Greg Scalzo et al., A Search for New Candidate Super-Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia Supernovae in the Nearby Supernova Factory Data Set, The Astrophysical Roepke et al., Constraining Type Ia Supernova Models: SN

  17. 2013 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 2013 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources On their Allocation Year 2014 ERCAP Request Forms Principal Investigators reported 1,977 refereed publications (published or in press) for the preceding 12 months, based on using, at least in part, NERSC resources. Aldering , Greg "Evidence of Environmental Dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory indicated by Local H-alpha," the Nearby Supernova Factory 2013, Astronomy and Astrophysics, accepted.

  18. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2011-06-08

    A panel of Lab scientists ? including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering ? along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  19. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lewis acid zeolites (Zr-, Sn- and Ti-BEA) were developed for tandem Diels-Alder cycloaddition and dehydration of 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) and ethylene to p-xylene achieving the highest selectivity of 80% at 99% conversion of DMF, with improved recalcitrance to deactivation. Lewis Acid Zeolites for Production of Biorenewable p-xylene Work performed in CCEI at the Universities of Massachusetts, Minnesota and Pennsylvania CATALYSIS CENTER FOR ENERGY INNOVATION - http://www.efrc.udel.edu/ Research

  20. Supernova Twins: Making Standard Candles More Standard Than Ever

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supernova Twins: Making Standard Candles More Standard Than Ever Supernova Twins: Making Standard Candles More Standard Than Ever New Modeling Method Measures Cosmological Distances With Far Greater Accuracy January 13, 2016 Contact: Paul Preuss, paul_preuss@lbl.gov, +1 415 272 3253 supernovatwins From left, Greg Aldering, Kyle Boone, Hannah Fakhouri and Saul Perlmutter of the Nearby Supernova Factory. Behind them is a poster of a supernova spectrum. Matching spectra among different supernovae

  1. Flash pyrolysis of biomass with reactive and nonreactive gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

    1982-10-01

    Studies were done on the flash pyrolysis of Douglas fir wood in the presence of reactive and nonreactive gases including hydrogen, methane, and helium. Pyrolysis and gasification of the wood particles was done in one step, without catalysts. Almost complete (98%) gasification of the carbon in Douglas fir wood was achieved at 1000/sup 0/C and 500-psi hydrogen pressure. The reaction products were methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide, BTX, and water. Flash hydropyrolysis produced a large yield of hydrocarbon gases (up to 78% C) comprising methane and ethane. High yields of ethylene (up to 21% C) and BTX (up to 12% C) were obtained via methane pyrolysis of fir wood; a free-radical mechanism is proposed to explain the enhanced yield of ethylene in a methane atmosphere.

  2. Highly tunable quantum Hall far-infrared photodetector by use of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As-graphene composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    We have developed a highly tunable, narrow band far-infrared (FIR) photodetector which utilizes the characteristic merits of graphene and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As heterostructure in the Quantum Hall states (QHS). The heterostructure surface is covered with chemical vapor-deposited graphene, which functions as a transparent top-gate to vary the electron density of the 2DEG. FIR response observed in the vicinity of integer QH regime can be effectively tuned in a wide range of 27102?cm{sup ?1} with a bias voltage less than ?1?V. In addition, we have found that the presence of graphene can genuinely modulate the photoresponse. Our results demonstrate a promising direction for realizing a tunable long-wavelength FIR detector using QHS in GaAs 2DEG/ graphene composite material.

  3. ALMA observation of 158 μm [C II] line and dust continuum of a z = 7 normally star-forming galaxy in the epoch of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ota, Kazuaki; Walter, Fabian; Da Cunha, Elisabete; González-López, Jorge; Decarli, Roberto; Hodge, Jacqueline A.; Ohta, Kouji; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Nagai, Hiroshi; Iye, Masanori; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Carilli, Chris L.; Egami, Eiichi; Jiang, Linhua; Riechers, Dominik A.; Bertoldi, Frank; Cox, Pierre; Neri, Roberto; Weiss, Axel

    2014-09-01

    We present ALMA observations of the [C II] line and far-infrared (FIR) continuum of a normally star-forming galaxy in the reionization epoch, the z = 6.96 Lyα emitter (LAE) IOK-1. Probing to sensitivities of σ{sub line} = 240 μJy beam{sup –1} (40 km s{sup –1} channel) and σ{sub cont} = 21 μJy beam{sup –1}, we found the galaxy undetected in both [C II] and continuum. Comparison of ultraviolet (UV)-FIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of IOK-1, including our ALMA limit, with those of several types of local galaxies (including the effects of the cosmic microwave background, CMB, on the FIR continuum) suggests that IOK-1 is similar to local dwarf/irregular galaxies in SED shape rather than highly dusty/obscured galaxies. Moreover, our 3σ FIR continuum limit, corrected for CMB effects, implies intrinsic dust mass M {sub dust} < 6.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, FIR luminosity L {sub FIR} < 3.7 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} (42.5-122.5 μm), total IR luminosity L {sub IR} < 5.7 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} (8-1000 μm), and dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) < 10 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, if we assume that IOK-1 has a dust temperature and emissivity index typical of local dwarf galaxies. This SFR is 2.4 times lower than one estimated from the UV continuum, suggesting that <29% of the star formation is obscured by dust. Meanwhile, our 3σ [C II] flux limit translates into [C II] luminosity, L {sub [C} {sub II]} < 3.4 × 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}. Locations of IOK-1 and previously observed LAEs on the L {sub [C} {sub II]} versus SFR and L {sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub FIR} versus L {sub FIR} diagrams imply that LAEs in the reionization epoch have significantly lower gas and dust enrichment than AGN-powered systems and starbursts at similar/lower redshifts, as well as local star-forming galaxies.

  4. Optical layout and mechanical structure of polarimeter-interferometer system for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Z. Y.; Liu, H. Q. Jie, Y. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Shen, J. S.; An, Z. H.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Li, G. S.; Zhu, X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.

    2014-11-15

    A Far-InfaRed (FIR) three-wave POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system for measurement current density profile and electron density profile is under development for the EAST tokamak. The FIR beams are transmitted from the laser room to the optical tower adjacent to EAST via ?20 m overmoded dielectric waveguide and then divided into 5 horizontal chords. The optical arrangement was designed using ZEMAX, which provides information on the beam spot size and energy distribution throughout the optical system. ZEMAX calculations used to optimize the optical layout design are combined with the mechanical design from CATIA, providing a 3D visualization of the entire POINT system.

  5. AmeriFlux US-Syv Sylvania Wilderness Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Syv Sylvania Wilderness Area. Site Description - Old growth forest consisting primarily of sugar maple and eastern hemlock. Note that a small lake to the north and data analyses suggest that wind direction screening is appropriate (see Desai, A.R., Bolstad, P.V., Cook, B.D., Davis, K.J., and Carey, E.V., 2005. Comparing net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide between an old-growth and mature forest in the upper midwest, USA. Ag. For. Met. 128(1-2): 33-55 (doi: 10.1016/j.agrformet.2004). Site was chosen to represent an end member representative of the upland forests in the WLEF tall tower flux footprint. (Note, however, that old growth forests are not found within the WLEF tall tower flux footprint.)

  6. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  7. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the fir+ hamrd dmn d-l- with BCZ' C. mot 4-0 b. krpti io Rind* l;.r, Fienhar,thQ plant nana@, told ua thut tha kao WOr@ taW6mWt e&W+ xmt;i P6 sot thi: pwiblo tblle rffeatar of...

  8. Star formation relations and CO spectral line energy distributions across the J-ladder and redshift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greve, T. R.; Leonidaki, I.; Xilouris, E. M.; Wei, A.; Henkel, C.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Van der Werf, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Daz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; Gonzlez-Alfonso, E.; Harris, A.; Naylor, D. A.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present FIR [50-300 ?m]CO luminosity relations (i.e., log L{sub FIR}=?log L{sub CO}{sup ?}+?) for the full CO rotational ladder from J = 1-0 up to J = 13-12 for a sample of 62 local (z ? 0.1) (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs; L {sub IR[8-1000} {sub ?m]} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}) using data from Herschel SPIRE-FTS and ground-based telescopes. We extend our sample to high redshifts (z > 1) by including 35 submillimeter selected dusty star forming galaxies from the literature with robust CO observations, and sufficiently well-sampled FIR/submillimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs), so that accurate FIR luminosities can be determined. The addition of luminous starbursts at high redshifts enlarge the range of the FIRCO luminosity relations toward the high-IR-luminosity end, while also significantly increasing the small amount of mid-J/high-J CO line data (J = 5-4 and higher) that was available prior to Herschel. This new data set (both in terms of IR luminosity and J-ladder) reveals linear FIRCO luminosity relations (i.e., ? ? 1) for J = 1-0 up to J = 5-4, with a nearly constant normalization (? ? 2). In the simplest physical scenario, this is expected from the (also) linear FIR(molecular line) relations recently found for the dense gas tracer lines (HCN and CS), as long as the dense gas mass fraction does not vary strongly within our (merger/starburst)-dominated sample. However, from J = 6-5 and up to the J = 13-12 transition, we find an increasingly sublinear slope and higher normalization constant with increasing J. We argue that these are caused by a warm (?100 K) and dense (>10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}) gas component whose thermal state is unlikely to be maintained by star-formation-powered far-UV radiation fields (and thus is no longer directly tied to the star formation rate). We suggest that mechanical heating (e.g., supernova-driven turbulence and shocks), and not cosmic rays, is the more likely source of energy for this component. The global CO

  9. HerMES: Spectral energy distributions of submillimeter galaxies at z > 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.-S.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Clements, D. L.; Dai, Y.; Fazio, G. G.; Bock, J. J.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A. J.; Wang, L.; Page, M.; Symeonidis, M.; Riechers, D.; Roseboom, I.; and others

    2014-03-20

    We present a study of the infrared properties for a sample of seven spectroscopically confirmed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z > 4.0. By combining ground-based near-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, Herschel SPIRE, and ground-based submillimeter/millimeter photometry, we construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a composite model to fit the SEDs. The model includes a stellar emission component at λ{sub rest} < 3.5 μm, a hot dust component peaking at λ{sub rest} ∼ 5 μm, and cold dust component which becomes significant for λ{sub rest} > 50 μm. Six objects in the sample are detected at 250 and 350 μm. The dust temperatures for the sources in this sample are in the range of 40-80 K, and their L {sub FIR} ∼ 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉} qualifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. The mean FIR-radio index for this sample is around (q) = 2.2 indicating no radio excess in their radio emission. Most sources in the sample have 24 μm detections corresponding to a rest-frame 4.5 μm luminosity of Log{sub 10}(L {sub 4.5}/L {sub ☉}) = 11 ∼ 11.5. Their L {sub 4.5}/L {sub FIR} ratios are very similar to those of starburst-dominated SMGs at z ∼ 2. The L {sub CO} – L {sub FIR} relation for this sample is consistent with that determined for local ULIRGs and SMGs at z ∼ 2. We conclude that SMGs at z > 4 are hotter and more luminous in the FIR but otherwise very similar to those at z ∼ 2. None of these sources show any sign of the strong QSO phase being triggered.

  10. LBNL-41172 Discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    41172 Discovery of a Supernova Explosion at Half the Age of the Universe and its Cosmological Implications S. Perlmutter, G. Aldering, M. Della Valle, S. Deustua, R. S. Ellis, S. Fabbro, A. Fruchter, G. Goldhaber, A. Goobar, D. E. Groom, 1. M. Hook, A. G. Kim, M. Y. Kim, R.A. Knop, C. Lidman, R. G. McMahon, P. Nugent, R. Pain, N. Panagia, C. R. Pennypacker, P. Ruiz-Lapuente, B. Schaefer & N. Walton (The Supernova Cosmology Project) This work was supported in part by the Director, Office of

  11. Method of making thermally removable adhesives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aubert, James H.

    2004-11-30

    A method of making a thermally-removable adhesive is provided where a bismaleimide compound, a monomeric furan compound, containing an oxirane group an amine curative are mixed together at an elevated temperature of greater than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a homogeneous solution, which, when cooled to less than approximately 70.degree. C., simultaneously initiates a Diels-Alder reaction between the furan and the bismaleimide and a epoxy curing reaction between the amine curative and the oxirane group to form a thermally-removable adhesive. Subsequent heating to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. causes the adhesive to melt and allows separation of adhered pieces.

  12. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  13. Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

    2012-01-31

    The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the

  14. AmeriFlux US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest. Site Description - The Bartlett Experimental Forest (448170 N, 71830 W) is located within the White Mountains National Forest in north-central New Hampshire, USA. The 1050 ha forest extends across an elevational range from 200 to 900 m a.s.l. It was established in 1931 and is managed by the USDA Forest Service Northeastern Research Station in Durham, NH. The climate is humid continental with short, cool summers (mean July temperature, 19.8C) and long, cold winters (mean January temperature, 9.8C). Annual precipitation averages 130 cm and is distributed evenly throughout the year. Soils are developed from glacial till and are predominantly shallow, well-drained spodosols. At lowto mid-elevation, vegetation is dominated by northern hardwoods (American beech, Fagus grandifolia; sugar maple, Acer saccharum; yellow birch, Betula alleghaniensis; with some red maple, Acer rubrum and paper birch, Betula papyrifera). Conifers (eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis; eastern white pine, Pinus strobus; red spruce, Picea rubens) are occasionally found intermixed with the more abundant deciduous species but are generally confined to the highest (red spruce) and lowest (hemlock and pine) elevations. In 2003, the site was adopted as a NASA North American Carbon Program (NACP) Tier-2 field research and validation site. A 26.5 m high tower was installed in a low-elevation northern hardwood stand in November, 2003, for the purpose of making eddy covariance measurements of the forest–atmosphere exchange of CO2, H2O and radiant energy. Continuous flux and meteorological measurements began in January, 2004, and are ongoing. Average canopy height in the vicinity of the tower is approximately 20–22 m. In the tower footprint, the forest is predominantly classified into red maple, sugar maple, and American beech forest types. Leaf area index in the vicinity of the tower is 3.6 as measured

  15. A far-infrared spectroscopic survey of intermediate redshift (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Farrah, D.; Pearson, C.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Perez Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Thatte, N.; Scott, D.; Valtchanov, I.; Vaccari, M.

    2014-11-20

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground-based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 ? z ? 0.88) sample of Herschel-selected (ultra)-luminous infrared galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ?}). With these measurements, we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [C II] 157.7 ?m, as well as the molecular gas of z ? 0.3 luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [C II] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow an L {sub C} {sub II}L {sub FIR} relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high- z active-galactic-nucleus-dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratio and the far-IR color L {sub 60}/L {sub 100} observed in the local universe holds over a broad range of redshifts and luminosities, in the sense that warmer sources exhibit lower L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} at any epoch. Intermediate redshift ULIRGs are also characterized by large molecular gas reservoirs and by lower star formation efficiencies compared to that of local ULIRGs. The high L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios, the moderate star formation efficiencies (L {sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} or L {sub IR}/M{sub H{sub 2}}), and the relatively low dust temperatures of our sample (which are also common characteristics of high-z star-forming galaxies with ULIRG-like luminosities) indicate that the evolution of the physical properties of (U)LIRGs between the present day and z

  16. Observations of summer roosting and foraging behavior of a hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) in southern New Hampshire.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veillieux, J. P.; Moosman, P. R.; Reynolds, D. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Walston, L. J.; Environmental Science Division; Franklin Pierce Univ.; Fitchburg State Coll.; St. Paul's School

    2009-01-01

    Few data are available that describe the roosting and foraging ecology of the Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and no such data are available for the northeastern United States. We captured a juvenile Hoary Bat in south-central New Hampshire during July of 2007 and monitored its roosting behavior for ten days and its foraging behavior for one night. The bat roosted with two other bats, which we presumed were its mother and sibling. These bats roosted exclusively in Tsuga canadensis (Eastern Hemlock Tree) and tended to roost near tree tops in the forest canopy. The radiotagged bat used at least six roost trees and changed roost location eight times during the ten-day observation period. Although roost-tree fidelity was low, all roost trees were located within a maximum circular area of 0.5 ha. The bat foraged over an estimated 156-ha area of mostly forest habitat (68%), with additional open habitats (15%) and wetlands (17%). These data are the first observations of roosting and foraging behaviors by the Hoary Bat in the northeastern region of its geographic range.

  17. Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.; Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  18. arXiv:astro-ph/0205476 v1 28 May 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    205476 v1 28 May 2002 Accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal LPNHE 02-02 The distant Type Ia supernova rate R. Pain 1 , S. Fabbro 1,2 , M. Sullivan 3 , R. S. Ellis 4,5 , G. Aldering 6 , P. Astier 1 , S. E. Deustua 6 , A. S. Fruchter 7 , G. Goldhaber 6,8 , A. Goobar 9 , D. E. Groom 6 , D. Hardin 1 , I. M. Hook 10 , D. A. Howell 6 , M. J. Irwin 4 , A. G. Kim 6 , M. Y. Kim 6 , R. A. Knop 6 , J. C. Lee 6,11 , C. Lidman 12 , R. G. McMahon 4 , P. E. Nugent 6 , N. Panagia 7 , C. R.

  19. Insight into organic reactions from the direct random phase approximation and its corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Zhang, Igor Ying; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-10-14

    The performance of the random phase approximation (RPA) and beyond-RPA approximations for the treatment of electron correlation is benchmarked on three different molecular test sets. The test sets are chosen to represent three typical sources of error which can contribute to the failure of most density functional approximations in chemical reactions. The first test set (atomization and n-homodesmotic reactions) offers a gradually increasing balance of error from the chemical environment. The second test set (Diels-Alder reaction cycloaddition = DARC) reflects more the effect of weak dispersion interactions in chemical reactions. Finally, the third test set (self-interaction error 11 = SIE11) represents reactions which are exposed to noticeable self-interaction errors. This work seeks to answer whether any one of the many-body approximations considered here successfully addresses all these challenges.

  20. Development of a removable conformal coating through the synthetic incorporation of Diels-Adler thermally reversible adducts into an epoxy resin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, James Henry; Sawyer, Patricia Sue; Tallant, David Robert; Garcia, Manuel Joseph

    2005-02-01

    An epoxy-based conformal coating with a very low modulus has been developed for the environmental protection of electronic devices and for stress relief of those devices. The coating was designed to be removable by incorporating thermally-reversible Diels-Alder (D-A) adducts into the epoxy resin utilized in the formulation. The removability of the coating allows us to recover expensive components during development, to rebuild during production, to upgrade the components during their lifetime, to perform surveillance after deployment, and it aids in dismantlement of the components after their lifetime. The removability is the unique feature of this coating and was characterized by modulus versus temperature measurements, dissolution experiments, viscosity quench experiments, and FTIR. Both the viscosity quench experiments and the FTIR measurements allowed us to estimate the equilibrium constant of the D-A adducts in a temperature range from room temperature to 90 C.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS ON THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD SEEN AT 20-600 μm WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakićević, Maša; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl; Roman-Duval, Julia; Seale, Jonathan; Bot, Caroline; Babler, Brian; Bolatto, Alberto; Engelbracht, Chad; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Filipović, Miroslav; Hony, Sacha; Okumura, K.; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Sauvage, Marc; Patat, Ferdinando; Sonneborn, George; and others

    2015-01-20

    We present the analysis of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and their influence on the environment at far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter wavelengths. We use new observations obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory and archival data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, to make the first FIR atlas of these objects. The SNRs are not clearly discernible at FIR wavelengths; however, their influence becomes apparent in maps of dust mass and dust temperature, which we constructed by fitting a modified blackbody to the observed spectral energy distribution in each sightline. Most of the dust that is seen is pre-existing interstellar dust in which SNRs leave imprints. The temperature maps clearly reveal SNRs heating surrounding dust, while the mass maps indicate the removal of 3.7{sub −2.5}{sup +7.5} M {sub ☉} of dust per SNR. This agrees with the calculations by others that significant amounts of dust are sputtered by SNRs. Under the assumption that dust is sputtered and not merely pushed away, we estimate a dust destruction rate in the LMC of 0.037{sub −0.025}{sup +0.075} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} due to SNRs, yielding an average lifetime for interstellar dust of 2{sub −1.3}{sup +4.0}×10{sup 7} yr. We conclude that sputtering of dust by SNRs may be an important ingredient in models of galactic evolution, that supernovae may destroy more dust than they produce, and that they therefore may not be net producers of long lived dust in galaxies.

  2. THE PHYSICS OF THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION. I. CALORIMETRY, CONSPIRACY, AND IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot

    2010-07-01

    The far-infrared (FIR) and radio luminosities of star-forming galaxies are linearly correlated over a very wide range in star formation rate, from normal spirals like the Milky Way to the most intense starbursts. Using one-zone models of cosmic ray (CR) injection, cooling, and escape in star-forming galaxies, we attempt to reproduce the observed FIR-radio correlation (FRC) over its entire span. The normalization and linearity of the FRC, together with constraints on the CR population in the Milky Way, have strong implications for the CR and magnetic energy densities in star-forming galaxies. We show that for consistency with the FRC, {approx}2% of the kinetic energy from supernova explosions must go into high-energy primary CR electrons and that {approx}10%-20% must go into high-energy primary CR protons. Secondary electrons and positrons are likely comparable to or dominate primary electrons in dense starburst galaxies. We discuss the implications of our models for the magnetic field strengths of starbursts, the detectability of starbursts by Fermi, and CR feedback. Overall, our models indicate that both CR protons and electrons escape from low surface density galaxies, but lose most of their energy before escaping dense starbursts. The FRC is caused by a combination of the efficient cooling of CR electrons (calorimetry) in starbursts and a conspiracy of several factors. For lower surface density galaxies, the decreasing radio emission caused by CR escape is balanced by the decreasing FIR emission caused by the low effective UV dust opacity. In starbursts, bremsstrahlung, ionization, and inverse Compton cooling decrease the radio emission, but they are countered by secondary electrons/positrons and the dependence of synchrotron frequency on energy, both of which increase the radio emission. Our conclusions hold for a broad range of variations in our fiducial model, such as those including winds, different magnetic field strengths, and different diffusive escape

  3. On the origin of a sunquake during the 2014 March 29 X1 flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judge, Philip G.; Kleint, Lucia; Donea, Alina; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Fletcher, Lyndsay E-mail: lucia.kleint@fhnw.ch E-mail: asdalda@stanford.edu

    2014-12-01

    Helioseismic data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instrument have revealed a sunquake associated with the X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48 in active region NOAA 12017. We try to discover if acoustic-like impulses or actions of the Lorentz force caused the sunquake. We analyze spectropolarimetric data obtained with the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Fortunately, the FIRS slit crossed the flare kernel close to the acoustic source during the impulsive phase. The infrared FIRS data remain unsaturated throughout the flare. Stokes profiles of lines of Si I 1082.7 nm and He I 1083.0 nm are analyzed. At the flare footpoint, the Si I 1082.7 nm core intensity increases by a factor of several, and the IR continuum increases by 4% ± 1%. Remarkably, the Si I core resembles the classical Ca II K line's self-reversed profile. With nLTE radiative models of H, C, Si, and Fe, these properties set the penetration depth of flare heating to 100 ± 100 km (i.e., photospheric layers). Estimates of the non-magnetic energy flux are at least a factor of two less than the sunquake energy flux. Milne-Eddington inversions of the Si I line show that the local magnetic energy changes are also too small to drive the acoustic pulse. Our work raises several questions. Have we missed the signature of downward energy propagation? Is it intermittent in time and/or non-local? Does the 1-2 s photospheric radiative damping time discount compressive modes?.

  4. HerMES: LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES INDIVIDUALLY DETECTED AT 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 2.0 IN GOODS-N WITH HERSCHEL/SPIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgarella, D.; Heinis, S.; Buat, V.; Giovannoli, E.; Ilbert, O.; Magdis, G.; Hwang, H. S.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Brisbin, D.; Chanial, P.; Clements, D. L.; Franceschini, A.; Marchetti, L.; Glenn, J.; Gonzalez Solares, E. A. E-mail: sebastien.heinis@oamp.fr

    2011-06-10

    As part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey we have investigated the rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) properties of a sample of more than 4800 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North field. Most LBGs are not detected individually, but we do detect a sub-sample of 12 objects at 0.7 < z < 1.6 and one object at z = 2.0. The ones detected by Herschel SPIRE have redder observed NUV - U and U - R colors than the others, while the undetected ones have colors consistent with average LBGs at z > 2.5. The UV-to-FIR spectral energy distributions of the objects detected in the rest-frame FIR are investigated using the code CIGALE to estimate physical parameters. We find that LBGs detected by SPIRE are high-mass, luminous infrared galaxies. It appears that LBGs are located in a triangle-shaped region in the A{sub FUV} versus log L{sub FUV} = 0 diagram limited by A{sub FUV} = 0 at the bottom and by a diagonal following the temporal evolution of the most massive galaxies from the bottom right to the top left of the diagram. This upper envelop can be used as upper limits for the UV dust attenuation as a function of L{sub FUV}. The limits of this region are well explained using a closed-box model, where the chemical evolution of galaxies produces metals, which in turn lead to higher dust attenuation when the galaxies age.

  5. STRONG C{sup +} EMISSION IN GALAXIES AT z? 1-2: EVIDENCE FOR COLD FLOW ACCRETION POWERED STAR FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisbin, Drew; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Nikola, Thomas; Parshley, Stephen; Spoon, Henrik; Stacey, Gordon J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Verma, Aprajita

    2015-01-20

    We have recently detected the [C II] 157.7 ?m line in eight star-forming galaxies at redshifts 1 to 2 using the redshift (z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS). Our sample targets star formation dominant sources detected in PAH emission. This represents a significant addition to [C II] observations during the epoch of peak star formation. We have augmented this survey with observations of the [O I] 63 ?m line and far infrared photometry from the PACS and SPIRE Herschel instruments as well as Spitzer IRS spectra from the literature showing PAH features. Our sources exhibit above average gas heating efficiency, many with both [O I]/FIR and [C II]/FIR of ?1% or more. The relatively strong [C II] emission is consistent with our sources being dominated by star formation powered photo-dissociation regions, extending to kiloparsec scales. We suggest that the star formation mode in these systems follows a Schmidt-Kennicutt law similar to local systems, but at a much higher rate due to molecular gas surface densities 10-100times that of local star-forming systems. The source of the high molecular gas surface densities may be the infall of neutral gas from the cosmic web. In addition to the high [C II]/FIR values, we also find high [C II]/PAH ratios and, in at least one source, a cool dust temperature. This source, SWIRE 4-5, bears a resemblance in these diagnostics to shocked regions of Stephan's Quintet, suggesting that another mode of [C II] excitation in addition to normal photoelectric heating may be contributing to the observed [C II] line.

  6. Laminated root rot in western North America. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thies, W.G.; Sturrock, R.N.

    1995-04-01

    Laminated root rot, caused by Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gib., is a serious root disease affecting Douglas-fir and other commercially important species of conifers in northwestern North America. This report gives an overview of the disease as it occurs in the Pacific Northwest in Canada and the United States. Information on recognizing crown symptoms and signs of the disease is presented. The disease cycle of laminated root rot, from initiation to intensification and distribution within infected stands, is described. Finally, disease management strategies during stand development and at stand regeneration are discussed. Features on mechanical approaches also are included. The report is intended as a general reference for a wide audience.

  7. Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287) (11/28/06)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    811 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 28, 2006 / Notices Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339. [FR Doc. E6-20124 Filed 11-27-06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Amended Record of Decision. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its Record of Decision (ROD) published

  8. Architecture and technology of 500 Msample/s feedback systems for control of coupled-bunch instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2000-03-30

    Feedback control of coupled-bunch instabilities presents many challenges. Control bandwidths up to 250 MHz are required to damp all of the unstable coupled-bunch modes in recent accelerators. A digital parallel-processing array with 80 DSPs has been developed to control longitudinal instabilities in PEP-II/ALS/DA NE machines. Here the authors present a description of the architecture as well as the technologies used to implement 500 Msample/s real-time control system with 2,000 FIR filtering channels. Algorithms for feedback control, data acquisition, and analysis are described and measurements from ALS are presented.

  9. Root Diseases and Exotic Ecosystems: Implications for Long-Term Site Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otrosina, W. J.; Garbelotto, M.

    1997-09-01

    Management activities and various land uses have taken place recently that have dramatically altered edaphic and environmental conditions under which forest tree species and ecosystems have evolved. Sequoia giganteum stands, fire suppression in this fire dependent ecosystem has resulted in increased mortality due to Heterobasidion annosum. On hypothesis is that fire suppression results in increased encroachment of true firs, easily infected by S-group Heterobasidion annosum, thereby transferring the disease via root contacts with S. giganteum. Existence of a hybrid with S and P ISG's of H. annosum may be evidence for anthropogenic influences on evolutionary pathways in this pathogen.

  10. J

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .Jq. 3 8.5 J Hr. Mark Finkelstein . . State Street Associates L.P. II Ithaca, New York 14GSO Dear Fir. Flnkelstein: .' This Is a followup letter to your telephone discussion on September 30, 1994, with Dr. Y. Alexander Yilliams of my staff. As you discussed, the Department of Energy (DOE) Is tmplementfng a radiological survey,program to determine the radiological conditions at.sites that were formerly used by DOE predecessor agencies. One such slte is the former Ithaca Gun Company facility in

  11. COLA. III. RADIO DETECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN COMPACT MODERATE LUMINOSITY INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, R.; Conway, J. E.; Aalto, S.; Appleton, P. N.; Norris, R. P.; Pihlstroem, Y. M.; Kewley, L. J.

    2010-09-01

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11.01} L{sub sun}) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores ({approx}10{sup 21} W Hz{sup -1}) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whose VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.

  12. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-28

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gasmore » chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  13. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore » coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  14. Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Inez

    2014-07-28

    In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

  15. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model for Skagit River Estuary for Estuarine Restoration Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Hedong; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2006-08-03

    The Skagit River is the largest river in the Puget Sound estuarine system. It discharges about 39% of total sediment and more than 20% of freshwater into Puget Sound. The Skagit River delta provides rich estuarine and freshwater habitats for salmon and many other wildlife species. Over the past 150 years, economic development in the Skagit River delta has resulted in significant losses of wildlife habitat, particularly due to construction of dikes. Diked portion of the delta is known as Fir Island where irrigation practices for agriculture land over the last century has resulted in land subsidence. This has also caused reduced efficiency of drainage network and impeded fish passages through the area. In this study, a three-dimensional tidal circulation model was developed for the Skagit River delta to assist estuarine restoration in the Fir Island area. The hydrodynamic model used in the study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The hydrodynamic model was calibrated using field data collected from the study area specifically for the model development. Wetting and drying processes in the estuarine delta are simulated in the hydrodynamic model. The calibrated model was applied to simulate different restoration alternatives and provide guidance for estuarine restoration and management. Specifically, the model was used to help select and design configurations that would improve the supply of sediment and freshwater to the mudflats and tidal marsh areas outside of diked regions and then improve the estuarine habitats for salmon migration.

  16. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  17. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  18. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition of dichlorosilane in an advanced Siemen's reactor. Final report, October 11, 1982-May 21, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, J.R.; Arvidson, A.N.; Sawyer, D.H.; Muller, D.M.

    1983-07-14

    Dichlorosilane (DCS) was used as the feedstock for an advanced decomposition reactor for silicon production. The advanced reactor had a cool bell jar wall temperature, 300/sup 0/C, when compared to Siemen's reactors previously used for DCS decomposition by Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation. Previous reactors had bell jar wall temperatures of approximately 750/sup 0/C. The cooler wall temperature allows higher DCS flow rates and concentrations. A silicon deposition rate of 2.28 gm/hr-cm was achieved with power consumption of 59 kWh/kg. Interpretation of data suggests that a 2.8 gm/hr-cm deposition rate is possible. The 2.8 gm/hr-cm deposition rate surpasses the goal of 2.0 gm/hr-cm. Power consumption and conversion should approach the program goals of 60 kWh/kg and 40%. Screening of lower cost materials of construction was done as a separate program segment. Stainless Steel (304 and 316), Hastalloy B, Monel 400 and 1010-1020 Carbon Steel were placed individually in an experimental scale reactor. Silicon was deposited from trichlorosilane feedstock. The resultant silicon was analyzed for electrically active and metallic impurities as well as carbon. No material contributed significant amounts of electrically active or metallic impurities, but all contributed carbon. Single crystal growth could not be maintained in most zone refining evaluations. No material need be excluded from consideration for use in construction of decomposition reactor components for production of photovoltaic grade silicon; however, further evaluation and the use of the low carbon alloys is considered essential.

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NOVEL LOW-NOx BURNERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, David

    2006-12-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), together with Hamworthy Peabody Combustion Incorporated (formerly Peabody Engineering Corporation), the University of Utah, and Far West Electrochemical have developed and demonstrated an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas and coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The combustion system is a simple, low-cost, energy-efficient burner that can reduce NOx by more than 75%. The U.S. steel industry needs to address NOx control at its steelmaking facilities. A significant part of NOx emissions comes from gas-fired boilers. In steel plants, byproduct gases – blast furnace gas (BFG) and coke-oven gas (COG) – are widely used together with natural gas to fire furnaces and boilers. In steel plants, natural gas can be fired together with BFG and COG, but, typically, the addition of natural gas raises NOx emissions, which can already be high because of residual fuel-bound nitrogen in COG. The Project Team has applied its expertise in low-NOx burners to lower NOx levels for these applications by combining advanced burner geometry and combustion staging with control strategies tailored to mixtures of natural gas and byproduct fuel gases. These methods reduce all varieties of NOx – thermal NOx produced by high flame temperatures, prompt NOx produced by complex chain reactions involving radical hydrocarbon species and NOx from fuel-bound nitrogen compounds such as ammonia found in COG. The Project Team has expanded GTI’s highly successful low-NOx forced internal recirculation (FIR) burner, previously developed for natural gas-fired boilers, into facilities that utilize BFG and COG. For natural gas firing, these burners have been shown to reduce NOx emissions from typical uncontrolled levels of 80-100 vppm to single-digit levels (9 vppm). This is done without the energy efficiency penalties incurred by alternative NOx control methods, such as external flue gas recirculation (FGR), water injection, and selective non

  20. Temperature dependent Raman scattering and far-infrared reflectance spectra of MgO modified Pb{sub 0.99}(Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} ceramics: A composition effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Z. H.; Chang, P.; Hu, Z. G. Chu, J. H.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, G. S.; Dong, X. L.

    2014-09-07

    Lattice dynamics and phase transition of MgO modified Pb{sub 0.99}(Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} (PZTN-x wt. % MgO, x?=?0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5) ceramics have been investigated by far-infrared (FIR) reflectance in the temperature range of 5.5300?K and Raman spectra between 77 and 300?K, respectively. With the aid of above complementary methods, the structure of all ceramics was defined as low-temperature ferroelectric rhombohedral phase [F{sub R(LT)}] at room temperature. The FIR dielectric functions were extracted from the multi-Lorentz oscillator dispersion model. The lowest frequency phonon mode, which is related to Pb-BO{sub 3} (B?=?Zr, Ti, Nb) vibration, mainly dominates the FIR dielectric response. With increasing MgO composition, the dielectric constants ?(0) at room temperature are estimated to 85.4, 73.4, 73.9, and 41.9, respectively. The decreasing trend can be due to the doubly ionized oxygen vacancies induced by Mg substitution for B-site. The order-disorder phase transition located around 120?K can be clearly clarified from temperature evolution of phonon frequency, damping, and intensity. It decreases slightly with increasing MgO composition, which influence the distortion due to the broken correlation chains and local permanent dipoles creation. Moreover, the transformation from antiferroelectric orthorhombic A{sub O} to [ F{sub R(LT)} ] phase has been observed around 250?K, which is associated with the antiferroelectric displacement of Pb atoms along ? 110 ? and coupled rotations of the corner-connected oxygen octahedral. Furthermore, the transition from [ F{sub R(LT)} ] to [ F{sub R(HT)} ] (high-temperature ferroelectric rhombohedral phase) was identified around 290?K for MgO-doped PZTN ceramics. It arises from the shift of cation (Pb and Zr/Ti/Nb/Mg ions) along the ? 111 ? direction and the transition temperature slightly decreases compared to the pure ceramic.

  1. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T.; Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Freeland, E.; Rasmussen, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.

    2014-11-10

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  2. A Study of NO{sub x} Reduction by Fuel Injection Recirculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feese, J.J.; Turns, S.R.

    1996-08-01

    Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub X}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments in natural-gas fired boilers have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub X}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. The objective of the present investigation is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub X} reduction observed between FIR and FGR by studying laminar diffusion flames. The purpose of studying laminar flames is to isolate chemical effects from the effects of turbulent mixing and heat transfer, which are inherent in practical boilers. Numerical simulations of H{sub 2}-air and CH{sub 4}-air counterflow diffusion flames using full kinetics were performed and NO{sub X} emission indices calculated for various conditions. Studies were conducted in which a N{sub 2} diluent was added either on the fuel- or air-side of the flame for conditions of either fixed initial velocities or fixed fuel mass flux. Results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in diluent effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side verses air-side dilution. Simulations in which flow velocities were fixed as diluent was added either to the air or fuel stream showed lower NO{sub X} emissions for air-side dilution; however, if instead, fuel mass fluxes were fixed as diluent was added, which results in an increase in the velocity of the streams, fuel-side dilution was more effective. These results were independent of whether H{sub 2} or Ch

  3. Search for [C II] emission in z = 6.5-11 star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzlez-Lpez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Riechers, Dominik A. E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl; and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the search for the [C II] emission line in three z > 6.5 Ly? emitters (LAEs) and one J-dropout galaxy using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We observed three bright z ? 6.5-7 LAEs discovered in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and the multiple imaged lensed z ? 11 galaxy candidate found behind the galaxy cluster MACSJ0647.7+7015. For the LAEs IOK-1 (z = 6.965), SDF J132415.7+273058 (z = 6.541), and SDF J132408.3+271543 (z = 6.554) we find upper limits for the [C II] line luminosity of <2.05, <4.52, and <10.56 10{sup 8} L {sub ?}, respectively. We find upper limits to the far-IR (FIR) luminosity of the galaxies using a spectral energy distribution template of the local galaxy NGC 6946 and taking into account the effects of the cosmic microwave background on the millimeter observations. For IOK-1, SDF J132415.7+273058, and SDF J132408.3+271543 we find upper limits for the FIR luminosity of <2.33, 3.79, and 7.72 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}, respectively. For the lensed galaxy MACS0647-JD, one of the highest-redshift galaxy candidates to date with z{sub ph}=10.7{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.6}, we put an upper limit in the [C II] emission of <1.36 10{sup 8} (?/15){sup 1} L {sub ?} and an upper limit in the FIR luminosity of <6.1 10{sup 10} (?/15){sup 1} L {sub ?} (where ? is the magnification factor). We explore the different conditions relevant for the search for [C II] emission in high-redshift galaxies as well as the difficulties for future observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope (CCAT).

  4. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase I, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome

    1988-02-01

    Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, impacts to wildlife due to the development and operation of the US Army Corps of Engineers Dworshak Project have been examined. Using existing information, it has been determined that the project has resulted in the loss of 15,316 acres of elk habitat, 15,286 acres of white-tailed deer habitat, 16,986 acres of black bear habitat, 14,776 acres of ruffed grouse habitat, 13,616 acres of pileated woodpecker habitat, and 66 acres of yellow warbler habitat (scrub-shrub/red alder). Acreages of mallard, Canada goose, river otter, and beaver habitat could not be determined from existing information. The interagency work group has recommended that a HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) be used to determine changes in the quantity and quality of target species habitat in the study area, due to the development and operation of Dworshak Reservoir. 60 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. imageApps Package v 4.8

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-11

    The imageApps package provides a number of image processing modules that are compatible with the Umbra/Camera package. Each module works with an connector and generally generates an output image. Modules include the following: imageBlobber: Rapid image segmentation into color blob regions. imageSegmenter: Another image segmentation module. imageAverage: A simple FIR image filter. imageMovingAverage: A simple IIR image filter. imageColorGrid: Used for tracking calibration color blobs. imageCrop: Simple cropping function. imageDifference: Used for detecting motion inmore » image objects. imageSnake: Incorporates the (patent pending) polygon snake algorithm developed under the LDRD. camcal: A calibration module for performing visual targeting (originally developed under Automated Visual Direction LDRD)« less

  6. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  7. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  8. Triple effect absorption chiller utilizing two refrigeration circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, R.C.

    1988-03-22

    This patent describes a heat absorption method for an absorption chiller. It comprises: providing a firs absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range, providing a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range; heat exchanging refrigerant and absorber solution; thermal communication with an external heat load. This patent describes a heat absorption apparatus for use as an absorption chiller. It includes: a first absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range; a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range which has a lower maximum temperature relative to the first temperature range; the first circuit having generator means, condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operatively connected together; the second circuit having generator means condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operative connected together; and the first circuit condenser means and the first circuit absorber means being in heat exchange communication with the second circuit generator means.

  9. Instrumentation in astronomy VII; Proceedings of the SPIE Meeting, Vol. 1235, Pts. 1 2, Tucson, AZ, Feb. 13-17, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics discussed include IR detectors and instrumentation, detectors, other instrumentation, optical instrumentation, and space instrumentation. Papers are presented on the IR spectrometer/imager for the ESO VLT, the fiber-coupled high-resolution IR array spectrometer for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, the Balloon-Borne Infrared Telescope for FIR spectroscopy, and a simple transputer-based CCD camera controller. Attention is given to CCD guidance system for William Herschel Telescope, the New Technology Telescope control/acquisition system as a prototype for the VLT, a control system for spincasting 8-m borosilicate honeycomb mirrors, echelle spectrographs for 8-m class telescopes, and fiber spectroscopy at Palomar Observatory. Other papers are on the Kitt Peak National Observatory fiber actuator device, a two-star photoelectric photometer, an ultrahigh-resolution XUV spectroheliograph, an optical monitor for X-ray satellites, and large-format electrographic and array detectors for a space Schmidt imaging telescope.

  10. INEEL BNCT Research Program Annual Report, CY-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2001-03-01

    This report is a summary of the activities conducted in conjunction with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 2000. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, neutron source design and demonstration, and support the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National BNCT Program goals are the goals of this Program. Contributions from the individual contributors about their projects are included, specifically described are the following, chemistry: analysis of biological samples and an infrared blood-boron analyzer, and physics: progress in the patient treatment planning software, measurement of neutron spectra for the Argentina RA-6 reactor, and recalculation of the Finnish research reactor FiR 1 neutron spectra, BNCT accelerator technology, and modification to the research reactor at Washington State University for an epithermal-neutron beam.

  11. Caltech Campus Map and Directory 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O I INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O LIG O LIG O S AN PAS QUAL S T. HOLLIS TON AVE . HILL AVE . C ALIFOR NIA B LVD. DE L MAR B LVD. WILS ON AVE . C ATALINA AVE . S AN PAS QUAL S T. C HE S TE R AVE . MIC HIG AN AVE . A R D E N R D . S AN PAS QUAL S HOLLIS TON AVE . S S C a m p u s D i r e c to r y M a p A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 MOOR E AVE R Y FINANC IAL PAS ADE NA FIR E S TATION # 34 IMS S B E C KMAN AUD B AXTE R KE C K S E R VIC E S WATSON C E S H R STEELE LAB

  12. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse March 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 Tajima receives DOe early career awarD 2 NeuTrON reflec- TOmeTry prOviDes firsT sub-NaNOmeTer visualizaTiON Of live cell aDhesiON 3 creaTiNg a high- efficieNcy cOmpacT iON acceleraTOr, aN alTerNaTive TO larger, mOre cOsTly sTruc- Tures 4 heaDs up! LANSCE beam reliability achieves "world class" ranking AOT has issued

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Rykala, Adam; Isaak, Kate; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Bradford, Charles M.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, Asantha; Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter; Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub

  14. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1

  15. Femtosecond Electron and Photon Pulses Facility in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimjaem, S.; Thongbai, C.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, N.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M. W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.

    2007-01-19

    Femtosecond electron and photon pulses facility has been established as SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF). Femtosecond electron bunches can be generated from a system consisting of an RF gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha magnet as an magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. Femtosecond electron pulses can be used directly or used as a source to produce equally short electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses via certain kind of radiation production processes. At SURIYA project, we are interested especially in production of radiation in Far-infrared (FIR) regime. At these wavelengths, the radiation from femtosecond electron pulses is emitted coherently resulting in high intensity radiation. Overview of the facility, the generation of femtosecond electron bunches, the theoretical background of coherent transition radiation and the recent experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  16. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  17. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  18. High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldova, D.; Fridman, E.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

  19. RESOLVING THE RADIO SOURCE BACKGROUND: DEEPER UNDERSTANDING THROUGH CONFUSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Fomalont, E. B.; Kellermann, K. I.; Miller, N.; Perley, R. A.; Scott, D.; Vernstrom, T.; Wall, J. V.

    2012-10-10

    We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image one primary beam area at 3 GHz with 8'' FWHM resolution and 1.0 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise near the pointing center. The P(D) distribution from the central 10 arcmin of this confusion-limited image constrains the count of discrete sources in the 1 < S({mu}Jy) < 10 range. At this level, the brightness-weighted differential count S {sup 2} n(S) is converging rapidly, as predicted by evolutionary models in which the faintest radio sources are star-forming galaxies; and Almost-Equal-To 96% of the background originating in galaxies has been resolved into discrete sources. About 63% of the radio background is produced by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the remaining 37% comes from star-forming galaxies that obey the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation and account for most of the FIR background at {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 160 {mu}m. Our new data confirm that radio sources powered by AGNs and star formation evolve at about the same rate, a result consistent with AGN feedback and the rough correlation of black hole and stellar masses. The confusion at centimeter wavelengths is low enough that neither the planned Square Kilometre Array nor its pathfinder ASKAP EMU survey should be confusion limited, and the ultimate source detection limit imposed by 'natural' confusion is {<=}0.01 {mu}Jy at {nu} = 1.4 GHz. If discrete sources dominate the bright extragalactic background reported by ARCADE 2 at 3.3 GHz, they cannot be located in or near galaxies and most are {<=}0.03 {mu}Jy at 1.4 GHz.

  20. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart.

  1. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysismass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450600 C). At low temperatures (450 C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include DielsAlder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e

  2. Dusty cradles in a turbulent nursery: the SGR A east H II region complex at the galactic center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, R. M.; Herter, T. L.; Adams, J. D.; Morris, M. R.

    2014-10-20

    We present imaging at 19, 25, 31, and 37 μm of the compact H II region complex G-0.02-0.07 located 6 pc in projection from the center of the Galaxy obtained with SOFIA using FORCAST. G-0.02-0.07 contains three compact H II regions (A, B, and C) and one ultra-compact H II region (D). Our observations reveal the presence of two faint, infrared sources located 23'' and 35'' to the east of region C (FIRS 1 and 2) and detect dust emission in two of the three 'ridges' of ionized gas west of region A. The 19/37 color temperature and 37 μm optical depth maps of regions A-C are used to characterize the dust energetics and morphology. Regions A and B exhibit average 19/37 color temperatures of ∼105 K, and regions C and D exhibit color temperatures of ∼115 K and ∼130 K, respectively. Using the DustEM code, we model the SEDs of regions A-D and FIRS 1, all of which require populations of very small, transiently heated grains and large, equilibrium-heated grains. We also require the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in regions A-C in order to fit the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm fluxes observed by Spitzer/IRAC. The location of the heating source for region A is determined by triangulation from distances and temperatures derived from DustEM models fit to SEDs of three different points around the region, and it is found to be displaced to the northeast of the center of curvature near the color temperature peak. Based on total luminosity, expected 1.90 μm fluxes, and proximity to the mid-IR color temperature peaks, we identify heating source candidates for regions A, B, and C. However, for region D, the observed fluxes at 1.87 and 1.90 μm of the previously proposed ionizing star are a factor of ∼40 times too bright to be the heating source and hence is likely just a star lying along the line of sight toward region D.

  3. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

    2011-10-01

    This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of

  4. Flash pyrolysis of biomass with reactive and non-reactive gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1984-03-01

    The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ and with the non-reactive gases He and N/sub 2/ is being determined in an 1'' downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000/sup 0/C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000/sup 0/C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the ethylene yield based on pine wood carbon conversion is 27%, for benzene it is 25% and for CO the yield is 39%, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood. The yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, thus indicating a free radical reaction between CH/sub 4/ and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicate an economically competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 7 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  5. Dual nozzle single pump fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes an improvement in a fuel injection system in a stratified charge hybrid internal combustion engine including a main combustion chamber, a precombustion chamber connected with the main chamber, fuel injectors in the main combustion chamber and precombustion chamber which open at higher and lower pressure levels respectively to sequentially inject fuel into the prechamber and the main chamber, timed spark ignition means in the prechamber for ignition of the fuel-air mixture therein, and an engine driven and timed fuel injection pump having a variable output capacity that varies with power level position, the injection pump is supplied by a low pressure charging pump. The improvement comprises: a shuttle valve including a bore therein; a shuttle spool means positioned within the bore defining a prechamber supply chamber on one side thereof and a spool activation chamber on the opposite side thereof the spool means having a first and second position; biasing means urging the spool towards it first position with the spool actuation chamber at its minimum volume; first conduit means connecting charging pressure to the prechamber supply camber in the first position oil the spool means; second conduit means connecting the injection pump to spool actuation chamber; third conduit means connecting the spool actuating chamber with the main injector; forth conduit means connecting the prechamber supply chamber with the prechamber injector; the initial charge from the injection pump actuates the spool means from its fir to its second position.

  6. Direct detector for terahertz radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C.; Lee, Mark; Shaner, Eric A.; Allen, S. James

    2008-09-02

    A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

  7. On the future of BNL user facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to portray the emerging technology of high-power high-brightness electron beams. This new technology will impact several fields of science and it is essential that BNL stay abreast of the development. BNL has a relative advantage and vital interest in pursuing this technology that will impact its two major facilities, the NSLS and RHIC. We have a sensible development path towards this critical future technology, in which BNL will gradually acquire a strong basis of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technology while executing useful projects. The technology of high-power AND high-brightness (HPHB) electron beams is based of the convergence of two extant, but relatively recent technologies: Photoinjectors and superconducting energy-recovering linacs. The HPHB technology presents special opportunities for the development of future BNL user facilities for High-Energy and Nuclear Science (HE-NP) and Basic Energy Science (BES). In HE-NP this technology makes it possible to build high-energy electron cooling for RHIC in the short range and a unique linac-based electron-ion collider (eRHIC). In BES, we can build short pulse, coherent FIR sources and high flux femtosecond hard x-ray sources based on Compton scattering in the short range and, in the longer range, femtosecond, ultra-high brightness synchrotron light sources and, ultimately, an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL).

  8. Compact, Low-power and Precision Timing Photodetector Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.; Schwiening, Jochen; Vavra, Jaroslav; /SLAC

    2011-06-14

    Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and single-photon detection requires a digitizer capable of integrated recording of dense arrays of sensor elements with high analog bandwidth (precision timing) and large record depth, in a cost-effective, compact and low-power way. Simply stated, one cannot do better than having a high-fidelity 'oscilloscope on a chip' for every sensor channel. A firs version of the Buffered Large Analog Bandwidth (BLAB1) ASIC has been designed based upon the lessons learned from the development of the Large Analog Bandwidth Recorder and Digitizer with Ordered Readout (LABRADOR) ASIC. While this LABRADOR ASIC has been very successful and forms the readout basis of a generation of new, large-scale radio neutrino detectors, its limited sampling depth is a major drawback. To address this shortcoming, a prototype intended for photodetector readout has been designed and fabricated with 64k deep sampling at multi-GSa/s operation. An evaluation system has been constructed for instrumentation of Time-Of-Propagation (TOP) and focusing DIRC prototypes and test results will be reported.

  9. AmeriFlux CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCaughey, Harry [Queen's University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Gro Ontario - Groundhog River, Boreal Mixedwood Forest.. Site Description - Groundhog River (FCRN or CCP site "ON-OMW") is situated in a typical boreal mixedwood forest in northeastern Ontario (48.217 degrees north and 82.156 degrees west) about 80 km southwest of Timmins in Reeves Twp. near the Groundhog River. Rowe (1972) places the site in the Missinaibi-Cabonga Section of the Boreal Forest Region. In terms of ecoregion and ecozone, the site is in the Lake Timiskaming Lowlands of the Boreal Shield. The forest developed after high-grade logging in the 1930's. The average age in 2013 is estimated at beteen 75 and 80 years. The forest is dominated by five species characteristic of Ontario boreal mixedwoods: trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.), white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss.), white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.). The surficial geology is a lacustrine deposit of varved or massive clays, silts and silty sands. The soil is an orthic gleysol with a soil moisture regime classified as fresh to very fresh. Plonski (1974) rates it as a site class 1. The topography is simple and flat with an overall elevation of 340 m ASL.

  10. Scaling to Nanotechnology Limits with the PIMS Computer Architecture and a new Scaling Rule.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debenedictis, Erik

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new approach to computing that moves towards the limits of nanotechnology using a newly formulated sc aling rule. This is in contrast to the current computer industry scali ng away from von Neumann's original computer at the rate of Moore's Law. We extend Moore's Law to 3D, which l eads generally to architectures that integrate logic and memory. To keep pow er dissipation cons tant through a 2D surface of the 3D structure requires using adiabatic principles. We call our newly proposed architecture Processor In Memory and Storage (PIMS). We propose a new computational model that integrates processing and memory into "tiles" that comprise logic, memory/storage, and communications functions. Since the programming model will be relatively stable as a system scales, programs repr esented by tiles could be executed in a PIMS system built with today's technology or could become the "schematic diagram" for implementation in an ultimate 3D nanotechnology of the future. We build a systems software approach that offers advantages over and above the technological and arch itectural advantages. Firs t, the algorithms may be more efficient in the conventional sens e of having fewer steps. Second, the algorithms may run with higher power efficiency per operation by being a better match for the adiabatic scaling ru le. The performance analysis based on demonstrated ideas in physical science suggests 80,000 x improvement in cost per operation for the (arguably) gene ral purpose function of emulating neurons in Deep Learning.

  11. THE EXTENT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AROUND GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J. E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch

    2013-08-01

    Radio quasar sightlines with strong Mg II absorption lines display statistically enhanced Faraday rotation measures (RMs), indicating the presence of additional magneto-active plasma with respect to sightlines free of such absorption. In this Letter, we use multi-color optical imaging to identify the galaxies likely hosting the magneto-active plasma, and to constrain the location of the latter with respect to the putative parent halo. We find that all of the sightlines with high |RM| pass within 50 kpc of a galaxy and that the |RM| distribution for low impact parameters, D < 50 kpc, is significantly different than for larger impact parameters. In addition, we find a decrease in the ratio of the polarization at 21 cm and 1.5 cm, p{sub 21}/p{sub 1.5}, toward lower D. These two effects are most likely related, strengthen the association of excess |RM| with intervening galaxies, and suggest that intervening galaxies operate as inhomogeneous Faraday screens. These results are difficult to reconcile with only a disk model for the magnetic field, but are consistent with highly magnetized winds associated with Mg II systems. We infer strong magnetic fields of a few tens of {mu}G, consistent with the values required by the lack of evolution of the FIR-radio correlation at high redshifts. Finally, these findings lend support to the idea that the small-scale helicity bottleneck of {alpha}-{Omega} galactic dynamos can be significantly alleviated via galactic winds.

  12. Alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} with large nonlinear optical properties in the deep-ultraviolet region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshak, A. H.; Huang, Hongwei; Kamarudin, H.; Auluck, S.

    2015-02-28

    The linear optical response and second harmonic generation (SHG) in alkali-metal/alkaline-earth-metal fluorine beryllium borate NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} are investigated by means of density functional theory. Calculations are performed using four types of exchange correlations: Ceperley-Alder local density approximation, Perdew Burke and Ernzerhof general gradient approximation, Engel-Vosko generalized gradient approximation, and the recently modified Becke-Johnson potential (mBJ). The mBJ approach brings the calculated band gap (7.20 eV) in excellent agreement with the experimental one (7.28 eV). The calculated values of the uniaxial anisotropy δε=−0.076 and the birefringence Δn(0)=0.052 indicate considerable anisotropy in the linear optical properties, which makes it favorable for the second harmonic generation. The dominant component of the second harmonic generation is χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω). The value of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| is about 1.2 pm/V at λ = 1064 nm in agreement with previous calculations. To analyze the origin of the high SHG of NaSr{sub 3}Be{sub 3}B{sub 3}O{sub 9}F{sub 4} single crystals, we have correlated the features of |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)| spectra with the features of ε{sub 2}(ω) spectra as a function of ω/2 and ω. From the calculated dominant component |χ{sub 111}{sup (2)}(ω)|, we find that the microscopic first hyperpolarizability, β{sub 111}, the vector components along the dipole moment direction is 0.5 × 10{sup −30} esu at static limit and 0.6 × 10{sup −30} esu at λ = 1064 nm.

  13. Effects of Mine Waste Contamination on Fish and Wildlife Habitat at Multiple Levels of Biological Organization in the Methow River, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert.

    2002-06-01

    A three-year multidisciplinary study was conducted on the relationship between mine waste contamination and the effects on aquatic and terrestrial habitats in the Methow River below abandoned mines near Twisp in Okanogan County, Washington (U.S.A.). Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to study potentially impacted sites. Although the dissolved metal content of water in the Methow River was below the limits of detection, eleven chemicals of potential environmental concern were identified in the tailings, mine effluents, groundwater, streamwater and sediments (Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn). The potential for ecosystem level impacts was reflected in the risk of contamination in the mine waste to communities and populations that are valued for their functional properties related to energy storage and nutrient cycling. Dissolved and sediment metal contamination changed the benthic insect community structure in a tributary of the Methow River below Alder Mine, and at the population level, caddisfly larval development in the Methow River was delayed. Arsenic accumulation in bear hair and Cd in fish liver suggest top predators are effected. In situ exposure of juvenile triploid trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to conditions at the downstream site resulted in reduced growth and increased mortality among exposed individuals. Histopathological studies of their tissues revealed extensive glycogen inclusions suggesting food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body. Subcellular observations revealed mitochondrial changes including a decrease in the number and increase in the size of electron-dense metrical granules, the presence of glycogen bodies in the cytoplasm, and glycogen nuclei in exposed trout hepatocytes, which are signs that Type IV

  14. BASELINE MEMBRANE SELECTION AND CHARACTERIZATION FOR AN SDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon-Mercado, H; David Hobbs, D

    2007-04-03

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In FY05 and FY06, testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) explored a low temperature fuel cell design concept for the SDE. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small footprint that are crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. A key component of the SDE is the ion conductive membrane through which protons produced at anode migrate to the cathode and react to produce hydrogen. An ideal membrane for the SDE should have both low ionic resistivity and low sulfur dioxide transport. These features allow the electrolyzer to perform at high currents with low potentials, along with preventing contamination of both the hydrogen output and poisoning of the catalysts involved. Another key component is the electrocatalyst material used for the anode and cathode. Good electrocatalysts should be chemically stable and have a low overpotential for the desired electrochemical reactions. This report summarizes results from activities to evaluate commercial and experimental membranes for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for sulfur dioxide transport as a function of acid strength including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated poly-etherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membranes. Experimental membranes from the sulfonated diels-alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) and modified Nafion{reg_sign} 117 were evaluated for SO{sub 2} transport as well. These membranes exhibited reduced transport coefficient for SO{sub 2} transport without the loss in ionic conductivity. The use of Nafion{reg_sign} with EW 1100 is recommended for the present SDE testing due to the limited data regarding chemical

  15. HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT, NHI WORK PACKAGE N-SR07TC0301, FY07 FIRST QUARTER REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, W

    2006-12-20

    The proof of concept of SO2 electrolysis for the hybrid sulfur (HyS) process is the second priority research target of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative's thermochemical program for FY07. The proof of concept of the liquid-phase option must be demonstrated at the single cell level for an extended run times (>100 hours). The rate of development of HyS will depend on the identification of a promising membrane or an alternative means for controlling sulfur formation. Once successful long-duration operation has been demonstrated, SRNL will develop a multi-cell stack that can be connected to the H2SO4 decomposer being developed by SNL for the S-I ILS for a Hybrid Sulfur Integrated Laboratory-Scale Experiment during FY 2008. During the first quarter of FY07, SRNL continued the component development and membrane development activities with the goal of identifying and characterizing improved electrodes, electrocatalysts, membranes and MEA configurations which could then be tested at larger scale in the SDE test facility. A modified glass cell was fabricated to allow measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) transport across membrane samples at elevated temperatures (up to 70 C). This testing also includes evaluating SO2 transport in different sulfuric acid concentrations (30-70 wt%). A new potentiostat/frequency analyzer was installed for determining ionic conductivity of membranes. This instrument enhances our capabilities to characterize membrane, electrocatalyst and MEA properties and performance. Continuing work from FY06, evaluations were preformed on various commercial and experimental membranes and electrocatalyst materials for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for sulfur dioxide transport as a function of acid strength including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated polyetherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membranes. Experimental membranes from the sulfonated diels-alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) and

  16. FY08 MEMBRANE CHARACTERIZATION REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

    2008-09-01

    This report summarizes results from all of the membrane testing completed to date at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for the sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE). Several types of commercially-available membranes have been analyzed for ionic resistance and sulfur dioxide transport including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated polyether-ketone-ketone (SPEKK), and polybenzimidazole membranes (PBI). Of these membrane types, the poly-benzimidazole membrane, Celtec-L, exhibited the best combination of characteristics for use in an SDE. Several experimental membranes have also been analyzed including hydrated sulfonated Diels-Alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) membranes from Sandia National Laboratory, perfluorosulfonimide (PFSI) and sulfonated perfluorocyclobutyl aromatic ether (S-PFCB) prepared by Clemson University, hydrated platinum-treated PFSA prepared by Giner Electrochemical Systems (GES) and Pt-Nafion{reg_sign} 115 composites prepared at SRNL. The chemical stability, SO{sub 2} transport and ionic conductivity characteristics have been measured for several commercially available and experimental proton-conducting membranes. Commercially available PFSA membranes such as the Nafion{reg_sign} series exhibited excellent chemical stability and ionic conductivity in sulfur dioxide saturated sulfuric acid solutions. Sulfur dioxide transport in the Nafion{reg_sign} membranes varied proportionally with the thickness and equivalent weight of the membrane. Although the SO{sub 2} transport in the Nafion{reg_sign} membranes is higher than desired, the excellent chemical stability and conductivity makes this membrane the best commercially-available membrane at this time. Initial results indicated that a modified Nafion{reg_sign} membrane incorporating Pt nanoparticles exhibited significantly reduced SO{sub 2} transport. Reduced SO{sub 2} transport was also measured with commercially available PBI membrane and several experimental membranes produced

  17. HERschel key program heritage: A far-infrared source catalog for the Magellanic Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seale, Jonathan P.; Meixner, Margaret; Sewiło, Marta; Babler, Brian; Engelbracht, Charles W.; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Gordon, Karl; Roman-Duval, Julia; Hony, Sacha; Okumura, Koryo; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Sauvage, Marc; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Matsuura, Mikako; Oliveira, Joana M.; Loon, Jacco Th. van; Srinivasan, Sundar; and others

    2014-12-01

    Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). We conducted the study using the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources available from the Herschel Science Center from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 μm) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 μm) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 μm. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC. To be bright in the FIR, a source must be very dusty, and so the sources in the HERITAGE catalogs represent the dustiest populations of sources. The brightest HERITAGE sources are dominated by young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dimmest by background galaxies. We identify the sources most likely to be background galaxies by first considering their morphology (distant galaxies are point-like at the resolution of Herschel) and then comparing the flux distribution to that of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (ATLAS) survey of galaxies. We find a total of 9745 background galaxy candidates in the LMC HERITAGE images and 5111 in the SMC images, in agreement with the number predicted by extrapolating from the ATLAS flux distribution. The majority of the Magellanic Cloud-residing sources are either very young, embedded forming stars or dusty clumps of the interstellar medium. Using the presence of 24 μm emission as a tracer of star formation, we identify 3518 YSO candidates in the LMC and 663 in the SMC. There are far fewer far-IR bright YSOs in the SMC than the LMC

  18. Flash hydropyrolysis and methanolysis of biomass with hydrogen and methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.

    1985-04-01

    The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ and with the non-reactive gases He and N/sub 2/ is being determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000/sup 0/C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000/sup 0/C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 30% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH/sub 4/ and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates an economically competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 8 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Flash pyrolysis of biomass with reactive and non-reactive gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ and with the non-reactive gases He and N/sub 2/ is being determined in a 1'' downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000/sup 0/C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000/sup 0/C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 30% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH/sub 4/ and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates an economically competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 8 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Flash methanolysis of wood for the production of fuels and chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Biomass in the form of less than 1000 micron oven dried fir wood particles was flash pyrolyzed in the presence of methane (methanolysis) in a downflow 1 in. I.D. tubular reactor at pressures of 20 to 200 psi and temperatures between 800/sup 0/ and 1050/sup 0/C. The major products were benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX), a heavy oily liquid (greater than or equal to C/sub 9/), ethylene and carbon monoxide. As much as 12% of the available carbon in the wood was converted to BTX, 21% to ethylene and 48% to carbon monoxide at 50 psi and 1000/sup 0/C. The maximum heavier oil yield of 11% was observed at 50 psi and 800/sup 0/C. Wood particle residence times for all experiments were calculated to be less than 1 second at 20 and 50 psi and up to 2.8 sec at 200 psi. The yelds were found to be greatly influenced by the methane to wood feed ratio. Experiments were conducted to insure the results to be that produced from the wood and methane and not a catalytic effect of the reactor wall of foreign matter. Material balance, including char analyses, indicate approximately 75 to 80% of the available carbon in the feed wood reacted. Methane balances were within the margin of error of the measuring equipment showing that there is no significant net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary economic evaluation of a 2000 ton/day wood processing plant producing ethylene, benzene and methanol showed a reasonably cmpetitive plant investment of $29,000/barrel fuel oil equivalent/day assuming 15% return on investment and present market values for the products.

  1. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, J.

    1995-12-31

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

  2. The flash pyrolysis and methanolysis of biomass (wood) for production of ethylene, benzene and methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1990-02-01

    The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} and with the non-reactive gases He and N{sub 2} is being determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000{degrees}C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000{degrees}C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 25% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH{sub 4} and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates a potentially economical competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 10 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Exploratory Technology Research Program for electrochemical energy storage: Annual report for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, K.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an Electrochemical Energy Storage Program, that includes research and development (R&D) on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The DOE Electrochemical Energy Storage Program is divided into two projects: the Electric Vehicle Advanced Battery Systems (EVABS) Development Program and the Exploratory Technology Research (ETR) Program. The EVABS Program management responsibility has been assigned to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is responsible for management of the ETR Program. The EVABS and ETR Programs include an integrated matrix of R&D efforts designed to advance progress on selected candidate electrochemical systems. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), a tripartite undertaking between DOE, the U.S. automobile manufacturers and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), was formed in 1991 to accelerate the development of advanced batteries for consumer EVs. The role of the FIR Program is to perform supporting research on the advanced battery systems under development by the USABC and EVABS Program, and to evaluate new systems with potentially superior performance, durability and/or cost characteristics. The specific goal of the ETR Program is to identify the most promising electrochemical technologies and transfer them to the USABC, the battery industry and/or the EVABS Program for further development and scale-up. This report summarizes the research, financial and management activities relevant to the ETR Program in CY 1993.

  4. Comparison of Laboratory and Field Methods for Determining the Quasi-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory and field ponded infiltration tests in quasi-saturated soils (containing entrapped air) exhibit the same three-stage temporal variability for the flow rate and hydraulic conductivity. However, the values for the hydraulic conductivity may differ by as much as two orders of magnitude due to differences in the geometry and physics of flow when different laboratory and field methods are applied. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this variability using a comparison of results of ponded infiltration tests conducted under laboratory conditions using confined cores, with results of field tests conducted using partially isolated cores and double-ring infiltrometers. Under laboratory conditions in confined cores, during the firs stage, the water flux decreases over time because entrapped air plugs the largest pores in the soils; during the second stage, the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity increases by one to two orders of magnitude, essentially reaching the saturated hydraulic conductivity, when entrapped air is discharged from the soils; during the third stage, the hydraulic conductivity decreases to minimum values due to sealing of the soil surface and the effect of biofilms sealing the pores within the wetted zone. Under field conditions, the second stage is only partially developed, and when the surface sealing process begins, the hydraulic pressure drops below the air entry value, thereby causing atmospheric air to enter the soils. As a result, the soils become unsaturated with a low hydraulic conductivity, and the infiltration rate consequently decreases. Contrary to the laboratory experiments in confined cores, the saturated hydraulic conductivity cannot be reached under field conditions. In computations of infiltration one has to take into account the variations in the quasi-saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities, moisture and entrapped air content, and the hydraulic gradient in the quasi-saturated or unsaturated soils.

  5. HERSCHEL FINDS EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR WIND PARTICLES IN A PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE: IS THIS WHAT HAPPENED TO THE YOUNG SUN?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceccarelli, C.; Lpez-Sepulcre, A.; Dominik, C.; Kama, M.; Padovani, M.; Caux, E.; Caselli, P.

    2014-07-20

    There is evidence that the young Sun emitted a high flux of energetic (?10MeV) particles. The collisions of these particles with the material at the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk induced spallation reactions that formed short-lived radionuclei, like {sup 10}Be, whose trace is now visible in some meteorites. However, it is poorly known exactly when this happened, and whether and how it affected the solar system. Here, we present indirect evidence for an ejection of energetic particles in the young protostar, OMC-2 FIR 4, similar to that experienced by the young solar system. In this case, the energetic particles collide with the material in the protostellar envelope, enhancing the abundance of two molecular ions, HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, whose presence is detected via Herschel observations. The flux of energetic particles at a distance of 1AU from the emitting source, estimated from the measured abundance ratio of HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, can easily account for the irradiation required by meteoritic observations. These new observations demonstrate that the ejection of ?10MeV particles is a phenomenon occurring very early in the life of a protostar, before the disappearance of the envelope from which the future star accretes. The whole envelope is affected by the event, which sets constraints on the magnetic field geometry in the source and opens up the possibility that the spallation reactions are not limited to the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk.

  6. SHOCK-ENHANCED C{sup +} EMISSION AND THE DETECTION OF H{sub 2}O FROM THE STEPHAN'S QUINTET GROUP-WIDE SHOCK USING HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, P. N.; Lord, S.; Lu, N.; Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forts, G.; Cluver, M. E.; Konstantopoulos, I.; Ogle, P.; Falgarone, E.; Duc, P.-A.; Gallagher, S.; Gao, Y.; Jarrett, T.; Lisenfeld, U.; Peterson, B. W.; Struck, C.; Sturm, E.; Tuffs, R.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the first Herschel spectroscopic detections of the [O I] 63 ?m and [C II] 158 ?m fine-structure transitions, and a single para-H{sub 2}O line from the 35 15 kpc{sup 2} shocked intergalactic filament in Stephan's Quintet. The filament is believed to have been formed when a high-speed intruder to the group collided with a clumpy intergroup gas. Observations with the PACS spectrometer provide evidence for broad (>1000 km s{sup 1}) luminous [C II] line profiles, as well as fainter [O I] 63 ?m emission. SPIRE FTS observations reveal water emission from the p-H{sub 2}O (1{sub 11}-0{sub 00}) transition at several positions in the filament, but no other molecular lines. The H{sub 2}O line is narrow and may be associated with denser intermediate-velocity gas experiencing the strongest shock-heating. The [C II]/PAH{sub tot} and [C II]/FIR ratios are too large to be explained by normal photo-electric heating in photodissociation regions. H II region excitation or X-ray/cosmic-ray heating can also be ruled out. The observations lead to the conclusion that a large fraction the molecular gas is diffuse and warm. We propose that the [C II], [O I], and warm H{sub 2} line emission is powered by a turbulent cascade in which kinetic energy from the galaxy collision with the intergalactic medium is dissipated to small scales and low velocities, via shocks and turbulent eddies. Low-velocity magnetic shocks can help explain both the [C II]/[O I] ratio, and the relatively high [C II]/H{sub 2} ratios observed. The discovery that [C II] emission can be enhanced, in large-scale turbulent regions in collisional environments, has implications for the interpretation of [C II] emission in high-z galaxies.

  7. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992-January 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, A.

    1998-12-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on December 27, 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa, on January 31, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section A10 included pressure, temperature, and salinity [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-1 1 , CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, TALK, and underway pCO{sub 2}. The TCO{sub 2} was measured by using two Single-Operator Multiparameter Metabolic Analyzers (SOMMAs) for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples that were coupled to a coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for TALK were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-}2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by infrared photometry with a precision of {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. The work aboard the R/V Meteor was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-76CHOO016, and the Bundesministerium fir Forschung und Technologies through grants 03F0545A and MPG 099/1.

  8. THE KILOPARSEC-SCALE STAR FORMATION LAW AT REDSHIFT 4: WIDESPREAD, HIGHLY EFFICIENT STAR FORMATION IN THE DUST-OBSCURED STARBURST GALAXY GN20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, J. A.; Riechers, D.; Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Carilli, C. L.; Daddi, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution observations of the 880?m (rest-frame FIR) continuum emission in the z=4.05 submillimeter galaxy GN20 from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). These data resolve the obscured star formation (SF) in this unlensed galaxy on scales of 0.''3נ0.''2 (?2.1נ1.3kpc). The observations reveal a bright (16 1mJy) dusty starburst centered on the cold molecular gas reservoir and showing a bar-like extension along the major axis. The striking anti-correlation with the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging suggests that the copious dust surrounding the starburst heavily obscures the rest-frame UV/optical emission. A comparison with 1.2mm PdBI continuum data reveals no evidence for variations in the dust properties across the source within the uncertainties, consistent with extended SF, and the peak star formation rate surface density (119 8 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}kpc{sup 2}) implies that the SF in GN20 remains sub-Eddington on scales down to 3kpc{sup 2}. We find that the SF efficiency (SFE) is highest in the central regions of GN20, leading to a resolved SF law with a power-law slope of ?{sub SFR}??{sub H{sub 2}{sup 2.11.0}}, and that GN20 lies above the sequence of normal star-forming disks, implying that the dispersion in the SF law is not due solely to morphology or choice of conversion factor. These data extend previous evidence for a fixed SFE per free-fall time to include the star-forming medium on ?kiloparsec scales in a galaxy 12Gyr ago.

  9. Parametric Grid Information in the DOE Knowledge Base: Data Preparation, Storage, and Access

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HIPP,JAMES R.; MOORE,SUSAN G.; MYERS,STEPHEN C.; SCHULTZ,CRAIG A.; SHEPHERD,ELLEN; YOUNG,CHRISTOPHER J.

    1999-10-01

    The parametric grid capability of the Knowledge Base provides an efficient, robust way to store and access interpolatable information which is needed to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. To meet both the accuracy and performance requirements of operational monitoring systems, we use a new approach which combines the error estimation of kriging with the speed and robustness of Natural Neighbor Interpolation (NNI). The method involves three basic steps: data preparation (DP), data storage (DS), and data access (DA). The goal of data preparation is to process a set of raw data points to produce a sufficient basis for accurate NNI of value and error estimates in the Data Access step. This basis includes a set of nodes and their connectedness, collectively known as a tessellation, and the corresponding values and errors that map to each node, which we call surfaces. In many cases, the raw data point distribution is not sufficiently dense to guarantee accurate error estimates from the NNI, so the original data set must be densified using a newly developed interpolation technique known as Modified Bayesian Kriging. Once appropriate kriging parameters have been determined by variogram analysis, the optimum basis for NNI is determined in a process they call mesh refinement, which involves iterative kriging, new node insertion, and Delauny triangle smoothing. The process terminates when an NNI basis has been calculated which will fir the kriged values within a specified tolerance. In the data storage step, the tessellations and surfaces are stored in the Knowledge Base, currently in a binary flatfile format but perhaps in the future in a spatially-indexed database. Finally, in the data access step, a client application makes a request for an interpolated value, which triggers a data fetch from the Knowledge Base through the libKBI interface, a walking triangle search for the containing triangle, and finally the NNI interpolation.

  10. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  11. A K{sub S} AND IRAC SELECTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT EXTREMELY RED OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei-Hao; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2012-01-10

    In order to find the most extreme dust-hidden high-redshift galaxies, we select 196 extremely red objects in the K{sub S} and Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bands (KIEROs, [K{sub s} - 4.5 {mu}m]{sub AB} > 1.6) in the 0.06 deg{sup 2} Great Observatories Origins Deep Surveys-North (GOODS-N) region. This selection avoids the Balmer breaks of galactic spectra at z < 4 and picks up red galaxies with strong dust extinction. The photometric redshifts of KIEROs are between 1.5 and 5, with {approx}70% at z {approx} 2-4. KIEROs are very massive, with M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. They are optically faint and usually cannot be picked out by the Lyman break selection. On the other hand, the KIERO selection includes approximately half of the known millimeter and submillimeter galaxies in the GOODS-N. Stacking analyses in the radio, millimeter, and submillimeter all show that KIEROs are much more luminous than average 4.5 {mu}m-selected galaxies. Interestingly, the stacked fluxes for Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS)-undetected KIEROs in these wave bands are 2.5-5 times larger than those for ACS-detected KIEROs. With the stacked radio fluxes and the local radio-FIR correlation, we derive mean infrared luminosities of (2-7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun} and mean star formation rates (SFRs) of 400-1200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for KIEROs with redshifts. We do not find evidence of a significant subpopulation of passive KIEROs. The large stellar masses and SFRs imply that KIEROs are z > 2 massive galaxies in rapid formation. Our results show that a large sample of dusty ultraluminous sources can be selected in this way and that a large fraction of high-redshift star formation is hidden by dust.

  12. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, T.; Bassler, N.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.; Hsiao, M. C.; Liu, Y. H.; Koivunoro, H.; Auterinen, I.; Sern, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Palmans, H.; Sharpe, P.; Langguth, P.; Hampel, G.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  13. THE PHYSICS OF THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION. II. SYNCHROTRON EMISSION AS A STAR FORMATION TRACER IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.

    2010-07-01

    We construct one-zone steady-state models of cosmic ray (CR) injection, cooling, and escape over the entire dynamic range of the FIR-radio correlation (FRC), from normal galaxies to starbursts, over the redshift interval 0 {<=} z {<=} 10. Normal galaxies with low star formation rates become radio faint at high z, because inverse Compton (IC) losses off the cosmic microwave background (CMB) cool CR electrons and positrons rapidly, suppressing their nonthermal radio emission. However, we find that this effect occurs at higher redshifts than previously expected, because escape, bremsstrahlung, ionization, and starlight IC losses act to counter this effect and preserve the radio luminosity of galaxies. The radio dimming of star-forming galaxies at high z is not just a simple competition between magnetic field energy density and the CMB energy density; the CMB must also compete with every other loss process. We predict relations for the critical redshift when radio emission is significantly suppressed compared to the z {approx} 0 FRC as a function of star formation rate per unit area. For example, a MilkyWay like spiral becomes radio faint at z {approx} 2, while an M82-like starburst does not become radio faint until z {approx} 10-20. We show that the 'buffering' effect of non-synchrotron losses improves the detectability of star-forming galaxies in synchrotron radio emission with Expanded Very Large Array and Square Kilometer Array. Additionally, we provide a quantitative explanation for the relative radio brightness of some high-z submillimeter galaxies. We show that at fixed star formation rate surface density, galaxies with larger CR scale heights are radio bright with respect to the FRC, because of weaker bremsstrahlung and ionization losses compared to compact starbursts. We predict that these 'puffy starbursts' should have steeper radio spectra than compact galaxies with the same star formation rate surface density. We find that radio-bright submillimeter

  14. Molecular gas heating mechanisms, and star formation feedback in merger/starbursts: NGC 6240 and Arp 193 as case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Weiss, Axel; Van der Werf, Paul; Israel, F. P.; Greve, T. R.; Isaak, Kate G.; Gao, Y. E-mail: zyzhang@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: aweiss@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de E-mail: israel@strw.leidenuniv.nl E-mail: kisaak@rssd.esa.int

    2014-06-20

    We used the SPIRE/FTS instrument aboard the Herschel Space Observatory to obtain the Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) of CO from J = 4-3 to J = 13-12 of Arp 193 and NGC 6240, two classical merger/starbursts selected from our molecular line survey of local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (L {sub IR} ≥ 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}). The high-J CO SLEDs are then combined with ground-based low-J CO, {sup 13}CO, HCN, HCO{sup +}, CS line data and used to probe the thermal and dynamical states of their large molecular gas reservoirs. We find the two CO SLEDs strongly diverging from J = 4-3 onward, with NGC 6240 having a much higher CO line excitation than Arp 193, despite their similar low-J CO SLEDs and L {sub FIR}/L {sub CO,} {sub 1} {sub –0}, L {sub HCN}/L {sub CO} (J = 1-0) ratios (proxies of star formation efficiency and dense gas mass fraction). In Arp 193, one of the three most extreme starbursts in the local universe, the molecular SLEDs indicate a small amount (∼5%-15%) of dense gas (n ≥ 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) unlike NGC 6240 where most of the molecular gas (∼60%-70%) is dense (n ∼ (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5}) cm{sup –3}). Strong star-formation feedback can drive this disparity in their dense gas mass fractions, and also induce extreme thermal and dynamical states for the molecular gas. In NGC 6240, and to a lesser degree in Arp 193, we find large molecular gas masses whose thermal states cannot be maintained by FUV photons from Photon-Dominated Regions. We argue that this may happen often in metal-rich merger/starbursts, strongly altering the initial conditions of star formation. ALMA can now directly probe these conditions across cosmic epoch, and even probe their deeply dust-enshrouded outcome, the stellar initial mass function averaged over galactic evolution.

  15. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2008-04-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  16. A REDSHIFT SURVEY OF HERSCHEL FAR-INFRARED SELECTED STARBURSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR OBSCURED STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, C. M.; Budynkiewicz, J.; Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B.; Bethermin, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Burgarella, D.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conselice, C. J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ivison, R. J.; and others

    2012-12-20

    We present Keck spectroscopic observations and redshifts for a sample of 767 Herschel-SPIRE selected galaxies (HSGs) at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m, taken with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and the Keck II DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph. The redshift distribution of these SPIRE sources from the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey peaks at z = 0.85, with 731 sources at z < 2 and a tail of sources out to z {approx} 5. We measure more significant disagreement between photometric and spectroscopic redshifts (({Delta}z/(1 + z{sub spec})) = 0.29) than is seen in non-infrared selected samples, likely due to enhanced star formation rates and dust obscuration in infrared-selected galaxies. The infrared data are used to directly measure integrated infrared luminosities and dust temperatures independent of radio or 24 {mu}m flux densities. By probing the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at its peak, we estimate that the vast majority (72%-83%) of z < 2 Herschel-selected galaxies would drop out of traditional submillimeter surveys at 0.85-1 mm. We find that dust temperature traces infrared luminosity, due in part to the SPIRE wavelength selection biases, and partially from physical effects. As a result, we measure no significant trend in SPIRE color with redshift; if dust temperature were independent of luminosity or redshift, a trend in SPIRE color would be expected. Composite infrared SEDs are constructed as a function of infrared luminosity, showing the increase in dust temperature with luminosity, and subtle change in near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral properties. Moderate evolution in the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation is measured for this partially radio-selected sample, with q{sub IR}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -0.30{+-}0.02} at z < 2. We estimate the luminosity function and implied star formation rate density contribution of HSGs at z < 1.6 and find overall agreement with work based on 24 {mu}m extrapolations of the LIRG

  17. REDSHIFT DETERMINATION AND CO LINE EXCITATION MODELING FOR THE MULTIPLY LENSED GALAXY HLSW-01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, K. S.; Lupu, R. E.; Aguirre, J. E.; Auld, R.; Eales, S.; Aussel, H.; Chanial, P.; Beelen, A.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Carpenter, J. M.; Cooray, A.; Dowell, C. D.; Brisbin, D.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Cox, P.

    2011-05-20

    We report on the redshift measurement and CO line excitation of HERMES J105751.1+573027 (HLSW-01), a strongly lensed submillimeter galaxy discovered in Herschel/SPIRE observations as part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). HLSW-01 is an ultra-luminous galaxy with an intrinsic far-infrared luminosity of L{sub FIR} = 1.4 x 10{sup 13} L{sub sun}, and is lensed by a massive group of galaxies into at least four images with a total magnification of {mu} = 10.9 {+-} 0.7. With the 100 GHz instantaneous bandwidth of the Z-Spec instrument on the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, we robustly identify a redshift of z = 2.958 {+-} 0.007 for this source, using the simultaneous detection of four CO emission lines (J = 7 {yields} 6, J = 8 {yields} 7, J = 9 {yields} 8, and J = 10 {yields} 9). Combining the measured line fluxes for these high-J transitions with the J = 1 {yields} 0, J = 3 {yields} 2, and J = 5 {yields} 4 line fluxes measured with the Green Bank Telescope, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy, and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, respectively, we model the physical properties of the molecular gas in this galaxy. We find that the full CO spectral line energy distribution is described well by warm, moderate-density gas with T{sub kin} = 86-235 K and n{sub H{sub 2}} = (1.1-3.5) x 10{sup 3} cm{sup -3}. However, it is possible that the highest-J transitions are tracing a small fraction of very dense gas in molecular cloud cores, and two-component models that include a warm/dense molecular gas phase with T{sub kin} {approx} 200 K, n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}10{sup 5} cm{sup -3} are also consistent with these data. Higher signal-to-noise measurements of the J{sub up} {>=} 7 transitions with high spectral resolution, combined with high spatial resolution CO maps, are needed to improve our understanding of the gas excitation, morphology, and dynamics of this interesting high-redshift galaxy.

  18. Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law , Christoph K. Thomas

    2011-09-20

    This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture

  19. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo, Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2003-12-01

    Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

  20. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2004-04-01

    Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fis

  1. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur dAlene Reservation : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.

    2009-09-08

    in the face of anthropogenic influences and prospective climate change. This included recovering the lacustrine-adfluvial life history form that was historically prevalent and had served to provide both resilience and resistance to the structure of cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin. To this end, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe closed Lake Creek and Benewah Creek to fishing in 1993 to initiate recovery of westslope cutthroat trout to historical levels. However, achieving sustainable cutthroat trout populations also required addressing biotic factors and habitat features in the basin that were limiting recovery. Early in the 1990s, BPA-funded surveys and inventories identified limiting factors in Tribal watersheds that would need to be remedied to restore westslope cutthroat trout populations. The limiting factors included: low-quality, low-complexity mainstem stream habitat and riparian zones; high stream temperatures in mainstem habitats; negative interactions with nonnative brook trout in tributaries; and potential survival bottlenecks in Coeur d'Alene Lake. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery (NWPPC Program Measures 10.8B.20). These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fisheries habitat; (3) Conduct an educational/outreach program for the general public within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation to facilitate a 'holistic' watershed protection process; (4) Develop an interim fishery for tribal and non-tribal members of the reservation through construction, operation and maintenance of five trout ponds; (5) Design, construct, operate and maintain a trout production facility; and (6) Implement a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. These

  2. Predicting the impacts of climate change on animal distributions: the importance of local adaptation and species' traits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HELLMANN, J. J.; LOBO, N. F.

    2011-12-20

    The geographic range limits of many species are strongly affected by climate and are expected to change under global warming. For species that are able to track changing climate over broad geographic areas, we expect to see shifts in species distributions toward the poles and away from the equator. A number of ecological and evolutionary factors, however, could restrict this shifting or redistribution under climate change. These factors include restricted habitat availability, restricted capacity for or barriers to movement, or reduced abundance of colonists due the perturbation effect of climate change. This research project examined the last of these constraints - that climate change could perturb local conditions to which populations are adapted, reducing the likelihood that a species will shift its distribution by diminishing the number of potential colonists. In the most extreme cases, species ranges could collapse over a broad geographic area with no poleward migration and an increased risk of species extinction. Changes in individual species ranges are the processes that drive larger phenomena such as changes in land cover, ecosystem type, and even changes in carbon cycling. For example, consider the poleward range shift and population outbreaks of the mountain pine beetle that has decimated millions of acres of Douglas fir trees in the western US and Canada. Standing dead trees cause forest fires and release vast quantities of carbon to the atmosphere. The beetle likely shifted its range because it is not locally adapted across its range, and it appears to be limited by winter low temperatures that have steadily increased in the last decades. To understand range and abundance changes like the pine beetle, we must reveal the extent of adaptive variation across species ranges - and the physiological basis of that adaptation - to know if other species will change as readily as the pine beetle. Ecologists tend to assume that range shifts are the dominant

  3. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. II. GAS-TO-DUST RATIO VARIATIONS ACROSS INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PHASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret; Bot, Caroline; Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine; Hughes, Annie; Hony, Sacha; Wong, Tony; Babler, Brian; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Clayton, Geoffrey C.; Fukui, Yasuo; Galametz, Maud; Galliano, Frederic; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young; Israel, Frank; Li, Aigen; and others

    2014-12-20

    The spatial variations of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) provide constraints on the chemical evolution and lifecycle of dust in galaxies. We examine the relation between dust and gas at 10-50pc resolution in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC) based on Herschel far-infrared (FIR), H I 21cm, CO, and H? observations. In the diffuse atomic interstellar medium (ISM), we derive the GDR as the slope of the dust-gas relation and find GDRs of 380{sub ?130}{sup +250} 3 in the LMC, and 1200{sub ?420}{sup +1600} 120 in the SMC, not including helium. The atomic-to-molecular transition is located at dust surface densities of 0.05 M {sub ?}pc{sup 2} in the LMC and 0.03 M {sub ?}pc{sup 2} in the SMC, corresponding to A {sub V} ? 0.4 and 0.2, respectively. We investigate the range of CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor to best account for all the molecular gas in the beam of the observations, and find upper limits on X {sub CO} to be 6 10{sup 20}cm{sup 2}K{sup 1}km{sup 1} s in the LMC (Z= 0.5 Z {sub ?}) at 15pc resolution, and 4 10{sup 21}cm{sup 2}K{sup 1}km{sup 1} s in the SMC (Z= 0.2 Z {sub ?}) at 45pc resolution. In the LMC, the slope of the dust-gas relation in the dense ISM is lower than in the diffuse ISM by a factor ?2, even after accounting for the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2} in the translucent envelopes of molecular clouds. Coagulation of dust grains and the subsequent dust emissivity increase in molecular clouds, and/or accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains, and the subsequent dust abundance (dust-to-gas ratio) increase in molecular clouds could explain the observations. In the SMC, variations in the dust-gas slope caused by coagulation or accretion are degenerate with the effects of CO-dark H{sub 2}. Within the expected 5-20times Galactic X {sub CO} range, the dust-gas slope can be either constant or decrease by a factor of several across ISM phases. Further modeling and observations are required to break the degeneracy