National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for finned tubes carrying

  1. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sohal, Manohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2005-12-20

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  2. Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sohal, Monohar S.; O'Brien, James E.

    2004-09-14

    A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

  3. Performance investigation of finned tube condensers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, G.D.

    1996-12-31

    A computer program has been developed to optimize the performance of finned tube condensers. The developed program is used to predict the thermal and hydrodynamic performance of finned tube condensers. The model is based on a steady-state finite difference model. The correlations for predicting the heat transfer and pressure drop are used from the literature. In this paper, the performance of a condenser of a 2-1/2 ton residential air conditioning system (split type) is optimized. The working fluid used in this investigation is R-22. ASHRAE`s condition A [Outside 95 F DBT/75 F WBT; Inside 80 F/67 F WBT] is used in this investigation. The predicted performance of the condenser is within {+-}5% of the experimental data.

  4. Fouling of HVAC fin and tube heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, Jeffrey; Carey, Van P.

    2001-07-01

    Fin and tube heat exchangers are used widely in residential, commercial and industrial HVAC applications. Invariably, indoor and outdoor air contaminants foul these heat exchangers. This fouling can cause decreased capacity and efficiency of the HVAC equipment as well as indoor air quality problems related to microbiological growth. This paper describes laboratory studies to investigate the mechanisms that cause fouling. The laboratory experiments involve subjecting a 4.7 fins/cm (12 fins/inch) fin and tube heat exchanger to an air stream that contains monodisperse particles. Air velocities ranging from 1.5-5.2 m/s (295 ft/min-1024 ft/min) and particle sizes from 1--8.6 {micro}m are used. The measured fraction of particles that deposit as well as information about the location of the deposited material indicate that particles greater than about 1 {micro}m contribute to fouling. These experimental results are used to validate a scaling analysis that describes the relative importance of several deposition mechanisms including impaction, Brownian diffusion, turbophoresis, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and gravitational settling. The analysis is extended to apply to different fin spacings and particle sizes typical of those found in indoor air.

  5. Heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops for R-134a and an ester lubricant mixture in a smooth tube and a micro-fin tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckels, S.J.; Doerr, T.M.; Pate, M.B.

    1998-10-01

    This paper reports average heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops during the evaporation and condensation of mixtures of R-134a and a 150 SUS penta erythritol ester branched-acid lubricant. The smooth tube and micro-fin tube tested in this study had outer diameters of 9.52 mm (3/8 in.). The micro-fin tube had 60 fins, a fin height of 0.2 mm (0.008 in), and a spiral angle of 18{degree}. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the micro-fin tube with R-134a and to determine the effect of circulating lubricant. The experimental results show that the micro-fin tube has distinct performance advantages over the smooth tube. For example, the average heat transfer coefficients during evaporation and condensation in the micro-fin tube were 50--200% higher than those for the smooth tube, while the average pressure drops were on average only 10--50% higher. The experimental results indicate that the presence of a lubricant degrades the average heat transfer coefficients during both evaporation and condensation at high lubricant concentrations. Pressure drops during evaporation increased with the addition of a lubricant in both tubes. For condensation, pressure drops were unaffected by the addition of a lubricant.

  6. A comparison of the heat transfer and pressure drop performance of R-134a-lubricant mixtures in different diameter smooth tubes and micro-fin tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckels, S.J.; Doerr, T.M.; Pate, M.B.

    1998-10-01

    The average heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops during evaporation and condensation are reported for mixtures of R-134a and an ester lubricant in tubes of 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) outer diameter. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the performance of the R-134a-lubricant mixtures in these tubes and determine the performance benefits of the micro-fin tube. The performance benefits of the tubes with 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) outer diameter are compared to those of smaller tubes with 9.52 mm (3/8 in.) outer diameter. The lubricant used was a 169 SUS penta erythritol ester mixed-acid lubricant. The lubricant concentration was varied from 0--5.1% in the mixture. The average heat transfer coefficients in the 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) micro-fin tube were 50--150% higher than those for the 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) smooth tube, while pressure drops in the micro-fin tube were 5% to 50% higher than in the smooth tube. The addition of lubricant degraded the average heat transfer coefficients in all cases except during evaporation at low lubricant concentrations. Pressure drops were always increased with the addition of lubricant. The experimental results also indicate that tube diameter has some effect on the performance benefits of the micro-fin tube over that of the smooth tube.

  7. Thermal behavior of spiral fin-and-tube heat exchanger having fly ash deposit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuntaphan, Atipoang; Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat

    2007-08-15

    This research investigates the effect of fly-ash deposit on thermal performance of a cross-flow heat exchanger having a set of spiral finned-tubes as a heat transfer surface. A stream of warm air having high content of fly-ash is exchanging heat with a cool water stream in the tubes. In this study, the temperature of the heat exchanger surface is lower than the dew point temperature of air, thus there is condensation of moisture in the air stream on the heat exchanger surface. The affecting parameters such as the fin spacing, the air mass flow rate, the fly-ash mass flow rate and the inlet temperature of warm air are varied while the volume flow rate and the inlet temperature of the cold water stream are kept constant at 10 l/min and 5 C, respectively. From the experiment, it is found that as the testing period is shorter than 8 h the thermal resistance due to the fouling increases with time. Moreover, the deposit of fly-ash on the heat transfer surface is directly proportional to the dust-air ratio and the amount of condensate on heat exchange surface. However, the deposit of fly-ash is inversely proportional to the fin spacing. The empirical model for evaluating the thermal resistance is also developed in this work and the simulated results agree well with those of the measured data. (author)

  8. In-tube heat transfer and pressure drop of R-134a and ester lubricant mixtures in a smooth tube and a micro-fin tube. Part 1: Evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckels, S.J.; Doerr, T.M.; Pate, M.B.

    1994-12-31

    In-tube heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops during evaporation are reported for mixtures of refrigerant R-134a and a penta erythritol ester mixed-acid lubricant. The ester lubricant was tested at viscosities of 169 SUS and 369 SUS over a lubricant concentration range of 0% to 5% in both a smooth tube and a micro-fine tube. The average saturation temperature used was 1 C (33.8 F). Measurements were taken for the refrigerant-lubricant mixture over a mass flux range of 85 kg/m{sup 2}{center_dot}s (62,700 lb/ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h) to 375 kg/m{sup 2}{center_dot}s (276,640 lb/ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h) in test tubes with an outer diameter of 9.52 mm (3/8 in.). Heat transfer coefficients during evaporation increased at low concentrations of the 169-SUS ester lubricant and then dropped off at high lubricant concentrations in both the smooth tube and the micro-fin tube. The higher viscosity 369-SUS lubricant decreased the heat transfer coefficients in both tubes over the range of lubricant concentrations tested. Pressure drops during evaporation increased in both the smooth tube and the micro-fin tube with the addition of ester lubricant of either viscosity. The heat transfer coefficients for the micro-fin tube were 100% to 50% higher than those for the smooth tube, with the higher values occurring at low mass fluxes. Pressure drops in the micro-fin tube were 10% to 20% higher than those in the smooth tube.

  9. Retention sleeve for a thermal medium carrying tube in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Norman Douglas (Ballston Lake, NY); Czachor, Robert Paul (Cincinnati, OH)

    2003-01-01

    Multiple tubes are connected to steam supply and spent cooling steam return manifolds for supplying cooling steam to buckets and returning spent cooling steam from the buckets to the manifolds, respectively. The tubes are prevented from axial movement in one direction by flanges engaging end faces of the spacer between the first and second-stage wheels. Retention sleeves are disposed about cantilevered ends of the tubes. One end of the retention sleeve engages an enlarged flange on the tube, while an opposite end is spaced axially from an end face of the adjoining wheel, forming a gap, enabling thermal expansion of the tubes and limiting axial displacement of the tube in the opposite direction.

  10. Heat exchanger with transpired, highly porous fins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kutscher, Charles F.; Gawlik, Keith

    2002-01-01

    The heat exchanger includes a fin and tube assembly with increased heat transfer surface area positioned within a hollow chamber of a housing to provide effective heat transfer between a gas flowing within the hollow chamber and a fluid flowing in the fin and tube assembly. A fan is included to force a gas, such as air, to flow through the hollow chamber and through the fin and tube assembly. The fin and tube assembly comprises fluid conduits to direct the fluid through the heat exchanger, to prevent mixing with the gas, and to provide a heat transfer surface or pathway between the fluid and the gas. A heat transfer element is provided in the fin and tube assembly to provide extended heat transfer surfaces for the fluid conduits. The heat transfer element is corrugated to form fins between alternating ridges and grooves that define flow channels for directing the gas flow. The fins are fabricated from a thin, heat conductive material containing numerous orifices or pores for transpiring the gas out of the flow channel. The grooves are closed or only partially open so that all or substantially all of the gas is transpired through the fins so that heat is exchanged on the front and back surfaces of the fins and also within the interior of the orifices, thereby significantly increasing the available the heat transfer surface of the heat exchanger. The transpired fins also increase heat transfer effectiveness of the heat exchanger by increasing the heat transfer coefficient by disrupting boundary layer development on the fins and by establishing other beneficial gas flow patterns, all at desirable pressure drops.

  11. Carrie Noonan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carrie Noonan received her BSEE degree from California State University, Fresno, and her MBA degree from the University of Colorado, Boulder in international marketing and finance and her law...

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A REPRODUCIBLE SCREENING METHOD TO DETERMINE THE MECHANISM AND EFFECT OF ORGANIC ACIDS AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS ON THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM-FINNED COPPER-TUBE HEAT EXCHANGE COILS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Corbett; Dave Severance

    2005-02-01

    Formicary corrosion is an insidious form of localized pitting corrosion. Notoya (1997b) wrote, ?In Japan, this type of corrosion is found in approximately 10% of cases of premature failure of copper tubes.? Attack characteristically features very small surface pits which are not visible to the un-aided eye, and random directional changes in the underlying copper metal. Attack is rapid. Failures have occurred before installation, shortly thereafter, or within several years later. Objectives of this Research Project Conduct an in depth literature search on the subject of formicary corrosion. Define the corrosion mechanism. Develop a test method that will reproduce formicary corrosion. Develop a test method for screening candidate materials that could cause formicary corrosion.

  13. Tube Bank C - metal wastage: status report, August 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Experimental Pressurised Fluidized Bed Combustion Facility at Grimethorpe, South Yorkshire, UK incorporates an in-bed tube bank. During the operation of the facility between June and September 1982, an unexpectedly high degree of metal wastage occurred from the external surfaces of this tube bank. Measures were taken to reduce the rate of metal wastage and extend the life of the tube bank, which was subsequently replaced in July 1983 after a total operating period of 1222 hours of coal burning. Using small-scale fluidized bed cold models, experimental investigations were carried out to determine measures to reduce the metal wastage. The results indicated that metal wastage would be reduced by the following changes: a reduction in the fluidizing velocity; the attachment of studs or axial fins to the tubes; a reduction in the height of the space between the distributor plate and the bottom of the tube bank; and the elimination, where possible of any large gaps within the tube bank. Such changes have been incorporated into the design of the replacement tube bank. This has now been installed and has experienced significantly less metal wastage. 9 references, 6 tables, 34 figures.

  14. Fin-line horn antenna

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reindel, John

    1990-01-01

    A fin line circuit card containing a fin line slot feeds a dipole antenna ich extends a quarterwave outside the waveguide and provides an energy beam focal point at or near the open end of the waveguide. The dipole antenna thus maintains a wide and nearly constant beamwidth, low VSWR and a circular symmetric radiation pattern for use in electronic warfare direction finding and surveillance applications.

  15. Flow visualisation in inclined louvered fins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T'Joen, C.; De Paepe, M. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University-UGent, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Jacobi, A. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    In this study the flow within an interrupted fin design, the inclined louvered fin, is investigated experimentally through visualisation. The inclined louvered fin is a hybrid of the offset strip fin and standard louvered fin, aimed at improved performance at low Reynolds numbers for compact heat exchangers. The flow behaviour is studied in six geometrically different configurations over a range of Reynolds numbers and quantified using the concept of 'fin angle alignment factor'. The transition from steady laminar to unsteady flow was studied in detail. The fin geometry had a very large impact on the transitional flow behaviour, especially on vortex shedding. (author)

  16. Method for laser welding a fin and a tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Mahoney, A. Roderick; Milewski, John O

    2001-01-01

    A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

  17. Carrie Farberow | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Farberow Carrie Farberow Postdoctoral Researcher Carrie.Farberow@nrel.gov | 303-384-7882 Research Interests Designing improved heterogeneous catalysts for chemical reactions important in addressing energy and environmental challenges Elucidating reaction mechanisms using combined computational and experimental techniques Microkinetic and kinetic modeling to predict catalyst activity and selectivity under reaction conditions Developing improved models to bridge the pressure gap and materials gap

  18. Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plant: Phase 1, Task 2 topical report---Grimethorpe tube bundle E'' wastage evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kegel, W.

    1989-08-01

    Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) took part in a pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) test program at the Grimethorpe PFBC facility in England. FWDC's participation included generating data to assess comparative wear rates and patterns on several different tubing alloys and surface protection techniques. The alloys and protection techniques are being used in, or are planned for, commercial atmospheric and pressurized fluidized bed boilers. Tubular specimens which were grouped into ten classes: carbon steel; finned carbon steel; finned 2-1/4%Cr-1%Mo; finned and studded carbon steel; finned and studded 2-1/4%Cr-1%Mo; finned and studded Type 347H stainless steel; chromized carbon steel; chromized 2-1/4%Cr-1%Mo; finned, studded and chromized carbon steel; and finned, studded and chromized 2-1/4%Cr-1%Mo. The materials are typical of those normally used in boiler service for carrying water, generating steam, and superheating steam. The test program and spanned approximately 1400 operating hours and was composed of three test sequences. Each test in the A2 series was run with a different fuel feedstock. The first utilized a UK coal (dry); the second evaluated a US coal/water mixture (slurry); the third test employed a UK coal slurry. Test runs with UK coal included a limestone sorbent while dolomite was used in the second test sequence. Exposed test specimens were removed for independent surface scale analysis before FWDC began metal wastage evaluations. The specimens were then inspected visually, analyzed dimensionally, and examined metallographically. 5 refs., 75 figs., 14 tabs.

  19. Carrie Eckert | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eckert Carrie Eckert Scientist IV Carrie.Eckert@nrel.gov | 303-384-6891 Research Interests Development of genetic tools for analysis and metabolic engineering of diverse microbes CO and CO2 metabolism Hydrogenases and H2 metabolism Engineering novel microbial platforms for biofuels/bioproducts Development of high throughput screening and selection methods Affiliated Research Programs Development of a genetic system in Chloroflexus aurantiacus to utilize syngas feedstocks (collaborator, PI

  20. Ion plated electronic tube device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meek, T.T.

    1983-10-18

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by ion plating techniques. The process is carried out in an automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  1. Thermoelectric generator with hinged assembly for fins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Purdy, David L.; Shapiro, Zalman M.; Hursen, Thomas F.; Maurer, Gerould W.

    1976-11-02

    A cylindrical casing has a central shielded capsule of radioisotope fuel. A plurality of thermonuclear modules are axially arranged with their hot junctions resiliently pressed toward the shield and with their cold junctions adjacent a transition member having fins radiating heat to the environment. For each module, the assembly of transition member and fins is hinged to the casing for swinging to permit access to and removal of such module. A ceramic plate having gold layers on opposite faces prevents diffusion bonding of the hot junction to the shield.

  2. Protective tubes for sodium heated water tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Essebaggers, Jan

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which water tubes are heated by liquid sodium which minimizes the results of accidental contact between the water and the sodium caused by failure of one or more of the water tubes. A cylindrical protective tube envelopes each water tube and the sodium flows axially in the annular spaces between the protective tubes and the water tubes.

  3. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Naidu, Balachandar; Ziminksy, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2013-08-13

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  4. Multiple tube premixing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Varatharajan, Balachandar; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Yilmaz, Ertan; Lacy, Benjamin; Stevenson, Christian; Felling, David

    2012-12-11

    The present application provides a premixer for a combustor. The premixer may include a fuel plenum with a number of fuel tubes and a burner tube with a number of air tubes. The fuel tubes extend about the air tubes.

  5. Uniform Fin Sizes versus Uniform Fin Root Temperatures for Unsymmetrically Obstructed Solar Probe RTGs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Noravian, Heros

    1991-08-01

    Paper presented at the 26th IECEC, August 4-9, 1991 in Boston, MA. The Solar Probe will approach the sun within four solar radii or 0.02 AU. Because of that proximity, the spacecraft must be protected by a thermal shield. The protected umbra is a cone of 4 m diameter and 7.5 m height, and all temperature-sensitive flight components must fit within that cone. Therefore, the RTGs which power the Solar probe cannot be separated from each other and from other payload components by deploying them on long booms. They must be located near and thermally isolated from the spacecraft's paylod. This paper compares the performance of such variable-fin RTGs with that of uniform-fin RTGs. It derives the fin dimensions required for circumferential isothermicity, identifies a design that maximizes the RTGs specific power, and proves the practicality of that design option. However, detailed thermal and electrical analyses led to the somewhat surprising conclusion that (for a given thermal power) the non-uniform-fin design results in the same power output, at a higher maximum hot-junction temperature, as the standard uniform-fin design, despite the latter's nonuniform cold-junction temperatures. There are three copies in the file.

  6. Electron tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suyama, Motohiro; Fukasawa, Atsuhito; Arisaka, Katsushi; Wang, Hanguo

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  7. Neutron tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  8. QUANTIZING TUBE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, A.S.; Gray, G.W.

    1958-07-01

    Beam deflection tubes are described for use in switching or pulse amplitude analysis. The salient features of the invention reside in the target arrangement whereby outputs are obtained from a plurality of collector electrodes each correspondlng with a non-overlapping range of amplitudes of the input sigmal. The tube is provded with mcans for deflecting the electron beam a1ong a line in accordance with the amplitude of an input signal. The target structure consists of a first dymode positioned in the path of the beam wlth slots spaced a1ong thc deflection line, and a second dymode posltioned behind the first dainode. When the beam strikes the solid portions along the length of the first dymode the excited electrons are multiplied and collected in separate collector electrodes spaced along the beam line. Similarly, the electrons excited when the beam strikes the second dynode are multiplied and collected in separate electrodes spaced along the length of the second dyode.

  9. Tube furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Kenneth G.; Frohwein, Eugene J.; Taylor, Robert W.; Bowen, David W.

    1991-01-01

    A vermiculite insulated tube furnace is heated by a helically-wound resistance wire positioned within a helical groove on the surface of a ceramic cylinder, that in turn is surroundingly disposed about a doubly slotted stainless steel cylindrical liner. For uniform heating, the pitch of the helix is of shorter length over the two end portions of the ceramic cylinder. The furnace is of large volume, provides uniform temperature, offers an extremely precise programmed heating capability, features very rapid cool-down, and has a modest electrical power requirement.

  10. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.; Olson, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  11. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashcroft, John; Campbell, Brian; DePoy, David

    1998-01-01

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell.

  12. Tube-in-tube thermophotovoltaic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashcroft, J.; Campbell, B.; DePoy, D.

    1998-06-30

    A thermophotovoltaic device includes at least one thermal radiator tube, a cooling tube concentrically disposed within each thermal radiator tube and an array of thermophotovoltaic cells disposed on the exterior surface of the cooling tube. A shell having a first end and a second end surrounds the thermal radiator tube. Inner and outer tubesheets, each having an aperture corresponding to each cooling tube, are located at each end of the shell. The thermal radiator tube extends within the shell between the inner tubesheets. The cooling tube extends within the shell through the corresponding apertures of the two inner tubesheets to the corresponding apertures of the two outer tubesheets. A plurality of the thermal radiator tubes can be arranged in a staggered or an in-line configuration within the shell. 8 figs.

  13. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  14. Carrie Goodson | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carrie Goodson Carrie Goodson Carrie Goodson Research Technician E-mail: cgoodson@wustl.edu Website: Washington University Research and Technical Associates...

  15. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Oglesby, Ken

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  16. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  17. REACTOR COOLANT TUBE SEAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, W.J.

    1958-12-01

    A plle-flattenlng control element and a fluid seal therefore to permit movement of the element into a liquld contnining region of a neutronlc reactor are described. The device consists of flattened, thin-walled aluminum tubing contalnlng a uniform mixture of thermal neutron absorbing material, and a number of soft rubber closures for the process tubes, having silts capable of passing the flattened elements therethrough, but effectively sealing the process tubes against fluld leaknge by compression of the rubber. The flattened tubing is sufficiently flexible to enable it to conform to the configuratlon of the annular spacing surrounding the fuel elements ln the process tubes.

  18. Integral finned heater and cooler for stirling engines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John A.

    1984-01-01

    A piston and cylinder for a Stirling engine and the like having top and bottom meshing or nesting finned conical surfaces to provide large surface areas in close proximity to the working gas for good thermal (addition and subtraction of heat) exchange to the working gas and elimination of the usual heater and cooler dead volume. The piston fins at the hot end of the cylinder are perforated to permit the gas to pass into the piston interior and through a regenerator contained therein.

  19. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  20. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  1. dc-plasma-sprayed electronic-tube device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meek, T.T.

    1982-01-29

    An electronic tube and associated circuitry which is produced by dc plasma arc spraying techniques is described. The process is carried out in a single step automated process whereby both active and passive devices are produced at very low cost. The circuitry is extremely reliable and is capable of functioning in both high radiation and high temperature environments. The size of the electronic tubes produced are more than an order of magnitude smaller than conventional electronic tubes.

  2. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Outwater, John O. (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  3. Coiled Tubing Safety Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, W.

    1999-04-06

    This document addresses safety concerns regarding the use of coiled tubing as it pertains to the preservation of personnel, environment and the wellbore.

  4. Wound tube heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  5. Underbalanced coiled tubing sidetrack successful

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam, J.; Berry, M.

    1995-12-18

    The technique of drilling through a completion string, underbalanced, with coiled tubing eliminated some of the problems encountered with overbalanced drilling in a group of offset wells. This project confirmed that performing drilling operations in live wells can be carried out safely and effectively. Dalen is a sour gas field in the eastern part of The Netherlands and produces from vertical fractures in the Zechstein carbonate reservoir. The proposal for Dalen 2 was to abandon the lower section of the original hole and subsequently sidetrack conventionally to the top of the reservoir, run and cement a 5-in. liner, complete the well with a 5-in. monobore completion, and install the christmas tree. This part of the operation would be performed with a workover hoist. Thereafter, a 3 3/4-in. hole would be drilled through the completion and into the reservoir, underbalanced with coiled tubing. The drilling proposal had to address a number of key issues: creating underbalanced conditions; handling sour gas production at surface; handling and treating drilling fluids at surface; removing drilled solids from the returned fluid system; and deploying a long coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) into a live well. The paper discusses planning, legislative issues, well preparation, the drilling program, and lessons learned.

  6. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  7. Tube bank wastage in the Grimethorpe pressurized fluidized-bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The coal-fired pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) at Grimethorpe, England, was run for over 3600 hours of combustion testing under the joint sponsorship of the governments of the Federal Republic of Germany, the United Kingdom, and the US. Early in the course of these tests, significant metal wastage was experienced, especially on the inbed heat transfer tubes. This paper describes the modifications to design and new alloys which were tested in the PFBC. Operating conditions for three tube banks are given. A new tube bank, D, has been designed which incorporates a variety of alloy types, a number of tubes designed to operate at higher temperatures than those typical of the rest of the tube bank, and some tubes fitted with fins. The datum fluidizing velocity has been reduced to 0.8 m/sec. The effects of these variables: metal surface temperature, alloy chromium content, fin or stud arrangements, and fluidizing velocity, will be investigated in a continuing program funded by British Coal and the Central Electricity Generating Board of the UK, with some participation from the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute. 3 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  8. Brazed aluminum, Plate-fin heat exchangers for OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foust, H.D.

    1980-12-01

    Brazed aluminum plate-fin heat exchangers have been available for special applications for over thirty years. The performance, compactness, versatility, and low cost of these heat exchangers has been unequaled by other heat exchanger configuration. The application of brazed aluminum has been highly limited because of necessary restrictions for clean non-corrosive atmospheres. Air and gas separation have provided ideal conditions for accepting brazed aluminum and in turn have benefited by the salient features of these plate-fin heat exchangers. In fact, brazed aluminum and cryogenic gas and air separation have become nearly synonymous. Brazed aluminum in its historic form could not be considered for a seawater atmosphere. However, technology presents a new look of significant importance to OTEC in terms of compactness and cost. The significant technological variation made was to include one-piece hollow extensions for the seawater passages. Crevice corrosion sites are thereby entirely eliminated and pitting corrosion attack will be controlled by an integral and sacrificial layer of a zinc-aluminum alloy. This paper on brazed aluminum plate-fin heat exchangers for OTEC will aquaint the reader with the state-of-art and variations suggested to qualify this form of aluminum for seawater use. In order to verify the desirable cost potential for OTEC, Trane teamed with Westinghouse to perform an OTEC system analysis with this heat exchanger. These results are very promising and reported in detail elsewhere.

  9. Novel Tube-in-Tube System Simplifies Subsurface Fluid Sampling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Geothermal Geothermal Find More Like This Return to Search Novel Tube-in-Tube System Simplifies Subsurface Fluid Sampling Lawrence Berkeley National...

  10. Penetrameter positioner for bore-side radiography of tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Earl V. (Oak Ridge, TN); Foster, Billy E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A positioner is provided for placing plaque or wire penetrameters, as used in radiographic inspection, in close proximity with the inner wall of tubing at any desired location along the tubing. The positioner head carrying the penetrameter is inflatable whereby it is positioned in the deflated condition, inflated to place the penetrameter against a weld to be inspected in the tubing wall, and then deflated during removal. If desired, the penetrameter holder may be used to center the radiographic source on the axis of the tube.

  11. Penetrameter positioner for bore-side radiography of tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, E.V.; Foster, B.E.

    1980-02-05

    A positioner is provided for placing plaque or wire penetrameters, as used in radiographic inspection, in close proximity with the inner wall of tubing at any desired location along the tubing. The positioner head carrying the penetrameter is inflatable whereby it is positioned in tte deflated condition, inflated to place the penetrameter against a weld to be inspected in the tubing wall, and then deflated during removal. If desired, the penetrameter holder may be used to center the radiographic source on the axis of the tube.

  12. Coiled tubing apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baugh, B.F.

    1981-05-05

    Disclosed are coiled tubing apparatus for operating on wells. A tubing injector head is supported on a mast and is moveable to selected elevations along the mast. The mast includes a lower section maintained in upright orientation, and an upper section which is pivotally joined to the lower section. The injector head may be lowered below the pivot point and the mast folded for transportation purposes. A chain drive maneuvers the injector head in one horizontal direction, and a fluid pressure cylinder maneuvers the injector head in a second horizontal direction generally orthogonal to the first. The chain drive is fitted with a worm gear coupling to positively lock the injector head in position. A height-adjustable level wind tubing guide directs the tubing onto or off of a reel. The base of the apparatus is fitted with a track along which a blowout preventer may be moved for subsequent positioning over a well.

  13. Helically coiled tube heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, A.M.

    1981-08-18

    In a heat exchanger such as a steam generator for a nuclear reactor, two or more bundles of helically coiled tubes are arranged in series with the tubes in each bundle integrally continuing through the tube bundles arranged in series therewith. Pitch values for the tubing in any pair of tube bundles, taken transverse to the path of the reactor coolant flow about the tubes, are selected as a ratio of two unequal integers to permit efficient operation of each tube bundle while maintaining the various tube bundles of the heat exchanger within a compact envelope. Preferably, the helix angle and tube pitch parallel to the path of coolant flow are constant for all tubes in a single bundle so that the tubes are of approximately the same length within each bundle.

  14. Coiled tubing operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworsky, A.S. II )

    1991-11-01

    Coiled tubing offers many advantages over conventional jointed tubing used for drilling in oil fields, including time savings, pumping flexibility, fluid placement, reduced formation damage and safety. The article gives an overview of coiled tubing history and development. Operating concepts are explained, along with descriptions of the major equipment and components associated with coiled tubing use in the oil field today.

  15. Coiled tubing working life prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Failure of coiled tubing, due to the repeated bending and plastic deformation of coiled tubing on and off the reel and gooseneck, is of great concern in coiled tubing operations. This paper discusses the coiled tubing working life based on one of the coiled tubing life models published in the literature, and compares the results with other models. Certain agreements are found among these models. A group of curves is presented to illustrate the coiled tubing working life affected by coiled tubing size and wall thickness, internal pressure, yield strength, reel diameter, gooseneck radius, operation condition (corrosion) and butt-welded connection (stress concentration). The results show that coiled tubing life can be greatly increased by increasing CT wall thickness and CT strength, while the coiled tubing working life decreases under high internal pressure, corrosion, and butt-weld conditions. These curves can be easily used in estimating coiled tubing life for the field use.

  16. Downhole pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.

    1997-12-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary design study to explore the plausibility of using pulse tube refrigeration to cool instruments in a hot down-hole environment. The original motivation was to maintain Dave Reagor`s high-temperature superconducting electronics at 75 K, but the study has evolved to include three target design criteria: cooling at 30 C in a 300 C environment, cooling at 75 K in a 50 C environment, cooling at both 75 K and 30 C in a 250 C environment. These specific temperatures were chosen arbitrarily, as representative of what is possible. The primary goals are low cost, reliability, and small package diameter. Pulse-tube refrigeration is a rapidly growing sub-field of cryogenic refrigeration. The pulse tube refrigerator has recently become the simplest, cheapest, most rugged and reliable low-power cryocooler. The authors expect this technology will be applicable downhole because of the ratio of hot to cold temperatures (in absolute units, such as Kelvin) of interest in deep drilling is comparable to the ratios routinely achieved with cryogenic pulse-tube refrigerators.

  17. Fluorescent Tube Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP temporarily suspended its energy efficiency requirements for fluorescent tube lamps as it evaluates the market impact of the pending 2012 minimum efficiency standards for fluorescent lamps. The program will issue updated energy efficiency requirements when the market distribution of this product category stabilizes and when doing so has the potential to result in significant Federal energy savings.

  18. Methods and criteria for safety analysis (FIN L2535)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    In response to the NRC request for a proposal dated October 20, 1992, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) submit this proposal to provide contractural assistance for FIN L2535, ``Methods and Criteria for Safety Analysis,`` as specified in the Statement of Work attached to the request for proposal. The Statement of Work involves development of safety analysis guidance for NRC licensees, arranging a workshop on this guidance, and revising NRC Regulatory Guide 3.52. This response to the request for proposal offers for consideration the following advantages of WSRC in performing this work: Experience, Qualification of Personnel and Resource Commitment, Technical and Organizational Approach, Mobilization Plan, Key Personnel and Resumes. In addition, attached are the following items required by the NRC: Schedule II, Savannah River Site - Job Cost Estimate, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 1, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 2, Project Description.

  19. Porous coolant tube holder for fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT)

    1981-01-01

    A coolant tube holder for a stack of fuel cells is a gas porous sheet of fibrous material adapted to be sandwiched between a cell electrode and a nonporous, gas impervious flat plate which separates adjacent cells. The porous holder has channels in one surface with coolant tubes disposed therein for carrying coolant through the stack. The gas impervious plate is preferably bonded to the opposite surface of the holder, and the channel depth is the full thickness of the holder.

  20. Collapse pressure of coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-09-01

    The collapse pressure is a measure of an external force required to collapse a tube in the absence of internal pressure. It is defined as the minimum pressure required to yield the tube in the absence of internal pressure. Coiled tubing is sometimes used in high-pressure wells. If the external pressure becomes too high, the coiled tubing will collapse. This could not only lead to serious well-control problems, but may result in extensive fishing operations. A reliable safety criterion of collapse pressure for the coiled tubing is needed by the coiled tubing operators. Theoretical models of collapse pressure are well developed for perfectly round coiled tubing but not for oval coiled tubing. Coiled tubing is initially manufactured with nearly perfect roundness, sometimes having a small ovality (typically {le} 0.5%). Perfectly round CT becomes oval owing to the plastic mechanical deformation of the coiled tubing as it spooled on and off the reel and over the gooseneck. As the cycling continues, the ovality usually increases. This ovality significantly decreases the collapse failure pressure as compared to perfectly round tubing. In this paper, an analytical model of collapse pressure for oval tubing under axial tension or compression is developed based on elastic instability theory and the von Mises criterion. The theoretical model shows satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  1. Produce through coiled tubing to keep marginal wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The use of coiled tubing as an alternate production tubing string has been attempted or considered by numerous operators in the past. However, its use has been tempered due to several problems known to be inherent with coiled tubing recompletions. Some of the problems encountered are: Killing the well to allow for tubing installation always carries the risk of formation damage; Candidate wells normally are marginal producers and may not produce sufficient revenue to justify the cost of a major workover; Procedures followed to install surface equipment may be hazardous; Previous installation designs required running the coiled tubing to the top of the tree, affecting the functional loss of all existing wellhead equipment; Often substandard modifications were required to reconnect into existing production facilities. However, a prototype spool and tubing hanger that incorporated modifications designed to solve these problems has been developed jointly by Reeled Tubing, Inc., and Well-head Control Systems. The solution is a new concept in the coiled tubing hanger. The design incorporates a floating element, which is a combination slip bowl, seal element and retaining sub. The entire assembly is installed and activated in the bore of a specially designed spool installed between the primary and secondary master valves of the existing wellhead.

  2. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.

    1982-07-02

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  3. Induction plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, Donald E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    An induction plasma tube having a segmented, fluid-cooled internal radiation shield is disclosed. The individual segments are thick in cross-section such that the shield occupies a substantial fraction of the internal volume of the plasma enclosure, resulting in improved performance and higher sustainable plasma temperatures. The individual segments of the shield are preferably cooled by means of a counterflow fluid cooling system wherein each segment includes a central bore and a fluid supply tube extending into the bore. The counterflow cooling system results in improved cooling of the individual segments and also permits use of relatively larger shield segments which permit improved electromagnetic coupling between the induction coil and a plasma located inside the shield. Four embodiments of the invention, each having particular advantages, are disclosed.

  4. Joined concentric tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

  5. Concentric tube support assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubio, Mark F.; Glessner, John C.

    2012-09-04

    An assembly (45) includes a plurality of separate pie-shaped segments (72) forming a disk (70) around a central region (48) for retaining a plurality of tubes (46) in a concentrically spaced apart configuration. Each segment includes a support member (94) radially extending along an upstream face (96) of the segment and a plurality of annularly curved support arms (98) transversely attached to the support member and radially spaced apart from one another away from the central region for receiving respective upstream end portions of the tubes in arc-shaped spaces (100) between the arms. Each segment also includes a radial passageway (102) formed in the support member for receiving a fluid segment portion (106) and a plurality of annular passageways (104) formed in the support arms for receiving respective arm portions (108) of the fluid segment portion from the radial passageway and for conducting the respective arm portions into corresponding annular spaces (47) formed between the tubes retained by the disk.

  6. TUBE SHEARING VALVE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilner, L.B.

    1960-05-24

    Explosive operated valves can be used to join two or more containers in fluid flow relationship, one such container being a sealed reservoir. The valve is most simply disposed by mounting it on the reservoir so thst a tube extends from the interior of the reservoir through the valve body, terminating at the bottom of the bore in a closed end; other containers may be similarly connected or may be open connected, as desired. The piston of the valve has a cutting edge at its lower end which shears off the closed tube ends and a recess above the cutting edge to provide a flow channel. Intermixing of the fluid being transferred with the explosion gases is prevented by a copper ring at the top of the piston which is force fitted into the bore at the beginning of the stroke. Although designed to avoid backing up of the piston at pressures up to 10,000 psi in the transferred fluid, proper operation is independent of piston position, once the tube ends were sheared.

  7. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.; Ferrante, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface. 8 figs.

  8. Vehicle for carrying an object of interest

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W. Thor; Ferrante, Todd A.

    1998-01-01

    A vehicle for carrying an object of interest across a supporting surface including a frame having opposite first and second ends; a first pair of wheels fixedly mounted on the first end of the frame; a second pair of wheels pivotally mounted on the second end of the frame; and a pair of motors borne by the frame, each motor disposed in driving relation relative to one of the pairs of wheels, the motors propelling the vehicle across the supporting surface.

  9. Ballistic electron transport calculation of strained germanium-tin fin field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, H.-S.; Liu, C. W.

    2014-05-12

    The dependence of ballistic electron current on Sn content, sidewall orientations, fin width, and uniaxial stress is theoretically studied for the GeSn fin field-effect transistors. Alloying Sn increases the direct ? valley occupancy and enhances the injection velocity at virtual source node. (112{sup ¯}) sidewall gives the highest current enhancement due to the rapidly increasing ? valley occupancy. The non-parabolicity of the ? valley affects the occupancy significantly. However, uniaxial tensile stress and the shrinkage of fin width reduce the ? valley occupancy, and the currents are enhanced by increasing occupancy of specific indirect L valleys with high injection velocity.

  10. Cooling system having reduced mass pin fins for components in a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J

    2014-03-11

    A cooling system having one or more pin fins with reduced mass for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The cooling system may include one or more first surfaces defining at least a portion of the cooling system. The pin fin may extend from the surface defining the cooling system and may have a noncircular cross-section taken generally parallel to the surface and at least part of an outer surface of the cross-section forms at least a quartercircle. A downstream side of the pin fin may have a cavity to reduce mass, thereby creating a more efficient turbine airfoil.

  11. Large-diameter coiled tubing completions decrease risk of formation damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, V. ); Edens, F. ); Coker, G. ); King, G. )

    1992-07-20

    Amoco Production Co. has used large-diameter coiled tubing strings to avoid damaging gas wells with kill fluids. The coiled tubing is stripped in the gas well under pressure. In Amoco's case, the gas flows up the tubing/casing annulus. The coiled tubing string provides a way to blow down the well whenever the well loads up with liquids from completion, workover, or naturally produced fluids. This paper reports that to date, Amoco has installed coiled tubing in four wells. The oldest has 18 months of service. Although some turbine longevity questions must be answered, the first four completions have proven fast and trouble free. The basic equipment for handling coil tubing is shown. The transport trailer and tubing injector head are similar to standard servicing equipment and not considered experimental. The production tubing reel is capable of carrying 14,000 ft of 2-in tubing or 18,000 ft of 1 3/4-in. tubing. For shallower wells, multiple tubing strings can be would on the same spool. Because of handling difficulties of large tubing, spools must be wound at the factory. Most of the largest sizes are made to order, making lead time a necessary consideration.

  12. Method for producing a tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Rohde, Steven B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Turner, Timothy S.

    2007-01-02

    A method is described for producing tubular substrates having parallel spaced concentric rings of electrical conductors that can be used as the drift tube of an Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS). The invention comprises providing electrodes on the inside of a tube that are electrically connected to the outside of the tube through conductors that extend between adjacent plies of substrate that are combined to form the tube. Tubular substrates are formed from flexible polymeric printed wiring board materials, ceramic materials and material compositions of glass and ceramic, commonly known as Low Temperature Co-Fired Ceramic (LTCC). The adjacent plies are sealed together around the electrode.

  13. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, J.L.; Stephens, R.K. )

    1992-09-01

    This paper reports on coiled tubing units which are used for many types of remedial well operations, including sand plugbacks, cement squeezes, fill cleanouts, underreaming, acid stimulations, and fishing. Fishing operations include removal of inflatable bridge plugs, lock mandrels stuck in profile nipples, coiled tubing, coiled tubing bottomhole assemblies (BHAs) and wireline. Recommended guidelines for selecting candidates, proper tool string configuration and operational techniques are presented here to assist coiled tubing supervisors and company representatives in the planning and implementation of efficient and effective fishing operations. Treatment of these areas are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather generally representative of common applications. Each fishing operation requires individualized analysis and planning.

  14. Coiled tubing. operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, C.M. )

    1992-11-01

    Coiled tubing is being used with increasing frequency in conventional or traditional production operations. Demand for coiled pipe in these types of applications is expected to experience rapid growth as standard 2 (3/8) and 2 (7/8)-in. OD tubing sizes and units equipped to run larger pipe become more readily available. This paper reports on a recent market survey which indicated that coiled tubing used for velocity strings and standard production tubing installations are two areas with the most potential for immediate and near-term expansion. Other applications include: well casing and liners, gravel packing, artificial lift, flowlines and pipelines.

  15. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  16. Hydrogen Tube Trailers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Delivery » Gaseous Hydrogen » Hydrogen Tube Trailers Hydrogen Tube Trailers Trucks that haul gaseous hydrogen are called tube trailers. Gaseous hydrogen is compressed to pressures of 180 bar (~2,600 psig) or higher into long cylinders that are stacked on a trailer that the truck hauls. This gives the appearance of long tubes, hence the name tube trailer. Tube trailers are currently limited to pressures of 250 bar by U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. Steel tube

  17. FLUID-COOLED HEAT SINK WITH IMPROVED FIN AREAS AND EFFICENCIES...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search FLUID-COOLED HEAT SINK WITH IMPROVED FIN AREAS AND ... Contact GRANT About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary A heat transfer device ...

  18. Equations determine coiled tubing collapse pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avakov, V.; Taliaferro, W.

    1995-07-24

    A set of equations has been developed for calculating pipe collapse pressure for oval tubing such as coiled tubing. When coiled tubing is placed onto a reel, the tubing is forced into an oval shape and never again returns to perfect roundness because the coiling process exceeds the plasticity limits of the tubing. Straightening the tubing for the trip into the well does not restore roundness. The consequence of this physical property is that all coiled tubing collapse pressure calculations should be made considering oval tubing, not round tubing. Tubing collapse can occur when formation pressure against the coiled tubing exceeds the collapse resistance inherent in the coiled tubing. As coiled tubing becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more oval in shape, it becomes more susceptible to collapse from outside pressure.

  19. Coiled tubing - Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gronseth, J.M. )

    1993-04-01

    Drilling with a continuous (rather than jointed) drill string is an old concept that is gaining new attention as a result of recent advances made in coiled tubing and drilling technology. The development of larger diameter, reliable, high-strength coiled tubing and smaller diameter, positive displacement motors, orienting tools, surveying systems and fixed cutting drill bits have given drilling with a continuous drill string a capability that was previously unattainable. Like its many other uses, (e.g., squeeze cementing, wellbore cleanouts, flow initiation, logging) the continuity of coiled tubing gives it several advantages over conventional drill strings. These include: drilling underbalanced safely, significantly reduced trip time, continuous circulation, smaller surface requirements. Coiled tubing drilling operations have smaller surface lease requirements than most conventional rigs due to the smaller footprint of the coiled tubing unit and associated equipment. Current coiled tubing drilling operations have the following limitations: conventional rig assistance is required for well preparation; conventional rigs must assist in running long protective and production casing strings or liners; hole sizes are smaller; working depth capabilities are shallower, coiled tubing life is less. This paper goes on to discuss the history of continuous drill strings and includes information on tubing units, circulating systems, drilling fluids, well control systems, downhole tools, orientation tools, and bottomhole assemblies. It then gives a cost comparison and an application of this type of drilling.

  20. Widget:YouTube | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This widget displays a YouTube video. Parameters id - the YouTube video id (this is the v parameter or the code at the end of the YouTube url. width - the width of video...

  1. Eddy current signal comparison for tube identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, S. W. E-mail: Ratko.Vojvodic@areva.com; Vojvodic, R. E-mail: Ratko.Vojvodic@areva.com

    2015-03-31

    Inspection of nuclear power plant steam generator tubes is required to justify continued safe plant operation. The steam generators consist of thousands of tubes with nominal diameters of 15 to 22mm, approximately 1mm wall thickness, and 20 to 30m in length. The tubes are inspected by passing an eddy current probe through the tubes from tube end to tube end. It is critical to know exactly which tube identification (row and column) is associated with each tube's data. This is controlled by a precision manipulator that provides the tube ID to the eddy current system. Historically there have been some instances where the manipulator incorrectly reported the tube ID. This can have serious consequences including lack of inspection of a tube, or if a pluggable indication is detected, the tube is likely to be mis-plugged thereby risking a primary to secondary leak.

  2. Method of making straight fuel cell tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borglum, Brian P. (Edgewood, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for making straight fuel cell tubes are disclosed. Extruded tubes comprising powders of fuel cell material and a solvent are dried by rotating the extruded tubes. The rotation process provides uniform circumferential drying which results in uniform linear shrinkage of the tubes. The resultant dried tubes are very straight, thereby eliminating subsequent straightening steps required with conventional processes. The method is particularly useful for forming inner air electrode tubes of solid oxide fuel cells.

  3. Titanium vs. traditional coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The development of composite and titanium pipe has the potential to eliminate many of the issues facing coiled-tubing (CT) work on platforms with restricted lift capability in the North Sea, such as the time to mobilize and set up the CT reel, additional personnel requirements, and weather dependence. A number of methods are available to overcome reel-weight limitations when conventional steel Ct is used. These include Ct welding, split reels, boat spooling, and tube/tube connectors. These factors are discussed then the paper discusses results from 3 field tests on gas and oil wells.

  4. Power Tube Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Tube Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Power Tube Inc Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77060 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Texan geothermal systems developer. Has...

  5. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Bakulin, Andrey

    2009-10-13

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  6. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  7. Vertical tube liquid pollutant separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, W.M.

    1982-06-08

    A plurality of elongated hollow, circular, foraminous substantially vertical tubes contiguously stacked transversely to the direction flowing liquid such as waste water containing foreign matter, I.E., settable solids and free oil, in a coalescer-separator apparatus provide a filter body providing for significant surface area contact by the liquid on both inside and outside surfaces of the tubes to entrap the foreign matter but defining substantially vertical passages permitting the entrapped foreign matter to be gravity separated with the lighter matter coalescing and floating upwardly and the heavier matter settling downwardly so that substantially clarified effluent flows from the apparatus. The stacked tube filter body is contained within an insulated closed container of a sufficient capacity, and the arrays of holes in the tube walls are coordinated with respect to the intended volumetric capacity of the apparatus, so that turbulence in the liquid flowing through the filter body is minimized.

  8. Photomultiplier tube gain regulating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Wayne F.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved system for regulating the gain of a photomultiplier tube, and was designed for use with the photomultiplier tubes of a GeMSAEC fast analyzers. It has the following advantages over the prior system: noise is virtually eliminated; sample analysis can begin after 3 to 4 revolutions of the rotor; fluorescent and light scattering solutions can be used as a reference; and the reference solution can be in any cuvette on the rotor.

  9. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, J.L. ); Whitlow, R.R. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that pulling tubing to clean out a production liner at Prudhoe Bay Unit Western Operating Area (PBU WOA) averages $600,000 to $800,000. Coiled tubing underreaming was developed to accomplish this objective at lower costs. Beginning in 1988, these operations have been improved through several generations of procedures and tool designs. Using current technology, the underreamer, in conjunction with coiled tubing, can reduce the cost of drilling out to a liner to about $50,000 or $100,000, depending on the amount and type of material to be removed. PBU WOA, operated by BP Exploration, produces about 600,000 bopd from 395 wells. Another 61 wells are used to inject produced water, seawater and miscible fluids. Most of the remedial well servicing operations are conducted using coiled tubing (CT). Three contract coiled tubing units (CTUs) work daily, performing wellbore cleanouts, stimulations, inflatable bridge plug installations and cement squeeze operations. About 42 underreaming jobs were performed from 1990 to 1991 at PBU WOA for an average cost of between $75,000 and $100,000, a cost savings of $500,000 power well compared to pulling tubing and cleaning out the wells conventionally.

  10. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  11. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  12. From: Talley, Carrie To: Congestion Study Comments Subject:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Talley, Carrie To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Transmission Line Congestion study ... Thank you, Carrie Talley 3796 Hwy MM Mexico, MO 65265 ...

  13. Reducing the risk, complexity and cost of coiled tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, L.

    1999-07-01

    Drilling vertical well extensions with coiled tubing, particularly in the underbalanced state, exploits the inherent strengths of coiled tubing including: The ability to enter slim holes against a live well head; The use of small equipment that is fast to rig up and down; and The ability to trip quickly and maintain a steady pressure downhole with continuous circulation. Coiled tubing has successfully been used to deepen hundreds of wells, yet this application has only received sporadic attention. There are some very important technical considerations when drilling non-directionally with coiled tubing that must be addressed to ensure a commercially successful job. A recent vertical drilling job carried out in Western Australia illustrates the critical engineering aspects of an underbalanced, non-directional, coiled tubing drilling job. This job was completed for Arc Energy in April 1999 and produced a well that stabilized at 1.1 MMcfd, where three other wells drilled conventionally into these zones had shown only trace amounts of hydrocarbon.

  14. Coiled tubing - Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, D.A.; Blue, T.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Sand production can severely impact well performance and profitability by damaging production equipment or plugging wellbores. Sand control in existing wells may be required because of inadequate initial completion design, recompletion to new intervals or changes in reservoir production characteristics. The most durable and reliable sand control is by conventional gravel packing, but in some cases, conventional packs may not be economic or feasible. Improvements in coiled tubing technology and reliability have resulted in better application and increased acceptance of through-tubing sand control. Concentric gravel packing and sand consolidation are being used more because of advances in equipment, services, downhole tools and fluids. Candidates for these techniques include conventional completions that begin producing sand and wells with gravel pack failures. Economical jobs have been performed successfully in several different wellbore configurations. Some initially non-gravel packed wells are now being designed for possible through-tubing gravel packing, anticipating sand production later in the completion's producing life. This paper reviews the general procedures for installing a through-tubing, washdown mechanical gravel pack using coiled tubing conveyance and placement techniques.

  15. Inspecting coiled tubing for well operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gard, M.F.; Pasternack, E.S.; Smith, L.J.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes improvement in a coiled tubing system for insertion of a substantially continuous bendable length of metal tubing into and withdrawal from a wellbore, the system including a tubing injection unit disposed for injecting the length of tubing into the well bore and storage means for dispensing the length of tubing and receiving the length of tubing from the injection unit. The improvement includes: tubing inspection apparatus for substantially continuously inspecting the wall section of the tubing to detect cracks and structural defects which may lead to tubing failure, the apparatus comprising: a source of electromagnetic radiation mounted in proximity to the tubing between the injection unit and a wellhead into which the tubing is injected; a radiation detector unit for receiving signals from the source which have been projected through the wall of the tubing; means for receiving signals form the detector unit for monitoring the structural integrity o the wall of the tubing during one of injecting and withdrawing the tubing with respect to the wellhead; and housing means supported for rotation about a longitudinal axis of the tubing.

  16. Coiled tubing -- Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II ); Blount, C.G. ); Tailby, R.J. )

    1993-06-01

    This paper reviews three industry authority's views on developments that will impact coiled tubing equipment and techniques for conventional land locations, Arctic and harsh offshore environments. Examples which are provided include the development of high-strength steels, composite pipe, integral lift devices, abrasive jet drilling, and extended reach drilling. It discusses the application of coiled tubing to well completion and maintenance, including the applications to plugged pipelines. The use of new steels and alloys help increase the corrosion resistance of the drilling stem along with greater load-bearing capacity. The economic advantages of coiled drilling versus jointed tubing drilling is somewhat more questionable as the cost for downhole motors and directional tools remain prohibitively high and borehole diameters remain small.

  17. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.T.; Wimberly, R.D.

    1992-10-01

    Oil and gas wells that flow on initial completion eventually reach a condition of liquid loading that kills the wells. This results form declining reservoir pressure, decreased gas volume (velocity), increased water production and other factors that cause liquids to accumulate at the bottom of the well and exert back pressure on the formation. This restricts or in some cases prevents fluid entry into the wellbore form the formation. Flowing production can be restored or increased by reducing surface backpressure, well bore stimulation, pressure maintenance or by installing a string of smaller diameter tubing. This paper reports on installation (hanging off) of a concentric string of coiled tubing inside existing production tubing which is an economically viable, safe, convenient and effective alterative for returning some of these liquid loaded )logged-up) wells to flowing status.

  18. End Calorimeter Warm Tube Heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primdahl, K.; /Fermilab

    1991-08-06

    The Tevatron accelerator beam tube must pass through the End Calorimeter cryostats of the D-Zero Collider Detector. Furthermore, the End Calorimeter cryostats must be allowed to roll back forty inches without interruption of the vacuum system; hence, the Tev tube must slide through the End Calorimeter cryostat as it is rolled back. The Tev pass through the End Calorimeter can actually be thought of as a cluster of concentric tubes: Tev tube, warm (vacuum vessel) tube, IS layers of superinsulation, cold tube (argon vessel), and Inner Hadronic center support tube. M. Foley generated an ANSYS model to study the heat load. to the cryostat. during collider physics studies; that is, without operation of the heater. A sketch of the model is included in the appendix. The vacuum space and superinsulation was modeled as a thermal solid, with conductivity derived from tests performed at Fermilab. An additional estimate was done. by this author, using data supplied by NR-2. a superinsulation manufacturer. The ANSYS result and hand calculation are in close agreement. The ANSYS model was modified. by this author. to incorporate the effect of the heater. Whereas the earlier model studied steady state operation only. the revised model considers the heater-off steady state mode as the initial condition. then performs a transient analysis with a final load step for time tending towards infinity. Results show the thermal gradient as a function of time and applied voltage. It should be noted that M. Foley's model was generated for one half the warm tube. implying the tube to be symmetric. In reality. the downstream connection (relative to the collision point) attachment to the vacuum shell is via several convolutions of a 0.020-inch wall bellows; hence. a nearly adiabatic boundary condition. Accordingly. the results reported in the table reflect extrapolation of the curves to the downstream end of the tube. Using results from the ANSYS analysis, that is, tube temperature and corresponding heat flux, temperature of the nichrome wire can be estimated. The possibility of frost is of genuine concern, as evidenced by the 250 K minimum temperature for the warm tube while heaters are not operating. Noting that steady state operation at 1 Amp (40 volts) allows the nichrome wire to stay below the critical temperature for Kapton, a conservative plan is to allow several days of heater operation, at 1 Amp (40 volts), before roll-back. Warm-up can be accelerated by operating the heaters in excess of 1 Amp, as evidenced by the test where a maximum of 3.2 Amp was supplied. Operating the heaters in excess of 1 Amp must be done with care since a rapid rise in temperature will likely occur once any ice present has been melted.

  19. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II )

    1991-12-01

    This article outlines the minimum safety requirements that should be considered for onshore and offshore oil well service operations with coiled tubing equipment. These guidelines comply with Minerals Management Service (MMS) regulations issued on May 31, 1988, for offshore work. Where specific MMS regulations are sited, the regulation reference, Incident of Non-Compliance (INC), number is provided. These guidelines can be used by operators and contractors, and although U.S. offshore operations are emphasized, they are applicable wherever coiled tubing services are used.

  20. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II )

    1992-03-01

    Operations involving sand or solids washing are the most common of today's coiled tubing workover services. Wellbore cleanouts require pumping fluid that will entrain solids and return them to the surface. In most cases, wash fluids and solids are captured in surface tanks of sufficient volume to allow solids to settle out. Where practical, fluids are recirculated to reduce cost. An important concern when designing sand wash programs is correct fluid system selection. Wash fluids should closely balance BHP and provide piston like displacement for solids removal. This paper is an overview of compressible and incompressible fluids commonly used for coiled tubing services.

  1. Opposed slant tube diabatic sorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erickson, Donald C.

    2004-01-20

    A sorber comprised of at least three concentric coils of tubing contained in a shell with a flow path for liquid sorbent in one direction, a flow path for heat transfer fluid which is in counter-current heat exchange relationship with sorbent flow, a sorbate vapor port in communication with at least one of sorbent inlet or exit ports, wherein each coil is coiled in opposite direction to those coils adjoining it, whereby the opposed slant tube configuration is achieved, with structure for flow modification in the core space inside the innermost coil.

  2. Coiled tubing 1994: Enhanced value through innovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teel, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the growth in use of coiled tubing in well completion and development processes. Larger tubing is now available and operations expand into more demanding and critical areas as a result of research and development, innovation, and better understanding of materials and tube development. This article highlights significant coiled tubing operations, services, practices, and applications since 1990. It describes the types of materials used in coiled tubing and the strength associated with each type. Various case studies are described which use this tubing in both horizontal and directional drilling. It also is discussed as it relates to various types of enhanced recovery techniques for oil and gas wells.

  3. Coiled-tubing logging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, E.P.; Smith, L.J.; Blount, C.G.

    1988-03-01

    Techniques have been developed to use coiled tubing containing a seven-conductor wireline to facilitate logging operations. Equipment has been designed to permit the connection of conventional logging tools to the tubing and the recording of logs. Operating techniques have been developed and applied under various wellbore conditions. The system allows traditional log measurements in a well while wellbore conditions are controlled. Advantages of the system include reduced wellbore pressure during peroration to maximize perforation performance; lubrication during pulling or pushing a logging tool through a borehole so that a more uniform velocity can be maintained with a logging sonde; continued circulation and thus borehole stability during logging; temperature reduction for improved reliability of logging sonde electronics in hot holes; and more stable positioning of perforation equipment. The ability of coiled tubing to push tools down highly deviated or horizontal wellbores makes logging or perforating feasible in these wells. Expenses can often be reduced with coiled-tubing logging because a rig is unnecessary during many operations.

  4. Coiled-tubing logging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, E.P.; Smith, L.J.; Blount, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques have been developed which use coiled tubing containing a seven-conductor wireline to facilitate logging operations. Equipment has been designed which permits the connection of conventional logging tools to the tubing and the recording of logs. Also, operating techniques have been developed and applied under various wellbore conditions. The system allows traditional log measurements in a well while controlling wellbore conditions. Advantages of the system include: reduced wellbore pressure during perforation to minimize formation damage: lubrication while pulling or pushing a logging tool through a borehole so that a more uniform velocity can be maintained with a logging sonde; continued circulation and thus borehole stability while logging; temperature reduction for improved reliability of logging sonde electronics in hot holes; and more stable positioning of perforation equipment. The ability of coiled tubing to push tools down highly deviated, or even horizontal wellbores, makes logging or perforating feasible in these wells. Expenses can often be reduced with coiled-tubing logging, since a rig is unnecessary during many operations.

  5. Apparatus for connecting aligned abutted tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, R.E.

    1984-11-29

    An apparatus for connecting abutted tubes and for maintaining their rotary alignment during connection. The apparatus comprises first and second tubes, a rotation prevention element, a collar and a retainer. Each tube has inside and outside walls, and first and second ends, each end having an inside and outside edge. The first tube has portions defining a first plurality of cavities located at the outside edge of its first end. An external threaded portion is on the outside wall of the first tube and next to the first plurality of cavities. The second tube has portions defining a second plurality of cavities located at the outside edge of its first end. The first plurality has a different number than the second plurality. The first ends of the first and second tubes have substantially the same outside diameter and are abutted during connection so that an orifice is formed whenever first and second tube cavities substantially overlap. A rotation prevension element is placed in the orifice to prevent rotation of the first and second tubes. A collar with an internal threaded portion is slidably disposed about the second tube. The internal threaded portion engages the external threaded portion of the first tube to connect the tubes. A lip connected to the collar prevents separation of the collar from the second tube.

  6. Conceptual optimization using genetic algorithms for tube in tube structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pârv, Bianca Roxana; Hulea, Radu; Mojolic, Cristian

    2015-03-10

    The purpose of this article is to optimize the tube in tube structural systems for tall buildings under the horizontal wind loads. It is well-known that the horizontal wind loads is the main criteria when choosing the structural system, the types and the dimensions of structural elements in the majority of tall buildings. Thus, the structural response of tall buildings under the horizontal wind loads will be analyzed for 40 story buildings and a total height of 120 meters; the horizontal dimensions will be 30m × 30m for the first two optimization problems and 15m × 15m for the third. The optimization problems will have the following as objective function the cross section area, as restrictions the displacement of the building< the admissible displacement (H/500), and as variables the cross section dimensions of the structural elements.

  7. Small bore ceramic laser tube inspection light table

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Updike, Earl O.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for inspecting small bore ceramic laser tubes, which includes a support base with one or more support rollers. A fluorescent light tube is inserted within the laser tube and the laser tube is supported by the support rollers so that a gap is maintained between the laser tube and the fluorescent tube to enable rotation of the laser tube. In operation, the ceramic tube is illuminated from the inside by the fluorescent tube to facilitate visual inspection. Centering the tube around the axial light of the fluorescent tube provides information about straightness and wall thickness of the laser tube itself.

  8. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J; Coico, Patrick A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-04-01

    A cooling apparatus for an electronics rack is provided which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures and a tube. The heat exchanger, which is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of distinct, coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and a coolant outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  9. Directly connected heat exchanger tube section and coolant-cooled structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Coico, Patrick A.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2015-09-15

    A method is provided for fabricating a cooling apparatus for cooling an electronics rack, which includes an air-to-liquid heat exchanger, one or more coolant-cooled structures, and a tube. The heat exchanger is associated with the electronics rack and disposed to cool air passing through the rack, includes a plurality of coolant-carrying tube sections, each tube section having a coolant inlet and outlet, one of which is coupled in fluid communication with a coolant loop to facilitate flow of coolant through the tube section. The coolant-cooled structure(s) is in thermal contact with an electronic component(s) of the rack, and facilitates transfer of heat from the component(s) to the coolant. The tube connects in fluid communication one coolant-cooled structure and the other of the coolant inlet or outlet of the one tube section, and facilitates flow of coolant directly between that coolant-carrying tube section of the heat exchanger and the coolant-cooled structure.

  10. Coiled tubing solves multiple downhole problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedford, S. ); Smith, I. )

    1994-11-01

    Declining reservoir pressure and water breakthrough in the UK North Sea Magnus field has coincided with general advances in application of coiled tubing and a continuous drive to reduce operating costs, particularly in a climate of weak oil prices. These factors have led to a dramatic increase in diversity and volume of coiled tubing interventions. In the following article, coiled tubing interventions, and results of those interventions, are discussed. An assessment of future coiled tubing activity on Magnus field is provided.

  11. Vacuum tube era: 1946-60

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacuum tube era Vacuum tube era: 1946-60 The eminent Hungarian mathematician, John von Neumann, introduced Los Alamos to the world's first electronic digital "computer," the ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer). The ENIAC was used to perform calculations to design and build the hydrogen bomb. July 10, 2015 Vacuum tubes Vacuum tubes "Highly accurate 3D computing is a Holy Grail of the Stockpile Stewardship Program's supercomputing efforts. As the weapons age, 3D

  12. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeMario, E.E.; Lawson, C.N.

    1993-11-23

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs. 7 figures.

  13. Spring/dimple instrument tube restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeMario, Edmund E.; Lawson, Charles N.

    1993-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly for a pressurized water nuclear reactor has a spring and dimple structure formed in a non-radioactive insert tube placed in the top of a sensor receiving instrumentation tube thimble disposed in the fuel assembly and attached at a top nozzle, a bottom nozzle, and intermediate grids. The instrumentation tube thimble is open at the top, where the sensor or its connection extends through the cooling water for coupling to a sensor signal processor. The spring and dimple insert tube is mounted within the instrumentation tube thimble and extends downwardly adjacent the top. The springs and dimples restrain the sensor and its connections against lateral displacement causing impact with the instrumentation tube thimble due to the strong axial flow of cooling water. The instrumentation tube has a stainless steel outer sleeve and a zirconium alloy inner sleeve below the insert tube adjacent the top. The insert tube is relatively non-radioactivated inconel alloy. The opposed springs and dimples are formed on diametrically opposite inner walls of the insert tube, the springs being formed as spaced axial cuts in the insert tube, with a web of the insert tube between the cuts bowed radially inwardly for forming the spring, and the dimples being formed as radially inward protrusions opposed to the springs.

  14. Manual tube-to-tubesheet welding torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiefer, Joseph H.; Smith, Danny J.

    1982-01-01

    A welding torch made of a high temperature plastic which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and the back side of a tube plate and has a ballooned end in which an electrode, filler wire guide, fiber optic bundle, and blanketing gas duct are disposed.

  15. Extrusion of metal oxide superconducting wire, tube or ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dusek, Joseph T. (Lombard, IL)

    1993-01-01

    A process for extruding a superconducting metal oxide composition YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x provides a wire (tube or ribbon) having a cohesive mass and a degree of flexibility together with enhanced electrical properties. Wire diameters in the range of 6-85 mils have been produced with smaller wires on the order of 10 mils in diameter exhibiting enhanced flexibility for forming braided, or multistrand, configurations for greater current carrying capacity. The composition for extrusion contains a polymeric binder to provide a cohesive mass to bind the particles together during the extrusion process with the binder subsequently removed at lower temperatures during sintering. The composition for extrusion further includes a deflocculent, an organic plasticizer and a solvent which also are subsequently removed during sintering. Electrically conductive tubing with an inner diameter of 52 mil and an outer diameter of 87-355 mil has also been produced. Flat ribbons have been produced in the range of 10-125 mil thick by 100-500 mil wide. The superconducting wire, tube or ribbon may include an outer ceramic insulating sheath co-extruded with the wire, tubing or ribbon.

  16. Extrusion of metal oxide superconducting wire, tube or ribbon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dusek, Joseph T.

    1993-10-05

    A process for extruding a superconducting metal oxide composition YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x provides a wire (tube or ribbon) having a cohesive mass and a degree of flexibility together with enhanced electrical properties. Wire diameters in the range of 6-85 mils have been produced with smaller wires on the order of 10 mils in diameter exhibiting enhanced flexibility for forming braided, or multistrand, configurations for greater current carrying capacity. The composition for extrusion contains a polymeric binder to provide a cohesive mass to bind the particles together during the extrusion process with the binder subsequently removed at lower temperatures during sintering. The composition for extrusion further includes a deflocculent, an organic plasticizer and a solvent which also are subsequently removed during sintering. Electrically conductive tubing with an inner diameter of 52 mil and an outer diameter of 87-355 mil has also been produced. Flat ribbons have been produced in the range of 10-125 mil thick by 100-500 mil wide. The superconducting wire, tube or ribbon may include an outer ceramic insulating sheath co-extruded with the wire, tubing or ribbon.

  17. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  18. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  19. Coiled tubing - Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, C.G. )

    1993-05-01

    Perhaps the most exciting area of coil tubing technology in the oil and gas industry is the development and testing of specialized tools for improving existing operations or meeting the requirements of new applications and techniques. A new generation of surface equipment and downhole tools will greatly expand through-tubing well servicing utility. This paper provides descriptions of current peripheral devices for concentric well work. It also includes a look at what's needed to meet future challenges and advance this technology. It specifically discusses various forms of fishing tools, power tongs used for bring drill stem, orienting tools for drilling, downhole adjustment tools, steering tools, well casing materials, perforation tools, and various other support equipment.

  20. Coiled tubing helps gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matheny, S.L. Jr.

    1980-08-11

    To boost production from its gas fields in Lake Erie, Consumers' Gas Co., Toronto, used a giant reel holding a 33,000-ft coil of 1-in. polypropylene-coated steel tubing to lay about 44 miles of control lines that now service 20 wells 17 miles offshore. As the forward motion of the boat unwound the tubing, the reel rig's hydraulic motor served as a brake to maintain the proper tension. This innovative method of laying the lines eliminated more than 80% of the pipe joints, correspondingly reduced the installation labor time, and improved the system's reliability. The two hydraulic-control lines that were laid actuate the gas-gathering line valves, while a hydrate-control line injects each well with methyl alcohol to inhibit hydrate formation.

  1. Coiled tubing; Operations and services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. )

    1993-01-01

    Coiled tubing can be used to wash or spot acid across completion intervals in vertical and high-angle wells. This technique allows easy wellbore cleanout, fluid placement flexibility and convenient flowback, and reduces damage from tubular deposits. Better zone coverage and rapid load recovery can improve well productivity. Oil and gas completions are intended to provide for efficient fluid transfer from permeable zones. When fluid inflow is less than optimum, the blockage or restriction is called 'formation damage,' and production or injection can be significantly affected. Damage mitigation treatments range form simple acid soaks to massive hydraulic fracturing, depending on damage type and severity. This article covers planning, designing and implementing treatments using coiled tubing.

  2. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  3. HIGH CURRENT COAXIAL PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, N.W.

    1960-01-19

    A medium-gain photomultiplier tube having high current output, fast rise- time, and matched output impedance was developed. The photomultiplier tube comprises an elongated cylindrical envelope, a cylindrical anode supported at the axis of the envelope, a plurality of elongated spaced opaque areas on the envelope, and a plurality of light admitting windows. A photo-cathode is supported adjacent to each of the windows, and a plurality of secondary emissive dynodes are arranged in two types of radial arrays which are alternately positioned to fill the annular space between the anode and the envelope. The dynodes are in an array being radially staggered with respect to the dynodes in the adjacent array, the dynodes each having a portion arranged at an angle with respect to the electron path, such that electrons emitted by each cathode undergo multiplication upon impingement on a dynode and redirected flight to the next adjacent dynode.

  4. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  5. Modelling Sawing of Metal Tubes Through FEM Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bort, C. M. Giorgio; Bosetti, P.; Bruschi, S.

    2011-05-04

    The paper presents the development of a numerical model of the sawing process of AISI 304 thin tubes, which is cut through a circular blade with alternating roughing and finishing teeth. The numerical simulation environment is the three-dimensional FEM software Deform v.10.1. The teeth actual trajectories were determined by a blade kinematics analysis developed in Matlab. Due to the manufacturing rolling steps and subsequent welding stage, the tube material is characterized by a gradient of properties along its thickness. Consequently, a simplified cutting test was set up and carried out in order to identify the values of relevant material parameters to be used in the numerical model. The dedicated test was the Orthogonal Tube Cutting test (OTC), which was performed on an instrumented lathe. The proposed numerical model was validated by comparing numerical results and experimental data obtained from sawing tests carried out on an industrial machine. The following outputs were compared: the cutting force, the chip thickness, and the chip contact area.

  6. Coiled tubing 1995 update: Production applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky II; Teel, M.E.

    1995-06-01

    This article reviews the use of coiled tubing in oil and gas well development and servicing. It reviews the new technology in tool development, concentric services, installation, and performance associated with coiled tubing. It provides numerous case studies of various offshore applications of coiled tubing for servicing of live wells without loosing production. Surface equipment and tool modifications allow tool segments to be connected, deployed, and retrieved in one trip. It also reviews the performance of the tubing for sand cleanouts, operation under high pressure environments, and for screen repairs. Finally, the article reviews the use of coiled tubing to enhance artificial lift technology.

  7. Turbine nozzle stage having thermocouple guide tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Greer, SC); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (late of Galway, NY); Lapine, Eric Michael (Northwood, NH)

    2002-01-01

    A guide tube is fixed adjacent opposite ends in outer and inner covers of a nozzle stage segment. The guide tube is serpentine in shape between the outer and inner covers and extends through a nozzle vane. An insert is disposed in the nozzle vane and has apertures to accommodate serpentine portions of the guide tube. Cooling steam is also supplied through chambers of the insert on opposite sides of a central insert chamber containing the guide tube. The opposite ends of the guide tube are fixed to sleeves, in turn fixed to the outer and inner covers.

  8. YouTube | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    YouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, so are our best practices for using it. We welcome feedback and suggestions to keep processes current and up-to-date. For more information, read our social media policy. What is YouTube and Why Should I Use It? YouTube is a video platform that allows users to publish and share videos for both public and private consumption with no hosting cost. Visitors to the site watch over 2 billion videos per day, much of which is

  9. State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    out by electric and gas utilities | Department of Energy and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the energy policy act of 2005. March 2007 PDF icon State and Regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas

  10. State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    out by electric and gas utilities | Department of Energy and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas utilities A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to section 139 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. March 2007 PDF icon State and regional policies that promote energy efficiency programs carried out by electric and gas

  11. Tribune carries magnet recycling story | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribune carries magnet recycling story Ames Tribune staff writer Julie Ferrell talked recently with Ames Laboratory researcher Ikenna Nlebedim about his work in recycling...

  12. Minimum wear tube support hole design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glatthorn, Raymond H. (St. Petersburg, FL)

    1986-01-01

    A minimum-wear through-bore (16) is defined within a heat exchanger tube support plate (14) so as to have an hourglass configuration as determined by means of a constant radiused surface curvature (18) as defined by means of an external radius (R3), wherein the surface (18) extends between the upper surface (20) and lower surface (22) of the tube support plate (14). When a heat exchange tube (12) is disposed within the tube support plate (14) so as to pass through the through-bore (16), the heat exchange tube (12) is always in contact with a smoothly curved or radiused portion of the through-bore surface (16) whereby unacceptably excessive wear upon the heat exchange tube (12), as normally developed by means of sharp edges, lands, ridges, or the like conventionally part of the tube support plates, is eliminated or substantially reduced.

  13. Fluid-cooled heat sink with improved fin areas and efficiencies for use in cooling various devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan; Bennion, Kevin; Kelly, Kenneth; Narumanchi, Sreekant

    2015-04-21

    The disclosure provides a fluid-cooled heat sink having a heat transfer base and a plurality of heat transfer fins in thermal communication with the heat transfer base, where the heat transfer base and the heat transfer fins form a central fluid channel through which a forced or free cooling fluid may flow. The heat transfer pins are arranged around the central fluid channel with a flow space provided between adjacent pins, allowing for some portion of the central fluid channel flow to divert through the flow space. The arrangement reduces the pressure drop of the flow through the fins, optimizes average heat transfer coefficients, reduces contact and fin-pin resistances, and reduces the physical footprint of the heat sink in an operating environment.

  14. Multi-tube arrangement for combustor and method of making the multi-tube arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-07-31

    A fuel injector tube includes a one piece, unitary, polygonal tube having an inlet end and an outlet end. The fuel injector tube further includes a fuel passage extending from the inlet end to the outlet end along a longitudinal axis of the polygonal tube, a plurality of air passages extending from the inlet end to the outlet end and surrounding the fuel passage, and a plurality of fuel holes. Each fuel hole connects an air passage with the fuel passage. The inlet end of the polygonal tube is formed into a fuel tube. A fuel injector includes a plurality of fuel injector tubes and a plate. The plurality of fuel tubes are connected to the plate adjacent the inlet ends of the plurality of fuel injector tubes.

  15. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  16. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  17. Various factors affect coiled tubing limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1996-01-15

    Safety and reliability remain the primary concerns in coiled tubing operations. Factors affecting safety and reliability include corrosion, flexural bending, internal (or external) pressure and tension (or compression), and mechanical damage due to improper use. Such limits as coiled tubing fatigue, collapse, and buckling need to be understood to avoid disaster. With increased use of coiled tubing, operators will gain more experience. But at the same time, with further research and development of coiled tubing, the manufacturing quality will be improved and fatigue, collapse, and buckling models will become more mature, and eventually standard specifications will be available. This paper reviews the uses of coiled tubing and current research on mechanical behavior of said tubing. It also discusses several models used to help predict fatigue and failure levels.

  18. Large Diameter Lasing Tube Cooling Arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jerome P.; Alger, Terry W.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Arnold, Philip A.

    2004-05-18

    A cooling structure (16) for use inside a ceramic cylindrical tube (11) of a metal vapor laser (10) to cool the plasma in the tube (11), the cooling structure (16) comprising a plurality of circular metal members (17,31) and mounting members (18, 34) that position the metal members (17,31) coaxially in the tube (11) to form an annular lasing volume, with the metal members (17, 31) being axially spaced from each other along the length of the tube (11) to prevent the metal members from shorting out the current flow through the plasma in the tube (11) and to provide spaces through which the heat from localized hot spots in the plasma may radiate to the other side of the tube (11).

  19. Large diameter lasing tube cooling arrangement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jerome P. (Livermore, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA); Anderson, Andrew T. (Livermore, CA); Arnold, Phillip A. (Livermore, CA)

    2004-05-18

    A cooling structure (16) for use inside a ceramic cylindrical tube (11) of a metal vapor laser (10) to cool the plasma in the tube (11), the cooling structure (16) comprising a plurality of circular metal members (17, 31) and mounting members (18, 34) that position the metal members (17, 31) coaxially in the tube (11) to form an annular lasing volume, with the metal members (17, 31) being axially spaced from each other along the length of the tube (11) to prevent the metal members from shorting out the current flow through the plasma in the tube (11) and to provide spaces through which the heat from localized hot spots in the plasma may radiate to the other side of the tube (11).

  20. Tube support grid and spacer therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ringsmuth, Richard J.; Kaufman, Jay S.

    1986-01-01

    A tube support grid and spacers therefor provide radially inward preloading of heat exchange tubes to minimize stress upon base welds due to differential thermal expansion. The grid comprises a concentric series of rings and spacers with opposing concave sides for conforming to the tubes and V-shaped ends to provide resilient flexibility. The flexibility aids in assembly and in transmitting seismic vibrations from the tubes to a shroud. The tube support grid may be assembled in place to achieve the desired inwardly radial preloading of the heat exchange tubes. Tab and slot assembly further minimizes stresses in the system. The radii of the grid rings may be preselected to effect the desired radially inward preloading.

  1. Carrying Semiautomatic Pistols with a Round in the Chamber

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-28

    Sets forth requirements for a DOE security police officer who must carry a round in the chamber of a semiautomatic pistol while on duty. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Stabilization of gene expression and cell morphology after explant recycling during fin explant culture in goldfish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais, Nathalie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Labbe, Catherine

    2015-07-01

    The development of fin primary cell cultures for in vitro cellular and physiological studies is hampered by slow cell outgrowth, low proliferation rate, poor viability, and sparse cell characterization. Here, we investigated whether the recycling of fresh explants after a first conventional culture could improve physiological stability and sustainability of the culture. The recycled explants were able to give a supplementary cell culture showing faster outgrowth, cleaner cell layers and higher net cell production. The cells exhibited a highly stabilized profile for marker gene expression including a low cytokeratin 49 (epithelial marker) and a high collagen 1a1 (mesenchymal marker) expression. Added to the cell spindle-shaped morphology, motility behavior, and actin organization, this suggests that the cells bore stable mesenchymal characteristics. This contrast with the time-evolving expression pattern observed in the control fresh explants during the first 2 weeks of culture: a sharp decrease in cytokeratin 49 expression was concomitant with a gradual increase in col1a1. We surmise that such loss of epithelial features for the benefit of mesenchymal ones was triggered by an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process or by way of a progressive population replacement process. Overall, our findings provide a comprehensive characterization of this new primary culture model bearing mesenchymal features and whose stability over culture time makes those cells good candidates for cell reprogramming prior to nuclear transfer, in a context of fish genome preservation. - Highlights: • Recycled fin explants outgrow cells bearing stable mesenchymal traits. • Cell production and quality is enhanced in the recycled explant culture system. • Fresh fin primary culture is highly variable and loose epithelial traits over time.

  3. Missile Captive Carry Monitoring using a Capacitive MEMS Accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Mauss, Fredrick J.; Santiago-Rojas, Emiliano; Amaya, Ivan A.; Skorpik, James R.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Marotta, Steve

    2010-04-08

    Military missiles are exposed to many sources of mechanical vibration that can affect system reliability, safety, and mission effectiveness. One of the most significant exposures to vibration occurs when the missile is being carried by an aviation platform, which is a condition known as captive carry. If the duration of captive carry exposure could be recorded during the missile’s service life, several advantages could be realized. Missiles that have been exposed to durations outside the design envelop could be flagged or screened for maintenance or inspection; lightly exposed missiles could be selected for critical mission applications; and missile allocation to missions could be based on prior use to avoid overuse. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been developing health monitoring systems to assess and improve reliability of missiles during storage and field exposures. Under the direction of AMRDEC staff, engineers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a Captive Carry Health Monitor (CCHM) for the HELLFIRE II missile. The CCHM is an embedded usage monitoring device installed on the outer skin of the HELLFIRE II missile to record the cumulative hours the host missile has been in captive carry mode and thereby assess the overall health of the missile. This paper provides an overview of the CCHM electrical and package design, describes field testing and data analysis techniques used to identify captive carry, and discusses the potential application of missile health and usage data for real-time reliability analysis and fleet management.

  4. Preparation of nitrogen-doped carbon tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chung, Hoon Taek; Zelenay, Piotr

    2015-12-22

    A method for synthesizing nitrogen-doped carbon tubes involves preparing a solution of cyanamide and a suitable transition metal-containing salt in a solvent, evaporating the solvent to form a solid, and pyrolyzing the solid under an inert atmosphere under conditions suitable for the production of nitrogen-doped carbon tubes from the solid. Pyrolyzing for a shorter period of time followed by rapid cooling resulted in a tubes with a narrower average diameter.

  5. Acoustic resonance in heat exchanger tube bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blevins, R.D. )

    1994-02-01

    A series of experiments has been made on aeroacoustic tones produced by flow over tubes in a duct. The sound is characterized by the onset of a loud and persistent acoustic resonance. The acoustic resonance occurs at the frequency of the acoustic modes. The magnitude and extent of the resonance are functions of tube pattern and tube pitch. The sound levels increase in proportion with Mach number, dynamic head and pressure drop. A design procedure for predicting the magnitude of the sound within the tube array is presented. Methods of resonance avoidance are illustrated. An example is made for a large petrochemical heat exchanger.

  6. True Color Tube Borescope Inspection System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-08-07

    The overall purpose of TCTBIS is to determine the quality of the inside surface of a tube. This is done by acquiring multiple images along the inside of a tube and converting these images into one unwrapped image of the inside of a tube. This resultant image is the same as if you had slit a tube length-wise, flattened it out, and then taken a picture of it. What is unique about this system ismore » that the picture is acquired in a non-destructive manner. TCTBIS also analyzes the unwrapped images for oxidation, foreign particles, and surface imperfections, scratches.« less

  7. Loose-tube optical-fiber cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, Mark Edmund; Angers, Tyler Louis; Jonker, Jan Wigger

    2015-01-06

    The present invention relates to loose-tube optical-fiber cables that are capable of operating in high-temperature environments.

  8. Tire with outer groove containing bonded tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welter, Carolin Anna; Chandra, Dinesh; Benedict, Robert Leon

    2016-02-16

    The invention relates generally to a pneumatic rubber tire which contains an outer, annular, circular groove which contains a flexible tube bonded to the walls of the groove.

  9. Eddy current measurement of tube element spacing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Latham, Wayne Meredith; Hancock, Jimmy Wade; Grut, Jayne Marie

    1998-01-01

    A method of electromagnetically measuring the distance between adjacent tube elements in a heat exchanger. A cylindrical, high magnetic permeability ferrite slug is placed in the tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. A bobbin or annular coil type probe operated in the absolute mode is inserted into a second tube adjacent the spacing to be measured. From prior calibrations on the response of the eddy current coil, the signals from the coil, when sensing the presence of the ferrite slug, are used to determine the spacing between the tubes.

  10. GEIGER-MULLER TYPE COUNTER TUBE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, I.L.; Watt, L.A.K.

    1959-12-15

    A single counter tube capable of responding to a wide range of intensities is described. The counter tube comprises a tubular cathode and an anode extending centrally of the cathode. The spacing between the outer surface of the anode and the inner surface of the cathode is varied along the length of the tube to provide different counting volumes in adjacent portions of the tube. A large counting volume in one portion adjacent to a low-energy absorption window gives adequate sensitivity for measuring lowintensity radiation, while a smaller volume with close electrode spacing is provided in the counter to make possible measurement of intense garnma radiation fields.

  11. Winning the fight against boiler tube failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J.; Dooley, B.

    1986-12-01

    Eliminating boiler tube failures could be worth $5 billion a year to the electric power industry. The causes and cures for the great majority of these ubiquitous failures are now known, with implications for change ranging from senior management to the maintenance crew. Methods for preventing boiler tube failure are discussed.

  12. Innovative applications stimulate coiled tubing development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II; Bell, S.

    1996-06-01

    Coiled tubing (CT) is increasingly becoming a viable option to many conventional well operations worldwide. Advanced technology, new equipment and recent field applications have shown CT to be a lower-cost, reliable and effective tool for drilling and recompleting certain wells. Seven example applications from two recent coiled tubing technical conferences are described.

  13. How loads affect coiled tubing life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. Inc., AK )

    1992-01-01

    Fatigue testing was performed on 1-3/4-in OD, 0.125 in. wall thickness (WT) coiled tubing using a standard coiled tubing unit (CTU) as shown in this paper. Testing was conducted under Prudhoe Bay, Alaska oil well, conditions to determine the effects of axial load, internal pressure and bending stress on the longevity, or usable running footage, that can be expected with larger diameter tubing. The CTU was rigged up in a standard configuration with injector head 50 ft off the ground, the worst case for bending on most currently available North Slope units. Internal pressure was supplied by a small triplex pump and the end of tubing was closed off with a fishing neck and bull plug. Weight, for the first four tests, was suspended from the coiled tubing by a special clamp. The tubing was cycled up and over the guide arch until a loss of internal coiled tubing pressure (CTP) occurred, or until the tubing became stuck in the stripper brass.

  14. Erosion-corrosion behavior of PFBC in-bed tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsumita, Yoshi; Namba, Kazuo; Kajigaya, Ichiro; Sonoya, Keiji

    1997-12-31

    In the design and operation of Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion (PFBC) plant, it is important to investigate erosion-corrosion behavior of in-bed heat exchanger tubes, since such phenomena is complicated by interaction of erosion and corrosion due to high operating temperature. Investigations to clarify the erosion-corrosion mechanism of materials were performed by using laboratory test facility and PFBC pilot plant (3MW), to determine the specifications of in-bed tubes and assess their life for the first commercial PFBC plant having a capacity of 360MW. In the laboratory test, erosion-corrosion behavior of wide variety of coated materials, which include thermally sprayed coatings, diffusion coatings and hard metal claddings, and non-coated steel candidates for the typical boiler tubes were evaluated by using fluidized-bed type erosion test rig. The erosion tests were carried out in order to obtain the tanking of candidate materials. And test coupons of candidate materials were also inserted into IHI`s PFBC pilot plant in order to predict the material wastage of actual boiler environment. The following guidelines for selecting the appropriate materials and assessing the life of in-bed tubes were given by these test results. (1) At lower temperature, applying thermal spray coatings is the best solution to protect erosion damage. (2) At higher temperature, materials show enough erosion-corrosion resistance because of the formation of hard oxide scale on the surface. These results have been verified by long-term operational experience of the 71MW Wakamatsu PFBC, which is the first demonstration plant in Japan.

  15. Ultra-fast framing camera tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, Ralph (1051 Batavia Ave., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1981-01-01

    An electronic framing camera tube features focal plane image dissection and synchronized restoration of the dissected electron line images to form two-dimensional framed images. Ultra-fast framing is performed by first streaking a two-dimensional electron image across a narrow slit, thereby dissecting the two-dimensional electron image into sequential electron line images. The dissected electron line images are then restored into a framed image by a restorer deflector operated synchronously with the dissector deflector. The number of framed images on the tube's viewing screen is equal to the number of dissecting slits in the tube. The distinguishing features of this ultra-fast framing camera tube are the focal plane dissecting slits, and the synchronously-operated restorer deflector which restores the dissected electron line images into a two-dimensional framed image. The framing camera tube can produce image frames having high spatial resolution of optical events in the sub-100 picosecond range.

  16. Evolution of coiled tubing drilling technology accelerates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, J.; Adam, B.

    1993-09-01

    This paper reviews the status of coiled tubing technology in oil and gas drilling operations. The paper starts with a description of current coiled tubing technology and provides a cost comparison between conventional and coiled tubing drilling. The results show that offshore operations are already competitive while onshore operations will still lag behind conventional drilling methods. A list of known coiled tubing drilling operations is provided which gives the current borehole diameters and depths associated with this technology. The paper then goes on to provide the advantages and disadvantages of the technology. The advantages include improved well control, a continuous drillstring, reduced mobilization costs, simplified logging and measurement-while drilling measurements, and less tripping required. The disadvantages include high friction with the borehole wall, downhole motors required, limited drillhole size, and fatigued or damaged sections of the tubing cannot be removed. Finally, a review of the reliability of this technology is provided.

  17. Coiled tubing flowline cuts wetlands disturbance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, E.A.; Marinello, S.A.

    1993-12-01

    Operators in environmentally sensitive wetland areas of South Louisiana have used jointed, or stickpipe flowlines to transmit oil and gas to and from wellsites and production facilities. Recently, a new method featuring coiled tubing was introduced, using it as a recyclable gas flowline. The coiled tubing method eliminates potential environmental damage that could occur when stickpipe is used and it allows the tubing to be easily recovered and reused when the well is taken out of service. This article describes economic advantages of using coiled tubing and how its use simplified environmental constraints encountered in swamps. It is an expanded version of the authors` presentation to World Oil`s Coiled Tubing Conference, Houston, March, 1993.

  18. Development and Field Trial of Dimpled-Tube Technology for Chemical Industry Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaroslav Chudnovsky; Aleksandr Kozlov

    2006-10-12

    Most approaches to increasing heat transfer rates in the convection sections of gas-fired process heaters involve the incorporation of fins, baffles, turbulizers, etc. to increase either the heat transfer surface area or turbulence or both. Although these approaches are effective in increasing the heat transfer rates, this increase is invariably accompanied by an associated increase in convection section pressure drop as well as, for heaters firing ‘dirty’ fuel mixtures, increased fouling of the tubes – both of which are highly undesirable. GTI has identified an approach that will increase heat transfer rates without a significant increase in pressure drop or fouling rate. Compared to other types of heat transfer enhancement approaches, the proposed dimpled tube approach achieves very high heat transfer rates at the lowest pressure drops. Incorporating this approach into convection sections of chemical industry fired process heaters may increase energy efficiency by 3-5%. The energy efficiency increase will allow reducing firing rates to provide the required heating duty while reducing the emissions of CO2 and NOx.

  19. Squeeze cement method using coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Underdown, D.R.; Ashford, J.D.; Harrison, T.W.; Eastlack, J.K.; Blount, C.G.; Herring, G.D.

    1986-12-09

    A method is described of squeeze cementing a well wherein the well has a casing throughout the wellbore, casing cement between the casing and the wellbore of the well, perforations through the casing and the casing cement to establish fluid communication between the interior of the casing and a formation adjacent the perforations, channels in the casing cement in fluid communication with at least some of the perforations, a well tubing string in the casing extending from the surface to the proximity of the perforations, and a packer means for sealing between the tubing and the casing above the perforations. The method consists of: isolating the casing adjacent the perforations; lowering a coiled tubing down the well tubing string to a point adjacent the perforations; flowing uncontaminated squeeze cement through the coiled tubing and through the perforations into the channels; flowing a cement contaminating liquid down the coiled tubing to mix with the squeeze cement remaining in the casing; allowing the uncontaminated squeeze cement in the channels to harden; and removing the contaminated squeeze cement from the casing through the coiled tubing.

  20. Particle motion at fluidized bed tube surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drennen, J.F.; Hocking, W.R.; Howard, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    Metal loss from in-bed heat transfer tubes in fluidized bed combustors is recognized as a problem that is affecting the commercialization of FBC technology for coal utilization. A program has been initiated to address the erosion aspect of the wastage problem. Objectives were: (1) to develop a method for measuring the particle impact velocities and mass flux at a fluidized bed tube surface, (2) to obtain wear data from test tubes in an operating cold flow model, and (3) to correlate the results. An instrumented probe was develop during Phase I that could be used to obtain the three orthogonal velocity components and mass flux at a fluidized bed tube surface. The sensors were contained in a 2 inch diameter schedule 40 pipe that can be installed in the cold flow model in place of one of the test tubes. This arrangement allows measurements to be made non-intrusively. The velocity measuring portion used a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) for obtaining the resultant impact velocity and impact angle of the bed particles at the immersed tube surface. Mass flux was derived from the output of a high speed force transducer that measured the individual particle impact momentum signals. The above system was used successfully to measure particle impact velocities and momentum during a limited test program. Test were run in a 1 ft {times} 2 ft ambient temperature fluidized bed test facility using sand and acrylic test tubes. Measurements were taken in the center of the bed at eight circumferential location, by rotating the probe to the desired tube angle. Tube erosion data were also taken at locations corresponding to the above measurement points. The instrumentation provided a wealth of information about the internal hydrodynamics of the fluidized bed. 3 refs., 49 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench Greenville Tube Company, a manufacturer of high-precision, small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page case study summarizes their experience. PDF icon Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench (February 1997) More Documents & Publications Impacts of IPv6 on Infrastructure Control

  2. Multi-tube fuel nozzle with mixing features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Michael John

    2014-04-22

    A system includes a multi-tube fuel nozzle having an inlet plate and a plurality of tubes adjacent the inlet plate. The inlet plate includes a plurality of apertures, and each aperture includes an inlet feature. Each tube of the plurality of tubes is coupled to an aperture of the plurality of apertures. The multi-tube fuel nozzle includes a differential configuration of inlet features among the plurality of tubes.

  3. Examination of hot-carrier stress induced degradation on fin field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yi-Lin Yen, Tzu-Sung; Ku, Chao-Chen; Wu, Tai-Hsuan; Wang, Tzuo-Li; Li, Chien-Yi; Wu, Bing-Tze; Zhang, Wenqi; Hong, Jia-Jian; Wong, Jie-Chen; Yeh, Wen-Kuan; Lin, Shih-Hung

    2014-02-24

    Degradation in fin field-effect transistor devices was investigated in detail under various hot-carrier stress conditions. The threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) shift, substrate current (I{sub B}), and subthreshold swing were extracted to determine the degradation of a device. The power-law time exponent of the V{sub TH} shift was largest at V{sub G}?=?0.3 V{sub D}, indicating that the V{sub TH} shift was dominated by interface state generation. Although the strongest impact ionization occurred at V{sub G}?=?V{sub D}, the V{sub TH} shift was mainly caused by electron trapping resulting from a large gate leakage current.

  4. Starter for inductively coupled plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, D.E.; Bieniewski, T.M.

    1988-08-23

    A starter assembly is provided for use with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tube to reliably initiate a plasma at internal pressures above about 30 microns. A conductive probe is inserted within the inductor coil about the tube and insulated from the tube shield assembly. A capacitive circuit is arranged for momentarily connecting a high voltage radio-frequency generator to the probe while simultaneously energizing the coil. When the plasma is initiated the probe is disconnected from the generator and electrically connected to the shield assembly for operation. 1 fig.

  5. Starter for inductively coupled plasma tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, Donald E.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.

    1988-01-01

    A starter assembly is provided for use with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) tube to reliably initate a plasma at internal pressures above about 30 microns. A conductive probe is inserted within the inductor coil about the tube and insulated from the tube shield assembly. A capacitive circuit is arranged for momentarily connecting a high voltage radio-frequency generator to the probe while simultaneously energizing the coil. When the plasma is initiated the probe is disconnected from the generator and electrically connected to the shield assembly for operation.

  6. Corrosion degradation mechanisms in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, R.D.; Cayard, M.S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the historical aspects related to the development of coiled tubing for oilfield drilling, logging, workover and production operations. It focuses on the metallurgical and process variables of coiled tubing and their interrelationship with aspects of the downhole service environment and the resultant corrosion performance. Special emphasis is placed on (1) operating conditions that can lead to excessive corrosion and/or cracking damage and corrosion fatigue and (2) metallurgical and processing parameters which can be controlled to maximize coiled tubing resistance to corrosion degradation.

  7. Coiled tubing facilitates deep underbalanced workover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, L.S.; Overstreet, C.C.

    1997-03-31

    A recent workover shows the technical capability and cost effectiveness of coiled tubing for cleaning out scale in a 22,611-ft, low pressure, high-temperature gas well. The well, operated by Chevron USA Production Co., is in the Fort Stockton Gas Unit 5-1 Gomez (Ellenburger) field, in West Texas. The development of reliable 100,000-psi minimal yield strength coiled tubing was a major factor that allowed this work to succeed. The methods demonstrated by this workover are becoming a standard for deep well cleanouts in the Gomez (Ellenburger) field. The paper describes coiled tubing advantages, well history, and implementation.

  8. Collapse tests expand coiled tubing uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J.; Mason, C.M. )

    1990-03-05

    Tests on coiled tubing have allowed the authors' company to decrease well work costs for some operations, especially squeeze cementing. They conducted collapse tests of 1.5 in. (0.095 in. and 0.109-in. wall thickness) and 1.75-in. (0.109-in. wall thickness) OD coiled tubing while under imposed axial load and differential pressure. These tests were performed to define accurate field operating limits for this size of coiled tubing. Findings from these tests are reported and discussed.

  9. Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruch, Jeffrey F.; Urban, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated.

  10. Detection and Control of Deposition on Pendant Tubes in Kraft...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detection and Control of Deposition on Pendant Tubes in Kraft Chemical Recovery Boilers Detection and Control of Deposition on Pendant Tubes in Kraft Chemical Recovery Boilers ...

  11. MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine.jpg Technology Profile...

  12. Working session 3: Tubing integrity (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Working session 3: Tubing integrity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Working session 3: Tubing integrity You are accessing a document from the Department ...

  13. Sample inlet tube for ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prior, David [Hermiston, OR; Price, John [Richland, WA; Bruce, Jim [Oceanside, CA

    2002-09-24

    An improved inlet tube is positioned within an aperture through the device to allow the passage of ions from the ion source, through the improved inlet tube, and into the interior of the device. The inlet tube is designed with a larger end and a smaller end wherein the larger end has a larger interior diameter than the interior diameter of the smaller end. The inlet tube is positioned within the aperture such that the larger end is pointed towards the ion source, to receive ions therefrom, and the smaller end is directed towards the interior of the device, to deliver the ions thereto. Preferably, the ion source utilized in the operation of the present invention is a standard electrospray ionization source. Similarly, the present invention finds particular utility in conjunction with analytical devices such as mass spectrometers.

  14. Staged multi-tube premixing injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang; Khan, Abdul Rafey; York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve

    2012-10-02

    A fuel injection nozzle includes a body member having an upstream wall opposing a downstream wall, and an internal wall disposed between the upstream wall and the downstream wall, a first chamber partially defined by the an inner surface of the upstream wall and a surface of the internal wall, a second chamber partially defined by an inner surface of the downstream wall and a surface of the internal wall a first gas inlet communicative with the first chamber operative to emit a first gas into the first chamber, a second gas inlet communicative with the second chamber operative to emit a second gas into the second chamber, and a plurality of mixing tubes, each of the mixing tubes having a tube inner surface, a tube outer surface, a first inlet communicative with an aperture in the upstream wall operative to receive a third gas.

  15. Performance of a tapered pulse tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.; Allen, M.; Woolan, J.J.

    1998-02-01

    In a well instrumented pulse tube refrigerator having 1,500 W of cooling power at 125 K, the authors have measured the figure of merit of a tapered pulse tube at several operating points. At operating points near the operating point for which the taper was designed, the figure of merit is 0.96. This is close to the theoretical optimum figure of merit 0.97 calculated for this pulse tube considering only two loss mechanisms: heat conduction in the metal pulse tube wall and ordinary thermoacoustic heat transport in the gas within a few thermal penetration depths of the wall. At operating points farther from the design operating point, the measured figure of merit is much lower, as streaming driven convection adds a third loss mechanism.

  16. Sidetracking technology for coiled-tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leising, L.J.; Doremus, D.M.; Hearn, D.D.; Rike, E.A.; Paslay, P.R.

    1996-05-01

    Coiled-tubing (CT) drilling is a rapidly growing new technology that has been used for shallow new wells and re-entry applications. Through-tubing drilling has evolved as a major application for CT drilling. The remaining key enabling technology for viable through-tubing drilling is the ability to sidetrack in casing below the tubing tail. This paper describes the three technologies developed for sidetracking and presents a mathematical model of forces, penetration rates, and torques for window milling with the cement-sidetracking (CS) technique. Window milling has been a seat of the pants operation in the past. To the authors` knowledge, this is the first published work on the mechanics of window milling. The results from several yard tests and one field test are presented and show some of the problems associated with sidetracking.

  17. High-Pressure Tube Trailers and Tanks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on High-Pressure Tube Trailers and Tanks for the DOE Hydrogen Delivery High-Pressure Tanks and Analysis Project Review Meeting held February 8-9, 2005 at Argonne National Laboratory

  18. Effect of lubricant on spray evaporation heat transfer performance of R-134a and R-22 in tube bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeykens, S.A.; Pate, M.B.

    1996-11-01

    This study evaluates the effects of lubricant on spray evaporation heat transfer performance. Tests were conducted with refrigerant R-134a and triangular-pitch tube bundles made from enhanced-condensation, enhanced-boiling, low-finned, and plain-surface tubes. A 340-SUS polyol-ester (POE) oil was used for the R-134a testing because this lubricant is being integrated into industry for use with this refrigerant. Refrigerant was sprayed onto the tube bundles with low-pressure-drop, wide-angle nozzles located directly above the bundle. Collector testing was conducted with both R-134a and R-22 to determine the percentage of refrigerant contacting the tue bundle. It was found that small concentrations of the polyol-ester lubricant yielded significant improvement in the heat transfer performance of R-134a. The shell-side heat transfer coefficient was more dependent on lubricant concentration than on film-feed supply rate within the range of the respective parameters evaluated in this study. As expected, pure R-22 results show higher heat transfer coefficients than those obtained with pure R-134a at the same saturation temperature of 2.0 C (35.6 F).

  19. Coiled tubing cuts horizontal screen repair cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crow, W.; Hill, P.; Johnston, R.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a case history of the successful workover performed by a coiled tubing unit (CTU) on Mississippi Canyon (MC) Block 109 Well A-24 in the US Gulf of Mexico to clean out sand and install new concentric screen for sand control. Workover design and operational details discussed are: Workover design -- hole-cleaning hydraulics, CT and screen predictions and comparison considerations; Workover operations -- cleanout, running packer and screens, coiled tubing (CT) weights, acid treatment and nitrogen lift and flow back.

  20. THE FORMATION OF A MAGNETIC CHANNEL BY THE EMERGENCE OF CURRENT-CARRYING MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Chae, Jongchul; Jing Ju; Wang Haimin; Wiegelmann, Thomas E-mail: jcchae@snu.ac.k

    2010-08-10

    A magnetic channel-a series of polarity reversals separating elongated flux threads with opposite polarities-may be a manifestation of a highly non-potential magnetic configuration in active regions. To understand its formation, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the magnetic channel in AR 10930 using data taken by the Solar Optical Telescope/Hinode. As a result, we found upflows (-0.5 to -1.0 km s{sup -1}) and downflows (+1.5 to +2.0 km s{sup -1}) inside and at both tips of the thread, respectively, and a pair of strong vertical currents of opposite polarity along the channel. Moreover, our analysis of the nonlinear force-free fields constructed from the photospheric magnetic field indicates that the current density in the lower corona may have gradually increased as a result of the continuous emergence of the highly sheared flux along the channel. With these results, we suggest that the magnetic channel originates from the emergence of the twisted flux tube that has formed below the surface before the emergence.

  1. Tube construction for fluidized bed combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Feo, Angelo; Hosek, William

    1984-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

  2. Fluidized bed combustor and tube construction therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Feo, Angelo; Hosek, William

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a reactor or a housing which has a windbox distributor plate adjacent the lower end thereof which contains a multiplicity of hole and air discharge nozzles for discharging air and coal into a fluidized bed which is maintained above the distributor plate and below a take-off connection or flue to a cyclone separator in which some of the products of combustion are treated to remove the dust which is returned into the fluidized bed. A windbox is spaced below the fluidized bed and it has a plurality of tubes passing therethrough with the passage of combustion air and fluidizing air which passes through an air space so that fluidizing air is discharged into the reaction chamber fluidized bed at the bottom thereof to maintain the bed in a fluidized condition. A fluid, such as air, is passed through the tubes which extend through the windbox and provide a preheating of the combustion air and into an annular space between telescoped inner and outer tubes which comprise heat exchanger tubes or cooling tubes which extend upwardly through the distributor plate into the fluidized bed. The heat exchanger tubes are advantageously arranged so that they may be exposed in groups within the reactor in a cluster which is arranged within holding rings.

  3. Coiled tubing as initial production tubing: An overview of case histories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nirider, H.L.; Snider, P.M.; Walsh, K.D.; Cordera, J.R.; Williams, J.

    1994-12-31

    From January, 1993 through July, 1994 Marathon Oil, Company completed ten newly drilled gas wells using coiled tubing as the initial production string. This paper reviews the operational aspects of each job and summarizes the areas where improvements in equipment and technique were implemented. The use of coiled tubing allows the tubing size to be closely matched to the performance of these relatively low rate wells, minimizing the tubular costs and improving the well`s ability to stay unloaded. The main areas of improvement from one job to the next involved the use of a pressurized, hydraulically operated access window, ensuring that all frac sand was cleaned out prior to landing the coiled tubing and employing a ``hot cut off`` system to make the final cut on the coil tubing. Lessons learned include keeping the coiled tubing size large enough to run smaller coiled tubing through it for clean out and slickline work, care in closing the BOP rams to avoid damaging the pipe and the use of wellhead equipment specifically designed for coiled tubing. This technique is especially suited to low pressure and water sensitive reservoirs where loss of fluid is of concern. An additional benefit is the cost savings from reducing the hole and casing sizes to match the reservoir potential. This completion technique is often quicker than using a conventional completion rig and jointed tubing.

  4. Ultrasonic liquid-in-line detector for tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piper, Thomas C.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting the presence of liquid in pipes or tubes using ultrasonic techniques A first piezoelectric crystal is coupled to the outside of the pipe or tube at the location where liquid in the tube is to be detected. A second piezoelectric crystal is coupled to the outside of the pipe or tube at the same location along the tube but circumferentially displaced from the first crystal by an angle around the pipe or tube of less than 180.degree.. Liquid in the pipe or tube is detected by measuring the attenuation of an ultrasonic signal sent by the first piezoelectric crystal and received by the second piezoelectric crystal.

  5. Automated Diagnosis and Classification of Steam Generator Tube Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gabe V. Garcia

    2004-10-01

    A major cause of failure in nuclear steam generators is tube degradation. Tube defects are divided into seven categories, one of which is intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC). Defects of this type usually begin on the outer surface of the tubes and propagate both inward and laterally. In many cases these defects occur at or near the tube support plates. Several different methods exist for the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear steam generator tubes for defect characterization.

  6. Pumpdown assistance extends coiled tubing reach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tailby, R.J. )

    1992-07-01

    One of the most challenging coiled tubing applications to emerge in the last few years is horizontal well maintenance. When wireline cannot be used, techniques that offer some of the same flexibility, availability and relatively low cost must be used. During this same period, however, drilling technology has also made huge strides in horizontal and extended-reach areas. Wells are now being drilled with horizontal lengths in excess of 6,000 ft and measured depths of more than 22,000 ft. This paper reports that although horizontal wells are definitely here to stay, many operators have had to reevaluate their positions after being confronted with the problem of recompleting these wells to eliminate excessive water or gas production. A full workover with workstring using either a drilling rig or snubbing unit can be expensive and may lead to lost production because of limited rig availability. Coiled tubing has successfully been used in most cases thus far, but it has length and horizontal reach limitations that drilling technology will soon overtake. Within the constraints of current technology and tube capabilities, coiled tubing does not have the buckling resistance or reel capacity to service today's longest horizontal and extended reach wells or those planned and foreseen in the future. Even if coiled tubing can reach TD, operations requiring downward force are severely restricted.

  7. Energy efficiency analysis carried out for Petrosix process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    In the production of shale oil, the effective use of energy is critically important for the viability of the process. The design of the Petrosix process developed by Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. reflects such a preoccupation with energy efficiency. A semi-industrial plant for the production of shale oil is being operated successfully by Petrobras in Sao Mateus do Sul in south central Brazil. An industrial module with a scale-up factor of 4 is under construction. The plant, due on stream in 1988, will produce 2650 barrels per day of shale oil and 50 metric tons per day sulfur. Future plants will be a multiplication of such modules. A thermodynamic energy analysis of the retorting section of the industrial module was carried out by Petrobras in order to identify critical points where the thermodynamic efficiencies can be improved. A mass and energy balance of the plant was made using mainly the process design data. The energy availability functions of different streams were evaluated and a lost work analysis was done for different units of the retorting section. Results of this analysis are summarized.

  8. A steady state thermal duct model derived by fin-theory approach and applied on an unglazed solar collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stojanovic, B.; Hallberg, D.; Akander, J.

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents the thermal modelling of an unglazed solar collector (USC) flat panel, with the aim of producing a detailed yet swift thermal steady-state model. The model is analytical, one-dimensional (1D) and derived by a fin-theory approach. It represents the thermal performance of an arbitrary duct with applied boundary conditions equal to those of a flat panel collector. The derived model is meant to be used for efficient optimisation and design of USC flat panels (or similar applications), as well as detailed thermal analysis of temperature fields and heat transfer distributions/variations at steady-state conditions; without requiring a large amount of computational power and time. Detailed surface temperatures are necessary features for durability studies of the surface coating, hence the effect of coating degradation on USC and system performance. The model accuracy and proficiency has been benchmarked against a detailed three-dimensional Finite Difference Model (3D FDM) and two simpler 1D analytical models. Results from the benchmarking test show that the fin-theory model has excellent capabilities of calculating energy performances and fluid temperature profiles, as well as detailed material temperature fields and heat transfer distributions/variations (at steady-state conditions), while still being suitable for component analysis in junction to system simulations as the model is analytical. The accuracy of the model is high in comparison to the 3D FDM (the prime benchmark), as long as the fin-theory assumption prevails (no 'or negligible' temperature gradient in the fin perpendicularly to the fin length). Comparison with the other models also shows that when the USC duct material has a high thermal conductivity, the cross-sectional material temperature adopts an isothermal state (for the assessed USC duct geometry), which makes the 1D isothermal model valid. When the USC duct material has a low thermal conductivity, the heat transfer course of events adopts a 1D heat flow that reassembles the conditions of the 1D simple model (for the assessed USC duct geometry); 1D heat flow through the top and bottom fins/sheets as the duct wall reassembles a state of adiabatic condition. (author)

  9. Zero dead volume tube to surface seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Folta, James A.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for connecting a tube to a surface that creates a dead volume seal. The apparatus is composed of three components, a body, a ferrule, and a threaded fitting. The ferrule is compressed onto a tube and a seal is formed between the tube and a device retained in the body by threading the fitting into the body which provides pressure that seals the face of the ferrule to a mating surface on the device. This seal can be used at elevated temperatures depending on the materials used. While the invention has been developed for use with micro-machined silicon wafers used in Capillary Gas Chromatograph (GC), it can be utilized anywhere for making a gas or fluid face seal to the surface of a device that has near zero dead volume.

  10. Coiled tubing velocity strings keep wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesson, H.R.; Shursen, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    Liquid loading is a problem in many older and even some newer gas wells, particularly in pressure depletion type reservoirs. This liquid loading results in decreased production and may even kill the well. The use of coiled tubing as a velocity string (or siphon string) has proved to be an economically viable alternative to allow continued and thus, increased cumulative production for wells experiencing liquid loading problems. Coiled tubing run inside the existing production string reduces the flow area, whether the well is produced up the tubing or up the annulus. This reduction in flow area results in an increase in flow velocity and thus, an increase in the well's ability to unload fluids.

  11. Unusual superheater tube wastage associated with carburization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Lopez, D.; Wong-Noreno, A. ); Martinez, L. . Programa de Corrosion del Golfo de Mexico)

    1994-12-01

    The effects of operational power changes on the corrosion of ASTM A 213 type 321H (UNS S32109) stainless steel tubes in a steam superheater were studied. The fuel oil consumed in the plant is high in sulfur, vanadium, and asphalt content. After 107,000 hours of service, the tubes were seriously corroded and developed cracking of the oxide layer. The cracking was associated with frequent temperature changes. Bursts of carbon coke and soot particles deposited on tube surfaces and introduced a carburization process in the steel matrix. Carbon-rich deposits formed in the grain boundaries of the austenitic metal matrix. A carburization-corrosion process caused the intergranular wastage of the steel near the exposed surfaces.

  12. Tube curvature measuring probe and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sokol, George J.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a probe and method for measuring the radius of curvature of a bend in a section of tubing. The probe includes a member with a pair of guide means, one located at each end of the member. A strain gauge is operatively connected to the member for detecting bending stress exrted on the member as the probe is drawn through and in engagement with the inner surface of a section of tubing having a bend. The method of the present invention includes steps utilizing a probe, like the aforementioned probe, which can be made to detect bends only in a single plane when having a fixed orientation relative the section of tubing to determine the maximum radius of curvature of the bend.

  13. Sidetracking technology for coiled tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leising, L.J.; Hearn, D.D.; Rike, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    Coiled tubing (CT) drilling is a rapidly growing new technology that has been used for shallow new wells and reentry applications. A new market has evolved as being a major application for CT drilling. This market is through-tubing drilling. The lower cost of mobilization of a coiled tubing unit (CTU) to an offshore platform or Arctic wellsite vs. a rotary rig provides additional economic incentive. In addition, the ease of drilling 4-3/4-in. and smaller boreholes with CT is an advantage in a region which does not have an established practice of slimhole drilling. The remaining key enabling technology for viable through-tubing drilling is the ability to sidetrack in casing below the tubing tail. The three technologies (cement sidetracking, whipstock in cement, and through-tubing whipstock) that have been developed for sidetracking are described in this paper. A mathematical model of forces, penetration rates, and torques for window milling with the cement sidetracking technique is presented. Window milling has been a {open_quotes}seat of the pants{close_quotes} operation in the past, to the authors` knowledge, this is the first published work on the mechanics of window milling. The analysis has shed much light on the interaction between motor bending stiffness, motor bend angle, and allowable advance rates for {open_quotes}time drilling.{close_quotes} The results from several yard tests are presented, and indicate some of the problems associated with sidetracking. The photographs of the sectioned hole/window illustrate the ledges caused downhole from {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes} bottomhole assembly (BHA) changes. The cement sidetrack technique has been successfully applied many times in the field, and the results of one of these field applications is presented.

  14. Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obermeyer, F.D.

    1993-11-16

    Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube, so that the threaded ends of the instrumentation tube do not unthread when subjected to vibration, such an instrumentation tube being suitable for use in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The instrumentation tube has a first member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of first holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The instrumentation tube also has a second member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of second holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The threads of the second member are caused to threadably engage the threads of the first member for defining a threaded joint there between. A sleeve having an inside surface surrounds the end portion of the first member and the end portion of the second member and thus surrounds the threaded joint. The sleeve includes a plurality of first projections and second projections that outwardly extend from the inside surface to engage the first holes and the second holes, respectively. The outside surface of the sleeve is crimped or swaged at the locations of the first projections and second projections such that the first projections and the second projections engage their respective holes. In this manner, independent rotation of the first member with respect to the second member is prevented, so that the instrumentation tube will not unthread at its threaded joint. 10 figures.

  15. Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obermeyer, Franklin D. (Pensacola, FL)

    1993-01-01

    Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube, so that the threaded ends of the instrumentation tube do not unthread when subjected to vibration, such an instrumentation tube being suitable for use in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The instrumentation tube has a first member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of first holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The instrumentation tube also has a second member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of second holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The threads of the second member are caused to threadably engage the threads of the first member for defining a threaded joint therebetween. A sleeve having an inside surface surrounds the end portion of the first member and the end portion of the second member and thus surrounds the threaded joint. The sleeve includes a plurality of first projections and second projections that outwardly extend from the inside surface to engage the first holes and the second holes, respectively. The outside surface of the sleeve is crimped or swaged at the locations of the first projections and second projections such that the first projections and the second projections engage their respective holes. In this manner, independent rotation of the first member with respect to the second member is prevented, so that the instrumentation tube will not unthread at its threaded joint.

  16. Coiled tubing buckling implication in drilling and completing horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-03-01

    This paper discusses coiled tubing buckling and load transmission when drilling and completing horizontal wells. Comprehensive analyses and new equations are presented to predict buckling of coiled tubing, slack-off weight transmission, actual bit weight or packer load, and maximum horizontal length. Coiled tubing lock-up and yield due to buckling are also discussed. These equations can also be used for other coiled tubing operations, such as coiled tubing workover, coiled tubing well stimulation, and even for conventional joint-connected drill strings. Calculations based on the equations presented are also compared with the previous literature.

  17. Instrumented tube burns: theoretical and experimental observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarrington, Cole Davis; Obrey, Stephen J; Foley, Timothy J; Son, Steven F

    2009-01-01

    The advent of widely available nanoscale energetic composites has resulted in a flurry of novel applications. One of these applications is the use of nanomaterials in energetic compositions. In compositions that exhibit high sensitivity to stimulus, these materials are often termed metastable intermolecular composites (MIC). More generally, these compositions are simply called nanoenergetics. Researchers have used many different experimental techniques to analyze the various properties of nanoenergetic systems. Among these various techniques, the confined tube burn is a simple experiment that is capable of obtaining much data related to the combustion of these materials. The purpose of this report is to review the current state of the confined tube burn experiment, including the drawbacks of the technique and possible remedies. As this report is intended to focus on the specific experimental technique, data from many different energetic materials, and experimental configurations will be presented. The qualitative and quantitative data that can be gathered using confined tube burn experiments include burning rates, total impulse, pressure rise rate, and burning rate differences between different detector types. All of these measurements lend insight into the combustion properties and mechanisms of specific nanoenergetics. Finally, certain data indicates a more complicated flow scenario which may need to be considered when developing burn tube models.

  18. Equation determines pressure drop in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.S.

    1995-12-04

    A single equation can determine the pressure drop in wells with laminar, transitional, and turbulent incompressible fluid flow in coiled tubing or other steel tubulars. The single equation is useful, especially in computer-aided design and operations. The equation is derived and illustrated by an example.

  19. Further advances in coiled-tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, E.; Brinkhorst, J.; Voelker, H.; Burge, P.; Ewen, R.L.

    1994-12-31

    The use of coiled tubing to drill horizontal re-entry wells has received considerable interest in the industry over the last two years. The benefit of being able to drill at balance, safely and in a controlled manner, using nitrogen to reduce down hole pressure while drilling highly depleted reservoirs, provides an advantage over conventional techniques, particularly in reducing impairment to the formation. The paper describes such a horizontal re-entry drilled in the shallow depleted water flooded reservoir Barenburg in Northern Germany. The entire program was executed with no intervention from a conventional rig or workover hoist. A special structure to be positioned over the well to support the coiled tubing injector head and to provide a work platform had to be constructed for this type of operation. A dedicated mast for lifting of pipe and down hole tools was placed on the substructure. The development of a surface controlled orienting tool and an adjustable motor provided excellent directional capabilities on a 2 3/8 in. coiled tubing. This program represents a significant extension of the capabilities of drilling with coiled tubing.

  20. Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

    2006-05-27

    A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

  1. EBR-II Superheater Duplex Tube Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Dennis D. Keiser; Douglas L. Porter; Naoyuki Kisohara

    2008-12-01

    After 30 years of operation, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Superheater 710 at Argonne National Laboratory-West (now Idaho National Laboratory) was decommissioned. As part of its post-service examination, four duplex tube sections were removed and Charpy impact testing was performed to characterize the crack arresting ability of nickel-bonded tube interfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination was also performed to characterize and identify changes in bond material microstructure. From room temperature to 400 degrees C, all samples demonstrated ductility and crack-stopping ability similar to that exhibited by beginning-of-life samples. However, at low temperature (-5 degrees C), samples removed from the lower region of the superheater (near the sodium inlet) failed while those from the upper region (near the sodium outlet) did not. SEM analysis revealed that all the tube-tube interfaces showed evidence of iron diffusion into the nickel braze, which resulted in the formation of a multiphase diffusion structure. Yet, significant void formation was only observed in the bond layer of the tubes removed from the lower region. This may be due to a change in the crystal microstructure of one of the phases within the bond layer that occurs in the 350 to 450 degrees C temperature range, which results in a lower density and the formation of porosity. Apparently, only the samples from the higher temperature region were exposed to this transition temperature, and the resulting large voids that developed acted as stress concentrators that led to low-temperature embrittlement and failure of the Charpy impact specimens.

  2. Coiled tubing operations and services. Part 3; Tube technology and capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A.I.I. )

    1992-01-01

    This article offers an overview of developments in commercial coiled tubing for oil wells including continuous coiled pipe manufacturing and production. Pipe behavior under various stresses and forces encountered during typical workover operations is addressed.

  3. Dynamic stability of a spinning tube conveying a fluid through a symmetrical noncircular cross-section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    When a fluid flows inside a tube, the deformations of the tube can interact with the fluid flowing within it and these dynamic interactions can result in significant lateral motions of the tube and the flowing fluid. The purpose of this report is to examine the dynamic stability of a spinning tube through which an incompressible frictionless fluid is flowing. The tube can be considered as either a hollow beam or a hollow cable. The analytical results can be applied to spinning or stationary tubes through which fluids are transferred; e.g., liquid coolants, fuels and lubricants, slurry solutions, and high explosives in paste form. The coupled partial differential equations are determined for the lateral motion of a spinning Bernoulli-Euler beam or a spinning cable carrying an incompressible flowing fluid. The beam, which spins about an axis parallel to its longitudinal axis and which can also be loaded by a constant axial force, is straight, uniform, simply supported, and rests on a massless, uniform elastic foundation that spins with the beam. Damping for the beam and foundation is considered by using a combined uniform viscous damping coefficient. The fluid, in addition to being incompressible, is frictionless, has a constant density, and flows at a constant speed relative to the longitudinal beam axis. The Galerkin method is used to reduce the coupled partial differential equations for the lateral motion of the spinning beam to a coupled set of 2N, second order, ordinary differential equations for the generalized beam coordinates. By simplifying these equations and examining the roots of the characteristic equation, an analytical solution is obtained for the lateral dynamic instability of the beam (or cable). The analytical solutions determined the minimum critical fluid speed and the critical spin speeds, for a specified fluid speed, in terms of the physical parameters of the system.

  4. Improving Efficiency of Tube Drawing Bench | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system performance optimization project to improve the efficiency of its No. 6 tube drawing bench. This four-page...

  5. Insulated laser tube structure and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dittbenner, Gerald R.

    1999-01-01

    An insulated high temperature ceramic laser tube having substantially uniform insulation along the length of the tube is disclosed having particulate ceramic insulation positioned between the outer wall of the ceramic laser tube and the inner surface of tubular ceramic fiber insulation which surrounds the ceramic laser tube. The particulate ceramic insulation is preferably a ceramic capable of sintering to the outer surface of the ceramic laser tube and to the inner surface of the tubular ceramic fiber insulation. The addition of the particulate ceramic insulation to fill all the voids between the ceramic laser tube and the fibrous ceramic insulation permits the laser tube to be operated at a substantially uniform temperature throughout the length of the laser tube.

  6. The Challenge: Improving the Efficiency of a Tube Drawing Bench

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    high-precision, small-diameter stainless steel tubing, conducted an in-house system ... 1 million linear feet of custom stainless steel tubing per month for its customers in the ...

  7. Modeling coiled tubing velocity strings for gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.; Martinez, A.

    1995-12-31

    Multiphase flowing pressure and velocity prediction models are necessary to coiled tubing velocity string design. A model used by most of the coiled tubing service companies or manufacturers is reviewed. Guidance is provided for selecting a coiled tubing of the proper size. The steps include: (1) Measured data matching; (2) Fluid property adjustment; (3) Pressure, velocity, and holdup selection; (4) Correlation choice; (5) Coiled tubing selection. A velocity range for the lift of liquid is given.

  8. Coiled tubing technology advances to a bright future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghiselin, R.

    1998-07-01

    This supplement contains six short articles on coiled tubing, its advantages, performance, and materials. The articles are: Coiled Tubing--On the Brink of a New Millennium; CT Advances Promise a Broad, Dynamic Future; Performance, Safety and Cost Make the Case for HPCT; Fast and Accurate, CTD Helps Drillers Hit Their Targets; Composite Tubing Rapidly Proves Advantages in the Field; and People and Performance are Key to Coiled Tubing Growth.

  9. TWISTED MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Vörös, Zoltán; Narita, Yasuhito; Bruno, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic flux tubes in the solar wind can be twisted as they are transported from the solar surface, where the tubes are twisted due to photospheric motions. It is suggested that the twisted magnetic tubes can be detected as the variation of total (thermal+magnetic) pressure during their passage through the observing satellite. We show that the total pressure of several observed twisted tubes resembles the theoretically expected profile. The twist of the isolated magnetic tube may explain the observed abrupt changes of magnetic field direction at tube walls. We have also found some evidence that the flux tube walls can be associated with local heating of the plasma and elevated proton and electron temperatures. For the tubes aligned with the Parker spiral, the twist angle can be estimated from the change of magnetic field direction. Stability analysis of twisted tubes shows that the critical twist angle of the tube with a homogeneous twist is 70°, but the angle can further decrease due to the motion of the tube with respect to the solar wind stream. The tubes with a stronger twist are unstable to the kink instability, therefore they probably cannot reach 1 AU.

  10. Device and method for shortening reactor process tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frantz, C.E.; Alexander, W.K.; Lander, W.E.B.

    A device and method are described for in situ shortening of nuclear reactor zirconium alloy process tubes which have grown as a result of radiation exposure. An upsetting technique is utilized which involves inductively heating a short band of a process tube with simultaneous application of an axial load sufficient to cause upsetting with an attendant decrease in length of the process tube.

  11. Device and method for shortening reactor process tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frantz, Charles E.; Alexander, William K.; Lander, Walter E. B.

    1980-01-01

    This disclosure describes a device and method for in situ shortening of nuclear reactor zirconium alloy process tubes which have grown as a result of radiation exposure. An upsetting technique is utilized which involves inductively heating a short band of a process tube with simultaneous application of an axial load sufficient to cause upsetting with an attendant decrease in length of the process tube.

  12. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billen, James H.

    1996-01-01

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the .pi.-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is .beta..lambda., where .lambda. is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a .pi./2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range.

  13. Coupled-cavity drift-tube linac

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billen, J.H.

    1996-11-26

    A coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL) combines features of the Alvarez drift-tube linac (DTL) and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). In one embodiment, each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between accelerating gaps is {beta}{lambda}, where {lambda} is the free-space wavelength of the resonant mode. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180 degrees. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. The CCDTL configuration provides an rf structure with high shunt impedance for intermediate velocity charged particles, i.e., particles with energies in the 20-200 MeV range. 5 figs.

  14. Coiled tubing applications for underground gas storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, H.; Holcombe, D.

    1994-12-31

    Technological advances in coiled tubing (CT), CT handling equipment, and application techniques have provided new opportunities for the effective, economic use of CT for gas storage and retrieval. This paper presents a review of the CT capabilities that can be used for improving the performance of gas storage wells and discusses applications that could be performed with CT in the near future. For more than 25 years, coiled tubing has been use as an effective, economic means of performing remedial well services. In response to the demand for better horizontal drilling equipment, the strength and diameter of CT has been increased, while surface equipment and downhole tools have become more sophisticated. CT is also widely used in well servicing after initial completion, especially since declining oil prices have made it imperative that operators find more cost-effective methods of increasing production and reducing maintenance costs. The gas storage industry can effectively take advantage of the many recent advancements in CT technology.

  15. Advanced composites enhance coiled tubing capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A.; Williams, J.G.

    1994-04-01

    From early coiled tubing (CT) use to recent operations, most concerns have been about tube damage from past service and remaining safe working life. Composite CT (CCT) is designed and constructed to exhibit unique anisotropic characteristics relative to steel or alternative isotropic materials that expand burst, collapse, tensile and compressive load performance capabilities. In 1988, Conoco Inc. began a development effort focused on using high-performance composite materials to meet numerous challenges associated with current and future oil and gas exploration and development. At that time, Conoco initiated a project to explore composite materials use for high-pressure, long-length, non-corroding tubulars with primary application as onshore water injection lines. In 1989, Conoco awarded a contract to AMAT a/s in Sandefjord, Norway to develop spoolable composite pipe for small diameter subsea lines. Concurrent with ongoing spoolable composite subsea lines, Conoco also began to explore high-performance CCT development in 1989.

  16. Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    2000-07-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

  17. AN APPARATUS FOR MEASURING ANNULAR OFFSET BETWEEN A FIRST METAL TUBE AND A SECOND METAL TUBE SPATIALLY DISPOSED WITHIN THE FIRST TUBE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spanner, J.C.

    1963-08-01

    An apparatus for measurirg the amount of offset from concentricity between a first metal tube mounted within a second metal tube comprises a first pair of like sensing coils mounted diametrically opposite each other adjacent to the interior of the first tube and a second pair of sensirg coils identical to the first pair of coils mounted diametrically opposite each other adjacent to tue interior surfuce of the first tube and spatinlly displaced 90 degrees from the first pair of sensing coils. An a-c signal at a frequency such that the resultant electromagnetic energy from the sensing coils passes through the first tube and is essentially totally attenuated by the second tube is alternately provided to each pair of coils. Differential measurement of the effective impedance of the sensing coils in each of the pairs gives the amount of offset. (AEC)

  18. Tube cutter tool and method of use for coupon removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D.; Etten, Jr., Marvin P.; Kurowski, Paul A.

    1997-01-01

    A tube cutter tool is insertable into a tube for cutting a coupon from a damaged site on the exterior of the tube. Prior to using the tool, the damaged site is first located from the interior of the tube using a multi-coil pancake eddy current test probe. The damaged site is then marked. A fiber optic probe is used to monitor the subsequent cutting procedure which is performed using a hole saw mounted on the tube cutter tool. Prior to completion of the cutting procedure, a drill in the center of the hole saw is drilled into the coupon to hold it in place.

  19. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jerome P. (Livermore, CA); Sawvel, Robert M. (Modesto, CA); Draggoo, Vaughn G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  20. Tube cutter tool and method of use for coupon removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, H.D.; Etten, M.P. Jr.; Kurowski, P.A.

    1997-05-06

    A tube cutter tool is insertable into a tube for cutting a coupon from a damaged site on the exterior of the tube. Prior to using the tool, the damaged site is first located from the interior of the tube using a multi-coil pancake eddy current test probe. The damaged site is then marked. A fiber optic probe is used to monitor the subsequent cutting procedure which is performed using a hole saw mounted on the tube cutter tool. Prior to completion of the cutting procedure, a drill in the center of the hole saw is drilled into the coupon to hold it in place. 4 figs.

  1. Alloy 400 tube failures by stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amar, A.S.

    1995-12-01

    A feedwater heater with SB163 Alloy 400 (cold drawn - stress relieved) tubing experienced numerous tube failures and was replaced after of 4.5 years. Failures were attributed to Inter Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) in the roll transition area. An eddy current test method was developed with EPRI NDE Center technical support to detect the cracks in the tubesheet region. Three tubes were pulled for metallurgical examination. Short axial cracks were found on tube inner surface. Measured crack depths were correlated with the eddy current indications. A large number of tubes were plugged. However, the heater continued to deteriorate rapidly. Potential contributors to IGSCC are discussed.

  2. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  3. Segmented lasing tube for high temperature laser assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawicki, Richard H.; Alger, Terry W.; Finucane, Raymond G.; Hall, Jerome P.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature laser assembly capable of withstanding operating temperatures in excess of 1500.degree. C. is described comprising a segmented cylindrical ceramic lasing tube having a plurality of cylindrical ceramic lasing tube segments of the same inner and outer diameters non-rigidly joined together in axial alignment; insulation of uniform thickness surround the walls of the ceramic lasing tube; a ceramic casing, preferably of quartz, surrounding the insulation; and a fluid cooled metal jacket surrounds the ceramic casing. In a preferred embodiment, the inner surface of each of the ceramic lasing tube segments are provided with a pair of oppositely spaced grooves in the wall thereof parallel to the center axis of the segmented cylindrical ceramic lasing tube, and both of the grooves and the center axis of the segmented cylindrical ceramic lasing tube lie in a common plane, with the grooves in each ceramic lasing tube segment in circumferential alignment with the grooves in the adjoining ceramic lasing tube segments; and one or more ceramic plates, all lying in a common plane to one another and with the central axis of the segmented ceramic lasing tube, are received in the grooves to provide additional wall area in the segmented ceramic lasing tube for collision and return to ground state of metastable metal atoms within the segmented ceramic lasing tube.

  4. Coiled tubing velocity string hangoff method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gipson, T.C.

    1991-07-02

    This patent describes a method for hanging off a coiled tube velocity string in an active gas production well tubing run, the run having at least a master valve and a first line valve. It includes installing a hangoff assembly in the production well tubing run between the master valve and the first line valve the hangoff assembly comprising a hangoff head, a second line valve, an upper valve, and a hydraulic packoff valve, the hangoff head further comprising a threaded body member, a slip bowl and a threaded cap; inserting through the hydraulic packoff valve, the upper valve, and the hangoff head, coiled tubing for fluid communication with well gases and fluids in the production well tubing run, the coiled tubing having a first downhole end being open to immediately receive and conduct the gases and fluids; opening gas and fluid communication between the production well tubing run and the open end of the coiled tubing whereby the well gases and fluid may pass up through the coiled tubing, the hangoff head sealing the gases and fluids from passing to the hydraulic packoff valve, the upper valve and the second line valve; further inserting the coiled tubing to a desired depth in the production well tubing run; and rotating the cap of the hangoff head to expose the slip bowl.

  5. Coiled tubing drilling requires economic and technical analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S.C. )

    1995-02-20

    Field experience has proven that coiled tubing drilling is a technical and economic option on some wells; however, coiled tubing drilling is not the solution to every drilling prospect or production-enhancement job. To determine if coiled tubing drilling is viable, the geographic, technical, and economic aspects of each project must be considered in detail. Generally, with some limitations, coiled tubing drilling is feasible primarily when jointed pipe cannot be used effectively. Also, coiled tubing drilling may be more appropriate because of some special well site requirements, such as environmental regulations requiring less surface disturbance. The paper discusses technical considerations which need to be considered, economic feasibility, limitations of well types (new shallow wells, conventional reentry, through-tubing reentry, and underbalanced drilling), and outlook for further growth in the coiled tubing drilling industry.

  6. Self-shielding flex-circuit drift tube, drift tube assembly and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, David Alexander

    2016-04-26

    The present disclosure is directed to an ion mobility drift tube fabricated using flex-circuit technology in which every other drift electrode is on a different layer of the flex-circuit and each drift electrode partially overlaps the adjacent electrodes on the other layer. This results in a self-shielding effect where the drift electrodes themselves shield the interior of the drift tube from unwanted electro-magnetic noise. In addition, this drift tube can be manufactured with an integral flex-heater for temperature control. This design will significantly improve the noise immunity, size, weight, and power requirements of hand-held ion mobility systems such as those used for explosive detection.

  7. Stress relief treatment of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Rooyen, D.; Cragnolino, C.

    1994-01-01

    The intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 tubing in the primary side of operating steam generators is the subject of this investigation. The objective of the program was to examine the feasibility of heat treatment to alleviate the IGSCC problem. In addition to this, tests were also performed to examine the IGSCC susceptibility of nuclear grade Alloy 600 tubing obtained from various sources. Examination of temperature-time combinations that may hold potential for improved IGSCC resistance of the transition regions of tubes expanded into tube sheet holes was done. The combinations fall in two categories. One is of short duration and relatively high temperature, where induction is the best method of heating because the treatment only lasts from some tens of seconds to a few minutes. The other is carried out in a lower temperature range and lasts for several hours. This latter combination of temperatures and times is considered for the so-called global heat treatment of entire tube sheet. To assess the effect of these treatments, reverse U-bend testing in high purity deaerated water containing an overpressure of hydrogen was employed and several heats of Alloy 600 were compared in tests at 365{degrees}C, which is well above actual operating temperatures of steam generators, but provides an accelerated test procedure. Results of furnace heating in the range of 550-610{degrees}C indicated improvement in IGSCC resistance, with best performance after a heat treatment at 610{degrees}C for nine hours. In addition to stress relief, carbide precipitation can also occur, and their relative contributions to the improvement is discussed.

  8. Fuel cell tubes and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borglum, Brian P.

    1999-11-30

    A method of manufacturing porous ceramic tubes for fuel cells with improved properties and higher manufacturing yield is disclosed. The method involves extruding a closed end fuel cell tube, such as an air electrode of a solid oxide fuel cell, in which the closed end also functions as the sintering support. The resultant fuel cell tube has a superior porosity distribution which allows improved diffusion of oxygen at the closed end of the tube during operation of the fuel cell. Because this region has the highest current density, performance enhancement and improved reliability of the fuel cell tube result. Furthermore, the higher manufacturing yield associated with the present method decreases the overall fuel cell cost. A method of manufacturing porous ceramic tubes for fuel cells with improved properties and higher manufacturing yield is disclosed. The method involves extruding a closed end fuel cell tube, such as an air electrode of a solid oxide fuel cell, in which the closed end also functions as the sintering support. The resultant fuel cell tube has a superior porosity distribution which allows improved diffusion of oxygen at the closed end of the tube during operation of the fuel cell. Because this region has the highest current density, performance enhancement and improved reliability of the fuel cell tube result. Furthermore, the higher manufacturing yield associated with the present method decreases the overall fuel cell cost.

  9. Life assessment of superheater/reheater tubes in fossil boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, R.; Gehl, S.; Paterson, S.R.; Grunloh, H.

    1995-08-01

    Creep rupture failure of superheater(SH)/-reheater(RH) tubes is a major cause of forced outages of power boilers. A methodology developed recently by EPRI researchers has helped utilities make more informed run/replace decisions for tubes by judiciously combining calculational, nondestructive and destructive evaluations. In this methodology, the tubes/tube assemblies at risk are identified by ultrasonically measuring the thickest steamside oxide scale and thinnest wall thickness in the tubes. The remaining life of each tube/tube assemblies is predicted using a computer code known as TUBELIFE, thus achieving a further level of focus on the tubes/assemblies in the highest risk category. Sacrificial tube samples are then removed from the select locations and subjected to laboratory metallurgical evaluation and isostress rupture testing to refine the remaining life estimates. Research has further refined this methodology by validating the ultrasonic technique for scale measurement, identifying the appropriate stress formula and oxide growth laws and evaluating the limitations of creep damage summation rules and isostress rupture test procedures. This paper provides an overview of the research in the field, and establish a road map for assessing the remaining life of SH/RH tubes.

  10. Life assessment of superheater/reheater tubes in fossil boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, R.; Gehl, S. ); Paterson, S.R. ); Grunloh, H. )

    1994-02-01

    Creep rupture failure of superheater (SH)/reheater (RH) tubes is a major cause of forced outages of power boilers. A methodology developed recently by EPRI and its contractors has helped utilities make more informed run/replace decisions for tubes by judiciously combining calculational, nondestructive, and destructive evaluations. In this methodology, the tubes/tube assemblies at risk are identified by ultrasonically measuring the thickest steamside oxide scale and thinnest wall thickness in the tubes. The remaining life of each tube/tube assembly is predicted using a computer code known as TUBELIFE, thus achieving a further level of focus on the tubes/assemblies in the highest risk'' category. Sacrificial tube samples are then removed from the select locations and subjected to laboratory metallurgical evaluation and isostress rupture testing to refine the remaining life estimates. Research has further refined this methodology by validating the ultrasonic technique for scale measurement, identifying the appropriate stress formula and oxide growths laws and evaluating the limitations of creep damage summation rules and isostress rupture test procedures. This paper provides an overview of the research in the field, and establishes a road map for assessing the remaining life of SH/RH tubes.

  11. Logging of subterranean wells using coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilla, J.

    1991-01-15

    This patent describes an apparatus for production logging of a well utilizing artificial lift in a wellbore. It comprises: coiled tubing extending into the wellbore having wireline electrical cable passing through a central bore thereof and having a remote end within the wellbore which end is connected to gas injector means. The wireline cable passing through the gas injector means to a flexible electrically conductive support spacer having an end portion remote from the gas injector means and logging means connected to the end portion of the support spacer.

  12. Developments in coiled tubing BOP ram design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.; Newman, K.; Reaper, A.

    1995-12-31

    Significant technical improvements have been made recently in the design of coiled tubing (CT) blowout preventer (BOP) shear and slip rams. This technology is constantly being enhanced and refined as the CT service industry continues to mature and new operational demands are placed on the CT pressure control equipment. Larger CT sizes require better BOP shearing capabilities. Advancements in the understanding of CT fatigue life have caused the life reducing affects of the slip ram markings on the pipe to be examined. This paper explores the circumstances that have precipitated these improvements, and the research and development methods involved in developing better BOP rams.

  13. Sound Coiled-Tubing Drilling Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Thomas; Deskins, Greg; Ward, Stephen L.; Hightower, Mel

    2001-09-30

    This Coiled-Tubing Drilling (CTD) Sound Practices Manual provides tools needed by CTD engineers and supervisors to plan, design and perform safe, successful CTD operations. As emphasized throughout, both careful planning and attention to detail are mandatory for success. A bibliography of many useful CTD references is presented in Chapter 6. This manual is organized according to three processes: 1) Pre-Job Planning Process, 2) Operations Execution Process, and 3) Post-Job Review Process. Each is discussed in a logical and sequential format.

  14. Field installation proves coiled tubing ESP completions successful

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovar, J.J.; Head, P.; Jordan, R.

    1995-06-01

    Coiled tubing (CT) technology has contributed new and innovative solutions for wells using electrical submersible pumps (ESP). A CT-ESP deployment system was developed as part of a joint industry project to take advantage of this new technology. Ten oil and service companies and the EEC, under the Thermie program, participated in its development. Two main areas were identified to introduce these innovations. The first was deployment and well control. This area has a great impact on the safety and operational aspects of installing and servicing ESPs. The second is cost. As ESPs are considered for new field developments and recompletion of old fields, installation and workover costs play a major role in the selection of completion alternatives. One of the main limitations of ESPs in the past has been the economics of installation and uncertainty about pump life. With focus in these two major areas, a system was successfully produced that offers considerable advantages over existing technologies. The reduction in rig time and equipment cost makes this alternative very attractive for areas where technical and economic obstacles such as live well deployment and high operating cost limit the use of ESP technology. Two field tests have been carried successfully during the development of this system.

  15. Coiled tubing as initial production tubing: An overview of case histories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nirider, H.L.; Snider, P.M.; Walsh, K.D.; Williams, J.D.; Cordera, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    From Jan. 1993 through Feb. 1995 Marathon Oil Co. completed 23 newly drilled gas wells with coiled tubing as the initial production string. This paper reviews operational aspects of representative jobs, summarizes areas where improvements in equipment and technique were implemented, and addresses cost and productivity benefits of rigless completions. A summary of lessons learned is also included.

  16. Coiled tubing 1994 update: Expanding applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teel, M.E.

    1994-06-01

    The coiled tubing (CT) resurgence, which began in late 1989 shows little sign of moderating in spite of lower oil and gas prices. In fact, this so-called revolution continues to expand into major new services and applications. CT units are replacing workover rigs and snubbing units in some areas and have recently started to replace drilling rigs even outside Alaska's North Slope Prudhoe Bay field. Activity is reaching record levels in many areas. Although drilling, completions and flowlines generate a lot of interest, these are currently only a small part of total CT business. About 75% of activity is split evenly between nitrogen, acidizing and cleanouts. The other 25% includes newer services like cementing, fishing, sliding sleeves, logging, underreaming to remove scale or cement and drilling. CT is used to drill slimholes and reentry drainholes up to 6 1/8-in. CT has been used as casing and more casing applications are planned. CT ODs to 3 1/2-in. are produced and 4 1/2-in. OD CT production is scheduled later this year. Larger ODs make CT feasible for replacing conventional jointed tubing and welded flowlines.

  17. New coiled tubing jet cleaning system reduces costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, C.C.; Zublin, C.W.

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes Chevron's water blsting system, called Hyperclean, which uses N80 tubing with a special high-pressure power swivel to supply rotation connected via jointed tubing to a replaceable jet stack. One licensee was able to develop the system into a more practical field form and has had good success in in situ liner perforation and slot cleaning. The Hyperclean system is effective, but limited to wells where the production tubing's ID is large enough to allow the collars on the system's 1 1/4-in. tubing easy and safe passage. If smaller tubing is in the well, the tubing must be removed before the Hyperclean tools are lowered into the well.

  18. Working session 3: Tubing integrity Cueto-Felgueroso, C. [Tecnatom...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tecnatom, S.A., San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain); Strosnider, J. NRC, Washington, DC (United States) 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; TUBES;...

  19. Simple method for elimination of theromoacoustic oscillations in cryogenic tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbachev, S.P.; Korolev, A.V.; Sysoev, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    The authors show that thermoacoustic oscillations of gas in cryogenic tubes can be eliminated by changing their length. Geometric dimensions that do not produce oscillations are given.

  20. Coiled tubing used for slim hole re-entry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traonmilin, E. ); Newman, K. )

    1992-02-17

    A coiled tubing unit with slim hole tools successfully re-entered and cored an existing Elf Aquitaine vertical well in the Paris basin in France. This experiment proved that coiled tubing could be used to drill, core, and test a slim hole well. Elf Aquitaine studied the use of coiled tubing for drilling inexpensive exploration wells in the Paris basin. As a result of this study, Elf believed that coiled tubing exploration drilling could significantly reduce exploration costs. This paper reports on a number of questions raised by this study: Can coiled tubing be used effectively to drill slim open hole How would the drilling rate compare with that of a conventional drilling rig If the rate were too slow, coiled tubing might not be economical. Can a straight vertical well be drilled Coiled tubing pipe has a residual curvature from bending over the reel and gooseneck. Will this curvature make it impossible to drill straight Can the coiled tubing also be used to take cores Once the hole is drilled, can it be tested with coiled tubing

  1. Jiangsu Yizheng Electron Tube Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Jiangsu Yizheng Electron Tube Co.,Ltd Place: Jiangsu Province, China Product: Energy saving high pressure sodium (HPS) light manufacturer References: Jiangsu Yizheng Electron...

  2. Bore tube assembly for steam cooling a turbine rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

    2002-01-01

    An axial bore tube assembly for a turbine is provided to supply cooling steam to hot gas components of the turbine wheels and return the spent cooling steam. A pair of inner and outer tubes define a steam supply passage concentric about an inner return passage. The forward ends of the tubes communicate with an end cap assembly having sets of peripheral holes communicating with first and second sets of radial tubes whereby cooling steam from the concentric passage is supplied through the end cap holes to radial tubes for cooling the buckets and return steam from the buckets is provided through the second set of radial tubes through a second set of openings of the end cap into the coaxial return passage. A radial-to-axial flow transitioning device, including anti-swirling vanes is provided in the end cap. A strut ring adjacent the aft end of the bore tube assembly permits axial and radial thermal expansion of the inner tube relative to the outer tube.

  3. Metal wastage analysis of carbon steel tubes in FBC environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethi, V.K.; Puentes, E. ); Natesan, K. )

    1989-01-01

    The TVA 20-MW AFBC Pilot Plant located near Paducah, Kentucky began operations in March 1982, and it operated with the same in-bed evaporator tubes (tube bundle B1) for {approximately}13,625 h through the end of 1985. During January-February 1986, the evaporator tubes were removed to test a new tube bundle configuration (tube bundle C1). After only a short period of operation, tube diameter measurements show that tube wastage rates for bundle C1 were almost an order of magnitude larger than those recorded for B1. Although several other changes could have been responsible for this increase, the consensus at the TVA was that the increase probably occurred because the pilot plant switched coals from a low chlorine (0.02%) to a high chlorine ({approximately}0.30%) KY No. 9 coal. In order to determine the validity of the role of chlorine in increasing the tube wastage, several tube sections were cut out from the plant and analyzed. The results of the chemical and metallographic examination are reported.

  4. Method Of Making Closed End Ceramic Fuel Cell Tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borglum, Brian P.

    2002-04-30

    A method of manufacturing closed end ceramic fuel cell tubes with improved properties and higher manufacturing yield is disclosed. The method involves bonding an unfired cap to a hollow unfired tube to form a compound joint. The assembly is then fired to net shape without subsequent machining. The resultant closed end tube is superior in that it provides a leak-tight seal and its porosity is substantially identical to that of the tube wall. The higher manufacturing yield associated with the present method decreases overall fuel cell cost significantly.

  5. Improved Grooving Tool for Tubing - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Tubing Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (746 KB) Technology Marketing SummarySandia has...

  6. Short-Pulse Beam Transport Tube - Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pulse Beam Transport Tube - Laboratory for Laser Energetics Laboratory for Laser Energetics Logo Search Home Around the Lab Past Issues Past Quick Shots About Office of the ...

  7. Assembly and method for testing the integrity of stuffing tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Edward Francis

    1997-01-01

    A stuffing tube integrity checking assembly includes first and second annular seals, with each seal adapted to be positioned about a stuffing tube penetration component. An annular inflation bladder is provided, the bladder having a slot extending longitudinally therealong and including a separator for sealing the slot. A first valve is in fluid communication with the bladder for introducing pressurized fluid to the space defined by the bladder when mounted about the tube. First and second releasible clamps are provided. Each clamp assembly is positioned about the bladder for securing the bladder to one of the seals for thereby establishing a fluid-tight chamber about the tube.

  8. Assembly and method for testing the integrity of stuffing tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, E.F.

    1997-08-26

    A stuffing tube integrity checking assembly includes first and second annular seals, with each seal adapted to be positioned about a stuffing tube penetration component. An annular inflation bladder is provided, the bladder having a slot extending longitudinally there along and including a separator for sealing the slot. A first valve is in fluid communication with the bladder for introducing pressurized fluid to the space defined by the bladder when mounted about the tube. First and second releasible clamps are provided. Each clamp assembly is positioned about the bladder for securing the bladder to one of the seals for thereby establishing a fluid-tight chamber about the tube. 5 figs.

  9. High Current-Carrying Capability in c -Axis-Oriented Superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High Current-Carrying Capability in c -Axis-Oriented Superconducting MgBsub 2 Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Current-Carrying Capability in c ...

  10. Arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pidcoe, Stephen V.; Zink, Roger A.; Boroski, William N.; McCaw, William R.

    1993-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube of a magnet such as is used with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The arrangement includes a magnetic field alignment gauge that is carried through the magnet bore tube by a positioning shuttle in predetermined increments. The positioning shuttle includes an extensible body assembly which is actuated by an internal piston arrangement. A pair of spaced inflatable cuffs are carried by the body assembly and are selectively actuated in cooperation with pressurizing of the piston to selectively drive the positioning shuttle in an axial direction. Control of the shuttle is provided by programmed electronic computer means located exteriorly of the bore tube and which controls valves provided pressurized fluid to the inflatable cuss and the piston arrangement.

  11. Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McConnell, Robert D.; Vansant, James H.

    1984-01-01

    A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

  12. Coiled tubing sidetrack: Slaughter Field case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, C.M.; Blount, C.G.; Ward, S.L.; Martin, R.F.; Cantwell, D.L.; Ackers, M.J.

    1995-03-01

    The paper describes the successful sidetrack of an oil well in the Slaughter Field in West Texas using coiled tubing (CT). Several first-time CT operations performed during this workover include: setting a whipstock in casing on CT; cutting a window with CT; using mud pulse measurement-while-drilling (MWD) with CT in a real well; use of a fluid-operated orientation tool for in-hole toolface changes; successful use of an autodriller to maintain weight on bit while drilling. Directional control of the sidetracked hole proved to be ineffective due to a surface software problem. The resultant wellbore was not horizontal as planned, but instead closely paralleled the original well for much of its length. However, the previously non-productive well flowed 1,000 barrels of fluid per day (BFPD) from the sidetrack following the workover.

  13. MULTI-ELECTRODE TUBE PULSE MEMORY CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gundlach, J.C.; Reeves, J.B.

    1958-05-20

    Control circuits are described for pulse memory devices for scalers and the like, and more particularly to a driving or energizing circuit for a polycathode gaseous discharge tube having an elongated anode and a successive series of cathodes spaced opposite the anode along its length. The circuit is so arranged as to utilize an arc discharge between the anode and a cathode to count a series of pulses. Upon application of an input pulse the discharge is made to occur between the anode and the next successive cathode, and an output pulse is produced when a particular subsequent cathode is reached. The circuit means for transfering the discharge by altering the anode potential and potential of the cathodes and interconnecting the cathodes constitutes the novel aspects of the invention. A low response time and reduced number of circuit components are the practical advantages of the described circuit.

  14. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, J.V.

    1993-12-01

    Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

  15. Aquifer Sampling Tube Results for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Peterson, Robert E.

    2003-10-27

    This report presents and discusses results of the fiscal year 2003 sampling event associated with aquifer tubes along the Columbia River in the northern Hanford Site. Aquifer tube data help define the extent of groundwater contamination near the river, determine vertical variations in contamination, monitor the performance of interim remedial actions near the river, and support impact studies.

  16. Variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, D.A.; Boyd, T.J. Jr.; Potter, J.M.; Stovall, J.E.

    A linear accelerator system includes a plurality of post-coupled drift-tubes wherein each post coupler is bistably positionable to either of two positions which result in different field distributions. With binary control over a plurality of post couplers, a significant accumlative effect in the resulting field distribution is achieved yielding a variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator.

  17. Variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Donald A.; Boyd, Jr., Thomas J.; Potter, James M.; Stovall, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A linear accelerator system includes a plurality of post-coupled drift-tubes wherein each post coupler is bistably positionable to either of two positions which result in different field distributions. With binary control over a plurality of post couplers, a significant accumlative effect in the resulting field distribution is achieved yielding a variable-energy drift-tube linear accelerator.

  18. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liska, Donald J.; Schamaun, Roger G.; Clark, Donald C.; Potter, R. Christopher; Frank, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  19. Nondestructive evaluation of new coiled tubing and pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, R.K.

    1996-09-01

    The nondestructive testing (NDT) and evaluation (NDE) of coiled tubing and pipe during manufacture has not previously been described. This paper outlines the NDE methods employed during the production of such material, along with flaw removal criteria. This paper describes coiled tubing and pipe up to 3.5 inches diameter for both downhole and line pipe use.

  20. Coiled-tubing applications for blowout-control operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, N.J.; Mack, S.K.; Fannin, V.R.; Rocchi, T.

    1996-05-01

    Coiled-tubing drilling is now being used in various operations. Its complete field of applications is not currently established. Coiled tubing used for well control while drilling is a new field where its limits are being explored. This paper provides guidelines on topics to be considered in determining the applicability of coiled tubing for well-control problems. The information provided is based on recent field experiences with several well-control problems when drilling vent and relief wells. In some cases, coiled-tubing drilling capabilities, by necessity, were significantly extended beyond levels the industry considered to be upper limits. Well control cannot always be handled by coiled tubing. It is a special-application tool that can handle many situations and is, in some cases, clearly the optimum choice for the application. This paper presents guidelines for selecting coiled tubing for each application and discusses economics. It also describes coiled-tubing operations for regaining control of blowout wells in certain situations and gives technical requirements for planning and executing these types of jobs. Case histories where coiled-tubing units (CTU`s) have been used to regain control of drilling and producing wells are provided for illustration.

  1. Downhole control -- The key to coiled tubing drilling efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    Coiled tubing drilling has experienced dramatic growth in recent years. Originally a step-child, the technique now claims built-for-purpose equipment and promises cost-effective drilling with little damage to formations. The paper describes a bottom hole assembly and an orienting tool designed to be used to control coiled tubing drilling.

  2. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieberbach, George; Bongaards, Donald J.; Lohmeier, Alfred; Duke, James M.

    1981-01-01

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  3. Erosion of heat exchanger tubes in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.K.; Flemmer, R.L.C.

    1991-01-01

    This final report describes the activities of the 3-year project entitled Erosion of Heat Exchanger Tubes In Fluidized Beds.'' which was completed at the end of 1990. Project accomplishments include the collection of a substantial body of wear data In a 24in. [times] 24in. fluidized bed, comparative wear results In a 6in. [times] 6in. fluidized bed, the development of a dragometer and the collection of a comprehensive set of drag force data in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of bubble probe data to establish dominant bubble frequencies in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed, the use of a heat flux gauge for measurement of heat transfer coefficients in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed and the modeling of the tube wear in the 24in. [times] 24in. bed. Analysis of the wear data from the 24in. square bed indicates that tube wear increases with increase in superficial velocity, and with increase in tube height. The latter effect is a result of the tubes higher up in the bed seeing greater movement of dense phase than tubes lower down In the bed. In addition, tube wear was found to decrease with increase in particle size, for constant superficial velocity. Three models of tube wear were formulated and provided acceptable prediction of wear when compared with the experimental data.

  4. Drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liska, D.J.; Schamaun, R.G.; Clark, D.C.; Potter, R.C.; Frank, J.A.

    1980-03-11

    The disclosure relates to a drift tube suspension for high intensity linear accelerators. The system comprises a series of box-sections girders independently adjustably mounted on a linear accelerator. A plurality of drift tube holding stems are individually adjustably mounted on each girder.

  5. Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS): A particle-based model of juvenile salmonid movement and dissolved gas exposure history in the Columbia River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2002-01-30

    This paper describes a numerical model of juvenile salmonid migration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. The model, called the Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator or FINS, employs a discrete, particle-based approach to simulate the migration and history of exposure to dissolved gases of individual fish. FINS is linked to a two-dimensional (vertically-averaged) hydrodynamic simulator that quantifies local water velocity, temperature, and dissolved gas levels as a function of river flow rates and dam operations. Simulated gas exposure histories can be input to biological mortality models to predict the effects of various river configurations on fish injury and mortality due to dissolved gas supersaturation. Therefore, FINS serves as a critical linkage between hydrodynamic models of the river system and models of biological impacts. FINS was parameterized and validated based on observations of individual fish movements collected using radiotelemetry methods during 1997 and 1998. A quasi-inverse approach was used to decouple fish swimming movements from advection with the local water velocity, allowing inference of time series of non-advective displacements of individual fish from the radiotelemetry data. Statistical analyses of these displacements are presented, and confirm that strong temporal correlation of fish swimming behavior persists in some cases over several hours. A correlated random-walk model was employed to simulate the observed migration behavior, and parameters of the model were estimated that lead to close correspondence between predictions and observations.

  6. Potential failure of steam generator tubes following a station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, L.W.; Palmrose, D.E.

    1994-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is considering changes to pressurized water reactor (PWR) requirements relating to steam generator tube plugging and repair criteria, including leakage monitoring. The proposed changes are known as the alternate tube plugging criteria (APC) and are intended to permit PWRs to operate with through-wall cracks in steam generator tubes subject to meeting a specified limit on predicted primary to secondary leakage under accident conditions. To assess the consequences of the alternate plugging criteria, analyses were performed for a station blackout sequence in which the reactor core melts while the reactor coolant system (RCS) remains at high pressure. Evaluations were conducted to investigate the potential for tube failure with and without secondary system depressurization. The excessive heat coupled with the high-pressure differentials across the steam generator tubes could result in creep rupture failure of the tubes during a severe accident, which could lead to a radiological release directly to the environment. In order to assess the safety significance of the APC, it is important to identify the level of steam generator tube leakage that can occur without challenging the previous study conclusions that steam generator creep failure will not occur prior to a surge line or hot-leg failure. To assess the effect of leakage on steam generator tube integrity during a core melt sequence with the RCS at high pressure and the secondary side of the steam generators pressurized and depressurized, an analysis was performed for a core melt event resulting from an unmitigated station blackout to identify the total steamenerator and tube leakage flow rates that could induce tube ruptures prior to other RCS boudary faliures that could depressurize the RCS.

  7. Metal wastage analysis of carbon steel tubes in FBC environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethi, V.K.; Puentes, E.; Natesan, K.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1988-11-01

    The TVA 20-MW AFBC Pilot Plant located near Paducah, Kentucky began operations in March 1982, and it operated with the same in-bed evaporator tubes (tube bundle B1) for {approximately}13,625 h through the end of 1985. During January--February 1986, the evaporator tubes were removed to test a new tube bundle configuration (tube bundle C1). After only a short period of operation, tube diameter measurements showed that tube wastage rates for bundle C1 were almost an order of magnitude larger than those recorded for B1. Although several other changes could have been responsible for this increase, the consensus at the TVA was that the increase probably occurred because the pilot plant switched coals from a low chlorine (0.02%) to a high chlorine ({approximately}0.30%) KY 9 coal. In order to determine the validity of the role of chlorine in increasing the tube wastage, several tube sections were cut out from the plant and analyzed at the Kentucky Energy Cabinet Laboratory (KECL) and at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The results of the chemical and metallographic examination showed that wastage could be attributed to erosive wear of chlorine-impregnated iron oxide scales. Corrosion component (oxidation) could have been altered by the presence of elements such as chlorine, sulfur, and potassium in the combustion gases. The results also showed that, in order to understand the complex deposition/corrosion phenomena that occur in FBC systems, it is imperative to characterize the local environment in the vicinity of the tube bundles. 5 refs., 16 figs.

  8. Microhole Coiled Tubing Bottom Hole Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Macune

    2008-06-30

    The original objective of the project, to deliver an integrated 3 1/8-inch diameter Measurement While Drilling (MWD) and Logging While Drilling (LWD) system for drilling small boreholes using coiled tubing drilling, has been achieved. Two prototype systems have been assembled and tested in the lab. One of the systems has been successfully tested downhole in a conventional rotary drilling environment. Development of the 3 1/8-inch system has also lead to development and commercialization of a slightly larger 3.5-inch diameter system. We are presently filling customer orders for the 3.5-inch system while continuing with commercialization of the 3 1/8-inch system. The equipment developed by this project will be offered for sale to multiple service providers around the world, enabling the more rapid expansion of both coiled tubing drilling and conventional small diameter drilling. The project was based on the reuse of existing technology whenever possible in order to minimize development costs, time, and risks. The project was begun initially by Ultima Labs, at the time a small company ({approx}12 employees) which had successfully developed a number of products for larger oil well service companies. In September, 2006, approximately 20 months after inception of the project, Ultima Labs was acquired by Sondex plc, a worldwide manufacturer of downhole instrumentation for cased hole and drilling applications. The acquisition provided access to proven technology for mud pulse telemetry, downhole directional and natural gamma ray measurements, and surface data acquisition and processing, as well as a global sales and support network. The acquisition accelerated commercialization through existing Sondex customers. Customer demand resulted in changes to the product specification to support hotter (150 C) and deeper drilling (20,000 psi pressure) than originally proposed. The Sondex acquisition resulted in some project delays as the resistivity collar was interfaced to a different MWD system and also as the mechanical design was revised for the new pressure requirements. However, the Sondex acquisition has resulted in a more robust system, secure funding for completion of the project, and more rapid commercialization.

  9. SINGLE CRYSTAL NIOBIUM TUBES FOR PARTICLE COLLIDERS ACCELERATOR CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MURPHY, JAMES E

    2013-02-28

    The objective of this research project is to produce single crystal niobium (Nb) tubes for use as particle accelerator cavities for the Fermi laboratory’s International Linear Collider project. Single crystal Nb tubes may have superior performance compared to a polycrystalline tubes because the absence of grain boundaries may permit the use of higher accelerating voltages. In addition, Nb tubes that are subjected to the high temperature, high vacuum crystallization process are very pure and well annealed. Any impurity with a significantly higher vapor pressure than Nb should be decreased by the relatively long exposure at high temperature to the high vacuum environment. After application of the single crystal process, the surfaces of the Nb tubes are bright and shiny, and the tube resembles an electro polished Nb tube. For these reasons, there is interest in single crystal Nb tubes and in a process that will produce single crystal tubes. To convert a polycrystalline niobium tube into a single crystal, the tube is heated to within a few hundred ?C of the melting temperature of niobium, which is 2477 ?C. RF heating is used to rapidly heat the tube in a narrow zone and after reaching the operating temperature, the hot zone is slowly passed along the length of the tube. For crystallization tests with Nb tubes, the traverse rate was in the range of 1-10 cm per hour. All the crystallization tests in this study were performed in a water-cooled, stainless steel chamber under a vacuum of 5 x10-6 torr or better. In earliest tests of the single crystal growth process, the Nb tubes had an OD of 1.9 cm and a wall thickness of 0.15 mm. With these relatively small Nb tubes, the single crystal process was always successful in producing single crystal tubes. In these early tests, the operating temperature was normally maintained at 2200 ?C, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In the next test series, the Nb tube size was increased to 3.8 cm OD and the wall thickness was increased 0.18 mm and eventually to 0.21 mm. Again, with these larger tubes, single crystal tubes were usually produced by the crystallization process. The power supply was generally operated at full output during these tests, and the traverse rate was 5 cm per hour. In a few tests, the traverse rate was increased to 10 cm per hour, and at the faster traverse rate, single crystal growth was not achieved. In these tests with a faster traverse rate, it was thought that the tube was not heated to a high enough temperature to achieve single crystal growth. In the next series of tests, the tube OD was unchanged at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was increased to 0.30 mm. The increased wall thickness made it difficult to reach an operating temperature above 2,000 ?C, and although the single crystal process caused a large increase in the crystal grains, no single crystal tubes were produced. It was assumed that the operating temperature in these tests was not high enough to achieve single crystal growth. In FY 2012, a larger power supply was purchased and installed. With the new power supply, temperatures above the melting point of Nb were easily obtained regardless of the tube thickness. A series of crystallization tests was initiated to determine if indeed the operating temperature of the previous tests was too low to achieve single crystal growth. For these tests, the Nb tube OD remained at 3.8 cm and the wall thickness was 0.30 mm. The first test had an operating temperature of 2,000 ?C. and the operating temperature was increased by 50 ?C increments for each successive test. The final test was very near the Nb melting temperature, and indeed, the Nb tube eventually melted in the center of the tube. These tests showed that higher temperatures did yield larger grain sizes if the traverse rate was held constant at 5 cm per hour, but no single crystal tubes were produced even at the highest operating temperature. In addition, slowing the traverse rate to as low as 1 cm per hour did not yield a single crystal tube regardless of operating temperature. At this time, it

  10. Effectiveness of 700{degrees}C thermal treatment on primary water stress corrosion sensitivity of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes: Laboratory tests and in field experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cattant, F.; Keroulas, F. de; Garriga-Majo, D.; Todeschini, P.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    In France, the steam generators of some 900 MWe reactors, and of all the 1 300 MWe reactors in service are equipped with heat treated Alloy 600 tubes. The purpose of the heat treatment, performed at 700{degrees}C, is to relieve the residual stresses. Generally, it also increases the SCC resistance of the alloy. A laboratory study has been carried out in order to gain a better understanding of the metallurgical factors influencing the PWSCC resistance of Alloy 600 after heat treatment. It has been shown that there are two kinds of tubes for which the heat treatment does not produce a microstructure having a potentially high resistance to SCC: tubes with a high carbon content (over 0.032%) or tubes mill-annealed at high temperatures and heavily cold-worked by the straightening. The analysis of the behaviour of french steam generators reveals that the heat treatment generally had the expected beneficial effect. However, the early cracking in service of some treated tubes led EDF (national power company) to proceed with removals. The majority of the cracked pulled-out tubes exhibit microstructures having a potentially high PWSCC sensibility in laboratory tests. It has been shown that these microstructures can be correlated to a high carbon content.

  11. Advances in coiled-tubing operating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II

    1997-06-01

    The expansion of coiled tubing (CT) applications into spooled flowlines, spooled completions, and CT drilling continues to grow at an accelerated rate. For many users within the oil and gas industry, the CT industry appears to be poised on the threshold of the next logical step in its evolution, the creation of a fully integrated operating system. However, for CT to evolve into such an operating system, the associated services must be robust and sufficiently reliable to support the needs of exploration, development drilling, completion, production management, and wellbore-retirement operations both technically and economically. The most critical hurdle to overcome in creating a CT-based operating system is a fundamental understanding of the operating scope and physical limitations of CT technology. The complete list of mechanisms required to advance CT into an operating system is large and complex. However, a few key issues (such as formal education, training, standardization, and increased levels of experience) can accelerate the transition. These factors are discussed.

  12. Defining coiled tubing limits -- A new approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.R.; Sathuvalli, U.B.; Stone, L.R.; Wolhart, S.

    1996-12-31

    The burst, collapse and axial load operating limits for Coiled Tubing (CT) are currently established using the Von Mises incipient yield criterion. This criterion has historically been used to calculate the limits for oil country tubular goods (OCTG). The limits according to this criterion are based on the point at which the pipe material reaches a load state in which it begins to yield. Because of the bending that occurs when the CT is spooled on and off the reel, and when it is bent over the guide arch, the CT is already far beyond the yield point before it enters a well. Thus, this criterion does not really apply to CT. This paper describes a research project currently in progress. The purpose of this project is to define a new set of CT limits based on criteria other than incipient yield. This new approach to setting CT operating limits takes into account the internal residual stresses in the CT which are a consequence of repeated bending cycles and the accompanying change in material properties.

  13. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Joel B. Pecora, Collin

    2015-03-15

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.

  14. Multiaxial cyclic ratcheting in coiled tubing -- Part 1: Theoretical modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolovic, R.; Tipton, S.M.

    2000-04-01

    Coiled tubing is a long, continuous string of steel tubing that is used in the oil well drilling and servicing industry. Bending strains imposed on coiled tubing as it is deployed and retrieved from a well are considerably into the plastic regime and can be as high as 3%. Progressive growth of tubing diameter occurs when tubing is cyclically bent-straightened under constant internal pressure, regardless of the fact that the hoop stress imposed by typical pressure levels is well below the material's yield strength. A new incremental plasticity model is proposed in this study that can predict multiaxial cyclic ratcheting in coiled tubing more accurately than the conventional plasticity models. A new hardening rule is presented based on published experimental observations. The model also implements a new plastic modulus function. The predictions based on the new theory correlate well with experimental results presented in Part 2 of this paper. Some previously unexpected trends in coiled tubing deformation behavior were observed and correctly predicted using the proposed model.

  15. Overview of steam generator tube degradation and integrity issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Muscara, J.

    1996-10-01

    The degradation of steam generator tubes in pressurized water nuclear reactors continues to be a serious problem. Primary water stress corrosion cracking is commonly observed at the roll transition zone at U-bends, at tube denting locations, and occasionally in plugs and sleeves. Outer-diameter stress corrosion cracking and intergranular attack commonly occur near the tube support plate crevice, near the tube sheet in crevices or under sludge piles, and occasionally in the free span. A particularly troubling recent trend has been the increasing occurrence of circumferential cracking at the RTZ on both the primary and secondary sides. Segmented axial cracking at the tubes support plate crevices is also becoming more common. Despite recent advances in in-service inspection technology, a clear need still exists for quantifying and improving the reliability of in- service inspection methods with respect to the probability of detection of the various types of flaws and their accurate sizing. Improved inspection technology and the increasing occurrence of such degradation modes as circumferential cracking, intergranular attack, and discontinuous axial cracking have led to the formulation of a new performance-based steam generator rule. This new rule would require the development and implementation of a steam generator management program that monitors tube condition against accepted performance criteria to ensure that the tubes perform the required safety function over the next operating cycle. The new steam generator rule will also be applied to severe accident conditions to determine the continued serviceability of a steam generator with degraded tubes in the event of a severe accident. Preliminary analyses are being performed for a hypothetical severe accident scenario to determine whether failure will occur first in the steam generator tubes, which would lead to containment bypass, or instead in the hot leg nozzle or surge line, which would not.

  16. The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

    2010-09-22

    Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cell’s secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

  17. Hole cleaning imperative in coiled tubing drilling operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rameswar, R.M.; Mudda, K.

    1995-09-01

    Annular flow modeling in coiled tubing applications is essential for optimizing mud rheology and keeping the hole clean. Cuttings transport in coiled tubing drilling must be optimized, particularly the modeling of hole cleaning capabilities. The effects of two different muds in contrasting geometries on hold cleaning efficiency are considered, with the simulation performed using Petrocalc 14. Coiled tubing is widely used to drill new vertical and horizontal wells, and in re-entry operations. Horizontal well problems are subsequently modeled, where annular eccentricities can range anywhere from concentric to highly offset, given the highly buckled or helically deflected states of many drill coils.

  18. Serviceability of coiled tubing for sour oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cayard, M.S.; Kane, R.D.

    1996-08-01

    Coiled tubing is an extremely useful tool in many well logging and workover applications in oil and gas production operations. Several important concerns regarding its use include the need for improved guidelines for the assessment of mechanical integrity, fatigue damage, and the effects of hydrogen sulfide in sour oil and gas production environments. This paper provides information regarding the use of coiled tubing in sour environments with particular emphasis on sulfide stress cracking, hydrogen induced cracking and stress-oriented hydrogen induced cracking and how they work synergistically with cyclic cold working of the steel tubing.

  19. FABRICATION OF TUBE TYPE FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loeb, E.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1959-02-01

    A method of fabricating a nuclear reactor fuel element is given. It consists essentially of fixing two tubes in concentric relationship with respect to one another to provide an annulus therebetween, filling the annulus with a fissionablematerial-containing powder, compacting the powder material within the annulus and closing the ends thereof. The powder material is further compacted by swaging the inner surface of the inner tube to increase its diameter while maintaining the original size of the outer tube. This process results in reduced fabrication costs of powdered fissionable material type fuel elements and a substantial reduction in the peak core temperatures while materially enhancing the heat removal characteristics.

  20. Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Talmud, Fred M.; Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio

    1980-01-01

    A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

  1. Incorporation of a Helical Tube Heat Transfer Model in the MARS Thermal Hydraulic Systems Analysis Code for the T/H Analyses of the SMART Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young Jin Lee; Bub Dong Chung; Jong Chull Jo; Hho Jung Kim; Un Chul Lee

    2004-07-01

    SMART is a medium sized integral type advanced pressurized water reactor currently under development at KAERI. The steam generators of SMART are designed with helically coiled tubes and these are designed to produce superheated steam. The helical shape of the tubes can induce strong centrifugal effect on the secondary coolant as it flows inside the tubes. The presence of centrifugal effect is expected to enhance the formation of cross-sectional circulation flows within the tubes that will increase the overall heat transfer. Furthermore, the centrifugal effect is expected to enhance the moisture separation and thus make it easier to produce superheated steam. MARS is a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic systems analysis code with multi-phase, multi-dimensional analysis capability. The MARS code was produced by restructuring and merging the RELAP5 and the COBRA-TF codes. However, MARS as well as most other best-estimate systems analysis codes in current use lack the detailed models needed to describe the thermal hydraulics of helically coiled tubes. In this study, the heat transfer characteristics and relevant correlations for both the tube and shell sides of helical tubes have been investigated, and the appropriate models have been incorporated into the MARS code. The newly incorporated helical tube heat transfer package is available to the MARS users via selection of the appropriate option in the input. A performance analysis on the steam generator of SMART under full power operation was carried out using the modified MARS code. The results of the analysis indicate that there is a significant improvement in the code predictability. (authors)

  2. In-bed tube bank for a fluidized-bed combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hemenway, Jr., Lloyd F.

    1990-01-01

    An in-bed tube bank (10) for a fluidized bed combustor. The tube bank (10) of the present invention comprises one or more fluid communicating boiler tubes (30) which define a plurality of selectively spaced boiler tube sections (32). The tube sections (32) are substantially parallel to one another and aligned in a common plane. The tube bank (10) further comprises support members (34) for joining adjacent tube sections (32), the support members (34) engaging and extending along a selected length of the tube sections (32) and spanning the preselected space therebetween.

  3. Tubing wastage in fluidized-bed coal combustors (Grimethorpe PFBC (pressurized fluidized-bed combustion) Tube Bank E'')

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherell, C.E.

    1989-10-04

    Samples of evaporator tubing from Tube Bank E'' of the Grimethorpe pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) facility in the UK were examined in the third of a series of studies being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The program is being conducted to identify the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for metal loss (wastage) of in-bed carbon-steel evaporator tubes in bubbling-bed coal combustors. Results of examination suggest that bed conditions were less aggressive than in previous experiments in this combustor; however, tubing wastage was observed in some samples. Observations made on these tubes are consistent with the hypothesis of tubing wastage proposed in reports of previous LLNL studies conducted under this program that the dominant cause of metal loss is exfoliation of the normally-protective oxide scale by impacting bed particulates. Good correlation was also observed with trends noted earlier that microstructure of the tubing steel plays a role in its wastage response. 12 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolle , Jack J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

  5. Further advances in coiled-tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eide, E.; Brinkhorst, J.; Voelker, H.; Burge, P.; Ewen, R.

    1995-05-01

    The use of coiled tubing (CT) to drill horizontal re-entry wells has received considerable interest in the industry over the last two years. The benefits of being able to drill at balance, safely and in a controlled manner, with nitrogen to reduce downhole pressure while drilling highly depleted reservoirs, provides an advantage over conventional techniques, particularly in reducing formation damage. This paper describes such a horizontal re-entry drilled in the shallow depleted waterflooded reservoir Barenburg in northern Germany. The scope of work for this project included (1) cutting windows through 6 5/8- and 9 5/8-in. casing, (2) drilling a 5 7/8-in.-medium-radius curve, (3) running a 5-in. liner and a 5 1/2-in. parasitic string for nitrogen injection, (4) drilling a 4 3/8-in. horizontal with nitrogen to maintain a balanced condition, (5) running openhole logs, and (6) running 3 1/2-in. slotted liner. The entire program was executed with no intervention from a conventional rig or workover hoist. A special structure to be positioned over the well to support the CT injector head and to provide a work platform had to be constructed for this type of operation. A dedicated mast for lifting pipe and downhole tools was placed on the substructure. The development of a surface-controlled orienting tool and an adjustable motor provided excellent directional capabilities on a 2 3/8-in. CT. This program represents a significant extension of the capabilities of drilling with CT.

  6. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Kenneth V. (Clinton, TN); Cunningham, Jr., Robert A. (Powell, TN); Murrin, Horace T. (Alcoa, TN)

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  7. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Murrin, H.T.

    1981-05-29

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  8. Bundled multi-tube nozzle for a turbomachine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Zuo, Baifang; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2015-09-22

    A turbomachine includes a compressor, a combustor operatively connected to the compressor, an end cover mounted to the combustor, and an injection nozzle assembly operatively connected to the combustor. The injection nozzle assembly includes a cap member having a first surface that extends to a second surface. The cap member further includes a plurality of openings. A plurality of bundled mini-tube assemblies are detachably mounted in the plurality of openings in the cap member. Each of the plurality of bundled mini-tube assemblies includes a main body section having a first end section and a second end section. A fluid plenum is arranged within the main body section. A plurality of tubes extend between the first and second end sections. Each of the plurality of tubes is fluidly connected to the fluid plenum.

  9. Modeling coiled-tubing velocity strings for gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, J.; Martinez, A.

    1998-02-01

    Because of its ability to prolong well life, its relatively low expense, and the relative ease with which it is installed, coiled tubing has become a preferred remedial method of tubular completion for gas wells. Of course, the difficulty in procuring wireline-test data is a drawback to verifying the accuracy of the assumptions and predictions used for coiled-tubing selection. This increases the importance of the prediction-making process, and, as a result, places great emphasis on the modeling methods that are used. This paper focuses on the processes and methods for achieving sound multiphase-flow predictions by looking at the steps necessary to arrive at coiled-tubing selection. Furthermore, this paper examines the variables that serve as indicators of the viability of each tubing size, especially liquid holdup. This means that in addition to methodology, emphasis is placed on the use of a good wellbore model. The computer model discussed is in use industry wide.

  10. World Oils`s 1995 coiled tubing tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    Increasingly in demand in almost every aspect of today`s E and P market because of flexibility, versatility and economy, coiled tubing is being used for a variety of drilling, completion and production operations that previously required conventional jointed pipe, workover and snubbing units, or rotary drilling rigs. For 1995 the popular coiled tubing tables have been reformatted, expanded and improved to give industry engineering and field personnel additional, more specific selection, operational and installation information. Traditional specifications and dimensions have been augmented by addition of calculated performance properties for downhole workover and well servicing applications. For the first time the authors are presenting this information as a stand-alone feature, separate from conventional jointed tubing connection design tables, which are published annually in the January issue. With almost seven times as much usable data as previous listings, the authors hope that their new coiled tubing tables are even more practical and useful to their readers.

  11. Midcontinent well operators learn advantages of coiled-tubing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle, D.

    1995-07-01

    From well cleanup to velocity strings to squeeze jobs, more Midcontinent operators are adding coiled-tubing methods to their oilfield techniques. The advantages of these techniques are discussed.

  12. Specialized equipment enabled completions with large coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-02-19

    Specialized equipment enabled successful well completions in Oman with large 3{1/2}-inch coiled tubing. Conventional drilling or completion rigs were not needed. Although the use of 3{1/2}-inch coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. One Middle East operating company felt that if downhole completion equipment could be successfully run using coiled tubing, greater cost efficiency, both in initial deployment and in maintenance, could be derived. The paper lists some of the technical considerations for these assumptions. The long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, but experience in Oman has confirmed the belief that large coiled tubing completions can be technically achieved.

  13. OBSERVATION OF FLUX-TUBE CROSSINGS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, L.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Yan, Y.

    2013-03-20

    Current sheets are ubiquitous in the solar wind. They are a major source of the solar wind MHD turbulence intermittency. They may result from nonlinear interactions of the solar wind MHD turbulence or are the boundaries of flux tubes that originate from the solar surface. Some current sheets appear in pairs and are the boundaries of transient structures such as magnetic holes and reconnection exhausts or the edges of pulsed Alfven waves. For an individual current sheet, discerning whether it is a flux-tube boundary or due to nonlinear interactions or the boundary of a transient structure is difficult. In this work, using data from the Wind spacecraft, we identify two three-current-sheet events. Detailed examination of these two events suggests that they are best explained by the flux-tube-crossing scenario. Our study provides convincing evidence supporting the scenario that the solar wind consists of flux tubes where distinct plasmas reside.

  14. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  15. Alternative Electrostatic Green's Function for a Long Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, Stephan E.

    2003-11-01

    This note describes an expression for the electrostatic Green's function in a long conducting tube. The expression allows one to readily compute the potentials and fields at and in the vicinity of the singularity where other methods have difficulty.

  16. X-ray tube with magnetic electron steering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Kim W. (Albuquerque, NM); Turman, Bobby N. (Albuquerque, NM); Kaye, Ronald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Larry X. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An X-ray tube uses a magnetic field to steer electrons. The magnetic field urges electrons toward the anode, increasing the proportion of electrons emitted from the cathode that reach desired portions of the anode and consequently contribute to X-ray production. The magnetic field also urges electrons reflected from the anode back to the anode, further increasing the efficiency of the tube.

  17. Why high-frequency pulse tubes can be tipped

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, Gregory W092710; Backhaus, Scott N

    2010-01-01

    The typical low-frequency pulse-tube refrigerator loses significant cooling power when it is tipped with the pulse tube's cold end above its hot end, because natural convection in the pulse tube loads the cold heat exchanger. Yet most high-frequency pulse-tube refrigerators work well in any orientation with respect to gravity. In such a refrigerator, natural convection is suppressed by sufficiently fast velocity oscil1ations, via a nonlinear hydrodynamic effect that tends to align the density gradients in the pulse tube parallel to the oscillation direction. Since gravity's tendency to cause convection is only linear in the pulse tube's end-to-end temperature difference while the oscillation's tendency to align density gradients with oscillating velocity is nonlinear, it is easiest to suppress convection when the end-to-end temperature difference is largest. Simple experiments demonstrate this temperature dependence, the strong dependence on the oscillating velocity, and little dependence on the magnitude or phase of the oscillating pressure. In some circumstances in this apparatus, the suppression of convection is a hysteretic function of oscillating velocity. In some other circumstances, a time-dependent convective state seems more difficult to suppress.

  18. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Charles A.; Trowbridge, Frank R.

    2011-05-10

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  19. Recomplete deep hot wells successfully with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garner, T.; Fleckenstein, W.; Shelley, B.

    1995-06-01

    A squeeze reperforation procedure in the Elk Hills, California field using coiled tubing included contaminating excess cement and jetting it from the well bore to eliminate the need to drill out cement before shooting new perforations. The 324-7R well was producing 260 b/d of oil through 2 7/8-in. production tubing, with a 20,000-scf/bbl gas-oil ratio (GOR). Bottomhole static temperature was 250 F. After pumping a cement squeeze to 9,000 ft trough 1{1/2}-in. coiled tubing (CT) run inside the production tubing, oil production increased to 550 b/d of oil, and the GOR decreased to 5,000 scf/bbl when new perforations were shot. Cement was pumped 9,000 ft through the CT and circulated back through the production tubing/CT annulus. Operation cost was estimated at 20% less than for a comparable job performance with conventional tubing. Cost of the CT squeeze was recovered by 58 days incremental production.

  20. Logging with coiled tubing less effective than with drill pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Den Bosch, R. )

    1994-01-31

    Coiled tubing offered neither economic nor operational advantages over drill pipe for conveying logging tools in open hole shallow horizontal wells in Germany. In the past 2 years, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GMbH (MEEG) participated in completing eight shallow horizontal wells. These were medium-to-short radius wells at measured depths of between 850 and 2,000 m. The average horizontal section was 350 m. The logging tools were conveyed by coiled tubing or drill pipe. MEEG attempted to log five wells with coiled tubing-conveyed tools, four with 1 1/2-in. tubing. Total depth was reached reliably in only one well, the shallowest and with the shortest horizontal section. Simulation programs were unreliable for calculating the downhole forces of the coil/tool combination or predicting possible helical lockups. In wells with drill pipe-conveyed logs, the tool combination could always be pushed to total depth, and the operations were generally faster and cost less than logging with coiled tubing. Also, drill pipe allowed longer and heavier tool strings. For reliable operations, coiled tubing needs to be more rigid, rig-up/rig-down times need to be improved, and the simulation programs must be more reliable for predicting downhole lock-up.

  1. The effect of voltage waveform and tube diameter on transporting cold plasma strings through a flexible dielectric tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohbatzadeh, Farshad; Omran, Azadeh Valinataj

    2014-11-15

    In this work, we developed transporting atmospheric pressure cold plasma using single electrode configuration through a sub-millimetre flexible dielectric tube beyond 100?cm. It was shown that the waveform of the applied high voltage is essential for controlling upstream and downstream plasma inside the tube. In this regard, sawtooth waveform enabled the transport of plasma with less applied high voltage compared to sinusoidal and pulsed form voltages. A cold plasma string as long as 130?cm was obtained by only 4?kV peak-to-peak sawtooth high voltage waveform. Optical emission spectroscopy revealed that reactive chemical species, such as atomic oxygen and hydroxyl, are generated at the tube exit. The effect of tube diameter on the transported plasma was also examined: the smaller the diameter, the higher the applied voltage. The device is likely to be used for sterilization, decontamination, and therapeutic endoscopy as already suggested by other groups in recent past years.

  2. SU-E-I-25: Determining Tube Current, Tube Voltage and Pitch Suitable for Low- Dose Lung Screening CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K; Matthews, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The quality of a computed tomography (CT) image and the dose delivered during its acquisition depend upon the acquisition parameters used. Tube current, tube voltage, and pitch are acquisition parameters that potentially affect image quality and dose. This study investigated physicians' abilities to characterize small, solid nodules in low-dose CT images for combinations of current, voltage and pitch, for three CT scanner models. Methods: Lung CT images was acquired of a Data Spectrum anthropomorphic torso phantom with various combinations of pitch, tube current, and tube voltage; this phantom was used because acrylic beads of various sizes could be placed within the lung compartments to simulate nodules. The phantom was imaged on two 16-slice scanners and a 64-slice scanner. The acquisition parameters spanned a range of estimated CTDI levels; the CTDI estimates from the acquisition software were verified by measurement. Several experienced radiologists viewed the phantom lung CT images and noted nodule location, size and shape, as well as the acceptability of overall image quality. Results: Image quality for assessment of nodules was deemed unsatisfactory for all scanners at 80 kV (any tube current) and at 35 mA (any tube voltage). Tube current of 50 mA or more at 120 kV resulted in similar assessments from all three scanners. Physician-measured sphere diameters were closer to actual diameters for larger spheres, higher tube current, and higher kV. Pitch influenced size measurements less for larger spheres than for smaller spheres. CTDI was typically overestimated by the scanner software compared to measurement. Conclusion: Based on this survey of acquisition parameters, a low-dose CT protocol of 120 kV, 50 mA, and pitch of 1.4 is recommended to balance patient dose and acceptable image quality. For three models of scanners, this protocol resulted in estimated CTDIs from 2.9–3.6 mGy.

  3. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    confinement fusion plasmas (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas Authors: Rozmus, W. [1] ; Chapman, T. [2] ; Brantov, A. [3] Search SciTech Connect for author "Brantov, A." Search SciTech Connect for ORCID "0000000154139612" Search

  4. An evaluation of large diameter coiled tubing for subsurface production tubulars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, L.S.; Smith, L.W.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an economic and technological perspective for use of large diameter coiled tubing relative to threaded tubulars for subsurface production tubing. This new advancement in coiled tubing technology can significantly reduce the expense for purchasing and installing production tubing while increasing hydrocarbon reserve recovery and providing a safer, more desirable ecosystem interrelation.

  5. Apparatus and method for controlling heat transfer between a fluidized bed and tubes immersed therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, James L. (3 Hilltop Ave., Vernon, CT 06066); Cerkanowicz, Anthony E. (8 Fieldstone Dr., Livingston, NJ 07039)

    1983-01-01

    In a fluidized bed of solid particles having one or more heat exchange tubes immersed therein, the rate of heat transfer between the fluidized particles and a fluid flowing through the immersed heat exchange tubes is controlled by rotating an arcuate shield apparatus about each tube to selectively expose various portions of the tube to the fluidized particles.

  6. Apparatus and method for controlling heat transfer between a fluidized bed and tubes immersed therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, James L. (3 Hilltop Ave., Vernon, CT 06066); Cerkanowicz, Anthony E. (8 Fieldstone Dr., Livingston, NJ 07039)

    1982-01-01

    In a fluidized bed of solid particles having one or more heat exchange tubes immersed therein, the rate of heat transfer between the fluidized particles and a fluid flowing through the immersed heat exchange tubes is controlled by rotating an arcuate shield apparatus about each tube to selectively expose various portions of the tube to the fluidized particles.

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, Terri G.

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  8. Crimp sealing of tubes flush with or below a fixed surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Jon E.; Walmsley, Don; Wapman, P. Derek

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus for crimp sealing and severing tubes flush or below a fixed surface. Tube crimping below a fixed surface requires an asymmetric die and anvil configuration. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes. This asymmetric die and anvil is used when a ductile metal tube and valve assembly are attached to a pressure vessel which has a fixed surface around the base of the tube at the pressure vessel. A flat anvil is placed against the tube. Die guides are placed against the tube on a side opposite the anvil. A pinch-off die is inserted into the die guides against the tube. Adequate clearance for inserting the die and anvil around the tube is needed below the fixed surface. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes.

  9. Crimp sealing of tubes flush with or below a fixed surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, J.E.; Walmsley, D.; Wapman, P.D.

    1996-08-20

    An apparatus for crimp sealing and severing tubes flush or below a fixed surface. Tube crimping below a fixed surface requires an asymmetric die and anvil configuration. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes. This asymmetric die and anvil is used when a ductile metal tube and valve assembly are attached to a pressure vessel which has a fixed surface around the base of the tube at the pressure vessel. A flat anvil is placed against the tube. Die guides are placed against the tube on a side opposite the anvil. A pinch-off die is inserted into the die guides against the tube. Adequate clearance for inserting the die and anvil around the tube is needed below the fixed surface. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes. 8 figs.

  10. Incident report. Tube Bank C-metal wastage status report, November 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    During the Hot Commissioning tests in preparation for Test Series 2, a significant degree of metal wastage occurred on the external surfaces of Tube Bank 'C'. The extent of the metal wastage was unexpected and has been a matter of concern to the Project. The report provides a history of the operational period for Tube Bank 'C' and details the measurements of metal wastage that have been recorded. The project has initiated an extensive study of the possible cause, or causes, of the metal wastage and these are discussed. Operational tests are to be carried out at Grimethorpe, CURL and CRE with a view to determining the mechanism of metal wastage that exists within the fluidized bed. The results of these tests will be reported and will form the basis for the design of a new bank, which will be installed in the combustor in due course, if required. The Project is taking necessary steps to ensure that the cause of the metal wastage is fully investigated and that the resultant slippage in the Test Series 2 schedule is minimised.

  11. Analysis/control of in-bed tube erosion phenomena in the Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) system. Technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.W.

    1994-04-01

    This technical report summarizes the research work performed and progress achieved during the period of January 1, 1994 to March 31, 1994. The metal wastage mechanisms and rate that occur in 1018 carbon steel used in in-bed tube of the bubbling fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) are discussed with particle-surface collision frequency around tube. The distribution of particle-surface collision frequency around tube was affected by the location of tube and bed height. A series of material wastage tests was carried out using 742 {mu}m, quartz silica (SiO{sub 2}) on 1018 steel at elevated temperature (300 {degrees}C) which occurs in-bed locations of BFBC. The morphologies of the specimens were examined and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The maximum collision frequency around the periphery of the tube was found at 45 {degrees}, 315 {degrees} from bottom center, 0{degrees}, which was correlated with maximum material wastage rate of the specimens.

  12. Axisymmetrical separator for separating particulate matter from a fluid carrying medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linhardt, Hans D.

    1984-09-04

    A separator for separating particles carried in a fluid carrying medium is disclosed. The separator includes an elongated duct and associated openings incorporated in a solid body. The duct is axisymmetrical relative to its longitudinal axis, and includes a curved wall portion having a curved cross-section taken along the longitudinal axis. An axisymmetrical opening located downstream of the curved wall portion leads from the duct into an axisymmetrical channel which is substantially radially disposed relative to the longitudinal axis. Continuation of the duct downstream of the opening is a discharge portion which is substantially colinear with the longitudinal axis. In operation, a substantial majority of the fluid carrying medium leaves the duct radially through the opening and channel in a state substantially free of particles. A remaining small portion of the fluid carrying medium and a substantial majority of the particles are channelled into the discharge portion by centrifugal forces arising due to travel of the particles along the curved walls. For industrial scale separation of particles from a fluid carrying medium, such as for the clean-up of stack gases, an array of several hundred to several thousand of the separators is provided.

  13. Applying a tapered electrode on a porous ceramic support tube by masking a band inside the tube and drawing in electrode material from the outside of the tube by suction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vasilow, T.R.; Zymboly, G.E.

    1991-12-17

    An electrode is deposited on a support by providing a porous ceramic support tube having an open end and closed end; masking at least one circumferential interior band inside the tube; evacuating air from the tube by an evacuation system, to provide a permeability gradient between the masked part and unmasked part of the tube; applying a liquid dispersion of solid electrode particles to the outside surface of the support tube, where liquid flows through the wall, forming a uniform coating over the unmasked support part and a tapered coating over the masked part. 2 figures.

  14. Applying a tapered electrode on a porous ceramic support tube by masking a band inside the tube and drawing in electrode material from the outside of the tube by suction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vasilow, Theodore R.; Zymboly, Gregory E.

    1991-01-01

    An electrode is deposited on a support by providing a porous ceramic support tube (10) having an open end (14) and closed end (16); masking at least one circumferential interior band (18 and 18') inside the tube; evacuating air from the tube by an evacuation system (30), to provide a permeability gradient between the masked part (18 and 18') and unmasked part (20) of the tube; applying a liquid dispersion of solid electrode particles to the outside surface of the support tube, where liquid flows through the wall, forming a uniform coating (42) over the unmasked support part (20) and a tapered coating over the masked part (18 and 18').

  15. Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, N.P.

    2000-10-13

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Aiken, South Carolina that is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At SRS Draeger tubes are used to identify the amount and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Draeger tubes rely on a chemical reaction to identify the nature and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Disposal practices for these tubes were identified by performing a hazardous waste evaluation per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Additional investigations were conducted to provide guidance for their safe handling, storage and disposal. A list of Draeger tubes commonly used at SRS was first evaluated to determine if they contained any material that could render them as a RCRA hazardous waste. Disposal techniques for Draeger tubes that contained any of the toxic contaminants listed in South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79. 261.24 (b) and/or contained an acid in the liquid form were addressed.

  16. Signature of the Fragmentation of a Color Flux Tube

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-10-07

    The production of quark-antiquark pairs along a color flux tube precedes the fragmentation of the tube. Because of the local conservation of momentum and charge, the production of amore » $q$-$$\\bar q$$ pair will lead to correlations of adjacently produced mesons (mostly pions). Adjacently produced pions however can be signalled by the their rapidity difference $$\\Delta y$$ falling within the window of $$|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$, on account of the space-time-rapidity ordering of produced pions in a flux tube fragmentation. Therefore, the local conservation of momentum will lead to a suppression of azimuthal two-pion correlation $$dN/(d\\Delta \\phi\\, d\\Delta y)$$ on the near side at $$(\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta y) \\sim 0$$, but an enhanced azimuthal correlation on the back-to-back, away side at $$(\\Delta \\phi$$$$\\sim$$$$ \\pi,\\Delta y$$$$\\sim$$0). Similarly, in a flux tube fragmentation, the local conservation of charge will forbid the production of like charge pions within $$|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$, but there is no such prohibition for $$|\\Delta y| >1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$. These properties may be used as the signature for the fragmentation of a color flux tube.« less

  17. Multiaxial plasticity and fatigue life prediction in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, S.M.

    1996-12-31

    Coiled tubing is being used increasingly in the oil well drilling and servicing industry. Continuous steel tubing of structural dimensions (up to 89 mm or 3.5 in. in diameter) is wound onto a large-diameter reel for repeated deployment into and out of a well bore. The bending strain range associated with each wrap-unwrap cycle can exceed 3% with lives well below 100 cycles. During constant internal pressure fatigue testing, tubing has been observed to grow in diameter by as much as 30%. This paper describes an analytical model to predict the fatigue behavior of coiled tubing subjected to variable pressure service conditions. The approach utilizes standard low-cycle fatigue data but requires additional experimental results from constant pressure fatigue testing. The algorithm is based on estimates of biaxial ratcheting from an incremental plasticity model using a hybrid associated flow rule, a modified kinematic hardening rule with multiple von Mises yield surfaces, and a specialized limit surface concept. An empirical damage parameter was formulated based on constant pressure fatigue data using mean and fluctuating von Mises equivalent strain components occurring throughout the life of a section of tubing. This parameters is used with the Palmgren-Miner definition of cumulative damage to track damage that is accumulating nonlinearly under constant or variable pressure histories. Modifications to standard incremental plasticity components and implementation assumptions used to apply the model are presented and discussed. The predictive capability of the model is demonstrated relative to data generated under constant and variable pressure histories.

  18. Case studies from Oman for coiled tubing deployed completion techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, R.W.; Conrad, B.

    1996-09-01

    Although the use of ultra-large coiled tubing to complete wells is relatively new, it is gaining widespread industry application. This paper will detail the equipment necessary to perform an operation of this type and will present information from several case studies in Oman in which an operator has successfully deployed completion equipment on 3-1/2-inch-OD coiled tubing. In addition to a discussion of the equipment required to perform the necessary operations, the trial parameters that were established by this operator will be given. The information presented has been selected to allow an initial evaluation to be made of coiled tubing completions in general and will help to determine whether this method can prove to be less expensive than traditional rig-based completions. The topics presented have been chosen to provide the reader with a thorough understanding of the techniques and preparation needed to execute a coiled tubing completion. The summary of experiences will conclude that this innovative completion technique can be a viable method for completing wells. Although long-term advantages regarding production and well maintenance cannot yet be determined, the operator`s experiences to date have confirmed his initial belief that use of coiled tubing in ultra-large continuous-pipe applications can be cost effective.

  19. Signature of the Fragmentation of a Color Flux Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-10-07

    The production of quark-antiquark pairs along a color flux tube precedes the fragmentation of the tube. Because of the local conservation of momentum and charge, the production of a $q$-$\\bar q$ pair will lead to correlations of adjacently produced mesons (mostly pions). Adjacently produced pions however can be signalled by the their rapidity difference $\\Delta y$ falling within the window of $|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$, on account of the space-time-rapidity ordering of produced pions in a flux tube fragmentation. Therefore, the local conservation of momentum will lead to a suppression of azimuthal two-pion correlation $dN/(d\\Delta \\phi\\, d\\Delta y)$ on the near side at $(\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta y) \\sim 0$, but an enhanced azimuthal correlation on the back-to-back, away side at $(\\Delta \\phi$$\\sim$$ \\pi,\\Delta y$$\\sim$0). Similarly, in a flux tube fragmentation, the local conservation of charge will forbid the production of like charge pions within $|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$, but there is no such prohibition for $|\\Delta y| >1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$. These properties may be used as the signature for the fragmentation of a color flux tube.

  20. Missile Captive Carry Monitoring and Helicopter Identification Using a Capacitive Microelectromechanical Systems Accelerometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatchell, Brian K.; Mauss, Fredrick J.; Amaya, Ivan A.; Skorpik, James R.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Marotta, Steve

    2012-03-27

    Military missiles are exposed to many sources of mechanical vibration that can affect system reliability, safety, and mission effectiveness. The U. S. Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has been developing missile health monitoring systems to assess and improve reliability, reduce life cycle costs, and increase system readiness. One of the most significant exposures to vibration occurs when the missile is being carried by a helicopter or other aviation platform, which is a condition known as captive carry. Recording the duration of captive carry exposure during the missile’s service life can enable the implementation of predictive maintenance and resource management programs. Since the vibration imparted by each class of helicopter varies in frequency and amplitude, tracking the vibration exposure from each helicopter separately can help quantify the severity and harmonic content of the exposure. Under the direction of AMRDEC staff, engineers at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a Captive Carry Health Monitor (CCHM) for the Hellfire II missile. The CCHM is an embedded usage monitoring device installed on the outer skin of the Hellfire II missile to record the cumulative hours the host missile has been in captive carry mode. To classify the vibration by class of helicopter, the CCHM analyzes the amplitude and frequency content of the vibration with the Goertzel algorithm to detect the presence of distinctive rotor harmonics. Cumulative usage data are accessible in theater from an external display; monthly usage histograms are accessible through an internal download connector. This paper provides an overview of the CCHM electrical and package design, describes field testing and data analysis techniques used to monitor captive carry identify and the class of helicopter, and discusses the potential application of missile health and usage data for real-time reliability analysis and fleet management.

  1. High Current-Carrying Capability in c -Axis-Oriented Superconducting

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MgB{sub 2} Thin Films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect High Current-Carrying Capability in c -Axis-Oriented Superconducting MgB{sub 2} Thin Films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High Current-Carrying Capability in c -Axis-Oriented Superconducting MgB{sub 2} Thin Films In high-quality c -axis-oriented MgB{sub 2} thin films, we observed high critical current densities (J{sub c} ) of {approx}16 MA/cm{sup 2} at 15K under self-fields comparable to those of cuprate high-temperature

  2. Pair creation in an electric flux tube and chiral anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Economics and Politics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Using the chiral anomaly, we discuss the pair creation of massless fermions under the effect of a magnetic field B-vector when an electric flux tube E-vector parallel to B-vector is switched on. The tube is axially symmetric and infinitely long. For the constraint B>>E, we can analytically obtain the spatial and temporal behaviors of the number density of the fermions, the azimuthal magnetic field generated by the fermions, and so on. We find that the lifetime t{sub c} of the electric field becomes shorter as the width of the tube becomes narrower. Applying it to the plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, we find that the color electric field decays quickly such that t{sub c}{approx_equal}Q{sub s}{sup -1}, in which Q{sub s} is the saturation momentum.

  3. More collapse tests add to coiled tubing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, E.J. ); Costall, D. )

    1991-06-17

    The collapse limits of thicker-walled coiled tubing have been determined to ensure safe and successful workover operations. Prudhoe Bay has been using 1.75-in OD coiled tubing for 2 years. When BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. initially started using this larger size coil, collapse tests were run on 0.109-in. wall thickness coil. These tests provide a base curve by which much work has been performed in the western operating area of the Prudhoe Bay Unit. However, use of 1.75-in. coiled tubing has been expanded to include wall thickness of 0.125, 0.134, and 0.156-in. Except for theoretical calculations, no data were available to ensure that we would know the collapsed limitations for these sizes. To fill in this gap, further collapse testing has been done.

  4. Consumers' Gas lays coiled steel tubing in Lake Erie

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Forty-four miles of polypropylene-coated, coiled steel tubing have been laid underwater by the Consumers' Gas Co. of Toronto. Laid in 33,000-ft sections from a giant reel, the tubing is used for the remote control of subsea hydraulically operated line valves and the distribution of methyl alcohol to subsea gas wells. The installation is the first of long, continuous tubing underwater using this technology in Canada. The line was installed in conjunction with a newly completed gas well gathering system and processing plant that is expected to yield more than 35 billion cu ft of fuel over the next 15 yr. The new system under W.-Central Lake Erie provides consumers with a cost-effective method for remotely controlling underwater hydraulic valves and distributing methyl alcohol to eliminate hydrate build-up in the gas gathering lines.

  5. Temperature dependence of wastage of in-bed tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, I.G.; Sethi, V.K.; Stringer, J.

    1995-12-31

    Observations of the wastage of evaporator tubes immersed in combusting fluidized beds have suggested that a change in tube metal temperature, around the relatively narrow range of 300 to 400 C, can effect large changes in the rate and mode of tube wastage. A number of attempts has been made to reproduce this temperature dependence of metal wastage in the laboratory, with varying degrees of success. In this paper, the types of wastage temperature relationships developed by various research groups are reviewed in light of the erosion and corrosion conditions actually created in the laboratory simulations. In addition, the ability of the various scenarios proposed to explain this wastage phenomenon to rationalize the types of temperature dependence observed is examined.

  6. The effect of fluid flow on coiled tubing reach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhalla, K.; Walton, I.C.

    1996-12-31

    A critical parameter to the success of many coiled tubing (CT) operations in highly deviated or horizontal wells is the depth penetration that can be attained before the CT buckles and locks up. Achieving a desired depth is always critical in CT operations and attaining an additional reach of a few hundred feet can be crucial. This paper addresses the effect of fluid flow in the CT and in the CT/wellbore annulus on the state of force and stress in the CT, and thereby predicts its effect on the reach attainable by the CT. The flow of fluid through the CT and annulus between the CT and borehole modifies the pressures and the effective force which governs the mechanical stability of the CT. The net force per unit length due to fluid flow in the coiled tubing and annulus between the coiled tubing casing/well is calculated in terms of the shear stress and its effect on the onset of buckling and lockup is determined. The model is then implemented in a full tubing forces calculation and the effect of flowing fluids and producing fluids on reach is analyzed. The new model is utilized in the design of commercial jobs. The exact analytic model shows that fluid flow inside the CT has zero impact on reach, that downward flow in the annulus has a favourable impact, and upward flow in the annulus reduces the maximum attainable reach. Using the full tubing forces model, a coiled tubing job can be designed taking into account the flow of a fluid with a specified rheology, density and flow rate. Thus the feasibility of attaining a given reach can be more accurately determined. Results are presented in the form of the surface weight for commercial wells and compared to field jobs.

  7. Coiled tubing: Applications for today`s challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, M.; Headrick, D.; Isennock, C.

    1999-07-01

    Although coiled tubing (CT) was introduced to the oil and gas industry in the 1960s, the product was used for little more than nitrogen jetting and sand removal for nearly two decades. Then, in the 1990s, the availability of CT with large diameters (up to 4 inch OD) and higher strength enabled its use for more complicated and demanding jobs. For the first time, CT could provide the high flow rates and withstand the pressures required for production tubulars, without a rig or hoist unit. The paper describes composite coiled tubing, fracturing, laying offshore flow lines, and a gas storage well cleanout, and a geothermal well cleanout.

  8. An overview of McKittrick coiled tubing drilling project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewert, D.P.; Ramagno, R.A.; Hurkmans, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    In an effort to reduce drilling costs on thermal wells, service companies began reducing casing sizes and well pad location sizes in 1993. Based on a successful four-well pilot project completed in early 1994 at the Belridge Field, a 115-well steam injector project was completed in the McKittrick Field in late 1994, of which 68 wells were drilled with coiled tubing. This paper will discuss why slimhole completions and coiled tubing drilling were selected for this project, the operational aspects of drilling 68 wells in 92 working days, and conclusions about the project.

  9. Continuation of Studies on Development of ODS Heat Exchanger Tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Brown; David Workman; Bimal Kad; Gaylord Smith; Archie Robertson; Ian Wright

    2008-04-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Center (NETL), has initiated a strategic plan for the development of advanced technologies needed to design and build fossil fuel plants with very high efficiency and environmental performance. These plants, referred to as 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs by DOE, will produce electricity, chemicals, fuels, or a combination of these products, and possibly secondary products such as steam/heat for industrial use. MA956 is a prime candidate material being considered for a high temperature heat exchanger in the 'Vision 21' and FutureGen programs. This material is an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy; however, there are some gaps in the data required to commit to the use of these alloys in a full-size plant. To fill the technology gaps for commercial production and use of the material for 'Advanced Power Generation Systems' this project has performed development activity to significant increase in circumferential strength of MA956 as compared to currently available material, investigated bonding technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints through joining development, and performed tensile, creep and fire-side corrosion tests to validate the use and fabrication processes of MA956 to heat exchanger tubing applications. Development activities within this projected has demonstrated increased circumferential strength of MA956 tubes through flow form processing. Of the six fabrication technologies for bonding tube-to-tube joints, inertia friction welding (IFW) and flash butt welding (FBW) were identified as processes for joining MA956 tubes. Tensile, creep, and fire-side corrosion test data were generated for both base metal and weld joints. The data can be used for design of future systems employing MA956. Based upon the positive development activities, two test probes were designed and fabricated for field exposure testing at 1204 C ({approx}2200 F) flue gas. The probes contained tube portions with FBW and IFW welded MA956. Field testing of the probes and remaining heat exchanger design activity will be performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  10. High voltage supply for neutron tubes in well logging applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Humphreys, D. Russell

    1989-01-01

    A high voltage supply is provided for a neutron tube used in well logging. The "biased pulse" supply of the invention combines DC and "full pulse" techniques and produces a target voltage comprising a substantial negative DC bias component on which is superimposed a pulse whose negative peak provides the desired negative voltage level for the neutron tube. The target voltage is preferably generated using voltage doubling techniques and employing a voltage source which generates bipolar pulse pairs having an amplitude corresponding to the DC bias level.

  11. Method for forming a layer of synthetic corrosion products on tubing surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Salamon, Eugene J. M. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for forming a synthetic corrosion product layer on tube surfaces. The method utilizes two dissimilar materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion. An object tube and sacrificial tube are positioned one inside the other such that an annular region is created between the two tubes' surfaces. A slurry of synthetic corrosion products is injected into this annular region and the assembly is heat treated. This heat causes the tubes to expand, the inner tube with the higher coefficient of expansion expanding more than the outer tube, thereby creating internal pressures which consolidate the corrosion products and adhere the corrosion products to the tubing surfaces. The sacrificial tube may then be removed by conventional chemical etching or mechanical methods.

  12. Workover well control. Part 4. Coiled-tubing pigs speed workover operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, N.

    1981-09-14

    Many workover operations can be completed quickly and efficiently by using coiled tubing instead of jointed tubing or conventional rigs. In general, coiled tubing is a continuous string of small-diameter tubing that can be run into the well without the necessity of making joint connections. The operations are safe, involve small amounts of rig time, and usually are more economical than other forms of concentric work. Coiled tubing work is usually conducted on producing wells, which necessitates pressure-control precautions. Applications for coiled tubing involve all aspects of workover operations except wire-line work. Coiled tubing can be used in initiating flow, cleaning out sand in tubing, and performing stimulation operations. In addition, drilling can be conducted with coiled tubing when down-hole motors are used.

  13. Tubing wastage in fluidized-bed coal combustors: Examinations of tubing from Test Series 2, NCB (IEA Grimethorpe) Ltd. Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherell, C.E.; Meisenheimer, R.G.

    1987-10-30

    This study of wasted heat-exchanger tubing from the Grimethorpe PFBC Facility was conducted to characterize affected fireside surfaces and identify the mechanism/s responsible. Examinations showed that the wasted surfaces are not typical of those produced by erosion alone, as oxide deposits are present on all surfaces. Continual exfoliation of the normally-protective oxide layer is probably responsible for a major portion of tubing wastage. There are also indications of direct metal loss occurring through a series of events wherein repeatd formation and exfoliation of surface oxides produce an irregular metal interface that is mechanically deformed during combustor operation. The cold-worked metal protrusions, or platelets, on the roughened surface readily fracture from the tubing wall and are lost into the bed. 27 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Method and apparatus for remote tube crevice detection by current and voltage probe resistance measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kikta, T.J.; Mitchell, R.D.

    1992-11-24

    A method and apparatus for determining the extent of contact between an electrically conducting tube and an electrically conductive tubesheet surrounding the tube, based upon the electrical resistance of the tube and tubesheet. A constant current source is applied to the interior of the electrically conducting tube by probes and a voltmeter is connected between other probes to measure the voltage at the point of current injection, which is inversely proportional to the amount of contact between the tube and tubesheet. Namely, the higher the voltage measured by the voltmeter, the less contact between the tube and tubesheet. 4 figs.

  15. Method and apparatus for remote tube crevice detection by current and voltage probe resistance measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kikta, Thomas J.; Mitchell, Ronald D.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the extent of contact between an electrically conducting tube and an electrically conductive tubesheet surrounding the tube, based upon the electrical resistance of the tube and tubesheet. A constant current source is applied to the interior of the electrically conducting tube by probes and a voltmeter is connected between other probes to measure the voltage at the point of current injection, which is inversely proportional to the amount of contact between the tube and tubesheet. Namely, the higher the voltage measured by the voltmeter, the less contact between the tube and tubesheet.

  16. Development and quality assessments of commercial heat production of ATF FeCrAl tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2015-09-01

    Development and quality assessment of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl tube production with commercial manufacturers were conducted. The manufacturing partners include Sophisticated Alloys, Inc. (SAI), Butler, PA for FeCrAl alloy casting via vacuum induction melting, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for extrusion process to prepare the master bars/tubes to be tube-drawn, and Rhenium Alloys, Inc. (RAI), North Ridgeville, OH, for tube-drawing process. The masters bars have also been provided to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) who works with Century Tubes, Inc., (CTI), San Diego, CA, as parallel tube production effort under the current program.

  17. Etching of Copper Coated Mylar Tubes With CF-4 Gas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ecklund, Karl M.; Hartman, Keith W.; Hebert, Michael J.; Wojcicki, Stanley G.

    1996-04-01

    Using 5 mm diameter copper coated mylar straw tubes at a potential of 2.30 KV relative to a concentric 20 (mu)m diameter gold-plated tungsten anode, it has been observed that with very low flow rates of CF4-based gases the conductive copper cathode material may be removed entirely from the mylar surface.

  18. Rigid indented cylindrical cathode for x-ray tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudgens, C.R.

    1983-06-03

    A cathode assembly for a vacuum tube includes a wire filament, a straight tubular anode parallel to and surrounding the wire filament, insulating spacers for rigidly fastening the filament with respect to the anode, and with one side of the anode indented or flattened such that only one portion of the anode is heated to emitting temperatures by the filament.

  19. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  20. AXISYMMETRIC SCATTERING OF p MODES BY THIN MAGNETIC TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hindman, Bradley W.; Jain, Rekha

    2012-02-10

    We examine the scattering of acoustic p-mode waves from a thin magnetic fibril embedded in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The scattering is mediated through the excitation of slow sausage waves on the magnetic tube, and only the scattering of the monopole component of the wave field is considered. Since such tube waves are not confined by the acoustic cavity and may freely propagate along the field lines removing energy from the acoustic wave field, the excitation of fibril oscillations is a source of acoustic wave absorption as well as scattering. We compute the mode mixing that is achieved and the absorption coefficients and phase shifts. We find that for thin tubes the mode mixing is weak and the absorption coefficient is small and is a smooth function of frequency over the physically relevant band of observed frequencies. The prominent absorption resonances seen in previous studies of unstratified tubes are absent. Despite the relatively small absorption, the phase shift induced can be surprisingly large, reaching values as high as 15 Degree-Sign for f modes. Further, the phase shift can be positive or negative depending on the incident mode order and the frequency.

  1. Hand held sample tube manipulator, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kenny, Donald V. [Liberty Township, OH; Smith, Deborah L. [Liberty Township, OH; Severance, Richard A. [late of Columbus, OH

    2001-01-01

    A manipulator apparatus, system and method for measuring analytes present in sample tubes. The manipulator apparatus includes a housing having a central bore with an inlet end and outlet end; a plunger mechanism with at least a portion thereof slideably disposed for reciprocal movement within the central bore, the plunger mechanism having a tubular gas channel with an inlet end and an outlet end, the gas channel inlet end disposed in the same direction as said inlet end of the central bore, wherein the inlet end of said plunger mechanism is adapted for movement so as to expel a sample tube inserted in the bore at the outlet end of the housing, the inlet end of the plunger mechanism is adapted for connection to gas supply; a first seal is disposed in the housing for sealing between the central bore and the plunger mechanism; a second seal is disposed at the outlet end of the housing for sealing between the central bore and a sample tube; a holder mounted on the housing for holding the sample tube; and a biasing mechanism for returning the plunger mechanism to a starting position.

  2. Rigid indented cylindrical cathode for X-ray tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hudgens, Claude R. (Dayton, OH)

    1985-01-01

    A cathode assembly for a vacuum tube includes a wire filament, a straight bular anode parallel to and surrounding the wire filament, and insulating spacers for rigidly fastening the filament with respect to the anode, and with one side of the anode indented or flattened such that only one portion of the anode is heated to emitting temperatures by the filament.

  3. Acoustic recovery of lost power in pulse tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Gardner, D.L.; Backhaus, S.

    1999-02-01

    In an efficient Stirling-cycle cryocooler, the cold piston or displacer recovers power from the gas. This power is dissipated into heat in the orifice of an orifice pulse tube refrigerator, decreasing system efficiency. Recovery of some of this power in a pulse tube refrigerator, without sacrificing the simplicity and reliability inherent in a system with no cold moving parts, is described in this paper. In one method of such power recovery, the hot ends of both the regenerator and the pulse tube are connected to the front of the piston driving the refrigerator. Experimental data is presented demonstrating this method using a thermoacoustic driver instead of a piston driver. Control of time-averaged mass flux through the refrigerator is crucial to this power recovery, lest the refrigerator{close_quote}s cooling power be overwhelmed by a room-temperature mass flux. Two methods are demonstrated for control of mass flux: a barrier method, and a hydrodynamic method based on turbulent irreversible flow. At {minus}55{degree}C, the refrigerator provided cooling with 9{percent} of the Carnot coefficient of performance. With straightforward improvements, similar refrigerators should achieve efficiencies greater than those of prior pulse tube refrigerators and prior standing-wave thermoacoustic refrigerators, while maintaining the advantages of no moving parts. {copyright} {ital 1999 Acoustical Society of America.}

  4. New guidelines should enhance coiled tubing well control security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sas-Jaworsky, A. II

    1997-12-01

    The use of coiled tubing (CT) technology in well servicing operations has expanded dramatically in recent years, becoming a staple of remedial and workover programs. The advantages of CT services are numerous and well defined. As a result, the capabilities of this continuous-length tube technology have been exploited in applications such as high-pressure CT (HPCT), pushing the performance envelope into critical operations. In recent years, the mechanical capability and limitations of CT equipment components have become further defined, enhancing the safe working conditions of the prescribed operations. However, safety in coiled tubing operations is not only the product of equipment design, but of proper planning and identification of potential hazards. The following article highlights safety guidelines related to CT well control stack components as published in API RP 5C7, Recommended Practice for Coiled Tubing Operations in Oil and Gas Well Services (Dec. 1, 1996). API standards are published to facilitate the broad availability of proven engineering and operating practices, and are not intended to obviate the need for applying sound engineering judgment regarding when and where these standards should be utilized. Therefore, these standards should be considered the minimum safety requirements for well service operations, both onshore and offshore. These recommended practice guidelines have been prepared to reflect use by both operators and contract personnel.

  5. Proper bit selection improves ROP in coiled tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, W.W. )

    1994-04-18

    Using the correct type of bit can improve the rate of penetration (ROP) and therefore the economics of coiled tubing drilling operations. Key factors, based on studies of the coiled tubing jobs to date, are that the drilling system must be analyzed as a whole system and that both the drill bit type and the formation compressive strength are critical components in this analysis. Once a candidate job has been qualified technically for drilling with coiled tubing, the job will have to be justified economically compared to conventional drilling. A key part of the economic analysis is predicting the ROP in each formation to be drilled to establish a drilling time curve. This prediction should be based on the key components of the system, including the following: hydraulics, motor capabilities, weight on bit (WOB), rock compressive strength, and bit type. This analysis should not base expected ROPs and offset wells drilled with conventional rigs and equipment. Furthermore, a small-diameter bit should not be selected simply by using the International Association of Drilling Contractor (IADC) codes of large-diameter bits used in offset wells. Coiled tubing drilling is described, then key factors in the selection are discussed.

  6. Horizontal underbalanced drilling of gas wells with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, R.J.; Li, J.; Lupick, G.S.

    1999-03-01

    Coiled tubing drilling technology is gaining popularity and momentum as a significant and reliable method of drilling horizontal underbalanced wells. It is quickly moving into new frontiers. To this point, most efforts in the Western Canadian Basin have been focused towards sweet oil reservoirs in the 900--1300 m true vertical depth (TVD) range, however there is an ever-increasing interest in deeper and gas-producing formations. Significant design challenges on both conventional and coiled tubing drilling operations are imposed when attempting to drill these formations underbalanced. Coiled tubing is an ideal technology for underbalanced drilling due to its absence of drillstring connections resulting in continuous underbalanced capabilities. This also makes it suitable for sour well drilling and live well intervention without the risk of surface releases of reservoir gas. Through the use of pressure deployment procedures it is possible to complete the drilling operation without need to kill the well, thereby maintaining underbalanced conditions right through to the production phase. The use of coiled tubing also provides a means for continuous wireline communication with downhole steering, logging and pressure recording devices.

  7. Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.R. Goddard

    2004-12-15

    The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle concentration within the system. The effects of tubing, fluid, and particle material properties, tube geometry, fluid flow, and tube length on the structural excitation and consequently power requirements and concentration quality within the tube were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Limitations of the method are discussed, as well as ways to minimize or compensate for deleterious effects. Finally a preliminary demonstration of the efficacy of acoustic concentration is presented.

  8. Nonlinear Landau damping of a whistler in a current-carrying plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, D.P.; Sharma, A.K.

    1983-07-01

    A high-amplitude whistler wave propagating through a current-carrying plasma decays into a low-frequency resistive quasimode and frequency-upshifted scattered whistler. In this process of nonlinear Landau damping a pump-wave photon absorbs a quantum of energy from the drifting electrons to generate an upshifted whistler photon. Upconversion occurs only when the drift velocity of electrons exceeds the phase velocity of the quasimode (..omega..

  9. Simulation of filamentation instability of a current-carrying plasma by particle in cell method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R.; Mostafavi, P. S.; Komaizi, D.; Salahshoor, M. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma in the diffusion frequency region is studied using particle in cell simulation. The effects of electron thermal motion and ion-neutral collision on the evolution of this instability in the nonlinear stage of the filaments coalescence are discussed. It is found that the coalescence of the current filaments is enhanced by increasing the temperature and is delayed by increasing the collision frequency.

  10. The Effect of Element Formulation on the Prediction of Boost Effects in Numerical Tube Bending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardelcik, A.; Worswick, M.J.

    2005-08-05

    This paper presents advanced FE models of the pre-bending process to investigate the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost effects in tube bending. Tube bending experiments are conducted with 3'' (OD) IF (Interstitial-Free) steel tube on a fully instrumented Eagle EPT-75 servo-hydraulic mandrel-rotary draw tube bender. Experiments were performed in which the bending boost was varied at three levels and resulted in consistent trends in the strain and thickness distribution within the pre-bent tubes. A numerical model of the rotary draw tube bender was used to simulate pre-bending of the IF tube with the three levels of boost from the experiments. To examine the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost, the tube was modeled with shell and solid elements. Both models predicted the overall strain and thickness results well, but showed different trends in each of the models.

  11. An overview of the nondestructive inspection techniques for coiled tubing and pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, R.K.

    1996-11-01

    Coiled steel tubing and pipe in the diameter range 20--90 mm (0.75--3.5 in.) are replacing conventional oilfield materials for a variety of purposes including workovers, drilling, production tubing, umbilicals, and flowlines. They offer all the advantages of long tubes with no threaded connections. Because coiled tubing is being produced to high quality standards, it is lasting longer than ever before, and the need has arisen for careful nondestructive inspection at frequent intervals to determine accumulated damage to the string and the need for repair. Currently, derating of used coiled tubing using nondestructive testing (NDT) is not performed. While NDT devices for oilfield tubulars have been well documented, little has been written regarding the NDT of coiled tubing. This paper outlines the current NDT methods used during the manufacture of new tubing and the inspection of used coiled tubing.

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Steel Co National Tube...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Steel Co National Tube Div Christy Park Works - PA 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. STEEL CO., NATIONAL TUBE DIV., CHRISTY PARK WORKS (PA.35) Eliminated from further...

  13. JLab's YouTube Channel Attracts 100,000 Subscribers | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab's YouTube Channel Attracts 100,000 Subscribers In roughly six years, Jefferson Lab's ... Over the years, most of Jefferson Lab's YouTube subscribers have tuned in for the ...

  14. Formation of current filaments and magnetic field generation in a quantum current-carrying plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niknam, A. R.; Taghadosi, M. R.; Majedi, S.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of filamentation instability and magnetic field in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the presence of quantum effects using the quantum hydrodynamic model. A new nonlinear partial differential equation is obtained for the spatiotemporal evolution of the magnetic field in the diffusion regime. This equation is solved by applying the Adomian decomposition method, and then the profiles of magnetic field and electron density are plotted. It is shown that the saturation time of filamentation instability increases and, consequently, the instability growth rate and the magnetic field amplitude decrease in the presence of quantum effects.

  15. Minimizing the life cycle costs attributed to boiler tubing in fossil-fueled plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paterson, S.R.

    1995-08-01

    During the past quarter century, much has been learned about tube degradation, the factors which lead to and influence the rate of damage, and measures to mitigate or eliminate the damage in boiler tubing. This paper will describe some of the knowledge which has been compiled regarding two of the most significant degradation modes--corrosion-fatigue of waterwall tubes and high temperature creep of superheater and reheater tubes.

  16. Through tubing window milling -- A cost effective method of casing exit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blizzard, B.; Carter, T.; Roberts, J.

    1996-12-31

    Through tubing operations currently provide oilfield operators with an attractive method for significantly enhancing production at a relatively low cost. This paper will present a newly developed and innovative system for initiating a production casing sidetrack below the production tubing. The system uses coiled tubing technology and blends the special techniques of both drilling and window milling operations using coiled tubing. Development details emphasized will be the overall system design, performance criteria and equipment evaluation.

  17. Stress relief to prevent stress corrosion in the transition region of expanded Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-05-01

    The feasibility of preventing primary side roll transition cracking has been investigated, using induction heating to attain stress relief of expanded Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Work on rolled tubing and U-bends has shown that temperatures with which stress relief can be obtained range from 700 to 850/sup 0/C, with lower temperatures in this range requiring longer times at temperature to provide the requisite reduction in residual stresses. No work has yet been done outside this range. Preliminary tests, using induction heating, have been carried out on a mock tube sheet assembly, designed to the dimensions of a typical steam generator, and have identified the type of heating/cooling cycle that would occur in the tube sheet during a stress relief operation. Preliminary results show that the times to reach the higher temperatures in the range observed to give stress relief, of the order of 850/sup 0/C, can be as short as 8 seconds, and less with optimum coil design and power control.

  18. A dynamic model for underbalanced drilling with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rommetveit, R.; Vefring, E.H.; Wang, Z.; Bieseman, T.; Faure, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    A model for underbalanced drilling with coiled tubing has been developed which takes into account all important factors contributing to the process. This model is a unique tool to plan and execute underbalanced or near balance drilling operations. It is a transient, one-dimensional multi-phase flow model with the following components: Lift gas system model, multiphase hydraulics model, reservoir-wellbore interaction model, drilling model, models for multiphase fluids (lift gas, produced gas, mud, foam, produced gas, oil, water and cuttings). Various alternative geometries for gas injection are modeled as well as all important operations during underbalanced drilling with coiled tubing. The model as well as some simulation results for its use are presented in this paper.

  19. The challenge of performing safer coiled tubing operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Adrichem, W.P.; Dowell, S.; Godsman, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The substantial growth in coiled tubing services over the past several years has increased both the frequency of lost time injuries and potential for job execution related incidents. As the industry realizes the additional benefits of coiled tubing e.g. well intervention under pressure, efficiency, selective placement of fluids down hole and drilling, it is obvious that pipe size has, and will continue to increase. Pipe size has increased from a modest 1 {1/4} inches outside diameter ten years ago to outside diameters in excess of 2 7/8 inch being used on a regular basis today. In addition the development of programs to predict pipe fatigue and down hole stresses have encouraged operators to become more confident with the service.

  20. Novel coiled tubing application controls large LPG storage well fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebhardt, F.; Eby, D.; Barnett, D.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional well control techniques for normal oil and gas wells are widely known and have been presented on numerous occasions. However, LPG storage (or cavern) wells rarely blow out and/or catch on fire. As a result, little information has been presented on the topic of well control for these types of wells. This article chronicles a case history of a high-volume liquid propane storage well fire. Because conventional wellhead removal methods could not be applied in this case, the capping/kill plan called for use of coiled tubing in a novel manner to cut the tubing downhole and install an inflatable packer to shut off propane flow. The plan was successfully executed, saving the operator millions of dollars in LPC product loss and cost of control.

  1. Acetone sensor based on zinc oxide hexagonal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastir, Anita Singh, Onkar Anand, Kanika Singh, Ravi Chand

    2014-04-24

    In this work hexagonal tubes of zinc oxide have been synthesized by co-precipitation method. For structural, morphological, elemental and optical analysis synthesized powders were characterized by using x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning microscope, EDX, UV-visible and FTIR techniques. For acetone sensing thick films of zinc oxide have been deposited on alumina substrate. The fabricated sensors exhibited maximum sensing response towards acetone vapour at an optimum operating temperature of 400°C.

  2. Rotor for processing liquids using movable capillary tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Wayne F.; Burtis, Carl A.; Walker, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A rotor assembly for processing liquids, especially whole blood samples, is disclosed. The assembly includes apparatus for separating non-liquid components of whole blood samples from liquid components, apparatus for diluting the separated liquid component with a diluent and apparatus for transferring the diluted sample to an external apparatus for analysis. The rotor assembly employs several movable capillary tubes to handle the sample and diluents. A method for using the rotor assembly to process liquids is also described.

  3. Rotor for processing liquids using movable capillary tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, W.F.; Burtis, C.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1987-07-17

    A rotor assembly for processing liquids, especially whole blood samples, is disclosed. The assembly includes apparatus for separating non-liquid components of whole blood samples from liquid components, apparatus for diluting the separated liquid component with a diluent and apparatus for transferring the diluted sample to an external apparatus for analysis. The rotor assembly employs several movable capillary tubes to handle the sample and diluents. A method for using the rotor assembly to process liquids is also described. 5 figs.

  4. Low Power Photomultiplier Tube Circuit And Method Thereor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bochenski, Edwin B.; Skinner, Jack L.; Dentinger, Paul M.; Lindblom, Scott C.

    2006-04-18

    An electrical circuit for a photomultiplier tube (PMT) is disclosed that reduces power consumption to a point where the PMT may be powered for extended periods with a battery. More specifically, the invention concerns a PMT circuit comprising a low leakage switch and a high voltage capacitor positioned between a resistive divider and each of the PMT dynodes, and a low power control scheme for recharging the capacitors.

  5. Development of a coiled tubing cable installation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K.R.; Haver, N.A.; Stone, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    A system has been developed which installs and de-installs an electric wireline cable in coiled tubing (CT) while the CT is still on the reel. This cable installation system reduces the cost of a cable installation significantly compared with previous installation methods. This paper discusses the need for such a system, the theory used to develop this system, the various concepts considered, the system that was developed and test installation cases.

  6. PREDICTION OF OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION IN STEAM TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wright, Ian G

    2010-01-01

    Numerical simulation results are presented for the prediction of the likelihood of oxide scale exfoliation from superheater tubes. The scenarios considered involved alloys T22, TP347H, and TP347HFG subjected to a simplified operating cycle in a power plant generating supercritical steam. The states of stress and strain of the oxides grown in steam were based solely on modeling the various phenomena experienced by superheater tubes during boiler operation, current understanding of the oxidation behavior of each alloy in steam, and consideration of operating parameters such as heat flux, tube dimensions, and boiler duty cycle. Interpretation of the evolution of strain in these scales, and the approach to conditions where scale failure (hence exfoliation) is expected, makes use of the type of Exfoliation Diagrams that incorporate various cracking and exfoliation criteria appropriate for the system considered. In these diagrams, the strain accumulation with time in an oxide is represented by a strain trajectory derived from the net strain resulting from oxide growth, differences in coefficients of thermal expansion among the components, and relaxation due to creep. It was found that an oxide growing on a tube subjected to routine boiler load cycling conditions attained relatively low values of net strain, indicating that oxide failure would not be expected to occur during normal boiler operation. However, during a boiler shut-down event, strains sufficient to exceed the scale failure criteria were developed after times reasonably in accord with plant experience, with the scales on the ferritic steel failing in tension, and those on the austenitic steels in compression. The results presented illustrate that using this approach to track the state of strain in the oxide scale through all phases of boiler operation, including transitions from full-to-low load and shut-down events, offers the possibility of identifying the phase(s) of boiler operation during which oxide failure is most likely to occur.

  7. Rotor for processing liquids using movable capillary tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Wayne F.; Burtis, Carl A.; Walker, William A.

    1989-05-30

    A rotor assembly for processing liquids, especially whole blood samples, is disclosed. The assembly includes apparatus for separating non-liquid components of whole blood samples from liquid components, apparatus for diluting the separated liquid component with a diluent and apparatus for transferring the diluted sample to an external apparatus for analysis. The rotor assembly employs several movable capillary tubes to handle the sample and diluents. A method for using the rotor assembly to process liquids is also described.

  8. Research at ITER towards DEMO: Specific reactor diagnostic studies to be carried out on ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Y. A.; Vershkov, V. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Petrov, V. G.; Tugarinov, S. N. [Institution Project center ITER, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-21

    In ITER diagnostics will operate in the very hard radiation environment of fusion reactor. Extensive technology studies are carried out during development of the ITER diagnostics and procedures of their calibration and remote handling. Results of these studies and practical application of the developed diagnostics on ITER will provide the direct input to DEMO diagnostic development. The list of DEMO measurement requirements and diagnostics will be determined during ITER experiments on the bases of ITER plasma physics results and success of particular diagnostic application in reactor-like ITER plasma. Majority of ITER diagnostic already passed the conceptual design phase and represent the state of the art in fusion plasma diagnostic development. The number of related to DEMO results of ITER diagnostic studies such as design and prototype manufacture of: neutron and ?–ray diagnostics, neutral particle analyzers, optical spectroscopy including first mirror protection and cleaning technics, reflectometry, refractometry, tritium retention measurements etc. are discussed.

  9. Spatial and temporal evolution of filamentation instability in a current-carrying plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammadhosseini, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin 34149-16818 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Laser-Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The spatial and temporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields in a current-carrying plasma is investigated in the nonlinear regime. Using the magnetohydrodynamic equations, a nonlinear diffusion equation for the magnetic field in the plasma is obtained. This nonlinear equation is numerically solved and the spatiotemporal evolution of the electric and magnetic fields and the electron density distribution are plotted. It is shown that as the time passes, the profile of the electric and magnetic fields changes from a sinusoidal shape to a saw-tooth one and the electron density distribution becomes very steepened. Also, the mechanism of the filament formation is then discussed. Furthermore, the effects of the thermal motion, collisions, and ion mass on growth rate of filaments as well as the saturation time are argued. Finally, it is found that the energy dissipation is associated with the aforementioned effects and strong plasma density gradient.

  10. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  11. Use of coiled tubing fans out among well sites of the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-03

    Better operator understanding of coiled tubing improvements is generating a burst of applications at well sites around the world. Prompted by economics, producers are using coiled tubing in a wide range of well maintenance and remediation procedures to lower costs and increase recovery. Some more common workovers using coiled tubing--production tubing cleanouts and matrix acidizing, for example--not only are lowering costs but also are achieving better results. Other less known uses--logging, recompletions, and reentry drilling--until recently were thought unreliable or impossible. But better management of tubing fatigue, better materials, and larger tubing sizes are combining to boost producers' confidence in the relatively old technology. The paper describes coiled tubing opportunities, modeling fatigue, and then discusses some of its current applications.

  12. Handling state-of-the-art large-diameter coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, P.

    1994-12-31

    Completion and workover demands placed on coiled tubing technology in the last 10 years have shown the limitations of small-diameter (1- to 1{1/2}-in.) coiled tubing. The small tubing tends to buckle when used at lengths greater than 1,500 ft in most horizontal applications. Large-diameter coiled tubing (up to 3{1/2} in.) provides greater flexibility of job design and increases horizontal reach possibilities for drilling, completion, and workover activities. Transportation and handling equipment to accommodate the larger, heavier tubing is naturally a critical component of the system. This paper will present the benefits of large-diameter coiled tubing including completion and workover for greater depth and more extended horizontal reach. It will also discuss the unique concerns of transportation and handling of large diameter tubing and associated equipment.

  13. Coiled tubing workover saves horizontal well in Lake Maracaibo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lizak, K.; Patterson, J.; Suarez, D.; Salas, J.

    1996-12-31

    A slotted liner horizontal completion became stuck while being run. Inflatable packers were to be used to isolate the productive interval from a water-bearing, unconsolidated sand in the curved section of this well. While personnel were deciding how to cement the well, the liner was left in the hole with the inflatable packers unset, and the production tubing was run. Coiled tubing was used to log the well, isolate the productive interval, and remove damage to restore well productivity. Personnel considered all possible options, and a thorough decision-making process guided the workover. Because of severe lost-circulation problems, extensive ``what if`` scenarios were made and updated daily for the engineers on location. Service company and oil company personnel worked together to guarantee the job designs were practical and did not exceed the limits of the equipment on location. Computer simulations of all operations were run to allow corrective action to be taken if unusual circumstances arose. All fluids were thoroughly laboratory tested and witnessed by oil company personnel to ensure job success. Problems on the job included lost circulation, locating the exact positions of the packers and water zone, ensuring correct cement placement, removing mud and workover fluids without damaging the squeeze, and bad weather on Lake Maracaibo. Advantages and disadvantages of all the solutions that were considered are included to assist anyone in a similar situation. Post-job oil production has stabilized at 900 BOPD with no water or sand production. Careful job planning and the versatility of coiled tubing saved this well and proved economical with an estimated payout of 33 days, assuming a price of $12 per barrel of oil.

  14. Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Oglesby

    2008-12-01

    An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

  15. Condensation of Refrigerant-11 on the outside of vertical enhanced tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domingo, N.

    1981-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine heat transfer performance of single vertical tubes with Refrigerant-11 condensing on its outside surface. Twelve enhanced (fluted, spiraled, roped, and corrugated) tubes of 2.54-cm (1-in.) nominal outside diameter and 1.2-m (4-ft) length were tested. Several of the tested tubes featured internal enhanced geometries. A previously tested smooth tube served as the basis for comparison. Composite heat transfer coefficients (coefficients that include the resistances of both the condensing film and the tube wall), based on the total tube outside surface area, ranged from 850 to 6530 W/m/sup 2/ . K (150 to 1150 Btu/h . ft/sup 2/ . /sup 0/F) over the heat flux range of 5675 to 31,375 W/m/sup 2/ (1800 to 9950 Btu/h . ft/sup 2/). The primary conclusions from this study are: (1) for a given heat flux, an external fluted tube can increase composite condensing heat transfer coefficients by up to 5.5 times the smooth tube values, giving better condensing performance than any of the other geometries tested; (2) further increase in composite condensing coefficients can be achieved by using skirts to divide the fluted tube into equal condensing lengths; and (3) for a given overall temperature difference and water flow rate, internal flutes can increase the overall performance by up to 17% over that for a tube with identical outside flutes and a smooth inside surface.

  16. Temperature Profile in Fuel and Tie-Tubes for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishal Patel

    2015-02-01

    A finite element method to calculate temperature profiles in heterogeneous geometries of tie-tube moderated LEU nuclear thermal propulsion systems and HEU designs with tie-tubes is developed and implemented in MATLAB. This new method is compared to previous methods to demonstrate shortcomings in those methods. Typical methods to analyze peak fuel centerline temperature in hexagonal geometries rely on spatial homogenization to derive an analytical expression. These methods are not applicable to cores with tie-tube elements because conduction to tie-tubes cannot be accurately modeled with the homogenized models. The fuel centerline temperature directly impacts safety and performance so it must be predicted carefully. The temperature profile in tie-tubes is also important when high temperatures are expected in the fuel because conduction to the tie-tubes may cause melting in tie-tubes, which may set maximum allowable performance. Estimations of maximum tie-tube temperature can be found from equivalent tube methods, however this method tends to be approximate and overly conservative. A finite element model of heat conduction on a unit cell can model spatial dependence and non-linear conductivity for fuel and tie-tube systems allowing for higher design fidelity of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion.

  17. Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar Model Utilizing Boron-10 Lined Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Jeremy L.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-09-18

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report, providing results for model development of Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) designs, is a deliverable under Task 2 of the project.

  18. Coiled tubing completions: An economic discussion of procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courville, P.W.; Clark, T.R.

    1995-11-01

    The introduction of 2- to 3 {1/2}-in. coiled tubing (CT) sizes provides economical alternative completion opportunities for both new and existing wells. Smaller diameters of CT can also be incorporated into completion designs on existing tubular completions for rigless workovers. This paper will discuss the evaluation method for CT completions in relatively low bottom-hole pressure wells in a non-hostile environment. It will concentrate on two major methods of artificial lift: (1) the use of electric submersible pumps (ESPs) on new wells or (2) the use of gas lift methods to extend the production life of existing wells.

  19. Interactions of Hydrogen Isotopes and Oxides with Metal Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2008-08-01

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results.

  20. Cooling for a rotating anode X-ray tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for cooling a rotating anode X-ray tube. An electromagnetic motor is provided to rotate an X-ray anode with cooling passages in the anode. These cooling passages are coupled to a cooling structure located adjacent the electromagnetic motor. A liquid metal fills the passages of the cooling structure and electrical power is provided to the motor to rotate the anode and generate a rotating magnetic field which moves the liquid metal through the cooling passages and cooling structure.

  1. METHOD AND MEANS FOR CLOSING TUBES BY SPINNING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graves, E.E.; Coonfare, R.H.

    1958-08-26

    An improved spinning tool is described for producing a fold-free closed end on an aluminum jacketing tube such as is commonly used to protect a uranium fuel element. The tool will fit the toolholder of a lathe in which the jacket is rotated. The tool has a number of working faces so that the hemispherical end- closure is formed, the folds and wrinkles are smcothed out, and the excess metal is trimmed off in one transverse cutting operation. This tool considerably speeds up the closure process, and eliminates the need for a weld seal.

  2. Study of the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-Al thermite reaction and strength of reactor fuel tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peacock, H B

    1983-01-01

    Research and test reactors are presently operated with aluminum-clad fuel elements containing highly enriched uranium-aluminum alloy cores. To lower the enrichment and still maintain reactivity, the uranium content of the fuel element will need to be higher than currently achievable with alloy fuels. This will necessitate conversion to other forms such as U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-aluminum cermets. Above the aluminum melting point, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ and aluminum undergo an exothermic thermite reaction and cermet fuel cores tend to keep their original shape. Both factors could affect the course and consequences of a reactor accident, and prompted an investigation of the behavior of cermet fuels at elevated temperatures. Tests were carried out using pellets and extruded tube-sections with 53 wt % U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in aluminum. This content corresponds to a theoretical uranium density of 1.9 g/cc. Results indicate that the thermite reaction occurs at about 900/sup 0/C in air without a violent effect. The heat of reaction was approximately 123 cal/g of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-aluminum fuel. Tensile and compressive strength of the fuel tube section is low above 660/sup 0/C. In tension, sections failed at about the aluminum melting point. In compression with 2-psi average axial stress, failure occurred at 917/sup 0/C, while 7 psi average axial stress produced failure at 669/sup 0/C.

  3. Coiled tubing drilling (CTD) moves to commercial viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romagno, R. ); Walker, R. )

    1994-12-01

    Shell Western E and P, Inc. (SWEPI) California Drilling Operations was interested in coiled tubing (CT) for drilling slimhole steam injectors. A four-well pilot project at South Belridge field, Kern County, Calif., was targeted for immediate CT use. Well programs included completion, a goal not previously attempted on wells drilled from surface with CT. This paper reviews the primary project focus which was to develop slimhole steam injectors and improve injection profiles in lower Tulare formation E and G sands. Feasibility of drilling wells with CT and having CT crews run and cement completion tubulars in place was an issue to be determined. Conventional tubing installation is usually outside the scope of CT operations, so it was not known if this would be technically or economically feasible. Another goal was to refine personnel expertise to further develop CTD services as a successful business line. Other items targeted for investigation were: deviation control; lost circulation solutions; WOB optimization to obtain maximum ROP; potential steam blowout intervals; and high temperature. Finally, economic feasibility of using CTD as a rotary rig alternative for specific applications like slimhole wells on sites where surface location is limited was to be determined.

  4. Coiled tubing deployed ESP on the Auk platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, D.W.; Watkins, P.; Holtslag, R.J.; Hudson, A.; Wee, P.Y.; McCleery, B.

    1996-12-31

    In March 1995, what is believed to be the world`s first offshore coiled tubing deployed electrical submersible pump (ESP) was successfully commissioned in well AA-03S1 on Shell U.K. Exploration and Production (Shell Expro) Auk platform in the United Kingdom`s Central North Sea. The ESP provides a new and important method of artificial lift for the 21 year old Auk platform, which hitherto had relied upon downhole hydraulic jet pumps to lift approximately half of the platform`s oil production. The coiled tubing deployment proved the viability of performing future workovers with or without the assistance or indeed the presence of a drilling package. The novel completion design successfully catered to the wide variety of customer requirements; Well Engineering for a rigless workover, Petroleum Engineering for reservoir access and Facilities Engineering for a specified flowline height. The experience gained during this project will be a valuable input in determining the future artificial lift strategy for this platform and for other prospects in terms of performance, reliability and operating costs.

  5. Coiled tubing enables rapid CO{sub 2} completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payton, R.; Baker, R.; Turner, D.; Bertrand, B.

    1996-08-01

    In the Bravo Dome field of northeastern New Mexico, Amoco has doubled their expected carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) production and reduced completion costs by 7.5% using coiled tubing in conjunction with other technologies. Amoco initially expected to produce an average 2.6 MMcfd per well. Instead, six months after completing the 31-well package, the company is producing an average 5.1 MMcfd. Important elements contributing cost and time savings on the project were: Log analysis to select perforations and help prevent water production, and lost circulation; the mobility and flexibility of coiled tubing; using cement for low-cost lost circulation control; using thermoplastic film to prevent proppant flowback; fracture designs optimized for each well; and forming an alliance between Amoco and vendors and developing of mutual trust. Amoco and other producing companies use about 95% of the CO{sub 2} produced at Amoco`s Bravo Dome field for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects in the Permian Basin area. Amoco sells 5% of the purest product to companies in the US food industry. While the low price of CO{sub 2}, about one-fourth that of methane, furnished part of the impetus for Amoco to implement the cost-cutting methods at Bravo Dome, the methods can be applied in many completion applications and are discussed in this paper.

  6. Double wall vacuum tubing and method of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stahl, Charles R.; Gibson, Michael A.; Knudsen, Christian W.

    1989-01-01

    An evacuated double wall tubing is shown together with a method for the manufacture of such tubing which includes providing a first pipe of predetermined larger diameter and a second pipe having an O.D. substantially smaller than the I.D. of the first pipe. An evacuation opening is then in the first pipe. The second pipe is inserted inside the first pipe with an annular space therebetween. The pipes are welded together at one end. A stretching tool is secured to the other end of the second pipe after welding. The second pipe is then prestressed mechanically with the stretching tool an amount sufficient to prevent substantial buckling of the second pipe under normal operating conditions of the double wall pipe. The other ends of the first pipe and the prestressed second pipe are welded together, preferably by explosion welding, without the introduction of mechanical spacers between the pipes. The annulus between the pipes is evacuated through the evacuation opening, and the evacuation opening is finally sealed. The first pipe is preferably of steel and the second pipe is preferably of titanium. The pipes may be of a size and wall thickness sufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing or may be of a size and wall thickness insufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing, and the double wall pipe positioned with a sliding fit inside a third pipe of a load-bearing size.

  7. Coiled tubing: Early warning system to detect flaws in flat sheet prior to rolling and welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edens, C.W. )

    1994-05-01

    Through experimentation and dynamic evaluation of skelp at a coiled tubing mill, the use of leakage flux solid state sensing devices shows clearly that the requirement for nondestructively testing skelp can be met. As coiled tubing for drilling purposes gains wider usage, its skelp can take advantage of upstream inspection prior to forming the tubes. A reliable coiled tubing product is one in which every aspect of its manufacturing was considered, from raw material through final inspection. In no other way can the concept of total quality management be satisfied providing reliability of product use. A guarantee of fitness for purpose falls directly on the coiled tubing manufacturer. Purveyors of jointed electronic resistance weld tubulars may also take advantage of this inspection method. The American Petroleum Institute (API) has recently established a committee to study and formulate recommended practices for coiled tubing operations.

  8. Coiled tubing velocity string set at record 20,500 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, L.S. )

    1992-04-13

    This paper reports that coiled tubing, set at record depth, significantly reduced costs and posed lower mechanical failure risk for recompleting a gas well in the Delaware basin of West Texas. Alternative completions such as replacing the existing tubing string with smaller diameter conventional API production tubing was deemed less economical and effective. The gas well, George M. Shelton No. 2, was recompleted on July 18, 1991, by Chevron U.S.A. Production Co. The gas is produced from the deep, low-pressure Ellenburger formation in the Gomez field. The hang-off depth of 20,500 ft set a world record for the deepest permanently installed coiled tubing. The 1-1/2 in. coiled tubing velocity string, run within the existing 4-1/2 and 4-in. tapered production tubing string, consists of seven segments that vary in wall thickness from 0.087 to 0.156 in.

  9. Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

    2007-06-30

    Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber test, the BHA delivered up to 50 kW (67 hhp) hydraulic power. The tool drilled uncertified class-G cement samples cast into casing at a rate of 0.04 to 0.17 m/min (8 to 33 ft/hr), within the range projected for this tool but slower than a conventional PDM. While the tool met most of the performance goals, reliability requires further improvement. It will be difficult for this tool, as currently configured, to compete with conventional positive displacement downhole motors for most coil tubing drill applications. Mechanical cutters on the rotating nozzle head would improve cutting. This tool can be easily adapted for well descaling operations. A variant of the Microhole jet drilling gas separator was further developed for use with positive displacement downhole motors (PDM) operating on commingled nitrogen and water. A fit-for-purpose motor gas separator was designed and yard tested within the Microhole program. Four commercial units of that design are currently involved in a 10-well field demonstration with Baker Oil Tools in Wyoming. Initial results indicate that the motor gas separators provide significant benefit.

  10. Fabrication Of Surface Bumps On A Capsule To Simulate Fill Tube Mass

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Defects (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Fabrication Of Surface Bumps On A Capsule To Simulate Fill Tube Mass Defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fabrication Of Surface Bumps On A Capsule To Simulate Fill Tube Mass Defects Precision single bumps were deposited on the surface of ICF capsules to simulate the hydrodynamic instability caused by a fill tube. The bump is fabricated by placing an aperture mask on the capsule and coating plasma polymer through the

  11. Text-Alternative Version: CALiPER: Troffers, Kits, and Tubes Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "CALiPER: Troffers, Kits, and Tubes" webcast, held June 20, 2013.

  12. CONDITIONS FOR TRANSVERSE WAVES PROPAGATION ALONG THIN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBES ON THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopin, Igor; Nagorny, Ivan

    2013-09-10

    The propagation of kink waves in the thin gravity stratified flux tubes with a generalized magnetic field distribution model is considered in cylindrical geometry. The new kink wave equations for both wave variables are obtained. It is shown that the inclusion of the radial component of an unperturbed tube magnetic field sufficiently transforms the conditions for the propagation of transverse waves. It is demonstrated that, for the models of isothermal and polytropic atmosphere in the tube and its environment, the propagation of kink waves along thin magnetic flux tubes is cutoff-free.

  13. Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doshi, Vinod B. (Monroeville, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Zelienople, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

  14. Enhanced heat transfer tubes for film absorbers of absorption chiller/heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Naoe; Nosetani, Tadashi; Furukawa, Masahiro; Kaneko, Toshiyuki

    1995-12-31

    Absorption chiller/heaters using non-CFC refrigerants are attracting attention as environmentally friendly energy systems. As the refrigerant/absorbent pair, the water/lithium bromide aqueous solution pair is preferably used for most absorption chiller/heaters in Japan. Absorption chiller/heaters, mainly used as water chillers and air-conditioners, are commercially available at least for unit cooling capacities above 60 kW. In absorption chiller/heaters, the absorber must be made compact, because the absorber has the largest heat transfer area of the four primary heat exchangers in the system: the evaporator, absorber, regenerator and condenser. Although a great amount of information is available on the evaporator and condenser, the same type of information concerning the absorber is lacking. This paper introduces two kinds of double fluted tubes called Arm tubs and Floral tubes for film absorbers. Arm tubes are manufactured using a two-pass drawbench process, while Floral tubes are made using a single pass drawbench process. The experiments using a lithium bromide aqueous solution with the addition of 250 ppm n-octyl alcohol as the surfactant showed that Arm tubes and Floral tubes had about 40% higher heat transfer performance than plain tubes. Therefore, Floral tubes are expected to realize a high performance at low cost. Furthermore, the optimization of the number of grooves on the outside of the tubes is also described here.

  15. EM Presents Video Highlights of Cleanup Across DOE Complex in YouTube

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Playlist | Department of Energy Presents Video Highlights of Cleanup Across DOE Complex in YouTube Playlist EM Presents Video Highlights of Cleanup Across DOE Complex in YouTube Playlist April 20, 2016 - 12:00pm Addthis EM's YouTube playlist features 55 videos of cleanup accomplishments and other events across the DOE complex. EM's YouTube playlist features 55 videos of cleanup accomplishments and other events across the DOE complex. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM continues to add footage of its

  16. Experimental characterization of pressure drops and channel instabilities in helical coil SG tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, M.; Cammi, A.; De Amicis, J.; Ricotti, M. E. [Politecnico di Milano, Dept. of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Div. - CeSNEF, Via La Masa 34, 20156, Milano (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Helical tube heat exchangers provide better heat transfer characteristics, an improved capability to accommodate stresses due to thermal expansions and a more compact design with respect to straight tube heat exchangers. For these advantages they are considered as an option for the Steam Generator (SG) of many new reactor projects of Generation III+ and Generation IV. In particular, their compactness fits well with the requirements of Small-medium Modular Reactors (SMRs) of integral design, where all the primary system components are located inside the reactor vessel. In this framework, thermal hydraulics of helical pipes has been studied in recent years by Politecnico di Milano in different experimental campaigns. Experiments have been carried out in a full-scale open loop test facility installed at SIET labs in Piacenza (Italy)), to simulate the SG of a typical SMR. The facility includes two helical pipes (1 m coil diameter, 32 m length, 8 m height), connected via lower and upper headers. Following recently completed experimental campaigns dedicated to pressure drops and density wave instabilities, this paper deals with a new experimental campaign focused on both pressure drops (single-phase flow and two-phase flow, laminar and turbulent regimes) and flow instabilities. The availability of a large number of experimental data, in particular on two-phase flow, is of fundamental interest for correlation development, model validation and code assessment. Two-phase pressure drops have been measured in adiabatic conditions, ranging from 200 to 600 kg/m{sup 2}s for the mass flux, from 30 to 60 bar for the pressure and from 0.1 to 1.0 for the flow quality. The channel characteristics mass flow rate - pressure drop has been determined experimentally in the range 10-40 bar, varying the mass flow rate at a fixed value of the thermal flux. In addition, single-phase pressure drops have been measured in both laminar and turbulent conditions. Density wave instabilities have been studied at mass flux from 100 to 400 kg/m{sup 2}s and pressure from 10 to 20 bar, to confirm the particular behavior of the stability boundary in helical geometry at low pressure and low mass flow rate. Finally, starting from the unstable regions identified from the experimental channel characteristics, Ledinegg type instabilities have been investigated to drawn stability maps with complete stable and unstable regions in the dimensionless plane N sub-N pch. (authors)

  17. Introducing thermally stable inter-tube defects to assist off-axial phonon transport in carbon nanotube films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Chen, Di; Wallace, Joseph; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas, 77843 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas, 77843 (United States)

    2014-05-12

    Through integrated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental studies, we demonstrated the feasibility of an ion-irradiation-and-annealing based phonon engineering technique to enhance thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) films. Upon ion irradiation of CNT films, both inter-tube defects and intra-tube defects are introduced. Our MD simulations show that inter-tube defects created between neighboring tubes are much more stable than intra-tube defects created on tube graphitic planes. Upon thermal annealing, intra-tube defects are preferentially removed but inter-tube defects stay. Consequently, axial phonon transport increases due to reduced phonon scattering and off-axial phonon transport is sustained due to the high stability of inter-tube defects, leading to a conductivity enhancement upon annealing. The modeling predictions agree with experimental observations that thermal conductivities of CNT films were enhanced after 2?MeV hydrogen ion irradiations and conductivities were further enhanced upon post irradiation annealing.

  18. Nondestructive Testing Qualification of Main Circulatory Tube Pipes DU 500

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabakova, Bojana M.; Tzokov, Petio

    2004-07-01

    The criteria for safe operation of nuclear energetic installations is given a higher priority in the policy of Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant. An efficient non-destructive inspection is the key point for the safe service. Kozloduy NPP keeps on making investments in equipment and qualification of specialists in this field. The processes of qualification of the NDT components, important for the nuclear and radiation safety, make considerable improvement in Kozloduy NPP, thanks to the accumulated in the years experience in the activities of NDT inspection qualification, and to the help of our partners Serco Assurance and the Institute of Rzes. The results obtained by ultrasonic non-destructive inspection of circulation tube mains DU 500 WWER 440 type are under discussion in this report. (authors)

  19. Fluidized bed combustor and removable windbox and tube assembly therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFeo, Angelo (Totowa, NJ); Hosek, William S. (Mt. Tabor, NJ)

    1981-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a housing having a chamber therein with a top having a discharge for the gases which are generated in the chamber and a bottom with a discharge for heated fluid. An assembly is arranged in the lower portion of the chamber and the assembly includes a lower plate which is mounted on a support flange of the housing so that it is spaced from the bottom of the chamber and defines a fluid plenum between it and the bottom of the chamber for the discharge of heated fluid. The assembly includes a heat exchanger inlet plenum having tubes therethrough for the passage of fluidizer air and a windbox above the heat exchanger plenum which has a distributor plate top wall. A portion of the chamber above the top wall defines a fluidized bed.

  20. Fluidized bed combustor and removable windbox and tube assembly therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFeo, Angelo (Totowa, NJ); Hosek, William (Mt. Tabor, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    A fluidized bed combustor comprises a housing having a chamber therein with a top having a discharge for the gases which are generated in the chamber and a bottom with a discharge for heated fluid. An assembly is arranged in the lower portion of the chamber and the assembly includes a lower plate which is mounted on a support flange of the housing so that it is spaced from the bottom of the chamber and defines a fluid plenum between it and the bottom of the chamber for the discharge of heated fluid. The assembly includes a heat exchanger inlet plenum having tubes therethrough for the passage of fluidizer air and a windbox above the heat exchanger plenum which has a distributor plate top wall. A portion of the chamber above the top wall defines a fluidized bed.

  1. Serviceability of coiled tubing for sour oil and gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) can reduce useful coiled-tubing (CT) life by strength degradation through a combination of hydrogen blistering, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC), stress-oriented hydrogen-induced cracking (SOHIC), sulfide-stress cracking (SSC), and possible weight-loss corrosion. These effects may work synergistically with the cyclic cold working of the steel that takes place during spooling and running. Prior studies on carbon steels have shown that cold work may significantly reduce the SSC threshold stresses. To develop a CT performance database, CLI Intl. Inc. conducted a multiclient program to increase understanding of the combined effects of strain cycling and resistance of CT to cracking in H{sub 2}S environments. The program was supported by 14 sponsors consisting of major oil and gas companies, service companies, CT manufacturers, and materials suppliers.

  2. Technical and economical feasibility of coiled tubing drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary, S.C.; Doremus, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    The technique for evaluating coiled tubing (CT) drilling prospects is described. The technical and economic factors involved are discussed using a flowchart to guide the operator in the decision making process. In the technical analysis, the parameters limiting the feasibility of using CT for a given drilling project are reviewed. These parameters include CT tension, helical buckling which limits the weight on bit (WOB) and the horizontal reach, CT collapse pressure when drilling underbalanced, CT fatigue, and the usual hydraulic parameters such as annular velocity and pumping pressure. In today`s business environment, some projects, while technically feasible, may not be economically feasible. In the economic analysis, the competitiveness of each CT drilling application versus conventional solutions is evaluated, and factors such as project duration and equipment use are reviewed. The equipment normally required for a CT drilling job and the costs associated with mobilizing this equipment are discussed.

  3. Efficiently log and perforate 60 + wells with coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fertl, W.H.; Hotz, R.F.

    1987-07-01

    In today's petroleum industry, more and more emphasis is being placed on logging and completion techniques for highly deviated (extended-reach) and horizontal boreholes. This is the result of cost-effective development of oil and gas via: a minimum number of production platforms on large structures, incremental but marginal reserves in outlying and/or small fault blocks, shallow reservoirs in deep offshore waters, and significant hydrocarbon accumulations in environmentally sensitive and/or restrictive areas, e.g., perma-frost, urban areas, etc. The major challenge in logging such high-angle, extended-reach, and also horizontal boreholes is guiding the logging tool string to the bottom of the wellbore. In the horizontal portion of a borehole, the use of coiled tubing has proven successful in ''pushing'' the logging instrumentation toward the bottom (end) of the borehole.

  4. The challenge for the coiled-tubing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, C.G.

    1994-05-01

    From Aug. 9 through 14, 1992, approximately 80 individuals from throughout the globe met in a seemingly remote area of the Colorado Rocky Mountains with one common bond: advancement of coiled-tubing (CT) technology. Numerous ideas and opinions were generated at the SPE Forum Series meeting to create a long list of areas with high leveraging potential (high return on investment) for an oil industry well below the crest of a boom'' cycle. However, from the master list, each individual was given the opportunity to vote for only three issues that they felt were the most pressing. The 17 items that survived the exercise are listed below, prioritized'' by this group's vote. A year and a half later, where do these leveraging ideas fit into the overall CT industry picture The paper reviews progress.

  5. Pulse Tube Interference in Cryogenic Sensor Resonant Circuits - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Tyler

    2015-08-27

    Transition edge sensors (TES) are extremely sensitive superconducting sensors, operating at 100 mK, which can be used to detect X-rays and Cosmic Microwave Background. The goal of our project is to design the electronics to read out an array of 10000 of these sensors by using microwave signals. However, we noticed the pulse tube used to maintain cryogenic temperatures caused interference in our readout. To determine the cause of the signal distortions, we used a detector with a 370 MHz sampling rate to collect and analyze sensor data. Although this data provided little information towards the nature of the noise, it was determined through a maintenance procedure than the 0.3 mm stainless steel wires were being vibrated due to acoustic waves, which distorted the signal. Replacing this wire appeared to cease the interference from the sensor data.

  6. An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

    2012-04-27

    During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

  7. Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

    2006-05-09

    The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of time is divided among the remaining four functions of rig up/rig down, logging, lay down bottomhole assembly, and pick up bottomhole assembly. Observations made during all phases of CT rig operation at each of the project well installations have verified a number of characteristics of the technology that represent advantages that can produce significant savings of 25-35 percent per well. Attributes of the CT rig performance include: (1) Excellent hole quality with hole deviation amounting to 1-2 degrees; (2) Reduced need for auxiliary equipment; (3) Efficient rig mobilization requiring only four trailers; (4) Capability of ''Zero Discharge'' operation; (5) Improved safety; and, (6) Measurement while drilling capability. In addition, commercial cost data indicates that the CT rig reduces drilling costs by 25 to 35% compared to conventional drilling technology. Widespread commercial use of the Microhole Coiled Tubing technology in the United States for onshore Lower-48 drilling has the potential of achieving substantially positive impacts in terms of savings to the industry and resource expansion. Successfully commercialized Microhole CT Rig Technology is projected to achieve cumulative savings in Lower-48 onshore drilling expenditures of approximately 6.8 billion dollars by 2025. The reduced cost of CT microhole drilling is projected to enable the development of gas resources that would not have been economic with conventional methods. Because of the reduced cost of drilling achieved with CT rig technology, it is estimated that an additional 22 Tcf of gas resource will become economic to develop. In the future, the Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig represents an important platform for the continued improvement of drilling that draws on a new generation of various technologies to achieve goals of improved drilling cost and reduced impact to the environment.

  8. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Johnson, A.C.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1998-07-28

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process. 4 figs.

  9. Collector surface for a microwave tube comprising a carbon-bonded carbon-fiber composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    In a microwave tube, an improved collector surface coating comprises a porous carbon composite material, preferably a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite having a bulk density less than about 2 g/cc. Installation of the coating is readily adaptable as part of the tube manufacturing process.

  10. Enhanced shell-and-tube heat eschangers for the power and process industries. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergles, A.E.; Jensen, M.K.; Somerscales, E.F.; Curcio, L.A. Jr.; Trewin, R.R.

    1994-08-01

    Single-tube pool boiling tests were performed with saturated pure refrigerants and binary mixtures of refrigerants. Generally, with pure refrigerants, the High Flux surface performed better at the higher heat fluxes compared to the Turbo-B tube, and both enhanced surfaces performed significantly better than smooth surface. In tests of R-11/R-113 mixtures, the enhanced surfaces had much less degradation in heat transfer coefficient due to mixture effects compared to smooth tubes; the largest degradation occurred at a mixture of 25% R-11/75% R-113. Under boiling in saturated aqueous solution of calcium sulfate, with a single tube, effects of fouling were more pronounced at the higher heat fluxes for all surfaces. Two staggered tube bundles were tested with tube pitch-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.50. For the pure refrigerant, tests on the smooth-tube bundle indicated that the effects on the heat transfer coefficient of varying mass flux, quality, and tube-bundle geometry were small, except at low heat fluxes. Neither enhanced surface showed any effect with changing mass flux or quality. The binary mixture bundle-boiling tests had results that were very similar to those obtained with the pure refrigerants. When boiling a refrigerant-oil mixture, all three surfaces (smooth, High Flux, and Turbo-B) experienced a degradation in its heat transfer coefficient; no surface studied was found to be immune or vulnerable to the presence of oil than another surface.

  11. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C.

    1997-04-01

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  12. MELCOR Analysis of Steam Generator Tube Creep Rupture in Station Blackout Severe Accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Y.; Vierow, K. [Purdue University (United States)

    2005-12-15

    A pressurized water reactor steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) is of concern because it represents a bypass of the containment for radioactive materials to the environment. In a station blackout accident, tube integrity could be threatened by creep rupture, particularly if cracks are present in the tube walls. Methods are developed herein to improve assessment capabilities for SGTR by using the severe-accident code MELCOR. Best-estimate assumptions based on recent research and computational fluid dynamics calculations are applied in the MELCOR analysis to simulate two-dimensional natural circulation and to determine the relative creep-rupture timing in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components. A new method is developed to estimate the steam generator (SG) hottest tube wall temperature and the tube critical crack size for the SG tubes to fail first. The critical crack size for SG tubes to fail first is estimated to be 20% of the wall thickness larger than by a previous analysis. Sensitivity studies show that the failure sequence would change if some assumptions are modified. In particular, the uncertainty in the countercurrent flow limit model could reverse the failure sequence of the SG tubes and surge line.

  13. Numerical study on coupled fluid flow and heat transfer process in parabolic trough solar collector tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Y.B.; He, Y.L.

    2010-10-15

    A unified two-dimensional numerical model was developed for the coupled heat transfer process in parabolic solar collector tube, which includes nature convection, forced convection, heat conduction and fluid-solid conjugate problem. The effects of Rayleigh number (Ra), tube diameter ratio and thermal conductivity of the tube wall on the heat transfer and fluid flow performance were numerically analyzed. The distributions of flow field, temperature field, local Nu and local temperature gradient were examined. The results show that when Ra is larger than 10{sup 5}, the effects of nature convection must be taken into account. With the increase of tube diameter ratio, the Nusselt number in inner tube (Nu{sub 1}) increases and the Nusselt number in annuli space (Nu{sub 2}) decreases. With the increase of tube wall thermal conductivity, Nu{sub 1} decreases and Nu{sub 2} increases. When thermal conductivity is larger than 200 W/(m K), it would have little effects on Nu and average temperatures. Due to the effect of the nature convection, along the circumferential direction (from top to down), the temperature in the cross-section decreases and the temperature gradient on inner tube surface increases at first. Then, the temperature and temperature gradients would present a converse variation at {theta} near {pi}. The local Nu on inner tube outer surface increases along circumferential direction until it reaches a maximum value then it decreases again. (author)

  14. Materials experience of the public domain portions of Tube Bank E' during Test Series A2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The tube banks at the Grimethorpe pressurized fluidized bed combustion facility are discussed. Tube Bank E'' was designed for operation as the in bed heat exchanger during Test Series A2 at the Grimethorpe PFBC Establishment between March and November 1987. The supply of the tube bank resulted from an agreement between Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC), the US Department of Energy, and the Operating Agent for the British Coal/CEGB Joint Programme on PFBC. The tube bank incorporated features, designed to produce acceptable and predictable wastage characteristics, suggested by both FWDC and BCC/CEGB interests. As part of the agreement between the various parties, it was agreed only data from 55% of the tube bank would enter the public domain. This report describes the tube bank, and describes and discusses the public domain wastage results following a total operating period approaching 1450 hours. It is concluded that although conditions varied throughout Test Series A2, there were no major differences in the aggressiveness of the bed. Armouring devices suggested by FWDC were not successful, but their chromised coatings offered promise. The results from UK proprietary parts of the tube bank indicated that the tube bank metal wastage need not be a life limiting problem for PFBC in-bed heat exchangers. 5 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Erosion of heat exchanger tubes in fluidized beds. Annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, E.K.; Flemmer, R.L.C.

    1991-01-01

    This final report describes the activities of the 3-year project entitled ``Erosion of Heat Exchanger Tubes In Fluidized Beds.`` which was completed at the end of 1990. Project accomplishments include the collection of a substantial body of wear data In a 24in. {times} 24in. fluidized bed, comparative wear results In a 6in. {times} 6in. fluidized bed, the development of a dragometer and the collection of a comprehensive set of drag force data in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of bubble probe data to establish dominant bubble frequencies in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed, the use of a heat flux gauge for measurement of heat transfer coefficients in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed and the modeling of the tube wear in the 24in. {times} 24in. bed. Analysis of the wear data from the 24in. square bed indicates that tube wear increases with increase in superficial velocity, and with increase in tube height. The latter effect is a result of the tubes higher up in the bed seeing greater movement of dense phase than tubes lower down In the bed. In addition, tube wear was found to decrease with increase in particle size, for constant superficial velocity. Three models of tube wear were formulated and provided acceptable prediction of wear when compared with the experimental data.

  16. Magnetohydrostatic equilibrium. II. Three-dimensional multiple open magnetic flux tubes in the stratified solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, F. A.; Erdélyi, R.; Fedun, V.

    2014-07-01

    A system of multiple open magnetic flux tubes spanning the solar photosphere and lower corona is modeled analytically, within a realistic stratified atmosphere subject to solar gravity. This extends results for a single magnetic flux tube in magnetohydrostatic equilibrium, described in Gent et al. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes are combined to form magnetic structures, which are consistent with high-resolution observations. The observational evidence supports the existence of strands of open flux tubes and loops persisting in a relatively steady state. Self-similar magnetic flux tubes, for which an analytic solution to the plasma density and pressure distribution is possible, are combined. We calculate the appropriate balancing forces, applying to the equations of momentum and energy conservation to preserve equilibrium. Multiplex flux tube configurations are observed to remain relatively stable for up to a day or more, and it is our aim to apply our model as the background condition for numerical studies of energy transport mechanisms from the solar surface to the corona. We apply magnetic field strength, plasma density, pressure, and temperature distributions consistent with observational and theoretical estimates for the lower solar atmosphere. Although each flux tube is identical in construction apart from the location of the radial axis, combinations can be applied to generate a non-axisymmetric magnetic field with multiple non-uniform flux tubes. This is a considerable step forward in modeling the realistic magnetized three-dimensional equilibria of the solar atmosphere.

  17. Cladding material, tube including such cladding material and methods of forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    A multi-layered cladding material including a ceramic matrix composite and a metallic material, and a tube formed from the cladding material. The metallic material forms an inner liner of the tube and enables hermetic sealing of thereof. The metallic material at ends of the tube may be exposed and have an increased thickness enabling end cap welding. The metallic material may, optionally, be formed to infiltrate voids in the ceramic matrix composite, the ceramic matrix composite encapsulated by the metallic material. The ceramic matrix composite includes a fiber reinforcement and provides increased mechanical strength, stiffness, thermal shock resistance and high temperature load capacity to the metallic material of the inner liner. The tube may be used as a containment vessel for nuclear fuel used in a nuclear power plant or other reactor. Methods for forming the tube comprising the ceramic matrix composite and the metallic material are also disclosed.

  18. Analysis of potential for jet-impingement erosion from leaking steam generator tubes during severe accidents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majumdar, S.; Diercks, D. R.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2002-05-01

    This report summarizes analytical evaluation of crack-opening areas and leak rates of superheated steam through flaws in steam generator tubes and erosion of neighboring tubes due to jet impingement of superheated steam with entrained particles from core debris created during severe accidents. An analytical model for calculating crack-opening area as a function of time and temperature was validated with tests on tubes with machined flaws. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code was used to calculate the jet velocity impinging on neighboring tubes as a function of tube spacing and crack-opening area. Erosion tests were conducted in a high-temperature, high-velocity erosion rig at the University of Cincinnati, using micrometer-sized nickel particles mixed in with high-temperature gas from a burner. The erosion results, together with analytical models, were used to estimate the erosive effects of superheated steam with entrained aerosols from the core during severe accidents.

  19. MANAGING OXIDE SCALE EXFOLIATION IN BOILERS WITH TP347H SUPERHEATER TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wright, Ian G.; Shingledecker, John P.; Tortorelli, Peter F

    2014-01-01

    A model based on a concept of fraction of exfoliated area as a function of oxide scale strain energy was developed to predict the extent of exfoliation of steam-side scale from boiler tube superheater loops. As compared with the Armitt diagram, which can be used to predict when scale damage and exfoliation would be likely to occur, a fraction of exfoliated area approach provides an estimation of mass of scale released and the fraction of tube likely to be blocked by the exfoliation. This paper show results for the extent of blockage expected in a single bend of a superheater loop was predicted as a function of operating time, bend geometry, and outlet steam temperature under realistic service conditions that include outages. The deposits of exfoliated scale were assumed to be distributed horizontally the tubes bends. Three types of bends were considered: regular bends, short bends, and hairpin bends. The progressive increase in steam and tube temperatures along a single loop of superheater tubing and the ensuing variation of oxide scale thickness are considered. Numerical simulation results for a superheater loop made of TP347H austenitic steel indicated that tube blockage fractions larger than 50% are likely to occur within the first two years of boiler operation (with regularly scheduled outages) for outlet tube temperatures of 540-570oC, which is consistent with practical experience. Higher blockage fractions were predicted for tubes with short bends and hairpin bends than for tubes with regular bends, of length that are larger than five internal tube diameters. Finally, the blockage model presented can be used with some confidence to devise operating schedules for managing the consequences of oxide scale exfoliation based on projections of time to some critical blockage fraction for specific boiler operating conditions.

  20. Detailed analysis of the energy yield of systems with covered sheet-and-tube PVT collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santbergen, R.; Rindt, C.C.M.; van Zolingen, R.J.Ch.; Zondag, H.A.

    2010-05-15

    Solar cells have a typical efficiency in the range of 5-20%, implying that 80% or more of the incident solar energy can be harvested in the form of heat and applied for low-temperature heating. In a PVT collector one tries to collect this heat. In this work, the electrical and thermal yield of solar domestic hot water systems with one-cover sheet-and-tube PVT collectors were considered. Objectives of the work were to understand the mechanisms determining these yields, to investigate measures to improve these yields and to investigate the yield consequences if various solar cell technologies are being used. The work was carried out using numerical simulations. A detailed quantitative understanding of all loss mechanisms was obtained, especially of those being inherent to the use of PVT collectors instead of PV modules and conventional thermal collectors. The annual electrical efficiencies of the PVT systems investigated were up to 14% (relative) lower compared to pure PV systems and the annual thermal efficiencies up to 19% (relative) lower compared to pure thermal collector systems. The loss of electrical efficiency is mainly caused by the relatively high fluid temperature. The loss of thermal efficiency is caused both by the high emissivity of the absorber and the withdrawal of electrical energy. However, both the loss of electrical and thermal efficiency can be reduced further by the application of anti-reflective coatings. The thermal efficiency can be improved by the application of a low-emissivity coating on the absorber, however at the cost of a reduced electrical efficiency. (author)

  1. Life Estimation of PWR Steam Generator U-Tubes Subjected to Foreign Object-Induced Fretting Wear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Jhung, Myung Jo; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2005-10-15

    This paper presents an approach to the remaining life prediction of steam generator (SG) U-tubes, which are intact initially, subjected to fretting-wear degradation due to the interaction between a vibrating tube and a foreign object in operating nuclear power plants. The operating SG shell-side flow field conditions are obtained from a three-dimensional SG flow calculation using the ATHOS3 code. Modal analyses are performed for the finite element models of U-tubes to get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape, and participation factor. The wear rate of a U-tube caused by a foreign object is calculated using the Archard formula, and the remaining life of the tube is predicted. Also discussed in this study are the effects of the tube modal characteristics, external flow velocity, and tube internal pressure on the estimated results of the remaining life of the tube.

  2. Testing of a 7-tube palladium membrane reactor for potential use in TEP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Bryan J; Trujillo, Stephen; Willms, R. Scott

    2010-01-01

    A Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) consists of a palladium/silver membrane permeator filled with catalyst (catalyst may be inside or outside the membrane tubes). The PMR is designed to recover tritium from the methane, water, and other impurities present in fusion reactor effluent. A key feature of a PMR is that the total hydrogen isotope content of a stream is significantly reduced as (1) methane-steam reforming and/or water-gas shift reactions proceed on the catalyst bed and (2) hydrogen isotopes are removed via permeation through the membrane. With a PMR design matched to processing requirements, nearly complete hydrogen isotope removals can be achieved. A 3-tube PMR study was recently completed. From the results presented in this study, it was possible to conclude that a PMR is appropriate for TEP, perforated metal tube protectors function well, platinum on aluminum (PtA) catalyst performs the best, conditioning with air is probably required to properly condition the Pd/Ag tubes, and that CO/CO{sub 2} ratios maybe an indicator of coking. The 3-tube PMR had a permeator membrane area of 0.0247 m{sup 2} and a catalyst volume to membrane area ratio of 4.63 cc/cm{sup 2} (with the catalyst on the outside of the membrane tubes and the catalyst only covering the membrane tube length). A PMR for TEP will require a larger membrane area (perhaps 0.35 m{sup 2}). With this in mind, an intermediate sized PMR was constructed. This PMR has 7 permeator tubes and a total membrane area of 0.0851 m{sup 2}. The catalyst volume to membrane area ratio for the 7-tube PMR was 5.18 cc/cm{sup 2}. The total membrane area of the 7-tube PMR (0.0851 m{sup 2}) is 3.45 times larger than total membrane area of the 3-tube PMR (0.0247 m{sup 2}). The following objectives were identified for the 7-tube PMR tests: (1) Refine test measurements, especially humidity and flow; (2) Refine maintenance procedures for Pd/Ag tube conditioning; (3) Evaluate baseline PMR operating conditions; (4) Determine PMR scaling method; (5) Evaluate PMR with realistic feed compositions; (6) Evaluate PMR performance with varying permeate pressures; (7) Study coking-related issues; and (8) Identify any unexpected behavior that may require further investigation (used to study transient behavior). This report presents the tests results defined by these objectives.

  3. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  4. Coiled tubing isolates zones, fractures wells with single trip service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, S.A.

    1999-04-01

    A system has been devised that combines high pressure coiled tubing (CT) and a selective isolation technique to frac multiple zones in a single operation. Multiple zones in one well can be individually isolated, fractured and flowed back simultaneously which results in reduced exposure to kill fluids and therefore higher retained conductivity for newly created fractures. The technique has been named CoilFRAC{trademark} by Dowell. The key benefits to the entire operation are reduced rig and operations time compared to conventional fracturing processes. Time savings, increased production, and environmental benefits are the economic drivers that result in rapid return on investment for production operators. The single trip concept for perforating and stimulation crews also brings additional benefits over multiple mobilizations. Wells which previously had only major zones perforated and stimulated and which are currently depleted can be revived economically using this system, giving the well a second life. The paper describes the equipment and its safety and contingency features, optimized shallow gas production in Alberta, and results from a South Texas oil well fracturing.

  5. Low-cost evacuated-tube solar collector. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beecher, D. T.

    1981-02-10

    A prototype design for an evacuated tube air cooled solar collector module has been completed. A product cost study, based on the production of 60,000 of the prototype modules per year (approx. 1,000,000 square feet annually), estimates that the module as shipped would have a cost at inventory of $7.09 to $7.40 per square foot of aperture. Computer programs were developed to predict the optical and thermal performance of the module. Antireflective coatings (porous aluminum oxide) which could be formed by spraying or dipping were demonstrated but degraded more rapidly when exposed to a high humidity ambient than acid etched films. A selective black chromium oxide multi-layered graded film was vapor deposited which had an absorptivity of about 0.9 and an emissivity of 0.03. When the film was heated to temperatures of 400/sup 0/C in a gettered vacuum for as little as 24 hours, however, irreversible changes took place both between and within coating layers which resulted in ..cap alpha.. decreasing to about 0.73 and epsilon increasing to 0.14. The product cost studies indicate that module design changes are warranted to reduce product cost prior to tooling for production.

  6. Support tube for high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Rossing, Barry R.

    1986-01-01

    Disclosed is a compound having a fluorite-like structure comprising a solid solution having the general formula [(ZrO.sub.2).sub.1-x (MO.sub.s).sub.x ].sub.1-y [(La.sub.m A.sub.1-m).sub.2-z (Mn.sub.n B.sub.1-n).sub.z O.sub.r ].sub.y where MO.sub.5 is an oxide selected from the group consisting of calcia, yttria, rare earth oxides, and mixtures thereof, x is about 0.1 to 0.3, y is about 0.005 to about 0.06, z is about 0.1 to about 1.9, A is yttrium, rare earth element, alkaline earth element, or mixture thereof, B is iron, nickel, cobalt, or mixture thereof, m is 0.3 to 1, n is 0.5 to 1, and r is 2 to 4. A porous tube made from such a composition can be coated with an electrically conducting mixed oxide electrode such as lanthanum manganite, and can be used in making high temperature electrochemical cells such as solid electrolyte fuel cells.

  7. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  8. A Built for Purpose Micro-Hole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bart Patton

    2007-09-30

    This report will serve as the final report on the work performed from the contract period October 2005 thru April 2007. The project 'A Built for Purpose Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)' purpose was to upgrade an existing state-of-the-art Coiled Tubing Drilling Rig to a Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) capable of meeting the specifications and tasks of the Department of Energy. The individual tasks outlined to meet the Department of Energy's specifications are: (1) Concept and development of lubricator and tool deployment system; (2) Concept and development of process control and data acquisition; (3) Concept and development of safety and efficiency improvements; and (4) Final unit integration and testing. The end result of the MCTR upgrade has produced a unit capable of meeting the following requirements: (1) Capable of handling 1-inch through 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing (Currently dressed for 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing and capable of running up to 3-1/2-inch coiled tubing); (2) Capable of drilling and casing surface, intermediate, production and liner hole intervals; (3) Capable of drilling with coiled tubing and has all controls and installation piping for a top drive; (4) Rig is capable of running 7-5/8-inch range 2 casing; and (5) Capable of drilling 5,000 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 6,000 ft true measured depth (TMD).

  9. Results of industry experience survey on coiled tubing uses and failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, J.G.; Cayard, M.S.; Kane, R.D.

    1999-11-01

    A survey of coiled tubing failures in various field applications was conducted. The survey included the collection of information on failure type, number of strain cycles to failure, service environment, well depth, failure location on the coiled tubing string, and coiled tubing grade employed. The most prevalent causes of failures and the impact of localized corrosion on the performance of coiled tubing were assessed from over thirty case studies herein reported. Pitting and tensile overload were the primary causes for failure in fifty percent of the cases reported from the field. Fatigue and weld area failures were the next most common types of failure. Most failures occurred within the range of 10 to 50 strain cycles. H{sub 2}S and brine/water containing environments were the most prevalent service conditions. Most failures occurred at well depths between 5,001 to 10,000 feet (1,524.3 to 3,048 meters). Also, most failures occurred in the coiled tubing string near the surface (less than 1,000 feet (304.8 meters)). Failures in roughly similar numbers were reported in 70, 80 and 100 coiled tubing grades. The understanding of the principal modes of failure herein reported should help in the development of improved handling and running procedures to minimize coiled tubing failures.

  10. Characterization of the resistance to PWSCC of hydraulic tube- tubesheet expansions. [Primary water stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gold, R.E.; Economy, G.; Jacko, R.J.; Harrod, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    The resistance to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of hydraulically expanded Alloy 600 steam generator tubing, manufactured by the Westinghouse Specialty Metals Division, was evaluated under highly accelerated conditions in a 400{degrees}C steam test environment. These evaluations included microstructural characterizations of all test materials, screening tests with highly stressed reverse U-bends (RUBs), and the testing of internally pressurized hydraulic expansion tube-in-collar mockups. Eighteen heats of archived tubing from an operating nuclear power plant were evaluated; included were heats of Alloy 600 in both the mill annealed (A600 MA) and thermally treated (A600 TT) conditions. Other heats of archived A600 TT tubing, and reference laboratory heats with known corrosion resistance, were also included in various portions of this investigation. Hydraulically expanded mockups of A600 T-F tubing exhibit high resistance to PWSCC in the aggressive steam test environment. Some of the archived A600 MA heats, however, possess low resistance to PWSCC. Shot peening of the ID surfaces of tubes of these latter heats prior to testing was effective in precluding the occurrence of PWSCC. Archived heats of Model F (or F-type replacement) A600 TT steam generator tubing typically exhibit carbide morphologies and distributions consistent with high resistance to PWSCC. These data are in agreement with the performance to date of operating Model F steam generators.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of Ni-Cu alloy 400 tubes in feedwater heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amar, A.S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of the inspections and metallurgical evaluations of a high pressure feedwater heater that experienced numerous tube failures after a short service life. Using EPRI NDE Center technical support, tubes were eddy current tested with special probes in the tubesheet region and with conventional probes in the remaining straight portion. Pulled tubes were metallurgically examined. Crack depths were correlated with eddy current indications. Short axial cracks were found on the inner surface of the tubes at roll transitions. Failures were attributed to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The cold drawn-stress relieved Monel{trademark} (Alloy 400) tube had < 10 KSI hoop residual stress, however the residual stress was probably much higher in the roll transition. A large number of tubes were plugged based on the eddy current indications, however several tubes that showed no indications had leaked a few months later. This suggested that after initiation, crack growth was rapid. The heater was replaced after 4.5 years of service.

  12. Heat-Rate Improvement Obtained by Retubing Power-Plant Condenser Enhanced Tubes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-21

    A utility will only retube a condenser with enhanced tubes if the incremental cost of the enhanced tubes can be offset with reduced fuel costs. The reduced fuel cost is obtained for some units because of the higher heat-transfer coefficient of enhanced tubes. They lead to improved condenser performance measured by a lower condenser pressure and therefore a more efficient power plant. However, the higher haet-transfer coefficients do not always guarantee that enhanced tubes willmore » be more cost effective. Other issues must be considered such as the cooling-water flow reduction due to the increased pressure drop, the low-pressure turbine heat-rate variation with backpressure, and the cooling-water pump and system characteristics. These and other parameters must be considered to calculate the efficiency improvement of the power plant as commonly measured by the quantity known as the heat rate. Knowing the heat-rate improvement, the fuel cost, and the incremental increase of the enhanced tubes from the supplier, the payback time can be determined. This program calculates the heat-rate improvement that can be obtained by retubing a power plant condenser with enhanced tubes of a particular type called Korodense LPD made by Wolverine Tube, Inc. The fuel savings are easily established knowing the heat-rate improvement. All electrical utilities are potential users because a condenser is used as the heat sink for every power plant.« less

  13. Fabrication of fine-grain tantalum diffusion barrier tube for Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, K. T.; Balachandran, S.; Mezyenski, R.; Seymour, N.; Robinson, J.; Barber, R. E.

    2014-01-27

    Diffusion barriers used in Nb{sub 3}Sn wire are often fabricated by wrapping Ta sheet into a tube with an overlap seam. A common result of such practice is non-uniform deformation in the Ta sheet as it thins by wire drawing because of non-uniform grain size and texture in the original Ta sheet. Seamless Ta tube with a fine-grain and uniform microstructure would be much better for the diffusion barrier application, but such material is expensive and difficult to manufacture. This report presents results on a new fabrication strategy for Ta tube that shows promise for manufacture of less costly tube with an improved microstructure. The fabrication method begins with seam-welded tube but gives a fine-grain uniform microstructure with little difference between the longitudinal seam weld region and the parent metal after post-weld processing. Severe plastic deformation processing (SPD) applied by area reduction extrusion and tube equal channel angular extrusion (tECAE) are used to refine and homogenize the microstructure. Microstructure and mechanical property results are presented for Ta tubes fabricated by this new processing strategy.

  14. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-29

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  15. Composite tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers: A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R.; Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1997-07-01

    Beginning in the mid-1960s, increasing energy costs in Finland and Sweden made energy recovery more critical to the cost-effective operation of a kraft pulp mill. Boiler designers responded to this need by raising the steam operating pressure, but almost immediately the wall tubes in these new boilers began to corrode rapidly. Test panels installed in the walls of the most severely corroding boiler identified austenitic stainless steel as sufficiently resistant to the new corrosive conditions, and discussions with Sandvik AB, a Swedish tube manufacturer, led to the suggestion that coextruded tubes be used for water wall service in kraft recovery boilers. Replacement of carbon steel by coextruded tubes has solved most of the corrosion problems experienced by carbon steel wall tubes, however, these tubes have not been problem-free. Beginning in early 1995, a multidisciplinary research program funded by the US Department of Energy was established to investigate the cause of cracking in coextruded tubes and to develop improved materials for use in water walls and floors of kraft recovery boilers. One portion of that program, a state-of-the-art review of public- and private-domain documents related to coextruded tube cracking in kraft recovery boilers is reported here. Sources of information that were consulted for this review include the following: tube manufacturers, boiler manufacturers, public-domain literature, companies operating kraft recovery boilers, consultants and failure analysis laboratories, and failure analyses conducted specifically for this project. Much of the information contained in this report involves cracking problems experienced in recovery boiler floors and those aspects of spout and air-port-opening cracking not readily attributable to thermal fatigue. 61 refs.

  16. Methods and systems for carrying out a pH-influenced chemical and/or biological reaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stern, Michael C.; Simeon, Fritz; Hatton, Trevor Alan

    2016-04-05

    The present invention generally relates to methods and systems for carrying out a pH-influenced chemical and/or biological reaction. In some embodiments, the pH-influenced reaction involves the conversion of CO.sub.2 to a dissolved species.

  17. Physical and Numerical Analysis of Extrusion Process for Production of Bimetallic Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misiolek, W.Z.; Sikka, V.K.

    2006-08-10

    Bimetallic tubes are used for very specific applications where one of the two metals provides strength and the other provides specific properties such as aqueous corrosion and carburization, coking resistance, and special electrical and thermal properties. Bimetallic tubes have application in pulp and paper industry for heat-recovery boilers, in the chemical industry for ethylene production, and in the petrochemical industry for deep oil well explorations. Although bimetallic tubes have major applications in energy-intensive industry, they often are not used because of their cost and manufacturing sources in the United States. This project was intended to address both of these issues.

  18. Method and apparatus for fine tuning an orifice pulse tube refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W.; Wollan, John J.

    2003-12-23

    An orifice pulse tube refrigerator uses flow resistance, compliance, and inertance components connected to a pulse tube for establishing a phase relationship between oscillating pressure and oscillating velocity in the pulse tube. A temperature regulating system heats or cools a working gas in at least one of the flow resistance and inertance components. A temperature control system is connected to the temperature regulating system for controlling the temperature of the working gas in the at least one of the flow resistance and inertance components and maintains a control temperature that is indicative of a desired temporal phase relationship.

  19. Utilization of endless coiled tubing and nitrogen gas in geothermal well system maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McReynolds, A.S.; Maxson, H.L.

    1980-09-01

    The use of endless coiled tubing and nitrogen gas combine to offer efficient means of initiating and maintaining geothermal and reinjection well productivity. Routine applications include initial flashing of wells in addition to the surging of the formation by essentially the same means to increase production rates. Various tools can be attached to the tubing for downhole measurement purposes whereby the effectiveness of the tools is enhanced by this method of introduction to the well bore. Remedial work such as scale and fill removal can also be accomplished in an efficient manner by using the tubing as a work string and injecting various chemicals in conjunction with specialized tools to remedy downhole problems.

  20. In-situ stress relief of expanded Alloy 600 steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.; McIlree, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is the most common cause of defects in steam generator tubing. Methods of averting tubing damage are constantly under review. This paper concentrates on the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking, initiated on the primary side, in the expansion transition region of roller expanded Alloy 600 tubing. In general it is believed that residual stresses, arising from the expansion process, are the cause of the problem. The work reported here discusses the identification and implementation of an optimal, in-situ stress relief treatment.

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- U S Steel Co National Tube Div Christy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Park Works - PA 35 Steel Co National Tube Div Christy Park Works - PA 35 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: U. S. STEEL CO., NATIONAL TUBE DIV., CHRISTY PARK WORKS (PA.35) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: National Tube Division PA.35-1 Location: McKeesport , Pennsylvania PA.35-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 PA.35-2 Site Operations: Metal fabrication operations. Pierced normal uranium billets by the three roll Assel Mill process. PA.35-1

  2. Reactance simulation for the defects in steam generator tube with outside ferrite sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Kwon-sang; Kima, Yong-il; Son, Derac; Park, Duck-gun; Jung, Jae-kap

    2009-04-01

    A magnetic sludge is partly produced around the tube sheet outside a steam generator due to stress and heat. The sludge with magnetite is one of the important factors affecting eddy current signals. It causes trouble for the safety of the steam generator tubes and is difficult to detect by conventional eddy current methods. A new type of probe is needed to detect the signals for the magnetic sludge. We designed a new U-type yoke which has two kinds of coils--a magnetizing coil and the other a detecting coil--and we simulated the signal induced by the ferromagnetic sludge in the Inconel 600 tube.

  3. Where is the coiled tubing wave headed. [The increased use of coiled tube drilling equipment in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, K. )

    1994-09-01

    In the late 1980s, the coiled tubing (CT) service market began a wave of growth and expansion unparalleled by other oil field services. In 1989, market growth was so rapid it was referred to as a ''CT revolution.'' The trend has continued through the early 1990s with annual growth rates of 20%--30%, while other oil field service markets have been stagnant or even shrinking. With the recent advent of open-hole CT drilling (CTD) and CT completions (CTC), the wave's momentum is increasing with no end in sight. Advances in CT manufacturing, fatigue prediction, larger-diameter tubing, CT logging and other CT equipment made in the late 1980s improved the reliability and effectiveness of CT services, triggering this wave of activity. The status of this technology is discussed along with the performance and reliability of coiled tubing drills.

  4. Using coiled tubing in HP/HT corrosive gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    High-yield-strength (100,000 psi) coiled tubing (CT) material has allowed for CT intervention in Mobile Bay Norphlet completions. These wells are approximately 22,000-ft-vertical-depth, high-pressure, hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) gas wells. Operations performed on the Norphlet wells include a scale cleanout to approximately 22,000 ft, a hydrochloric acid (HCl) job at 415 F, and buildup removal from a safety valve. The scale cleanout was performed first with a spiral wash tool. The well was killed with 10-lbm/gal sodium bromide (NaBr) brine; the same brine was used for cleanout fluid. Cost savings of 60% were realized. A HCl matrix acid job at 415 F was performed next, followed by a scale cleanout across the downhole safety valve. The safety valve was cleared of debris in 1 operational day. Estimated cost of the CT operation was 5 to 10% less than that of a rig workover. The 100,000-psi-yield Ct material used for the Mobile Bay operations does not comply with the (NACE) Standard MR-0175. But on the basis of extensive laboratory testing by the CT manufacturer, the decision was made that the material would pass a modified test performed with decreased H{sub 2}S levels. A maximum level of 400 ppm H{sub 2}S was determined as the safe working limit. Because the maximum H{sub 2}S content in the wells described later was 120 ppm, the risk of sulfide-stress cracking (SSC) was considered acceptably low. Elevated bottomhole temperatures (BHT`s) increase the corrosion rate of metals exposed to corrosives. Extensive laboratory testing of corrosion inhibitors allowed for design of a matrix-acidizing treatment to remove near-wellbore damage caused by lost zinc bromide (ZnBr) completion brine.

  5. Two-phase frictional pressure drop of R-134a and R-410A refrigerant-oil mixtures in straight tubes and U-type wavy tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ing Youn; Wu, Yu-Shi; Chang, Yu-Juei; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2007-02-15

    This study presents single-phase and two-phase pressure drop data for R-134a/oil mixture flowing in a wavy tube with inner diameter of D=5.07mm and curvature ratio 2R/D=5.18 and R-410A/oil mixture flowing in a wavy tube of D=3.25mm and 2R/D=3.91. Both mixtures have oil concentration C=0%, 1%, 3% and 5% for the tests. The ratio of frictional factor between U-bend in wavy tube and straight tube (f{sub C}/f{sub S}) is about 3.5 for Re<2500 and is approximate 2.5 for Re=3500-25,000 for oil and liquid R-134a mixture flowing in the 5.07mm diameter wavy tube. The influence of oil concentration on single-phase friction factor is negligible, provided that the properties are based on the mixture of lubricant and refrigerant. The ratio between two-phase pressure gradients of U-bend and straight tube is about 2.5-3.5. This ratio is increased with oil concentration and vapor quality. The influence of oil is augmented at a higher mass flux for liquid spreading around the periphery at an annular flow pattern. Moreover, the influence of lubricant becomes more evident of a U-bend configuration. This is associated the induced swirled flow motion and an early change of flow pattern from stratified to annular flow pattern. The frictional two-phase multiplier for straight tube can be fairly correlated by using the Chisholm correlation for the data having Martinelli parameter X between 0.05 and 1.0. Fridel correlation also shows a good agreement with a mean deviation of 17.6% to all the straight tube data. For the two-phase pressure drop in U-bend, the revised Geary correlation agrees very well with the R-134a and R-410A oil-refrigerant data with a mean deviation of 16.4%. (author)

  6. CRITICAL CONFIGURATION FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall

    2012-05-01

    A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first two experiments in the series were evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-001) and HEU-COMP-FAST-002 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-002). The first experiment had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The third set of experiments in the series, performed in mid-1963, which is studied in this evaluation, used beryllium reflectors. The beryllium reflected system was the preferred reactor configuration for this application because of the small thickness of the reflector. The two core configurations had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice and arranged in 7-tube clusters. The experiments have been determined to represent acceptable benchmark experiments. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

  7. EA-1131: Relocation of Neutron Tube Target Loading Operation, Los Alamos Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Neutron Tube Target Loading operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico from...

  8. Sensing system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kychakoff, George; Afromowitz, Martin A; Hugle, Richard E

    2005-06-21

    A system for detection and control of deposition on pendant tubes in recovery and power boilers includes one or more deposit monitoring sensors operating in infrared regions and about 4 or 8.7 microns and directly producing images of the interior of the boiler. An image pre-processing circuit (95) in which a 2-D image formed by the video data input is captured, and includes a low pass filter for performing noise filtering of said video input. An image segmentation module (105) for separating the image of the recovery boiler interior into background, pendant tubes, and deposition. An image-understanding unit (115) matches derived regions to a 3-D model of said boiler. It derives a 3-D structure the deposition on pendant tubes in the boiler and provides the information about deposits to the plant distributed control system (130) for more efficient operation of the plant pendant tube cleaning and operating systems.

  9. Evaluation and field validation of Eddy-Current array probes for steam generator tube inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodd, C.V.; Pate, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of the Improved Eddy-Current ISI for Steam Generator Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for inservice inspection of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification, and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC`s mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report describes the design of specialized high-speed 16-coil eddy-current array probes. Both pancake and reflection coils are considered. Test results from inspections using the probes in working steam generators are given. Computer programs developed for probe calculations are also supplied.

  10. The local heat transfer mathematical model between vibrated fluidized beds and horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Ye, Shichao; Pan, Xiaoheng

    2008-05-15

    A dimensionless mathematical model is proposed to predict the local heat transfer coefficients between vibrated fluidized beds and immersed horizontal tubes, and the effects of the thickness of gas film and the contact time of particle packets are well considered. Experiments using the glass beads (the average diameter bar d{sub p}=1.83mm) were conducted in a two-dimensional vibrated fluidized bed (240 mm x 80 mm). The local heat transfer law between vibrated fluidized bed and horizontal tube surface has been investigated. The results show that the values of theoretical prediction are in good agreement with experimental data, so the model is able to predict the local heat transfer coefficients between vibrated fluidized beds and immersed horizontal tubes reasonably well, and the error is in range of {+-}15%. The results can provide references for future designing and researching on the vibrated fluidized beds with immersed horizontal tubes. (author)

  11. A Story of Q-weak at Jefferson Lab (On YouTube) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Story of Q-weak at Jefferson Lab (On YouTube) External Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhYb53Kkl9k By jlab_admin on Sun, 2012-02-05

  12. Primary water stress corrosion crack growth rates in Alloy 600 steam generator tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, R.G.; Jacko, R.J.; Gold, R.E.

    1992-12-31

    Direct measurements of SCC crack growth rates have been used to determine the effects of changes in PWR primary water chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Reversing current DC potential measurement techniques have been adapted for use on thin walled tubing containing through-wall circumferential cracks. These techniques have been used to monitor crack rates in Alloy 600 tubing exposed to typical PWR primary water chemistries at 330{degrees}C. Crack growth rate studies, conducted under well defined stress intensity conditions, provide a sensitivity in the assessment of stress corrosion cracking susceptibility that is not possible using more traditional techniques. Preliminary studies have been conducted to determine the effects of B and Li concentrations on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of Alloy 600 tubing.

  13. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasma facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.

  14. Tube bank metal wastage in the Grimethorpe PFBC. [Pressurized fluidized bed combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    During hot commissioning tests of the Grimethorpe PFBC plant, a significant degree of metal wastage was observed on the fireside surfaces of the tube bank. The investigation of this wastage is described and the remedial measures taken are discussed.

  15. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasmamore » facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.« less

  16. Multi-tube thermal fuse for nozzle protection from a flame holding or flashback event

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Davis, Jr., Lewis Berkley; Johnson, Thomas Edward; York, William David

    2012-07-03

    A protection system for a pre-mixing apparatus for a turbine engine, includes: a main body having an inlet portion, an outlet portion and an exterior wall that collectively establish a fuel delivery plenum; and a plurality of fuel mixing tubes that extend through at least a portion of the fuel delivery plenum, each of the plurality of fuel mixing tubes including at least one fuel feed opening fluidly connected to the fuel delivery plenum; at least one thermal fuse disposed on an exterior surface of at least one tube, the at least one thermal fuse including a material that will melt upon ignition of fuel within the at least one tube and cause a diversion of fuel from the fuel feed opening to at least one bypass opening. A method and a turbine engine in accordance with the protection system are also provided.

  17. FABRICATION AND ATTACHMENT OF POLYIMIDE FILL TUBES TO PLASTIC NIF CAPSULES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takagi, M; Saito, K; Frederick, C; Nikroo, A; Cook, R

    2006-12-08

    We have developed a technique for drawing commercially available polyimide tubing to the required fill tube dimensions. The tubes are then precisely cut with an Excimer laser to produce a clean, flat tip. We have also demonstrated that one can use the Excimer laser to drill less than a 5 {micro}m diameter through hole in the {approx}150 wall of a NIF dimension GDP shell, and can then create a 10-15 {micro}m diameter, 20-40 {micro}m deep counterbore centered on the through hole with the same laser. Using a home built assembly station the tube is carefully inserted into the counterbore and glued in place with UV-cure epoxy, using a LED UV source to avoid heating the joint. We expect that the same joining technique can be used for Be shells.

  18. Plasma ? scaling of anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind flux tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima E-mail: amitava@princeton.edu

    2014-03-10

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of 'spaghetti'-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma ? dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma ?. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  19. Effects of bending stresses and tube curvature on remote field eddy current signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutherland, J.; Atherton, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of bending stresses and tube curvature on remote field eddy current signals were investigated. This technique is a recognized method for the nondestructive evaluation of ferromagnetic tubing, as used in heat exchangers and boiler systems. Different stress states were examined (elastic stress, plastic deformation, and residual stress) and found to give distinctive behavior. Elastic and residual stresses can appear as wall loss, depending on the operating frequency and baseline used for inspection and interpretation.

  20. Studies of the steam generator degraded tubes behavior on BRUTUS test loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chedeau, C.; Rassineux, B.

    1997-04-01

    Studies for the evaluation of steam generator tube bundle cracks in PWR power plants are described. Global tests of crack leak rates and numerical calculations of crack opening area are discussed in some detail. A brief overview of thermohydraulic studies and the development of a mechanical probabilistic design code is also given. The COMPROMIS computer code was used in the studies to quantify the influence of in-service inspections and maintenance work on the risk of a steam generator tube rupture.

  1. High strength Sn-Mo-Nb-Zr alloy tubes and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheadle, Brian A.

    1977-01-01

    Tubes for use in nuclear reactors fabricated from a quaternary alloy comprising 2.5-4.0 wt% Sn, 0.5-1.5 wt% Mo, 0.5-1.5 wt% Nb, balance essentially Zr. The tubes are fabricated by a process of hot extrusion, heat treatment, cold working to size and age hardening, so as to produce a microstructure comprising elongated .alpha. grains with an acicular transformed .beta. grain boundary phase.

  2. New technologies address the problem areas of coiled-tubing cementing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, R.B. )

    1992-05-01

    Coiled-tubing cementing has been practiced successfully on the Alaskan North Slope for several years. This paper discusses the special problems faced when this technology was applied to offshore U.S. gulf coast operations. The innovative solutions and procedures developed to improve the economic and technical success of coiled-tubing cementing are also discussed. Comparative laboratory and computer studies, as well as field case histories, will be presented to show the economic merit of this technology.

  3. Test program to simulate PFBC tube bundle metal wastage. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, R.A.; Kittle, W.F.

    1984-05-01

    The Westinghouse R and D Center conducted a series of laboratory-scale tests to (1) investigate two potential mechanisms for tube erosion in the IEA Grimethorpe PFBC tests: dense-phase abrasion and dilute-phase impact erosion; and to (2) compare the relative erosivity of several bed particle materials. Maximum dilute- and dense-phase velocities in the Grimethorpe unit were estimated from tube Bank A and tube Bank C test conditions and used to set the laboratory test conditions for the two units. Sand, raw dolomite and bed materials from Grimethorpe and from the New York University (NYU) PFBC facility were tested. With the maximum dilute- and dense-phase velocities estimated for Grimethorpe, tube erosion was substantial by both mechanisms for test durations of up to 100 hours. Dilute-phase impacts with fine sand resulted in local material losses at the impact point. Dilute-phase tests with coarse Grimethorpe bed materials, though, were not valid tests because of the short particle acceleration lengths available. The erosion pattern with the dense-phase testing led to a flattening of the tube face. The dense-phase erosion pattern was similar to the Grimethorpe tubes examined and described in DOE reports. We conclude that high-velocity, dense-phase streaming is the likely mechanism of erosion in the Grimethorpe unit. Tube erosion rates can be reduced by operating at lower fluidization velocities and with a smaller content of large particles (>2000 ..mu..m) in the bed. Behavior will change little with different types of sorbents and coals. High rates of particle attrition and tube deposition were also observed. 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Tuning gain and bandwidth of traveling wave tubes using metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, Robert Polizzi, Anthony

    2014-10-14

    We employ metamaterial beam-wave interaction structures for tuning the gain and bandwidth of short traveling wave tubes. The interaction structures are made from metal rings of uniform cross section, which are periodically deployed along the length of the traveling wave tube. The aspect ratio of the ring cross sections is adjusted to control both gain and bandwidth. The frequency of operation is controlled by the filling fraction of the ring cross section with respect to the size of the period cell.

  5. X-ray Tube with Magnetic Electron Steering - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search X-ray Tube with Magnetic Electron Steering Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (802 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Sandia National Laboratories has created an improved efficiency compact X-ray source to address a wide range of applications. The high average power large area X-ray tube provides increased X-ray generation efficiency

  6. Grid Integration and the Carrying Capacity of the U.S. Grid to Incorporate Variable Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report summarizes the challenges to integrating increasing amounts of variable renewable energy (RE), identifies emerging practices in power system planning and operation that can facilitate grid integration, and proposes a unifying concept-economic carrying capacity-that can provide a framework for evaluating actions to accommodate higher penetrations of RE. There is growing recognition that while technical challenges to variable RE integration are real, they can generally be addressed via a variety of solutions that vary in implementation cost. As a result, limits to RE penetration are primarily economic, driven by factors that include transmission and the flexibility of the power grid to balance supply and demand. This limit can be expressed as economic carrying capacity, or the point at which variable RE is no longer economically competitive or desirable to the system or society. Studies have demonstrated that carrying capacity is not fixed and can be improved through technical and institutional changes. This creates the possibility to achieve even higher penetration levels through strategic investments in both demand- and supply-side sources of flexibility.

  7. Measurements of the efficiency and refrigeration power of pulse-tube refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, S.; Radebaugh, R.

    1986-09-01

    Pulse-tube or thermoacoustic refrigerators have the potential for high reliability since they require only one moving part - an oscillating piston or diaphragm at room temperature. If a tube is closed at one end and connected to a pressure-wave generator at the open end, and if the phase angle between mass flow and pressure is shifted from 90/sup 0/, then refrigeration occurs at the open end. The shift in phase angle can be realized by thermal relaxation between the gas and the tube walls or by an orifice at the closed end. A low temperature of 60 K using helium gas in a one-stage orifice pulse tube has been achieved at NBS. The report describes the first measurements of the efficiency, refrigeration power, and refrigeration power per unit mass flow, for three pulse-tube refrigerators. Three tube sizes, differing in length and diameter, were studied over a frequency range of 3 to 11.5 Hz. Cooling efficiencies as high as 90% of the Carnot efficiency were obtained when compressor and regenerator losses are neglected.

  8. Manufacturing of SiCp Reinforced Magnesium Composite Tubes by Hot Extrusion Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Yeong-Maw [National Sun Yat-Sen University-Department of Mechanical and Electro-mechanical Engineering, No.70, Lien-Hai Rd., Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Song-Jeng; Huang, Yu-San [National Chung Cheng University-Department of Mechanical Engineering, 168 University Rd. Ming-Hsiung, ChiaYi, Taiwan (China)

    2011-05-04

    Magnesium alloys have higher specific strength compared with other metals, such as aluminum, copper and steel. Nevertheless, their ductility is still not good for further metal forming and their strength is not large enough for real structure applications. The aim of this paper is to develop magnesium alloy composite tubes reinforced with SiC particulates by the stir-casting method and hot extrusion processes. At first, AZ61/SiCp composite ingots reinforced with 5 wt% SiC particulates are fabricated by the melt-stirring technique. Then, finite element simulations are conducted to analyze the plastic flow of magnesium alloy AZ61 within the die and the temperature distribution of the products. AZ61/SiCp composite tubes are manufactured by hot extrusion using a specially designed die-set for obtaining uniform thickness distribution tubes. Finally, the mechanical properties of the reinforced AZ61/SiCp composite and Mg alloy AZ61 tubes are compared with those of the billets to manifest the advantages of extrusion processes and reinforcement of SiC particulates. The microstructures of the billet and extruded tubes are also observed. Through the improvement of the strength of the tube product, its life cycle can be extended and the energy consumption can be reduced, and eventually the environmental sustainability is achieved.

  9. Shallow gas well drilling with coiled tubing in the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, R.G.; Ovitz, R.W.; Guild, G.J.; Biggs, M.D.

    1996-12-31

    Coiled tubing is being utilized to drill new wells, for re-entry drilling to deepen or laterally extend existing wells, and for underbalanced drilling to prevent formation damage. Less than a decade old, coiled tubing drilling technology is still in its inaugral development stage. Initially, utilizing coiled tubing was viewed as a {open_quotes}science project{close_quotes} to determine the validity of performing drilling operations in-lieu of the conventional rotary rig. Like any new technology, the initial attempts were not always successful, but did show promise as an economical alternative if continued efforts were made in the refinement of equipment and operational procedures. A multiwell project has been completed in the San Juan Basin of Northwestern New Mexico which provides documentation indicating that coiled tubing can be an alternative to the conventional rotary rig. A 3-well pilot project, a 6-well project was completed uniquely utilizing the combined resources of a coiled tubing service company, a producing company, and a drilling contractor. This combination of resources aided in the refinement of surface equipment, personnel, mud systems, jointed pipe handling, and mobilization. The results of the project indicate that utilization of coiled tubing for the specific wells drilled was an economical alternative to the conventional rotary rig for drilling shallow gas wells.

  10. Internal thermal coupling in direct-flow coaxial vacuum tube collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glembin, J.; Rockendorf, G.; Scheuren, J.

    2010-07-15

    This investigation covers the impact of low flow rates on the efficiency of coaxial vacuum tube collectors. Measurements show an efficiency reduction of 10% if reducing the flow rate from 78 kg/m{sup 2} h to 31 kg/m{sup 2} h for a collector group with 60 parallel vacuum tubes with a coaxial flow conduit at one-sided connection. For a more profound understanding a model of the coaxial tube was developed which defines the main energy fluxes including the internal thermal coupling. The tube simulations show a non-linear temperature profile along the tube with the maximum temperature in the outer pipe. Due to heat transfer to the entering flow this maximum is not located at the fluid outlet. The non-linearity increases with decreasing flow rates. The experimentally determined flow distribution allows simulating the measured collector array. The simulation results confirm the efficiency decrease at low flow rates. The flow distribution has a further impact on efficiency reduction, but even at an ideal uniform flow, a considerable efficiency reduction at low flow rates is to be expected. As a consequence, low flow rates should be prevented for coaxial tube collectors, thus restricting the possible operation conditions. The effect of constructional modifications like diameter or material variations is presented. Finally the additional impact of a coaxial manifold design is discussed. (author)

  11. FORMING TUBES AND RODS OF URANIUM METAL BY EXTRUSION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method and apparatus are presented for the extrusion of uranium metal. Since uranium is very brittle if worked in the beta phase, it is desirable to extrude it in the gamma phase. However, in the gamma temperature range thc uranium will alloy with the metal of the extrusion dic, and is readily oxidized to a great degree. According to this patent, uranium extrusion in thc ganmma phase may be safely carried out by preheating a billet of uranium in an inert atmosphere to a trmperature between 780 C and 1100 C. The heated billet is then placed in an extrusion apparatus having dies which have been maintained at an elevated temperature for a sufficient length of time to produce an oxide film, and placing a copper disc between the uranium billet and the die.

  12. Air Conditioning | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    serpentine tubing surrounded by aluminum fins. This tubing is usually made of copper. A pump, called the compressor, moves a heat transfer fluid (or refrigerant) between the...

  13. Grid Integration and the Carrying Capacity of the U.S. Grid to Incorporate Variable Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Denholm, Paul; Speer, Bethany; Miller, Mackay

    2015-04-23

    In the United States and elsewhere, renewable energy (RE) generation supplies an increasingly large percentage of annual demand, including nine U.S. states where wind comprised over 10% of in-state generation in 2013. This white paper summarizes the challenges to integrating increasing amounts of variable RE, identifies emerging practices in power system planning and operation that can facilitate grid integration, and proposes a unifying concept—economic carrying capacity—that can provide a framework for evaluating actions to accommodate higher penetrations of RE. There is growing recognition that while technical challenges to variable RE integration are real, they can generally be addressed via a variety of solutions that vary in implementation cost. As a result, limits to RE penetration are primarily economic, driven by factors that include transmission and the flexibility of the power grid to balance supply and demand. This limit can be expressed as economic carrying capacity, or the point at which variable RE is no longer economically competitive or desirable to the system or society.

  14. Analysis/control of in-bed tube erosion phenomena in the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) system. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seong W.

    1996-01-01

    This technical report summarizes the research work performed and progress achieved during the period of October 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995. A series of material wastage tests was carried out on cooled AISI 1018 steel and three thermal-sprayed coating specimens at an elevated environmental temperature (3000{degrees}C) using a nozzle type erosion tester. Test conditions simulated the erosion conditions at the in-bed tubes of fluidized combustors (FBCs). Angular silica quartz particles of average size 742 {micro}m were used for erodent particles for tests at an impact angle of 30{degrees}, at a particle velocity of 2.5 m/s for exposure periods up to 96 hours. The specimens were water-cooled on backside. Material wastage rates were determined from thickness loss measurements of specimens. Test results were compared with material wastage test results from testing isothermal specimens. The morphology of specimens was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that the cooled specimens had greater material wastage than that of the isothermal specimens. The material wastage rate of cooling specimen for AISI 1018 was greater than that for thermal- sprayed coatings. The success in reduction of erosion wastage by cooled-coating specimens was related to the coatings, composition and morphology.

  15. PLASMA SPRAYED Ni-Al COATINGS FOR SAFE ENDING HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALLAN,M.L.; OTTERSON,D.; BERNDT,C.C.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AIB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand. It was determined that the Ni-Al coatings could be applied to a depth of two inches on the tube ends. When sprayed on flat coupons the coatings exhibited relatively high adhesion strength and microhardness. Polarization curves showed that the coating performance was variable. Measured corrosion potentials indicated that the Ni-Al coatings are active towards steel coated with thermally conductive polymers, thereby suggesting preferential corrosion. Corrosion also occurred on the coated coupons tested in the volcanic pool. This may have been exacerbated by the difficulty in applying a uniform coating to the coupon edges. The Ni-Al coatings applied to the tubes had significant porosity and did not provide adequate corrosion protection. This is associated with the short standoff distance and is not a reflection of the normal quality of plasma sprayed coatings. Even if coating porosity could be reduced, the coupling of an alloy coating to a polymer-based barrier coating in the same electrolyte is not recommended. Therefore, polymer coatings that can be field applied to the tube ends after roller expansion should be sought.

  16. Evaluation of the fabricability of advanced iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohn, W.R.; Topolski, M.J.

    1993-07-01

    Researchers at Babcock & Wilcox Alliance Research Center have investigated methods to produce bimetallic tubing consisting of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel for practical use in fossil fueled energy equipment. In the course of this work, the compatibility of iron aluminide with four candidate austenitic stainless steel substrates was first evaluated using diffusion couples. Based on these results, a combination of iron aluminide and 304 stainless steel was selected for further development. Two composite billets of this combination were then prepared and extruded in separate trails at 2200F and 2000F. Both extrusions yielded 2-inch OD clad tubes, each approximately 18 feet long. Results of the evaluation show that the tube extruded at 2000F had a sound, integrally bonded clad layer throughout its entire length. However, the tube extruded at 2200F exhibited regions of disbonding between the clad layer and the substrate. In supplement to this work, an assessment of the technical and economic merits of iron aluminide-clad austenitic stainless steel components in power generation systems was conducted by B&W Fossil Power Division. Future activities should include an investigation of lower extrusion processing temperatures to optimize the fabrication of high quality iron-aluminide clad tubing.

  17. Coiled tubing drilling: Real time MWD with dedicated powers to the BHA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leismer, D.; Williams, B.; Pursell, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes and analyzes the development and ongoing field trials of a Real Time MWD Coiled Tubing Drilling System. The new system holds great promise for advancing the state of coiled tubing drilling for certain applications. The system is designed for through-tubing, short radius re-entry and drilling highly deviated wells as horizontal laterals to a geologic target with minimum wellbore tortuosity. Currently, 4-1/2-in production tubing is the smallest re-entry candidate. Real time MWD and Bottom Hole Assembly (BHA) control is achieved by the use of a combination hydraulic and electric umbilical internal to the coiled tubing (CT), allowing continuous data collection and selective surface control of the BHA components. This communication line allows orientation in 10{degree} increments (or less) while drilling, applies weight-on-bit and operates a reusable circulating valve. In addition, the umbilical provides real-time monitoring of weight-on-bit, circulating pressures of the drilling fluid internal and external to the BHA, dedicated hydraulic system bottom hole pressure, downhole temperature and survey data from logging equipment.

  18. Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J.

    2009-08-15

    Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

  19. Development of a computer wellbore simulator for coiled-tube operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, H.; Walton, I.C.; Dowell, S.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a computer wellbore simulator developed for coiled tubing operations of fill cleanout and unloading of oil and gas wells. The simulator models the transient, multiphase fluid flow and mass transport process that occur in these operations. Unique features of the simulator include a sand bed that may form during fill cleanout in deviated and horizontal wells, particle transport with multiphase compressible fluids, and the transient unloading process of oil and gas wells. The requirements for a computer wellbore simulator for coiled tubing operations are discussed and it is demonstrated that the developed simulator is suitable for modeling these operations. The simulator structure and the incorporation of submodules for gas/liquid two-phase flow, reservoir and choke models, and coiled tubing movement are addressed. Simulation examples are presented to show the sand bed formed in cleanout in a deviated well and the transient unloading results of oil and gas wells. The wellbore simulator developed in this work can assist a field engineer with the design of coiled tubing operations. By using the simulator to predict the pressure, flow rates, sand concentration and bed depth, the engineer will be able to select the coiled tubing, fluid and schedule of an optimum design for particular well and reservoir conditions.

  20. In-vessel ITER tubing failure rates for selected materials and coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, T.D.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    Several materials have been suggested for fabrication of ITER in-vessel coolant tubing: beryllium, copper, Inconel, niobium, stainless steel, titanium, and vanadium. This report generates failure rates for the materials to identify the best performer from an operational safety and availability perspective. Coolant types considered in this report are helium gas, liquid lithium, liquid sodium, and water. Failure rates for the materials are generated by including the influence of ITER`s operating environment and anticipated tubing failure mechanisms with industrial operating experience failure rates. The analyses define tubing failure mechanisms for ITER as: intergranular attack, flow erosion, helium induced swelling, hydrogen damage, neutron irradiation embrittlement, cyclic fatigue, and thermal cycling. K-factors, multipliers, are developed to model each failure mechanism and are applied to industrial operating experience failure rates to generate tubing failure rates for ITER. The generated failure rates identify the best performer by its expected reliability. With an average leakage failure rate of 3.1e-10(m-hr){sup {minus}1}and an average rupture failure rate of 3.1e-11(m-hr){sup {minus}1}, titanium proved to be the best performer of the tubing materials. The failure rates generated in this report are intended to serve as comparison references for design safety and optimization studies. Actual material testing and analyses are required to validate the failure rates.

  1. Unusual refinery boiler tube failures due to corrosion by sulfuric acid induced by steam leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Lopez, D.; Wong-Moreno, A.

    1998-12-31

    Corrosion by sulfuric acid in boilers is a low probability event because gas temperature and metal temperature of boiler tubes are high enough to avoid the condensation of sulfuric acid from flue gases. This degradation mechanism is frequently considered as an important cause of air preheaters materials degradation, where flue gases are cooled by heat transfer to the combustion air. Corrosion is associated to the presence of sulfuric acid, which condensates if metal temperature (or gas temperature) is below of the acid dew point. In economizer tubes, sulfuric acid corrosion is an unlikely event because flue gas and tube temperatures are normally over the acid dewpoint. In this paper, the failure analysis of generator tubes (similar to the economizer of bigger boilers) of two small oil-fired subcritical boilers is reported. It is concluded that sulfuric acid corrosion was the cause of the failure. The sulfuric acid condensation was due to the contact of flue gases containing SO{sub 3} with water-steam spray coming from leaks at the interface of rolled tube to the drum. Considering the information gathered from these two cases studied, an analysis of this failure mechanism is presented including a description of the thermodynamics condition of water leaking from the drum, and an analysis of the factors favoring it.

  2. Continuous-wave radar to detect defects within heat exchangers and steam generator tubes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassersharif, Bahram (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Caffey, Thurlow Washburn Howell; Jedlicka, Russell P.; Garcia, Gabe V. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2003-01-01

    A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The experimental program resulted in a completed product development schedule and the design of an experimental apparatus for studying handling of the probe and data acquisition. These tests were completed as far as the prototypical probe performance allowed. The prototype probe design did not have sufficient sensitivity to detect a defect signal using the defined radar technique and did not allow successful completion of all of the project milestones. The best results from the prototype probe could not detect a tube defect using the radar principle. Though a more precision probe may be possible, the cost of design and construction was beyond the scope of the project. This report describes the probe development and the status of the design at the termination of the project.

  3. Measurement of spatial and temporal behavior of H{sub ?} emission from Aditya tokamak using a diagnostic based on a photomultiplier tube array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhuri, M. B. Ghosh, J.; Manchanda, R.; Banerjee, S.; Ramaiya, N.; Virani, Niral; Mali, Aniruddh; Amardas, A.; Kumar, Pintu; Tanna, R. L.; Gupta, C. N.; Bhatt, S. B.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Kumar, Ajay

    2014-11-15

    A photo multiplier tube (PMT) array based spectroscopic diagnostic with fast time response of 10 ?s and spatial resolution ?3 cm has been developed and installed on Aditya tokamak to study the spatial and temporal behavior of H{sub ?} emissions from typical discharges. Collimated light has been collected from the plasma along 16 lines of sight passing through entire plasma poloidal cross section of Aditya and detected by two 8 channels PMT arrays after selecting H{sub ?} emission using interference filter. The studies are carried out during plasma formation phase of Aditya by changing vertical field and its delay with respect to loop voltage. It is observed that plasma initiated in the high field side in typical discharges of Aditya. The plasma formation position is matched with null field location estimated through simulation.

  4. Submerged combustion melting processes for producing glass and similar materials, and systems for carrying out such processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charbonneau, Mark William

    2015-08-04

    Processes of controlling submerged combustion melters, and systems for carrying out the methods. One process includes feeding vitrifiable material into a melter vessel, the melter vessel including a fluid-cooled refractory panel in its floor, ceiling, and/or sidewall, and heating the vitrifiable material with a burner directing combustion products into the melting zone under a level of the molten material in the zone. Burners impart turbulence to the molten material in the melting zone. The fluid-cooled refractory panel is cooled, forming a modified panel having a frozen or highly viscous material layer on a surface of the panel facing the molten material, and a sensor senses temperature of the modified panel using a protected thermocouple positioned in the modified panel shielded from direct contact with turbulent molten material. Processes include controlling the melter using the temperature of the modified panel. Other processes and systems are presented.

  5. Multiaxial cyclic ratcheting in coiled tubing -- Part 2. Experimental program and model evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rolovic, R.; Tipton, S.M.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the plasticity model proposed in a separate paper (Part 1). Constant pressure, cyclic bend-straighten tests were performed to identify material parameters required by the analytical model. Block pressure, bend-straighten tests were conducted to evaluate the proposed model. Experiments were performed on full-size coiled steel tubing samples using a specialized test machine. Two commonly used coiled tubing materials and four specimen sizes were subjected to load histories consisting of bending-straightening cycles with varying levels of internal pressure. It was observed that cyclic ratcheting rates can be reversed without reversing the mean stress, i.e., diametral growth of coiled tubing can be followed by diametral shrinkage even when the internal pressure is kept positive, depending on the loading history. This material behavior is explained in the context of the new theory. The correlation between the predictions and the test data is very good.

  6. Corrosion effects of hydrogen sulfide on coiled tubing and carbon steel in hydrochloric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Coiled tubing is commonly used in oilwell drilling and stimulation. It has been reported to be less susceptible to acid attack than carbon steel in acidizing. Corrosion problems are frequently reported from field activities and include corrosion/erosion, galvanic attack, brine/oxygen/acid attack, and HCl/H{sub 2}S attack. In this study, coiled tubing was exposed to inhibited HCl acid in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S. Four HCl inhibitors and one H{sub 2}S inhibitor were evaluated, and the corrosion rates of coiled tubing, carbon steel (J-55), and carburized steel were compared. Tests were conducted at atmospheric pressure for temperatures less than and equal to 200 F. At temperatures greater than 200 F; tests were conducted at 4,000 psi.

  7. The use of coiled tubing during matrix acidizing of carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, R.L.; Milne, A.

    1995-10-01

    A laboratory and field study directed at improved well performance of horizontal wells is discussed. During the study, several wells were matrix acidized using bullhead and coiled tubing placement techniques. The study performed in carbonate reservoirs indicates acid placed with coiled tubing diverted with foam provides excellent zone coverage and damage removal. Conventional bullhead techniques do not result in effective damage removal. The study emphasizes the evaluation of the treatment results and the development of improved acidizing techniques. Laboratory simulations of matrix acidizing indicate proper placement techniques are essential. This observation is supported by field data in oil wells completed in carbonate reservoirs. The key to successful damage removal is (1) the placement of acid via coiled tubing and (2) proper diversion. Production logging and well performance data support this claim. The proposed treatment is applicable in both horizontal and vertical wells completed in carbonate reservoirs.

  8. Observations and insights into Pb-assisted stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 steam generator tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2005-08-15

    Pb-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (PbSCC) of Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing in high-temperature-water service and laboratory tests were studied by analytical transmission electron microscopy of cross-sectioned samples. Examinations of pulled tubes from many pressurized water reactors revealed lead in cracks from 11 of 17 samples. Comparisons of the degraded intergranular structures with ones produced in simple laboratory tests with PbO in near-neutral AVT water showed that the PbSCC characteristics in service tubing could be reproduced without complex chemistries and heat-flow conditions that can occur during plant operation. Observations of intergranular and transgranular cracks promoted by Pb in the test samples also provided new insights into the mechanisms of PbSCC in mill-annealed and thermally treated Alloy 600.

  9. Ion-induced swelling of ODS ferritic alloy MA957 tubing to 500 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Garner, F. A.; Voyevodin, V.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Melnichenko, V. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the potential swelling behavior of the ODS ferritic alloy MA957 at very high dpa levels, specimens were prepared from pressurized tubes that were unirradiated archives of tubes previously irradiated in FFTF to doses as high at 110 dpa. These unirradiated specimens were irradiated with 1.8 MeV Cr+ ions to doses ranging from 100 to 500 dpa and examined by transmission electron microscopy. No coinjection of helium or hydrogen was employed. It was shown that compared to several ferritic/martensitic steels irradiated in the same facility, these tubes were rather resistant to void swelling, reaching a maximum value of only 4.5% at 500 dpa and 450°C. In this fine-grained material, the distribution of swelling was strongly influenced by the presence of void denuded zones along the grain boundaries.

  10. A Review of Some Degradation Mechanisms in CANDU Steam Generator Tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogundele, G.; Clark, M.; Goszczynski, G.; Lloyd, A.; Pagan, S.; Sedman, K.; King, P.

    2006-07-01

    The first CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) went into operation in July 1971. Today, there are several units in operation at the Pickering, Bruce, and Darlington sites in Ontario, Canada. The steam generator tubing materials were manufactured from Monel 400, Inconel 600, and Incoloy 800 for the Pickering, Bruce, and Darlington respectively and are subjected to different operating conditions. This paper presents a review of some of the various types of degradation mechanisms that have been observed on these tubing materials over the operating period of the respective plants. The results presented are based on the metallurgical examination of removed tubes. The mechanisms that have been observed include pitting, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, fretting, and erosion corrosion. The nature of the flaws and causative factors (if known) are discussed. (authors)

  11. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-inlet-nozzle attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Bob G. (Kennewick, WA)

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching the lower end 21 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct tube to an upper end 11 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly inlet nozzle. The duct tube's lower end 21 has sides terminating in locking tabs 22 which end in inwardly-extending flanges 23. The flanges 23 engage recesses 13 in the top section 12 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11. A retaining collar 30 slides over the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to restrain the flanges 23 in the recesses 13. A locking nut 40 has an inside threaded portion 41 which engages an outside threaded portion 15 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to secure the retaining collar 30 against protrusions 24 on the duct tube's sides.

  12. Low-cost evacuated-tube solar collector appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beecher, D.T.

    1980-05-31

    A low cost solar heat energy collector module and array has been designed using the evacuated tube, selective absorber, air cooled concept. Glass tubing as used in fluorescent lamps with automatic sealing methods is a key feature of the evacuated tube design. A molded fiber glass concentrating reflector panel and sheet metal header assembly are proposed. Major design problems involved included the cost of materials and labor, thermal expansion and distortion problems, high stagnation and operating temperatures, isolation, thermal efficiency, sealing, joining, air pressure drop, and weight of the preassembled module. A cost of less than $5 per active square foot of collecting surface has been estimated for materials and labor of the module and its mounting frame.

  13. Development of a model of an x-ray tube transmission source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goda, Joetta M; Ianakiev, Kiril D; Moss, Cal E

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of an x-ray tube based source for transmission measurements of UF6 gas, we have developed a one-dimensional, spreadsheet-based model of the source. Starting with the spectrum produced by an x-ray tube we apply the linear attenuation coefficients for various notch filters, the aluminum pipe, and UF6 gas. This model allows calculation of the transmitted spectrum based on the type of filter, the thickness of the filter, the x-ray tube high voltage, the Al pipe thickness, and the UF6 gas pressure. The sensitivity of the magnitude of the transmission peak produced by the notch filter to any of these variables can be explored quickly and easily to narrow the choices for experimental measurements. To validate the spreadsheet based model, comparisons have been made to various experimental data.

  14. NASA Lewis Stirling SPRE testing and analysis with reduced number of cooler tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, W.A.; Cairelli, J.E.; Swec, D.M.; Doeberling, T.J.; Lakatos, T.F.; Madi, F.J.

    1994-09-01

    Free-piston Stirling power converters are a candidate for high capacity space power applications. The Space Power Research Engine (SPRE), a free-piston Stirling engine coupled with a linear alternator, is being tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of the Civil Space Technology Initiative. The SPRE is used as a test bed for evaluating converter modifications which have the potential to improve converter performance and for validating computer code predictions. Reducing the number of cooler tubes on the SPRE has been identified as a modification with the potential to significantly improve power and efficiency. This paper describes experimental tests designed to investigate the effects of reducing the number of cooler tubes on converter power, efficiency and dynamics. Presented are test results from the converter operating with a reduced number of cooler tubes and comparisons between this data and both baseline test data and computer code predictions.

  15. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, Roger W.

    1992-01-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating ched particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180.degree. relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube.

  16. High field pulsed microwiggler comprising a conductive tube with periodically space slots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, R.W.

    1992-09-01

    A microwiggler assembly produces large magnetic fields for oscillating charged particle beams, particularly electron beams for free electron laser (FEL) application. A tube of electrically conductive material is formed with radial slots axially spaced at the period of the electron beam. The slots have alternate 180[degree] relationships and are formed to a maximum depth of 0.6 to 0.7 times the tube circumference. An optimum slot depth is selected to eliminate magnetic quadrupole fields within the microwiggler as determined from a conventional pulsed wire technique. Suitable slot configurations include single slits, double slits, triple slits, and elliptical slots. An axial electron beam direction is maintained by experimentally placing end slits adjacent entrance and exit portions of the assembly, where the end slit depth is determined by use of the pulsed wire technique outside the tube. 10 figs.

  17. Creep-Rupture Behavior and Recrystallization in Cold-Bent Boiler Tubing for USC Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shingledecker, John P

    2008-01-01

    Creep-rupture experiments were conducted on candidate Ultrasupercritical (USC) alloy tubes to evaluate the effects of cold-work and recrystallization during high-temperature service. These creep tests were performed by internally pressurizing cold-bent boiler tubes at 775 C for times up to 8000 hours. The bends were fabricated with cold-work levels beyond the current ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (ASME B&PV) Code Section I limits for austenitic stainless steels. Destructive metallographic evaluation of the crept tube bends was used to determine the effects of cold-work and the degree of recrystallization. The metallographic analysis combined with an evaluation of the creep and rupture data suggest that solid-solution strengthened nickel-based alloys can be fabricated for high-temperature service at USC conditions utilizing levels of cold-work higher than the current allowed levels for austenitic stainless steels.

  18. Laws of convective vortex formation behind a flame front during its propagation in a tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrukov, S.A.; Samsonov, V.P.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines laws and conditions of convective vortex formation in combustion products during the propagation of a slow, stable flame in a vertical, half-open tube. The main element of the experimental unit was the reaction tube and weightless conditions were created in a freely falling container holding the reaction tube. Propane-air and CO-air mixtures were used. The structure of the flow behind the flame front was studied by the interferometric method. Frames are show from an interference film illustrating the typical pattern of vortex formation behind the flame front when the flame propagates upward at a velocity of 7 cm/sec. Analyses of the interferograms shows that the flame is stable before the vortices appear and that the flow of combustion products is laminar.

  19. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A. Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Todd, R.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Poole, H. J.

    2015-05-15

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50?cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5?cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3?cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10??m copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  20. Model boiler testing to evaluate inhibitors for caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daret, J.; Paine, J.P.N.; Partridge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of model boiler tests, using a mixture of precracked and non-precracked (virgin) tube-to-tube support plate intersections was performed. The testing supported the qualification of inhibitors for mitigating the secondary side corrosion of alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Many utilities suspect that the caustic impurities come from the feedwater. Candidate inhibitors included boric acid (as a reference), cerous acetate, and two forms of titanium dioxide: a laboratory produced titania-silica sol-gel, and manometer sized anatase The latter was combined with a 150 C pre-soaking with a titanium lactate, and was tested with and without a zeta potential treatment by sodium aluminate. Effectiveness of boric acid to prevent and retard caustic induced intergranular corrosion was confirmed in all crevice configurations (open and packed). The cerous acetate treatment multiplied by two to four the time necessary to detect a primary-to-secondary leak on virgin tubes, and reduced the propagation rate on precracked tubes. Cerium was found intimately mixed, as cerianite, with the free span and crevice deposits, when the crevices were sufficiently accessible. Due to its very low solubility and large particle size, the titania-silica sol-gel was unable to penetrate the crevices and had no effect on the degradation process. The nanometric particle size titania treatment and/or the preceding soaking with soluble titanium lactate drastically increased the titanium concentration in free span and open crevice deposit (with no added sodium aluminate, titania reacted with magnetite to form ilmenite) and showed undeniable capacity to prevent tubing degradation. Its effectiveness, in the case of packed crevices and for arresting cracks, was not so conclusive.