National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for finished products slow

  1. Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Data Series: Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline (Excl. Adj.) Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blenede w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & < Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, > Ed55 Other Conventional Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline Adjustment Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Jet, Commercial Kerosene-Type Jet,

  2. Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O.,

  3. Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than

  4. Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55

  5. 01-02-2003 - Hazards from Modifying Finished Products | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazards from Modifying Finished Products Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/2003 File (public): PDF icon 01-02-2003(2)

  6. Observable non-Gaussianity from gauge field production in slow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observable non-Gaussianity from gauge field production in slow roll inflation, and a challenging connection with magnetogenesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  7. A new target concept for production of slow positrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Y.L; White, M.

    1995-01-01

    Slow positrons in the energy range up to a few keV are useful for material sciences and surface studies. The Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator (linac) was designed to produce 8-mA of 450-MeV positrons. A 200-MeV, 1.7-Ampere electron beam impinges on a 7-mm-thick (2 radiation lengths) tungsten target, resulting in bremsstrahlung pair production of electrons and positrons. The existing target was optimized for high energy positron production, and most slow positrons produced by the electron-gamma shower remain trapped inside. The linac could also be used to produce slow positrons, and a modified target could increase the low energy positron yield. Use of a multilayer or segmented target reduces self-absorption by the target, and thus more fully utilizes the incident beam power for slow positron production. A slow positron yield of 10{sup 9}/sec is expected from the existing incident electron beam. Multilayer targets could probably be used by other accelerator-based slow positron sources to improve slow positron yield without increasing the incident beam power. Two variations of a multilayer target concept are presented and discussed in this paper.

  8. LANL Finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, Karen

    2010-06-03

    Karen Davenport of Los Alamos National Laboratory discusses a high-throughput next generation genome finishing pipeline on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  9. Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Blog Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading...

  10. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    manual, etc.) Solving genome gaps, hard stops & other difficult areas Alternative PCR strategies, enzymes, and SOPs Directed assemblies and finishing closely related genomes...

  11. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schedule (pdf) sponsor logos The Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future meeting is sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Department of Energy...

  12. Product Supplied for Finished Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9,797 9,752 9,769 9,762 9,659 9,511 1991

  13. Finishing Using Next Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tonder, Andries

    2010-06-03

    Andries van Tonder of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute discusses a pipeline for finishing genomes to the gold standard on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  14. ,"Weekly Blender Net Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels per Day)","Weekly East Coast (PADD 1) Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels per ...

  15. Sunrayce 97 Finish Sets Records

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Finish Sets Records For more information contact: Patrick Booher, Sunrayce Program Manager (202) 586-0713 Colorado Springs, Colo. -- Under sunny skies that have followed the race since its beginning in Indianapolis,, Sunrayce 97 roared to a record finish in Colorado Springs. Winning the event overall was California State University - Los Angeles with a record setting pace averaging 43:29 mph over the entire distance. Cal State - L.A. had a total elapsed time of 28:41:24 hours. Massachusetts

  16. The Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Deacon [OpGen, Inc.

    2013-03-22

    Deacon Sweeney on "the Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  17. Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at Plutonium Finishing Plant Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant August 15, 2016 - 12:20pm Addthis Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant Progress Continues at Plutonium Finishing Plant RICHLAND, Wash. - With demolition of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site rapidly

  18. Running Jobs Intermittently Slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs Intermittently Slow Running Jobs Intermittently Slow October 2, 2014 Symptom: User jobs are seeing intermittent slowness, jobs can run very slow in certain stages or appear hung. This could happen to jobs having input/output on global file systems (/project, /global/homes, /global/scratch2). It could also happen to aplications using shared libraries, or CCM jobs on any Hopper file systems. The slowness is identified to be related to DVS/GPFS issues, the cause of slownwss yet

  19. Hanford Site Workers Meet Challenging Performance Goal at Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Safely and methodically, piece by piece, workers at the Hanford site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant are surpassing goals for removing hazardous tanks once used in the plutonium production process.

  20. Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost from LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost from LANL Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost from LANL APJeT received a $100,000 Venture Acceleration Fund award from LANS helping to complete design and engineering of a commercial-scale production unit. April 3, 2012 image description Gary Selwyn conducts product quality assurance on dual-functional, plasma-treated fabric at APJeT's Santa Fe lab: LANL technology may transform performance apparel.

  1. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

  2. Ancillary Building Demolition at Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Ancillary Building Demolition at Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex Ancillary Building Demolition at Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex June 15, 2016 - 12:30pm Addthis Ancillary Building Demolition at Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex Ancillary Building Demolition at Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex Ancillary Building Demolition at Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex Ancillary Building Demolition at Plutonium Finishing Plant Complex RICHLAND, Wash. - Progress toward

  3. ,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and ... "Date","U.S. Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...

  4. Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant August 28, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis The ...

  5. Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated This document from the U.S. ...

  6. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant- May 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant [HIAR-RL-2012-05-14

  7. Independent Oversight Review, Plutonium Finishing Plant- July 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Targeted Review of the Safety Significant Confinement Ventilation System and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Plutonium Finishing Plant

  8. Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

    2013-01-25

    Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  9. Quantum gravity slows inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsamis, N.C. |; Woodard, R.P.

    1996-02-01

    We consider the quantum gravitational back-reaction on an initially inflating, homogeneous and isotropic universe whose topology is T{sup 3} {times} {Re}. Although there is no secular effect at one loop, an explicit calculation shows that two-loop processes act to slow the rate of expansion by an amount which becomes non-pertubatively large at late times. By exploiting Feynman`s tree theorem we show that all higher loops act in the same sense. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Estimated | Department of Energy Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated This document from the U.S. EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs is part of the Case Study Series, and explains how "Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner than Estimated." Pesticide Program Case Study (332.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Introduction to the Value of

  11. ,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)","East Coast (PADD 1) Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand ...

  12. Hanford Employee Returns to Finish Glovebox Cleanup as Team Lead

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RICHLAND, Wash. – For Gary Hix, a recent accomplishment at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) ended a long career chapter at the Hanford Site facility.

  13. Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished

  14. Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case Study Series-Demonstrating Value of Program Evaluation 
 Office of Pesticide Programs U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
 Evaluation Helps Pesticide Program Finish Project Four Years Sooner Than Estimated A jump in efficiency will likely result in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) completing its pesticide product re-registration process in 2014, four years sooner than previously estimated. This was due in part to the Office of Pesticide Programs' (OPP) implementation of

  15. Refinery & Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 3,306,400 3,306,028 3,267,022 3,370,460 3,493,224 3,568,871 1945-2015 PADD 1 993,681 1,055,660 1,044,853 1,062,487 1,087,368 ...

  16. Refiner and Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    10,068 9,992 10,098 10,280 10,035 10,021 1982

  17. Worker Involvement Improves Safety at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Employees at the Hanford site are working together to find new and innovative ways to stay safe at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, one of the site’s most complex decommissioning projects.

  18. Glovebox Removal at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant Winding Down

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – At the Plutonium Finishing Plant on the Hanford Site, crews with EM contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are in the process of removing the last of the gloveboxes from the facility before demolition begins.

  19. Hanford Site Prepares for Completion of Plutonium Finishing Plant Demolition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Work crews are nearly done preparing for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) demolition, a major remediation project that reduces risk to human health and the environment and lowers lifecycle costs for the Hanford Site.

  20. Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, and new lubricants. deer12_gangopadhyay.pdf (1.14 MB) More Documents & Publications Low-Friction Hard Coatings Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Modified PAG

  1. Crude Oil Domestic Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Crude Oil Domestic Production Refinery Crude Oil Inputs Refinery Gross Inputs Refinery Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refinery Percent Operable Utilization Net Inputs of Motor Gasoline Blending Components Net Inputs of RBOB Blending Components Net Inputs of CBOB Blending Components Net Inputs of GTAB Blending Components Net Inputs of All Other Blending Components Net Inputs of Fuel Ethanol Net Production - Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production - Finished Motor Gasoline (Excl.

  2. Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

    2013-02-11

    Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  3. Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequencing, Finishing, and Analysis in the Future Meeting The 11th annual SFAF Meeting will be held June 1-3, 2016 La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, NM The meeting will begin at 8:30 am on Wednesday, June 1st. Download the 2016 Meeting Guide (pdf). Overview "Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future" (SFAF) is an annual meeting dedicated to bringing together experts in the genomics field-including representatives from the industries that serve this specialized scientific community.

  4. Slow speed object detection for haul trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-15

    Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

  5. 32173,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORP",3,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",0401,"BOSTON, MA","MASSACHUSETTS",1,830,"SPAIN",130,0,0,,,,, 32173,"CITGO PETRO CORP",4,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED...

  6. EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    The EcoCAR Challenege is a competition that challenges participating students from across North America to re-engineer a vehicle donated by General Motors. With the goal of minimizing the vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions, while maintaining its utility, safety and performance, teams had to find the best combination of cutting-edge technologies to meet these objectives. In the final year, the vehicles ran through a series of safety and technical tests at GM's Proving Ground in Milford, Michigan very similar to those GM's own production vehicles undergo. As EcoCAR wraps up, it is only the beginning for the next chapter in the DOE's 23-year history of advanced vehicle technology competitions. In April, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow announced the launch of EcoCAR 2: Plugging into the Future http://www.ecocar2.org/index.html . We look forward to seeing the new and innovative designs that students bring to this challenge and know they will find a way to exceed even our highest expectations.

  7. EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    The EcoCAR Challenege is a competition that challenges participating students from across North America to re-engineer a vehicle donated by General Motors. With the goal of minimizing the vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions, while maintaining its utility, safety and performance, teams had to find the best combination of cutting-edge technologies to meet these objectives. In the final year, the vehicles ran through a series of safety and technical tests at GM's Proving Ground in Milford, Michigan very similar to those GM's own production vehicles undergo. As EcoCAR wraps up, it is only the beginning for the next chapter in the DOE's 23-year history of advanced vehicle technology competitions. In April, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow announced the launch of EcoCAR 2: Plugging into the Future http://www.ecocar2.org/index.html . We look forward to seeing the new and innovative designs that students bring to this challenge and know they will find a way to exceed even our highest expectations.

  8. Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

    2012-09-18

    A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

  9. Aerobic treatability of waste effluent from the leather finishing industry. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinger, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The Seton Company supplies finished leather products exclusively for the automotive industry. In the process of finishing leather, two types of wastewaters are generated. The majority of the wastewater is composed of water-based paint residuals while the remainder is composed of solvent-based coating residuals. Aerobic treatability studies were conducted using water-based and solvent-based waste recirculatory waters from the Seton Company's Saxton, Pennsylvania processing plant. The specific objective was to determine the potential for using aerobic biological processes to biodegrade the industry's wastes and determine the potential for joint treatment at the local publicly owned treatment works (POTW). This study was accomplished in two phases. Phase I was conducted during the Spring Semester 1993 and consisted of aerobic respirometer tests of the raw wastes and mass balance analysis. The results of Phase I were published in a report to the Seton Company as Environmental Resources Research Institute project number 92C.II40R-1. Phase II was conducted during the Summer Semester 1993 and consisted of bench-scale reactor tests and additional aerobic respirometer tests. The aerobic respirometer batch tests and bench-scale reactor tests were used to assess the treatability of solvent-based and water-based wastewaters and determine the degree of biodegradability of the wastewaters. Mass balance calculations were made using measured characteristics.

  10. Automated edge finishing using an active XY table

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loucks, Clifford S.; Starr, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for automated edge finishing using hybrid position/force control of an XY table. The disclosure is particularly directed to learning the trajectory of the edge of a workpiece by "guarded moves". Machining is done by controllably moving the XY table, with the workpiece mounted thereon, along the learned trajectory with feedback from a force sensor. Other similar workpieces can be mounted, without a fixture on the XY table, located and the learned trajectory adjusted

  11. Thermal oxidation technology ready for tougher paint finishing regs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, J.

    1995-04-01

    There is good news and bad news in the air for commercial paint finishers. The bad news is that future local and federal clean-air regulations are almost certain to require control of volatile organic compound emissions from spray booths and drying ovens. The good news is that one of the most effective systems for meeting such requirements also can help cut operations and maintenance costs. There are as many solutions to VOC emissions problems in paint finishing as there are types of paint-spraying facilities. However, despite the range of choices, regenerative thermal oxidation systems are gaining favor among plant managers, for whom performance and maximum application flexibility are key considerations. Compared to other VOC-destruction approaches, RTO systems are more forgiving and reliable. Although RTO systems involve somewhat higher capital investments than alternative approaches, such costs typically are offset by lower long-term fuel and maintenance requirements. In addition, RTO systems can convert pollutants into usable energy sources, helping minimize operating costs of abatement equipment.

  12. Deburring and surface finishing: The past ten years and projections for the next ten years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1990-09-01

    The 1970s were a decade of significant growth in deburring and surface finishing. In the 1980s progress was made in robotic finishing, burr formation models, surface finish measurement, new processes, equipment and tooling. The centers of burr and surface related research changed. The decade of the 1990s will bring greater competition, environmental restrictions, more processes, more automation, and better characterization and simulation of processes.

  13. DTRA Algorithm Prize (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Whitechurch, Christian [Defense Threat Reduction Agency

    2013-02-12

    Christian Whitchurch on the "DTRA Algorithm Prize" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  14. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Project- May 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  15. Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule April 09, 2010 Microsoft Office document icon NR-01-10

  16. EM's Final Cleanup Underway at Plutonium Finishing Plant at Hanford Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Final decontamination efforts are underway in a former processing canyon that once supported Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  17. Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – In recent weeks, the look of Hanford site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant has changed as crews removed or demolished eight buildings surrounding it.

  18. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the...

  19. Resolved: Hopper /scratch file system slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hopper /scratch file system slow Resolved: Hopper /scratch file system slow August 6, 2014 Symptom: Users have reported scripts hung when involving file copies from/to the /scratch file system, or jobs running in /scratch are slower than before since late last week. Workaround: If it is convenient, move your workflow to /scratch2 temporarily, avoid any reference to /scratch. It includes setting your input files directory, your batch job submission directory, your executable file location, and

  20. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print Wednesday, 25 June 2008 00:00 At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of

  1. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J.; Nass, R.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  2. Removal Rate Model for Magnetorheological Finishing of Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; WIlson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-11-14

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic subaperture polishing process. The process uses a magntorheological (MR) fluid that consists of micrometer-sized, spherical, magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) particles, nonmagnetic polishing abrasives, water, and stabilizers. Material removal occurs when the CI and nonmagnetic polishing abrasives shear material off the surface being polished. We introduce a new MRF material removal rate model for glass. This model contains terms for the near surface mechanical properties of glass, drag force, polishing abrasive size and concentration, chemical durability of the glass, MR fluid pH, and the glass composition. We introduce quantitative chemical predictors for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, into an MRF removal rate model. We validate individual terms in our model separately and then combine all of the terms to show the whole MRF material removal model compared with experimental data. All of our experimental data were obtained using nanodiamond MR fluids and a set of six optical glasses.

  3. Hanford Workers Achieve Success in Difficult Glove Box Project at Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) recently finished safely separating three glove boxes for removal from Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after months of planning and preparation.

  4. 'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers have made the first demonstration of rapidly switching on and off "slow light" ... Researchers have made the first demonstration of rapidly switching on and off "slow light" ...

  5. Classification and storage of wastewater from floor finish removal operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, C.E.

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates the wastewater generated from hard surface floor finish removal operations at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory in order to determine if this wastewater is a hazardous waste, either by statistical evaluation, or other measurable regulatory guidelines established in California Regulations. This research also comparatively evaluates the 55 gallon drum and other portable tanks, all less than 1,000 gallons in size in order to determine which is most effective for the management of this waste stream at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The statistical methods in SW-846 were found to be scientifically questionable in their application to hazardous waste determination. In this statistical evaluation, the different data transformations discussed in the regulatory guidance document were applied along with the log transformation to the population of 18 samples from 55 gallon drums. Although this statistical evaluation proved awkward in its application, once the data is collected and organized on a spreadsheet this statistical analysis can be an effective tool which can aid the environmental manager in the hazardous waste classification process.

  6. DEMOLITIONS OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S CONCENTRATOR AND FINISHING FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonagh, P; Cathy Sizemore, C

    2007-01-17

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has produced Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) starting in the early 1950's to the mid 1970's for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and from the mid 1970's to the present for the Department of Energy (DOE). In that time, over 1,000 facilities have been built in the sixteen (16) operational areas of the eight hundred (800) square kilometer site. Over the years, many of the facilities have been dispositioned by the DOE as inactive. In FY-03, DOE identified two hundred and forty-seven (247) (inactive or soon to be inactive) facilities that required demolition. Demolition work was scheduled to start in FY-04 and be completed in the first quarter of FY-07. Two-hundred and thirty-nine (239) of these facilities have been demolished employing Routine demolition techniques. This presentation reviews and discusses two (2) of the eight (8) Non-Routine demolitions Facilities, 420-D ''The Concentrator Facility'', and 421-D ''The Finishing Facility''.

  7. Normal Force and Drag Force in Magnetorheological Finishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, C.; Shafrir, S.N.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2010-01-13

    The material removal in magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is known to be controlled by shear stress, tau, which equals drag force, Fd, divided by spot area, As. However, it is unclear how the normal force, Fn, affects the material removal in MRF and how the measured ratio of drag force to normal force Fd/Fn, equivalent to coefficient of friction, is related to material removal. This work studies, for the first time for MRF, the normal force and the measured ratio Fd/Fn as a function of material mechanical properties. Experimental data were obtained by taking spots on a variety of materials including optical glasses and hard ceramics with a spot-taking machine (STM). Drag force and normal force were measured with a dual load cell. Drag force decreases linearly with increasing material hardness. In contrast, normal force increases with hardness for glasses, saturating at high hardness values for ceramics. Volumetric removal rate decreases with normal force across all materials. The measured ratio Fd/Fn shows a strong negative linear correlation with material hardness. Hard materials exhibit a low coefficient of friction. The volumetric removal rate increases with the measured ratio Fd/Fn which is also correlated with shear stress, indicating that the measured ratio Fd/Fn is a useful measure of material removal in MRF.

  8. Fire hazard analysis for Plutonium Finishing Plant complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKINNIS, D.L.

    1999-02-23

    A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The scope of the FHA focuses on the nuclear facilities/structures in the Complex. The analysis was conducted in accordance with RLID 5480.7, [DOE Directive RLID 5480.7, 1/17/94] and DOE Order 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'' [DOE Order 5480.7A, 2/17/93] and addresses each of the sixteen principle elements outlined in paragraph 9.a(3) of the Order. The elements are addressed in terms of the fire protection objectives stated in paragraph 4 of DOE 5480.7A. In addition, the FHA also complies with WHC-CM-4-41, Fire Protection Program Manual, Section 3.4 [1994] and WHC-SD-GN-FHA-30001, Rev. 0 [WHC, 1994]. Objectives of the FHA are to determine: (1) the fire hazards that expose the PFP facilities, or that are inherent in the building operations, (2) the adequacy of the fire safety features currently located in the PFP Complex, and (3) the degree of compliance of the facility with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders, related engineering codes, and standards.

  9. Finishing The Euchromatic Sequence Of The Human Genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, Edward M.; Lucas, Susan; Richardson, Paul; Rokhsar, Daniel; Pennacchio, Len

    2004-09-07

    The sequence of the human genome encodes the genetic instructions for human physiology, as well as rich information about human evolution. In 2001, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium reported a draft sequence of the euchromatic portion of the human genome. Since then, the international collaboration has worked to convert this draft into a genome sequence with high accuracy and nearly complete coverage. Here, we report the result of this finishing process.The current genome sequence (Build 35) contains 2.85 billion nucleotides interrupted by only 341 gaps. It covers {approx}99% of the euchromatic genome and is accurate to an error rate of {approx}1 event per 100,000 bases. Many of the remaining euchromatic gaps are associated with segmental duplications and will require focused work with new methods. The near-complete sequence, the first for a vertebrate, greatly improves the precision of biological analyses of the human genome including studies of gene number,birth and death. Notably, the human genome seems to encode only20,000-25,000 protein-coding genes. The genome sequence reported here should serve as a firm foundation for biomedical research in the decades ahead.

  10. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  11. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  12. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  13. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  14. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  15. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the

  16. Slowed demand ushers in summer season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    This article is the June 1996 market summary in uranium market. During this reporting period, there were six deals in the U3O8 spot market and three long-term deals for U3O8. There were four deals for UF6 conversion, and the spot market for uranium separation services had no transactions. This was little change from the previous month`s activities, and this slowness was reflected in the price trends of little or no increase.

  17. Metagenomics for Etiologic Agent Discovery (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ross, Matthew [Baylor College of Medicine

    2013-02-11

    Matthew Ross on "Metagenomics for etiological agent discovery" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  18. 32904,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORP",74,509,"RESIDUAL FUEL, 0.31-1.00% SULFUR",2101,"PORT ARTHUR, TX","TEXAS",3,830,"SPAIN",219,0.45,0,,,,, 32904,"CHEVRON CORP",75,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED...

  19. 32539,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    REFG & MKTG",4,133,"MOTOR GAS, FINISHED UNLEADED",1001,"NEW YORK, NY","NEW YORK",1,830,"SPAIN",248,0,0,,,,, 32539,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",5,134,"MOTOR GAS BLENDING...

  20. Deactivation and decommissioning environmental strategy for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex Hanford Nuclear Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2003-02-01

    The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement.

  1. Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Ben [LANL

    2013-01-25

    Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  2. Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Bruce (Broad Institute)

    2013-02-11

    Bruce Walker on "Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  3. Workers Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An employee at Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant uses a portable band saw to cut the last ventilation duct attached to glove boxes inside the facility’s former processing area.

  4. Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES, R.A.

    1999-10-06

    This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

  5. History and stabilization of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-18

    The 231-Z Isolation Building or Plutonium Metallurgy Building is located in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area, approximately 300 yards north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) (234-5 Building). When the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) built it in 1944 to contain the final step for processing plutonium, it was called the Isolation Building. At that time, HEW used a bismuth phosphate radiochemical separations process to make `AT solution,` which was then dried and shipped to Los Alamos, New Mexico. (AT solution is a code name used during World War II for the final HEW product.) The process was carried out first in T Plant and the 224-T Bulk Reduction Building and B Plant and the 224-B Bulk Reduction Building. The 224-T and -B processes produced a concentrated plutonium nitrate stream, which then was sent in 8-gallon batches to the 231-Z Building for final purification. In the 231-Z Building, the plutonium nitrate solution underwent peroxide `strikes` (additions of hydrogen peroxide to further separate the plutonium from its carrier solutions), to form the AT solution. The AT solution was dried and shipped to the Los Alamos Site, where it was made into metallic plutonium and then into weapons hemispheres.` The 231-Z Building began `hot` operations (operations using radioactive materials) with regular runs of plutonium nitrate on January 16, 1945.

  6. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  7. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  8. Counting graphene layers with very slow electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, Lud?k; Mikmekov, Elika; Mllerov, Ilona; Lejeune, Michal

    2015-01-05

    The study aimed at collection of data regarding the transmissivity of freestanding graphene for electrons across their full energy scale down to the lowest energies. Here, we show that the electron transmissivity of graphene drops with the decreasing energy of the electrons and remains below 10% for energies below 30?eV, and that the slow electron transmissivity value is suitable for reliable determination of the number of graphene layers. Moreover, electrons incident below 50?eV release adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules and effectively clean graphene in contrast to faster electrons that decompose these molecules and create carbonaceous contamination.

  9. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  10. Improved Technique of Hydrogen Content Analysis by Slow Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Rainwater, L. J.; Havens, W. W. Jr.

    1945-02-28

    A slow-neutron-transmission method fro determining the H content of fluorcarbons is described (G.Y.)

  11. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Research Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

    2013-03-22

    The MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. The LSDS collaborations suggests that the next step to in empirically testing the feasibility is to conduct measurements on fresh fuel assemblies to understand investigate self-attenuation and fresh mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rodlets so we may betterto understand extraction of masses for 235U and 239Pu. While progressing toward these goals, the collaboration also strongly suggests the continued development of enabling technology such as detector development and algorithm development, thatwhich could provide significant performance benefits.

  12. Improved laboratory assays of Pu and U for SRP purification and finishing processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, M K; Dorsett, R S

    1986-01-01

    Significant improvements have been made in routine assay techniques for uranium and plutonium as part of an effort to improve accountability at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Emphasis was placed on input/output accountability points and key physical inventory tanks associated with purification and finishing processes. Improvements were made in existing assay methods; new methods were implemented; and the application of these methods was greatly expanded. Prior to assays, samples were validated via density measurements. Digital density meters precise to four, five, and six decimal places were used to meet specific requirements. Improved plutonium assay techniques are now in routine use: controlled-potential coulometry, ion-exchange coulometry, and Pu(III) diode-array spectrophotometry. A new state-of-the-art coulometer was fabricated and used to ensure maximum accuracy in verifying standards and in measuring plutonium in product streams. The diode-array spectrophotometer for Pu(III) measurements was modified with fiber optics to facilitate remote measurements; rapid, precise measurements made the technique ideally suited for high-throughput assays. For uranium assays, the isotope-dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) method was converted to a gravimetric basis. The IDMS method and the existing Davies-Gray titration (gravimetric basis) have met accountability requirements for uranium. More recently, a Pu(VI) diode-array spectrophotometric method was used on a test basis to measure plutonium in shielded-cell input accountability samples. In addition, tests to measure uranium via diode-array spectrophotometry were initiated. This rapid, precise method will replace IDMS for certain key sample points.

  13. As Auto X Reaches the Finish Line, a New Race Begins | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    As Auto X Reaches the Finish Line, a New Race Begins As Auto X Reaches the Finish Line, a New Race Begins September 17, 2010 - 4:20pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs When the Automotive X Prize competition began back in March of 2008, the organizers laid out an ambitious goal: inspire a new generation of viable, safe and super fuel-efficient vehicles capable of achieving 100 miles per gallon or the energy equivalent (MPGe). The response

  14. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Correctors and Crystals (Conference) | SciTech Connect Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction,

  15. Guidelines for waste reduction and recycling: Metal finishing, electroplating, printed circuit board manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    The guidance manual describes waste reduction techniques for metal finishing, metal fabricating, electroplating, and printed circuitboard manufacturing operations. Techniques which can be applied to a wide range of industrial processes and those which are process-specific are discussed. Evaporation, reverse osmosis, ion exchange, electrodialysis, ultrafiltration, and electrolytic recovery are described. The manual also describes waste reduction assessment procedures.

  16. Finished genome assembly of warm spring isolate Francisella novicida DPG 3A-IS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Teshima, Hazuki; Coyne, Susan R.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James G.; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-09-17

    We sequenced the complete genome of Francisella novicida DPG 3A-IS to closed and finished status. This is a warm spring isolate recovered from Hobo Warm Spring (Utah, USA). The last assembly is available in NCBI under accession number CP012037.

  17. Safety Improvements, Project Progress at Hanford Site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Recent changes in how work crews are deployed at the Hanford Site’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) have yielded significant improvements in safety performance as EM’s Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company continue to make steady progress toward demolition of the plant.

  18. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in...

  19. Crude oil and finished fuel storage stability: An annotated review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whisman, M.L.; Anderson, R.P.; Woodward, P.W.; Giles, H.N.

    1991-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review and assessment of storage effects on crude oil and product quality was undertaken through a literature search by computer accessing several data base sources. Pertinent citations from that literature search are tabulated for the years 1980 to the present. This 1990 revision supplements earlier reviews by Brinkman and others which covered stability publications through 1979 and an update in 1983 by Goetzinger and others that covered the period 1952--1982. For purposes of organization, citations are listed in the current revision chronologically starting with the earliest 1980 publications. The citations have also been divided according to primary subject matter. Consequently 11 sections appear including: alternate fuels, gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, residual fuel, crude oil, biodegradation, analyses, reaction mechanisms, containment, and handling and storage. Each section contains a brief narrative followed by all the citations for that category.

  20. Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  1. Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Campbell, Catherine [Noblis

    2013-03-22

    Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  2. Full Focus Needed on Finishing Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant - 12196

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahl, Suzanne; Biyani, Rabindra; Holmes, Erika

    2012-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (US DOE's) Hanford Nuclear Site has 177 underground waste storage tanks located 19 to 24 km (12 to 15 miles) from the Columbia River in south-central Washington State. Hanford's tanks now hold about 212,000 cu m (56 million gallons) of highly radioactive and chemically hazardous waste. Sixty-seven tanks have leaked an estimated 3,785 cu m (1 million gallons) of this waste into the surrounding soil. Further releases to soil, groundwater, and the Columbia River are the inevitable result of the tanks continuing to age. The risk from this waste is recognized as a threat to the Northwest by both State and Federal governments. US DOE and Bechtel National, Inc., are building the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat and vitrify (immobilize in glass) the waste from Hanford's tanks. As is usual for any groundbreaking project, problems have arisen that must be resolved as they occur if treatment is to take place as specified in the court-enforceable Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) and the Consent Decree, entered into by US DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). At times, US DOE's approach to solving these critical issues seems to have caused undue wastes of time, energy, and, ultimately, public funds. Upon reviewing the history of Hanford's tank waste treatment project, Ecology hopes that constructive criticism of past failures and praise of successes will inspire US DOE to consider changing practices, be more transparent with regulatory agencies and the public, and take a 'lean production' approach to successfully completing this project. All three Tri-Party Agreement agencies share the goal of completing WTP on time, ensuring it is operational and in compliance with safety standards. To do this, Ecology believes US DOE should: - Maintain focus on the primary goal of completing the five major facilities of

  3. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, B.S.

    1996-01-01

    This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ESH) standards/requirements for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

  4. Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray ) The Slow Mo Guys came to GE Global Research in Niskayuna to film our researchers demonstrate a process called "cold spray", in which metal powders are sprayed at high velocities to build a part or add

  5. NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

    2013-03-22

    Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  6. The PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smith, Todd [PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory

    2013-01-25

    Todd Smith of the PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory gives a talk about his lab and its work at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  7. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, David

    2012-06-01

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  8. Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Sexton, David [Baylor

    2013-01-25

    David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  9. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

    2013-01-25

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  10. Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Crow, John [National Center for Genome Resources

    2013-01-25

    John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  11. The Role of Nanodiamonds in the Polishing Zone During Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; WIlson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-01-07

    In this work we discuss the role that nanodiamond abrasives play in magnetorheological finishing. We hypothesize that, as the nanodiamond MR fluid is introduced to the magnetic field, the micron sized spherical carbonyl iron (CI) particles are pulled down towards the rotating wheel, leaving a thin layer of nanodiamonds at the surface of the stiffened MR fluid ribbon. Our experimental results shown here support this hypothesis. We also show that surface roughness values inside MRF spots show a strong correlation with the near surface mechanical properties of the glass substrates and with drag force.

  12. Evaluating an Exterior Insulation and Finish System for Deep Energy Retrofits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan; Podorson, David

    2014-01-01

    Exterior insulation and finish systems (EIFS) are proprietary synthetic formulations that are applied to the exterior walls of buildings to serve as insulation and exterior cladding. The insulation thickness can vary from less than one inch to a foot or more. In this project the applicability of EIFS for residential deep energy retrofits was investigated through modeling and a case study home. The home was retrofitted using a site-applied four-inch-thick EIFS. Site-specific details were developed as required for the residential retrofit application. Site work and the costs of the EIFS system were documented. The demonstration home was modeled using Building Energy Optimization energy and cost analysis software to explore cost effectiveness of various EIFS insulation thicknesses in two climate locations.

  13. Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the plutonium finishing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.R.; Mayancsik, B.A.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Vejvoda, E.J.; Reddick, J.A.; Sheldon, K.M.; Weyns, M.I.

    1993-02-01

    During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 50% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to the WIPP has been generated at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), also known as the Plutonium Processing and Storage Facility and Z Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by the PFP since its construction in 1947 using process knowledge, existing records, and history-obtained from interviews. The PFP is currently operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  14. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) SUB-GRADE EE/CA EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES A NEW MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.

    2007-06-08

    An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was performed at the Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The purpose of the EVCA was to identify the sub-grade items to be evaluated; determine the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) hazardous substances through process history and available data; evaluate these hazards; and as necessary, identify the available alternatives to reduce the risk associated with the contaminants. The sub-grade EWCA considered four alternatives for an interim removal action: (1) No Action; (2) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M); (3) Stabilize and Leave in Place (Stabilization); and (4) Remove, Treat and Dispose (RTD). Each alternative was evaluated against the CERCLA criteria for effectiveness, implementability, and cost.

  15. ASSESSING CHEMICAL HAZARDS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) FOR PLANNING FUTURE D&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.; MINETT, M.J.

    2007-01-25

    This paper documents the fiscal year (FY) 2006 assessment to evaluate potential chemical and radiological hazards associated with vessels and piping in the former plutonium process areas at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Evaluations by PFP engineers as design authorities for specific systems and other subject-matter experts were conducted to identify the chemical hazards associated with transitioning the process areas for the long-term layup of PFP before its eventual final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities in the main process facilities were suspended in September 2005 for a period of between 5 and 10 years. A previous assessment conducted in FY 2003 found that certain activities to mitigate chemical hazards could be deferred safely until the D and D of PFP, which had been scheduled to result in a slab-on-grade condition by 2009. As a result of necessary planning changes, however, D and D activities at PFP will be delayed until after the 2009 time frame. Given the extended project and plant life, it was determined that a review of the plant chemical hazards should be conducted. This review to determine the extended life impact of chemicals is called the ''Plutonium Finishing Plant Chemical Hazards Assessment, FY 2006''. This FY 2006 assessment addresses potential chemical and radiological hazard areas identified by facility personnel and subject-matter experts who reevaluated all the chemical systems (items) from the FY 2003 assessment. This paper provides the results of the FY 2006 chemical hazards assessment and describes the methodology used to assign a hazard ranking to the items reviewed.

  16. Slow Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Transmission Studies Of Pu

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Havens, W. W. Jr.; Melkonian, E.; Rainwater, L. J.; Levin, M.

    1951-05-28

    The slow neutron transmission of several samples of Pu has been investigated with the Columbia Neutron Velocity Spectrometer. Data are presented in two groups, those covering the energy region from 0 to 6 ev, and those covering the region above 6 ev. Below 6 ev the resolution was relatively good, and a detailed study of the cross section variation was made. Work above 6 ev consisted of merely locating levels and obtaining a rough idea of their strengths.

  17. Slow Waveguide Structures for Particle Accelerators - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Early Stage R&D Early Stage R&D Find More Like This Return to Search Slow Waveguide Structures for Particle Accelerators Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryA waveguide design that can save time and money in the construction and tuning of a particle accelerator was developed by ORNL researchers. Particle accelerators use electromagnetic

  18. Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanfords Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2005-09-29

    This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

  19. Finished genome assembly of warm spring isolate Francisella novicida DPG 3A-IS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Teshima, Hazuki; Coyne, Susan R.; Davenport, Karen W.; Jaissle, James G.; Chain, Patrick S.

    2015-09-17

    We sequenced the complete genome of Francisella novicida DPG 3A-IS to closed and finished status. This is a warm spring isolate recovered from Hobo Warm Spring (Utah, USA). The last assembly is available in NCBI under accession number CP012037.

  20. Finished Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus Strain 03BB87, a Clinical Isolate with B. anthracis Virulence Genes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Shannon L.; Minogue, Timothy D.; Teshima, Hazuki; Davenport, Karen W.; Shea, April A.; Miner, Haven L.; Wolcott, Mark J.; Chain, Patrick S.G.

    2015-01-15

    Bacillus cereus strain 03BB87, a blood culture isolate, originated in a 56-year-old male muller operator with a fatal case of pneumonia in 2003. Here we present the finished genome sequence of that pathogen, including a 5.46-Mb chromosome and two plasmids (209 and 52 Kb, respectively).

  1. Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R.; Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Smithe, D. N.

    2011-12-23

    Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}slow wave may be related to the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave that propagates for frequencies above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency in warm plasmas or to a high frequency version of a kinetic Alfven wave. This slow wave, if physically real, would provide another path for rf power absorption in tokamaks and ST devices.

  2. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin; Xu, Jun

    2009-03-10

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow ({approx}3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10{sup 8} positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  3. Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation You ...

  4. A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

  5. A comparison of several surface finish measurement methods as applied to ground ceramic and metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Riester, L.

    1996-01-01

    Surface finish is one of the most common measures of surface quality of ground ceramics and metal parts and a wide variety of methods and parameters have been developed to measure it. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the surface roughness parameters obtained on the same two specimens from three different types of measuring instruments: a traditional mechanical stylus system, a non-contact laser scanning system, and the atomic force microscope (two different AFM systems were compared). The same surface-ground silicon nitride and Inconel 625 alloy specimens were used for all measurements in this investigation. Significant differences in arithmetic average roughness, root-mean-square roughness, and peak-to-valley roughness were obtained when comparing data from the various topography measuring instruments. Non-contact methods agreed better with the others on the metal specimen than on the ceramic specimen. Reasons for these differences include the effective dimensions and geometry of the probe with respect to the surface topography; the reflectivity of the surface, and the type of filtering scheme Results of this investigation emphasize the importance of rigorously specifying the manner of surface roughness measurement when either reporting roughness data or when requesting that roughness data be provided.

  6. INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) SAFEGUARDS DURING STABILIZATION AT HANFORD PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCRAE, L.P.

    2004-06-30

    The Vault at the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) became subject to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards beginning in 1994 as part of the US excess fissile material program. The inventory needed to be stabilized and repackaged for long-term storage to comply with Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. In 1998, the United States began negotiations with IAEA to develop methods to maintain safeguards during stabilization and repackaging of this material. The Design Information Questionnaire was revised and submitted to the IAEA in 2002 describing modification to the facility to accommodate the stabilization process line. The operation plan for 2003 was submitted describing the proposed schedules for removing materials for stabilization. Stabilization and repackaging activities for the safeguarded plutonium began in January 2003 and were completed in December 2003. The stabilization was completed in five phases. IAEA containment and surveillance measures were maintained until the material was removed by phase for stabilization and repackaging. Following placement of the repackaged material into the storage vault, the IAEA conducted inventory change verification measurements, and re-established containment and surveillance. Plant activities and the impacts on operations are described.

  7. Quality assurance project plan for the radionuclide airborne emissions for the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofzski, J.G.; Alison, D.

    1992-04-01

    The information provided in this document meets the quality assurance (QA) requirements for the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants'' (NESHAP) (EPA 1989a) radionuclide airborne emissions control program in accordance with the regulation's referenced stack monitoring method (i.e. Method 114) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). At the Hanford Site, the operations personnel have primary responsibility for implementing the continuous radionuclide emission measurements in conformance with NESHAP. Continuous measurement is used to describe continuous sampling of the effluent stream withdrawn and subjected to radiochemical analysis, and monitoring of radionuclide particulate emissions for administrative control. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) fully describes these PFP- implemented activities and the associated QA program as required by the NESHAP. The information is provided in the format specified in QAMS/005, Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA 1983a). This QAPjP describes the QA program for only those activities that are the responsibility of the PFP: operation, calibration, and maintenance of the sampling systems. The QA requirements for laboratory services, data compilation, and data reporting are beyond the scope of this QAPjP.

  8. Quality assurance project plan for the radionuclide airborne emissions for the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofzski, J.G.; Alison, D.

    1992-04-01

    The information provided in this document meets the quality assurance (QA) requirements for the ``National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants`` (NESHAP) (EPA 1989a) radionuclide airborne emissions control program in accordance with the regulation`s referenced stack monitoring method (i.e. Method 114) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). At the Hanford Site, the operations personnel have primary responsibility for implementing the continuous radionuclide emission measurements in conformance with NESHAP. Continuous measurement is used to describe continuous sampling of the effluent stream withdrawn and subjected to radiochemical analysis, and monitoring of radionuclide particulate emissions for administrative control. This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) fully describes these PFP- implemented activities and the associated QA program as required by the NESHAP. The information is provided in the format specified in QAMS/005, Interim Guidelines and Specifications for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA 1983a). This QAPjP describes the QA program for only those activities that are the responsibility of the PFP: operation, calibration, and maintenance of the sampling systems. The QA requirements for laboratory services, data compilation, and data reporting are beyond the scope of this QAPjP.

  9. TOTAL MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTY IN HOLDUP MEASUREMENTS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KEELE, B.D.

    2007-07-05

    An approach to determine the total measurement uncertainty (TMU) associated with Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) [1,2,3] measurements was developed and implemented in 2004 and 2005 [4]. This paper describes a condensed version of the TMU calculational model, including recent developments. Recent modifications to the TMU calculation model include a change in the attenuation uncertainty, clarifying the definition of the forward background uncertainty, reducing conservatism in the random uncertainty by selecting either a propagation of counting statistics or the standard deviation of the mean, and considering uncertainty in the width and height as a part of the self attenuation uncertainty. In addition, a detection limit is calculated for point sources using equations derived from summary equations contained in Chapter 20 of MARLAP [5]. The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2007-1 to the Secretary of Energy identified a lack of requirements and a lack of standardization for performing measurements across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The DNFSB also recommended that guidance be developed for a consistent application of uncertainty values. As such, the recent modifications to the TMU calculational model described in this paper have not yet been implemented. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is continuing to perform uncertainty calculations as per Reference 4. Publication at this time is so that these concepts can be considered in developing a consensus methodology across the complex.

  10. Magnetorheological finishing of chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide via chemically and mechanically modified fluids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salzman, Sivan; Romanofsky, Henry J.; Giannechini, Lucca J.; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Lambropoulos, John C.

    2016-02-19

    In this study, we describe the anisotropy in the material removal rate (MRR) of the polycrystalline, chemical-vapor deposited zinc sulfide (ZnS).We define the polycrystalline anisotropy via microhardness and chemical erosion tests for four crystallographic orientations of ZnS: (100), (110), (111), and (311). Anisotropy in the MRR was studied under magnetorheological finishing (MRF) conditions. Three chemically and mechanically modified magnetorheological (MR) fluids at pH values of 4, 5, and 6 were used to test the MRR variations among the four single-crystal planes. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with pH 5 and pH 6MR fluids, variations were found inmore » the MRR among the four single-crystal planes and surface artifacts were observed on the polycrystalline material. When polishing the single-crystal planes and the polycrystalline with the modified MR fluid at pH 4, however, minimal variation was observed in the MRR among the four orientations and a reduction in surface artifacts was achieved on the polycrystalline material.« less

  11. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  12. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Pipeline between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Normal Butane/Butylene Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Renewable Diesel Fuel Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional

  13. ON THE LOW-FREQUENCY BOUNDARY OF SUN-GENERATED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN THE SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shergelashvili, Bidzina M.; Fichtner, Horst

    2012-06-20

    New aspects of the slow solar wind turbulent heating and acceleration are investigated. A physical meaning of the lower boundary of the Alfven wave turbulent spectra in the solar atmosphere and the solar wind is studied and the significance of this natural parameter is demonstrated. Via an analytical and quantitative treatment of the problem we show that a truncation of the wave spectra from the lower frequency side, which is a consequence of the solar magnetic field structure and its cyclic changes, results in a significant reduction of the heat production and acceleration rates. An appropriate analysis is presented regarding the link of the considered problem with existing observational data and slow solar wind initiation scenarios.

  14. Phosphorus removal from slow-cooled steelmaking slags: Grain size determination and liberation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fregeau-Wu, E.; Iwasaki, I.

    1995-07-01

    The major obstacle in recycling steelmaking slags to the blast furnace is their phosphorus content. Removal of the phosphorus, which is primarily associated with the silicate and phosphate phases, would allow for greater recycle of these slags for their iron, manganese, and lime contents. Calculations show that separation of the silicates from the oxide phases would remove nearly 90% of the phosphorus from the slag. The variable grain size of the as-received slag made liberation by fine grinding difficult. Therefore, slow-cooling experiments were undertaken to improve the grain size distribution. The grain size distributions were determined using in-situ image analysis. The samples were ground to their apparent liberation size and high gradient magnetic separation was used to separate the magnetic oxides from the nonmagnetic silicates and phosphates. Liberation analysis and modeling was performed on selected separation products for discussion of benefication characteristics.

  15. Total Measurement Uncertainty for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Segmented Gamma Scan Assay System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTSIK, G.A.

    2001-06-06

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for the Canberra manufactured Segmented Gamma Scanner Assay System (SGSAS) as employed at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). In this document, TMU embodies the combined uncertainties due to all of the individual random and systematic sources of measurement uncertainty. It includes uncertainties arising from corrections and factors applied to the analysis of transuranic waste to compensate for inhomogeneities and interferences from the waste matrix and radioactive components. These include uncertainty components for any assumptions contained in the calibration of the system or computation of the data. Uncertainties are propagated at 1 sigma. The final total measurement uncertainty value is reported at the 95% confidence level. The SGSAS is a gamma assay system that is used to assay plutonium and uranium waste. The SGSAS system can be used in a stand-alone mode to perform the NDA characterization of a container, particularly for low to medium density (0-2.5 g/cc) container matrices. The SGSAS system provides a full gamma characterization of the container content. This document is an edited version of the Rocky Flats TMU Report for the Can Scan Segment Gamma Scanners, which are in use for the plutonium residues projects at the Rocky Flats plant. The can scan segmented gamma scanners at Rocky Flats are the same design as the PFP SGSAS system and use the same software (with the exception of the plutonium isotopics software). Therefore, all performance characteristics are expected to be similar. Modifications in this document reflect minor differences in the system configuration, container packaging, calibration technique, etc. These results are supported by the Quality Assurance Objective (QAO) counts, safeguards test data, calibration data, etc. for the PFP SGSAS system. Other parts of the TMU analysis utilize various modeling techniques such as Monte Carlo N

  16. DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT COMPLEX, HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Heineman, R.; Norton, S.; Miller, M.; Oates, L.

    2003-02-27

    Maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements is a significant priority in successful completion of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project. To ensure regulatory compliance throughout the deactivation and decommissioning of the PFP complex, an environmental regulatory strategy was developed. The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during PFP stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement. Significant environmental drivers for the PFP Nuclear Material Stabilization Project include the Tri-Party Agreement; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA); the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Recent TPA negotiation s with Ecology and EPA have resulted in milestones that support the use of CERCLA as the primary statutory framework for decommissioning PFP. Milestones have been negotiated to support the preparation of Engineering Evaluations/Cost Analyses for decommissioning major PFP buildings. Specifically, CERCLA EE/CA(s) are anticipated for the following scopes of work: Settling Tank 241-Z-361, the 232-Z Incinerator, , the process facilities (eg, 234-5Z, 242, 236) and the process facility support buildings. These CERCLA EE/CA(s) are for the purpose of analyzing the appropriateness of the slab-on-grade endpoint Additionally, agreement was reached on performing an evaluation of actions necessary to address below-grade structures or other structures remaining after completion of the decommissioning of PFP. Remaining CERCLA actions will be integrated with other Central Plateau activities at the Hanford site.

  17. Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Singh, Ranjan; Chiam, Sher-Yi; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Zhang, Weili

    2015-05-04

    We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces. Our results show that tailoring the coupling between the resonators modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. Observed change in the transmission amplitude is attributed to the change in the amount of destructive interference between the resonators in the vicinity of strong near field coupling. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters, and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

  18. Cosmic slowing down of acceleration for several dark energy parametrizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magaña, Juan; Cárdenas, Víctor H.; Motta, Verónica E-mail: victor.cardenas@uv.cl

    2014-10-01

    We further investigate slowing down of acceleration of the universe scenario for five parametrizations of the equation of state of dark energy using four sets of Type Ia supernovae data. In a maximal probability analysis we also use the baryon acoustic oscillation and cosmic microwave background observations. We found the low redshift transition of the deceleration parameter appears, independently of the parametrization, using supernovae data alone except for the Union 2.1 sample. This feature disappears once we combine the Type Ia supernovae data with high redshift data. We conclude that the rapid variation of the deceleration parameter is independent of the parametrization. We also found more evidence for a tension among the supernovae samples, as well as for the low and high redshift data.

  19. Slow processes in startup scenarios of long-pulse gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nusinovich, G. S.; Sinitsyn, O. V.; Antonsen, T. M. Jr.; Vlasov, A. N.; Cauffman, S. R.; Felch, K. L.

    2006-08-15

    A gyrotron startup scenario describes the variation of gyrotron parameters during onset of a pulse. This typically includes variations in beam parameters during the voltage rise, in the course of which the operating mode is excited and then driven to high efficiency operation while suppressing other parasitic modes. For long-pulse gyrotrons, however, additional processes with longer time constants should also be considered as part of the startup scenario. Such slow processes include ion neutralization of the beam space charge, thermal expansion of cavity walls caused by their ohmic heating, and reduction of the beam current due to emission cooling of the cathode. In the present paper, we analyze the importance of these effects on the stability and efficiency of gyrotron operation.

  20. THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones

  1. The Integrated Safety Management System Verification Enhancement Review of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRIGGS, C.R.

    2000-02-09

    The primary purpose of the verification enhancement review was for the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify contractor readiness for the independent DOE Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) on the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Secondary objectives included: (1) to reinforce the engagement of management and to gauge management commitment and accountability; (2) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct public involvement; (3) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct worker involvement; (4) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of the panel-to-panel review approach; and, (5) to evaluate the utility of the review's methodology/adaptability to periodic assessments of ISM status. The review was conducted on December 6-8, 1999, and involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with five separate panels of individuals with various management and operations responsibilities related to PFP. A semi-structured interview process was employed by a team of five ''reviewers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels which focused on: (1) evidence of management commitment, accountability, and involvement; and, (2) consideration and demonstration of stakeholder (including worker) information and involvement opportunities. The purpose of a panel-to-panel dialogue approach was to better spotlight: (1) areas of mutual reinforcement and alignment that could serve as good examples of the management commitment and accountability aspects of ISMS implementation, and, (2) areas of potential discrepancy that could provide opportunities for improvement. In summary, the Review Team found major strengths to include: (1) the use of multi-disciplinary project work teams to plan and do work; (2) the availability and broad usage of multiple tools to help with planning and integrating work; (3) senior management presence and accessibility; (4) the institutionalization of worker involvement; (5) encouragement of self-reporting and self

  2. Progress Continues Toward Demolition of Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Piece by piece, workers are safely and compliantly preparing to demolish a relic of Cold War plutonium production at the Hanford site.

  3. A policy synthesis approach for slowing global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timilsina, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming is a burning environmental issue today but confronting with subjective as well as policy conflicts. The findings of various studies indicate that developed countries that are capable of affording effective measures towards the global warming mitigation have fewer incentives for doing so because they will have a minimal damage from global warming. The developing countries, although they will have greater damage, are unlikely to divert their development budget for taking preventive actions towards global warming. The only solution in this situation is to design a policy that encourages all the nation in the world to participate in the programs for slowing global warming. Without active participation of all nations, it seems unlikely to reduce the global warming problem in an effective way. This study presents a qualitative policy recommendation extracted from a comprehensive analysis of the findings of several studies conducted so far in this field. This study has categorized the policy approaches for mitigating the global warming in three groups: Engineering approach, forestry approach and economic approach.

  4. Removal of Lattice Imperfections that Impact the Optical Quality of Ti:Sapphire using Advanced Magnetorheological Finishing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menapace, J A; Schaffers, K I; Bayramian, A J; Davis, P J; Ebbers, C A; Wolfe, J E; Caird, J A; Barty, C J

    2008-02-26

    Advanced magnetorheological finishing (MRF) techniques have been applied to Ti:sapphire crystals to compensate for sub-millimeter lattice distortions that occur during the crystal growing process. Precise optical corrections are made by imprinting topographical structure onto the crystal surfaces to cancel out the effects of the lattice distortion in the transmitted wavefront. This novel technique significantly improves the optical quality for crystals of this type and sets the stage for increasing the availability of high-quality large-aperture sapphire and Ti:sapphire optics in critical applications.

  5. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer FY2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

    2013-10-29

    Executive Summary The Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project, funded by the Materials Protection And Control Technology campaign, has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. This report is a high level summary of the progress completed in FY2013. This progress included: • Fabrication of a 4He scintillator detector to detect fast neutrons in the LSDS operating environment. Testing of the detector will be conducted in FY2014. • Design of a large area 232Th fission chamber. • Analysis using the Los Alamos National Laboratory perturbation model estimated the required number of neutrons for an LSDS measurement to be 10 to the 16th source neutrons. • Application of the algorithms developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to LSDS measurement data of various fissile samples conducted in 2012. The results concluded that the 235U could be measured to 2.7% and the 239Pu could be measured to 6.3%. Significant effort is yet needed to demonstrate the applicability of these algorithms for used-fuel assemblies, but the results reported here are encouraging in demonstrating that we are making progress toward that goal. • Development and cost-analysis of a research plan for the next critical demonstration measurements. The plan suggests measurements on fresh fuel sub assemblies as a means to experimentally test self-attenuation and the use of fresh mixed-oxide fuel as a means to test simultaneous measurement of 235U and 239Pu.

  6. Toda Material/Component Production Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review June 7-9, 2010 Washington D.C. Jun Nakano, David Han, Yasuhiro Abe Toda America Inc. Project ID: ARRAVT017 Esarravt017_han_2010_p_final This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Overview Li-ion Cathode Materials Production Facility Timelines Start: February, 2010 Finish: December, 2013 1 st Line Schedule: Feb., 2011 Completion: ~10% Challenges Compressed schedule - first line production within 1 year

  7. PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSTON GA

    2008-01-15

    Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The

  8. Emission of secondary particles from metals and insulators at impact of slow highly charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, T.

    1996-10-31

    Emission of secondary electrons and ions from clean Au, CxHy-Au, and SiO{sub 2} surfaces at impact of slow (v{approx}0.3 v{sub Bohr}) ions were measured as function of incident ion charge for 1+{le}q{le}75+. Electron yields from thermal SiO{sub 2} films (150 mm on Si) were found to be lower than those from the other two for q>3+. Yields of negative secondary ions from SiO{sub 2} and CxHy-Au were recorded in parallel with electron emission data and exhibit a q{sub 4} dependency on incident ion charge. Direct comparison of collisional and electronic contributions to secondary ion production from SiO{sub 2} films using a beam of charge state equilibrated Xe (at 2.75 keV/u) shows positive and negative secondary ion yield increases with incident ion charge of >400. Results are discussed in relation to key signatures of electronic sputtering by Coulomb explosions.

  9. U.S. oil production forecast update reflects lower rig count

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. oil production forecast update reflects lower rig count Lower oil prices and fewer rigs drilling for crude oil are expected to slow U.S. oil production growth this year and in ...

  10. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Propane/Propylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor

  11. AN APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING & EVALUATING ALTERNATIVES FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF SUB-GRADE STRUCTURES AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    In 2002, the Richland Operations Office (RL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) developed milestones for transitioning the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. These milestones required developing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EF/CA) for the facility's sub-grade structures and installations as part of a series of evaluations intended to provide for the transition of the facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. In addition to supporting decisions for interim actions, the analyses of sub-grade structures and installations performed through this EE/CA will contribute to the remedial investigation feasibility study(ies) and subsequently to the final records of decision for the relevant operable units responsible for site closure in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

  12. Weekly Refiner Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Finished Motor Gasoline 1,393 1,411 1,540 1,466 1,508 1,516 2010-2016 East Coast (PADD 1) ... Notes: Finished motor gasoline does not include adjustments for fuel ethanol and motor ...

  13. Weekly Blender Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Finished Motor Gasoline 8,512 8,581 8,277 8,536 8,525 8,757 2010-2016 East Coast (PADD 1) ... Notes: Finished motor gasoline does not include adjustments for fuel ethanol and motor ...

  14. Predicted concentrations in new relocatable classrooms of volatile organic compounds emitted from standard and alternate interior finish materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Fisk, William J.; Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.

    2001-07-01

    Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are widely employed by California school districts to satisfy rapidly expanding space requirements due to population growth and class size reduction policies. There is public concern regarding indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, particularly in RCs, but very little data to support or dispel these concerns. Several studies are investigating various aspects of IEQ in California schools. This laboratory-based study focused on evaluating the emissions of toxic and/or odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, from materials used to finish the interiors of new RCs. Furthermore, the study implemented a procedure for VOC source reduction by testing and selecting lower-emitting materials as substitutes for standard materials. In total, 17 standard and alternate floor coverings, wall panels and ceiling panels were quantitatively tested for emissions of VOCs using smallscale environmental chambers. Working with the largest northern California manufacturer of conventional RCs and two school districts, specifications were developed for four new RCs to be produced in early summer 2001. Two of these will be predominantly finished with standard materials. Alternate carpet systems, an alternate wall panel covering and an alternate ceiling panel were selected for the two other RCs based on the results of the laboratory study and considerations of cost and anticipated performance and maintenance. Particular emphasis was placed on reducing the concentrations of VOCs on California agency lists of toxic compounds. Indoor concentrations of toxic and odorous VOCs were estimated for the four classrooms by mass balance using the measured VOC emission factors, exposed surface areas of the materials in the RCs, and three ventilation rate scenarios. Results indicate that reductions in the concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde phenol, di(ethylene glycol) butyl ether, vinyl acetate, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene

  15. A slow neutron polarimeter for the measurement of parity-odd neutron rotary power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, W. M.; Anderson, E.; Bass, T. D.; Dawkins, J. M.; Fry, J.; Haddock, C.; Horton, J. C.; Luo, D.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Walbridge, S. B.; Barrn-Palos, L.; Maldonado-Velzquez, M.; Bass, C. D.; Crawford, B. E.; Crawford, C.; Esposito, D.; Gardiner, H.; Gan, K.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E. [University of Washington and others

    2015-05-15

    We present the design, description, calibration procedure, and an analysis of systematic effects for an apparatus designed to measure the rotation of the plane of polarization of a transversely polarized slow neutron beam as it passes through unpolarized matter. This device is the neutron optical equivalent of a crossed polarizer/analyzer pair familiar from light optics. This apparatus has been used to search for parity violation in the interaction of polarized slow neutrons in matter. Given the brightness of existing slow neutron sources, this apparatus is capable of measuring a neutron rotary power of d?/dz = 1 10{sup ?7} rad/m.

  16. Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  17. Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken]; SNL,

    2013-01-25

    Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  18. One of the Largest Pieces of Processing Equipment Removed from Plutonium Finishing Plant- Worker involvement led to safe completion of high-hazard work

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the successful removal of one of the largest, most complex pieces of equipment from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

  19. PanFunPro: Bacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Based on the Functional Profiles (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana [Technical University of Denmark

    2013-01-25

    Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  20. Large-scale production of marine algae for biofuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tuesday May 21, 2013 Algae Platform Review Mark Huntley (Contact Principal Investigator) Charles Greene (Principal Investigator) Cornell University Marine Algal Biofuels Consortium Marine Algal Biofuels Consortium Overall Goal and Key Objectives Our primary goal is to evaluate the commercial viability of a fully integrated, marine algal-production-to-finished-fuel technology pathway, based on data from scalable outdoor unit operations, that demonstrates: (1) by Q4 2013, performance against clear

  1. Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It has recently been shown that in single field slow-roll inflation the total volume cannot grow by a factor larger than esup Ssub dS2 without becoming infinite. The bound is ...

  2. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES OBSERVED ABOVE A QUIET-SUN REGION IN A DARK CAVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jiajia; Zhou Zhenjun; Wang Yuming; Liu Rui; Liao Chijian; Shen Chenglong; Zheng Huinan; Miao Bin; Su Zhenpeng; Wang, S.; Wang Bin E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn

    2012-10-20

    Waves play a crucial role in diagnosing the plasma properties of various structures in the solar corona and coronal heating. Slow magnetoacoustic (MA) waves are one of the important types of magnetohydrodynamic waves. In past decades, numerous slow MA waves were detected above active regions and coronal holes, but were rarely found elsewhere. Here, we investigate a 'tornado'-like structure consisting of quasi-periodic streaks within a dark cavity at about 40-110 Mm above a quiet-Sun region on 2011 September 25. Our analysis reveals that these streaks are actually slow MA wave trains. The properties of these wave trains, including phase speed, compression ratio, and kinetic energy density, are similar to those of the reported slow MA waves, except that the period of these waves is about 50 s, much shorter than the typical reported values (3-5 minutes).

  3. THE CREATIVE APPLICATION OF SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & WORK FORCE INNOVATIONS TO THE D&D OF PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARBONEAU, S.L.

    2006-02-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) consists of a number of process and support buildings for handling plutonium. Building construction began in the late 1940's to meet national priorities and became operational in 1950 producing refined plutonium salts and metal for the United States nuclear weapons program. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material for fabrication into a nuclear device for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race. PFP has now completed its mission and is fully engaged in deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). At this time the PFP buildings are planned to be reduced to ground level (slab-on-grade) and the site remediated to satisfy national, Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington state requirements. The D&D of a highly contaminated plutonium processing facility presents a plethora of challenges. PFP personnel approached the D&D mission with a can-do attitude. They went into D&D knowing they were facing a lot of challenges and unknowns. There were concerns about the configuration control associated with drawings of these old process facilities. There were unknowns regarding the location of electrical lines and process piping containing chemical residues such as strong acids and caustics. The gloveboxes were highly contaminated with plutonium and chemical residues. Most of the glovebox windows were opaque with splashed process chemicals that coated the windows or etched them, reducing visibility to near zero. Visibility into the glovebox was a serious worker concern. Additionally, all the gloves in the gloveboxes were degraded and unusable. Replacing gloves in gloveboxes was necessary to even begin glovebox cleanout. The sheer volume of breathing air needed was also an issue. These and other challenges and PFP's approach to overcome these challengers are

  4. Development of an alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process for microelectromechanical systems micropore x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riveros, Raul E.; Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Takagi, Utako; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Kato, Fumiki; Sugiyama, Susumu; Yamasaki, Noriko; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

    2010-06-20

    X-ray astronomy research is often limited by the size, weight, complexity, and cost of functioning x-ray optics. Micropore optics promises an economical alternative to traditional (e.g., glass or foil) x-ray optics; however, many manufacturing difficulties prevent micropore optics from being a viable solution. Ezoe et al. introduced microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micropore optics having curvilinear micropores in 2008. Made by either deep reactive ion etching or x-ray lithography, electroforming, and molding (LIGA), MEMS micropore optics suffer from high micropore sidewall roughness (10-30nmrms) which, by current standards, cannot be improved. In this research, a new alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process was developed using a mixture of ferrofluid and microscale abrasive slurry. A machine was built, and a set of working process parameters including alternating frequency, abrasive size, and polishing time was selected. A polishing experiment on a LIGA-fabricated MEMS micropore optic was performed, and a change in micropore sidewall roughness of 9.3{+-}2.5nmrms to 5.7{+-}0.7nmrms was measured. An improvement in x-ray reflectance was also seen. This research shows the feasibility and confirms the effects of this new polishing process on MEMS micropore optics.

  5. DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

  6. A point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y.; Berry, Ray A.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a point implicit time integration technique for slow transient flow problems. The method treats the solution variables of interest (that can be located at cell centers, cell edges, or cell nodes) implicitly and the rest of the information related to same or other variables are handled explicitly. The method does not require implicit iteration; instead it time advances the solutions in a similar spirit to explicit methods, except it involves a few additional function(s) evaluation steps. Moreover, the method is unconditionally stable, as a fully implicit method would be. This new approach exhibits the simplicity of implementation of explicit methods and the stability of implicit methods. It is specifically designed for slow transient flow problems of long duration wherein one would like to perform time integrations with very large time steps. Because the method can be time inaccurate for fast transient problems, particularly with larger time steps, an appropriate solution strategy for a problem that evolves from a fast to a slow transient would be to integrate the fast transient with an explicit or semi-implicit technique and then switch to this point implicit method as soon as the time variation slows sufficiently. We have solved several test problems that result from scalar or systems of flow equations. Our findings indicate the new method can integrate slow transient problems very efficiently; and its implementation is very robust.

  7. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) product removal can containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnside, M.E.

    1998-04-15

    Six Product Removal (PR) Cans and Containers are located within the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Each can is expected to contain a maximum of 3 g of residual radioactive material, consisting mainly of plutonium isotopes. The PR Can Containers were previously authorized by HNF-SD-TP-SEP-064, Rev. 0 (Boettger 1997), for the interarea transport of up to 3 g of plutonium. The purpose of this safety evaluation for packaging is to allow the transport of six PR Cans with their Containers from the Plutonium Finishing Plant to the 233 S Evaporator Facility. This safety evaluation for packaging is authorized for use until April 29, 1999, or until the shipment is made, whichever happens first.

  8. Slow light Mach-Zehnder interferometer as label-free biosensor with scalable sensitivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qin, Kun; Hu, Shuren; Retterer, Scott T.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2016-02-05

    Our design, fabrication, and characterization of a label-free Mach–Zehnder interferometer (MZI) optical biosensor that incorporates a highly dispersive one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal in one arm are presented. The sensitivity of this slow light MZI-based sensor scales with the length of the slow light photonic crystal region. The numerically simulated sensitivity of a MZI sensor with a 16 μm long slow light region is 115,000 rad/RIU-cm, which is sevenfold higher than traditional MZI biosensors with millimeter-length sensing regions. Moreover, the experimental bulk refractive index detection sensitivity of 84,000 rad/RIU-cm is realized and nucleic acid detection is also demonstrated.

  9. Existence domains of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons in two-ion space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V. Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-03-15

    A study of large amplitude ion-acoustic solitons is conducted for a model composed of cool and hot ions and cool and hot electrons. Using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential formalism, the scope of earlier studies is extended to consider why upper Mach number limitations arise for slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons. Treating all plasma constituents as adiabatic fluids, slow ion-acoustic solitons are limited in the order of increasing cool ion concentrations by the number densities of the cool, and then the hot ions becoming complex valued, followed by positive and then negative potential double layer regions. Only positive potentials are found for fast ion-acoustic solitons which are limited only by the hot ion number density having to remain real valued. The effect of neglecting as opposed to including inertial effects of the hot electrons is found to induce only minor quantitative changes in the existence regions of slow and fast ion-acoustic solitons.

  10. Matched slow optical soliton pairs via biexciton coherence in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Wenxing; Chen Aixi; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Wu Ying

    2011-07-15

    We theoretically investigate the simultaneous formation and stable propagation of slow optical soliton pairs in semiconductor quantum dots with a four-level biexciton-exciton cascade configuration. Owing to the destructive interference set up by two continuous wave control fields that couple to a biexciton state, the linear as well as nonlinear dispersion can be dramatically enhanced simultaneously with the absorptions of two weak probe fields being almost suppressed. These results reveal that the detrimental distortions of the two weak-pulsed probe fields due to dispersion effects can be well balanced by the self-phase modulation effect under very low input light intensity, which leads to the slow temporal optical soliton pairs with matched group velocity and amplitude. We also show that the propagation of slow optical solitons can be strongly modified by the biexciton coherence.

  11. Relativistic kinetic theory of pitch angle scattering, slowing down, and energy deposition in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robiche, J.; Rax, J.M.

    2004-10-01

    The collisional dynamics of a relativistic electron population in a Lorentzian plasma are investigated and analyzed within the framework of kinetic theory. The relativistic Fokker-Planck equation describing both slowing down and pitch angle scattering is derived, analyzed, and solved. The analytical Green function is used to express the electron range, the range straggling, and the mean radial dispersion as a function of the plasma parameters. Compared to standard slowing down theories, the inclusion of the pitch angle scattering without any Gaussian approximation appears to be essential to calculate these quantities.

  12. Enhanced four-wave mixing in graphene-silicon slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hao E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Gu, Tingyi E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu McMillan, James F.; Wong, Chee Wei E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu; Petrone, Nicholas; Zande, Arend van der; Hone, James C.; Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced four-wave mixing of monolayer graphene on slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides. 200-μm interaction length, a four-wave mixing conversion efficiency of −23 dB is achieved in the graphene-silicon slow-light hybrid, with an enhanced 3-dB conversion bandwidth of about 17 nm. Our measurements match well with nonlinear coupled-mode theory simulations based on the measured waveguide dispersion, and provide an effective way for all-optical signal processing in chip-scale integrated optics.

  13. COMMISSIONING RESULTS OF SLOW EXTRACTION OF HEAVY IONS FROM THE AGS BOOSTER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K A; Bellavia, S; Binello, S; Brelsford, B; Dumont, D; Eng, W; Gardner, G; Gassner, D; Glenn, J W; Hammons, L; Hock, J; Hoff, L; Hutchinson, E; Jamilkowski, J; Kling, N; Kotlyar, Y; Krishock, A; Lockey, R; Mapes, M; Marneris, I; Marr, G; McNerney, A; Meyer, A; Morris, J; Naylor, C; Nemesure, S; Phillips, D; Rusek, A; Ryan, J; Shrey, T; Snydstrup, L; Tsoupas, N; Vankuik, B; Zahariou-Cohen, K

    2003-05-12

    Brookhaven's AGS Booster has been modified to deliver slow extracted beam to a new beam line, the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). This facility was constructed in collaboration with NASA for the purpose of performing radiation effect studies for the NASA space program. The design of the resonant extraction system has been described in [1]. A more detailed description, which includes predictions of the slow extracted beam time structure has been described in [2]. In this report we will present results of the system commissioning and performance.

  14. Slow dynamics of nanocomposite polymer aerogels as revealed by X-ray photocorrelation spectroscopy (XPCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernndez, Rebeca, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Mijangos, Carmen [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologa de Polmeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologa de Polmeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nogales, Aurora, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sprung, Michael [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14

    We report on a novel slow dynamics of polymer xerogels, aerogels, and nanocomposite aerogels with iron oxide nanoparticles, as revealed by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The polymer aerogel and its nanocomposite aerogels, which are porous in nature, exhibit hyper-diffusive dynamics at room temperature. In contrast, non-porous polymer xerogels exhibit an absence of this peculiar dynamics. This slow dynamical process has been assigned to a relaxation of the characteristic porous structure of these materials and not to the presence of nanoparticles.

  15. Growth in global oil inventories slows, drawdown in stocks expected in late 2017

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Growth in global oil inventories slows, drawdown in stocks expected in late 2017 The growth in global oil inventories is expected to slow in response to stronger growth in world oil demand, with inventories now expected to be drawn down during the second half of next year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said oil inventories will grow by just under 1 million barrels per day this year. Inventories will continue to grow during the first half of 2017 though

  16. Slowing-Down Dynamics of Fast Particles in Plasmas via the Fokker-Planck Equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.; Lisak, M.; Andersson, F.; Fueloep, T.

    2004-01-15

    A detailed discussion is given of the effects of energy diffusion and pitch-angle scattering on the slowing-down dynamics of a beam of monoenergetic particles being released with unidirectional velocity. Approximate solutions are given for characteristic averaged quantities like the pitch-angle averaged distribution function and different physically relevant velocity moments. The relation to previous exact investigations is discussed.

  17. Polarization rotation of slow light with orbital angular momentum in ultracold atomic gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruseckas, Julius; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Oehberg, Patrik; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2007-11-15

    We consider the propagation of slow light with an orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a moving atomic medium. We have derived a general equation of motion and applied it in analyzing propagation of slow light with an OAM in a rotating medium, such as a vortex lattice. We have shown that the OAM of slow light manifests itself in a rotation of the polarization plane of linearly polarized light. To extract a pure rotational phase shift, we suggest to measure a difference in the angle of the polarization plane rotation by two consecutive light beams with opposite OAM. The differential angle {delta}{alpha}{sub l} is proportional to the rotation frequency of the medium {omega}{sub rot} and the winding number l of light, and is inversely proportional to the group velocity of light. For slow light the angle {delta}{alpha}{sub l} should be large enough to be detectable. The effect can be used as a tool for measuring the rotation frequency {omega}{sub rot} of the medium.

  18. Arbitrary amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons in three-electron temperature space plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2015-06-15

    We examine the characteristics of large amplitude slow electron-acoustic solitons supported in a four-component unmagnetised plasma composed of cool, warm, hot electrons, and cool ions. The inertia and pressure for all the species in this plasma system are retained by assuming that they are adiabatic fluids. Our findings reveal that both positive and negative potential slow electron-acoustic solitons are supported in the four-component plasma system. The polarity switch of the slow electron-acoustic solitons is determined by the number densities of the cool and warm electrons. Negative potential solitons, which are limited by the cool and warm electron number densities becoming unreal and the occurrence of negative potential double layers, are found for low values of the cool electron density, while the positive potential solitons occurring for large values of the cool electron density are only limited by positive potential double layers. Both the lower and upper Mach numbers for the slow electron-acoustic solitons are computed and discussed.

  19. Modulational instability and associated rogue structures of slow magnetosonic wave in Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panwar, Anuraj; Ryu, Chang-Mo

    2014-06-15

    The modulational instability and associated rogue structures of a slow magnetosonic wave are investigated for a Hall magnetohydrodynamic plasma. Nonlinear Schrodinger equation is obtained by using the multiple scale method, which shows a modulationally unstable slow magnetosonic mode evolving into bright wavepackets. The dispersive effects induced by the Hall electron current increase with the increase in plasma β and become weaker as the angle of propagation increases. The growth rate of the modulational instability also increases with the increase in plasma β. The growth rate is greatest for the parallel propagation and drops to zero for perpendicular propagation. The envelope wavepacket of a slow magnetosonic is widened with less oscillations as plasma β increases. But the wavepacket becomes slightly narrower and more oscillatory as the angle of propagation increases. Further a non-stationary envelope solution of the Peregrine soliton is analyzed for rogue waves. The Peregrine soliton contracts temporally and expands spatially with increase in plasma β. However, the width of a slow magnetosonic Peregrine soliton decreases both temporally and spatially with increase of the propagation angle.

  20. ACTIV: Sandwich Detector Activity from In-Pile Slowing-Down Spectra Experiment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    ACTIV calculates the activities of a sandwich detector, to be used for in-pile measurements in slowing-down spectra below a few keV. The effect of scattering with energy degradation in the filter and in the detectors has been included to a first approximation.

  1. Tensor to scalar ratio and large scale power suppression from pre-slow roll initial conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lello, Louis; Boyanovsky, Daniel, E-mail: lal81@pitt.edu, E-mail: boyan@pitt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We study the corrections to the power spectra of curvature and tensor perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r in single field slow roll inflation with standard kinetic term due to initial conditions imprinted by a ''fast-roll'' stage prior to slow roll. For a wide range of initial inflaton kinetic energy, this stage lasts only a few e-folds and merges smoothly with slow-roll thereby leading to non-Bunch-Davies initial conditions for modes that exit the Hubble radius during slow roll. We describe a program that yields the dynamics in the fast-roll stage while matching to the slow roll stage in a manner that is independent of the inflationary potentials. Corrections to the power spectra are encoded in a ''transfer function'' for initial conditions T{sub ?}(k), P{sub ?}(k) = P{sup BD}{sub ?}(k)T{sub ?}(k), implying a modification of the ''consistency condition'' for the tensor to scalar ratio at a pivot scale k{sub 0}: r(k{sub 0}) = ?8n{sub T}(k{sub 0})[T{sub T}(k{sub 0})/T{sub R}(k{sub 0})]. We obtain T{sub ?}(k) to leading order in a Born approximation valid for modes of observational relevance today. A fit yields T{sub ?}(k) = 1+A{sub ?}k{sup ?p}cos [2??k/H{sub sr}+?{sub ?}], with 1.5?slow roll inflation, where curvature and tensor perturbations feature the same p,? for a wide range of initial conditions. These corrections lead to both a suppression of the quadrupole and oscillatory features in both P{sub R}(k) and r(k{sub 0}) with a period of the order of the Hubble scale during slow roll inflation. The results are quite general and independent of the specific inflationary potentials, depending solely on the ratio of kinetic to potential energy ? and the slow roll parameters ?{sub V}, ?{sub V} to leading order in slow roll. For a wide range of ? and the values of ?{sub V};?{sub V} corresponding to the upper bounds from Planck, we find that the low quadrupole is consistent with the results from Planck, and

  2. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Mouse and Human Genome Resources and Trace Archive, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Genome Sequencing: Draft sequencing, assembly and quality ...

  3. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eukaryotes, metagenomics, single cell, etc.) De novo sequencing, re-sequencing, Human seq., RNA seq., metagenomics, etc. Genome Assembly: Whole genome assemblers and...

  4. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    genomics, re-sequencing, SNPs, structural variation Large scale data management, cloud computing Metagenomic analysis 2012 Meeting Presentation pdfsvideos new Meeting...

  5. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metagenomics, single cell, etc.) De novo sequencing, re-sequencing, Human seq., RNA seq., metagenomics, etc. Genome Assembly: Whole genome assemblers and integration of...

  6. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eukaryotes, metagenomics, single cell, etc.) De novo sequencing, re-sequencing, RNA sequencing, metagenomics, etc. Genome Assembly: Whole genome assemblers and integration...

  7. Finishing the job

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management has a simple mission. Since the late 1980s, we have made tremendous progress in removing legacies of contamination from past operations on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  8. Finishing in the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 (Completed) Areas emphasized at this conference included: Genome Sequencing: Sequencing strategy, DNA quality and library construction Draft sequencing, assembly and quality...

  9. Mechanism of abnormally slow crystal growth of CuZr alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, X. Q.; Lü, Y. J.

    2015-10-28

    Crystal growth of the glass-forming CuZr alloy is shown to be abnormally slow, which suggests a new method to identify the good glass-forming alloys. The crystal growth of elemental Cu, Pd and binary NiAl, CuZr alloys is systematically studied with the aid of molecular dynamics simulations. The temperature dependence of the growth velocity indicates the different growth mechanisms between the elemental and the alloy systems. The high-speed growth featuring the elemental metals is dominated by the non-activated collision between liquid-like atoms and interface, and the low-speed growth for NiAl and CuZr is determined by the diffusion across the interface. We find that, in contrast to Cu, Pd, and NiAl, a strong stress layering arisen from the density and the local order layering forms in front of the liquid-crystal interface of CuZr alloy, which causes a slow diffusion zone. The formation of the slow diffusion zone suppresses the interface moving, resulting in much small growth velocity of CuZr alloy. We provide a direct evidence of this explanation by applying the compressive stress normal to the interface. The compression is shown to boost the stress layering in CuZr significantly, correspondingly enhancing the slow diffusion zone, and eventually slowing down the crystal growth of CuZr alloy immediately. In contrast, the growth of Cu, Pd, and NiAl is increased by the compression because the low diffusion zones in them are never well developed.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic slow mode with drifting He{sup ++}: Implications for coronal seismology and the solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollweg, Joseph V.; Verscharen, Daniel; Chandran, Benjamin D. G. E-mail: daniel.verscharen@unh.edu

    2014-06-10

    The MHD slow mode wave has application to coronal seismology, MHD turbulence, and the solar wind where it can be produced by parametric instabilities. We consider analytically how a drifting ion species (e.g. He{sup ++}) affects the linear slow mode wave in a mainly electron-proton plasma, with potential consequences for the aforementioned applications. Our main conclusions are as follows. 1. For wavevectors highly oblique to the magnetic field, we find solutions that are characterized by very small perturbations of total pressure. Thus, our results may help to distinguish the MHD slow mode from kinetic Alfvén waves and non-propagating pressure-balanced structures, which can also have very small total pressure perturbations. 2. For small ion concentrations, there are solutions that are similar to the usual slow mode in an electron-proton plasma, and solutions that are dominated by the drifting ions, but for small drifts the wave modes cannot be simply characterized. 3. Even with zero ion drift, the standard dispersion relation for the highly oblique slow mode cannot be used with the Alfvén speed computed using the summed proton and ion densities, and with the sound speed computed from the summed pressures and densities of all species. 4. The ions can drive a non-resonant instability under certain circumstances. For low plasma beta, the threshold drift can be less than that required to destabilize electromagnetic modes, but damping from the Landau resonance can eliminate this instability altogether, unless T{sub e} /T{sub p} >> 1.

  11. Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

    2005-07-01

    Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at

  12. THE SLOW-MODE NATURE OF COMPRESSIBLE WAVE POWER IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Bale, S. D.; Chen, C. H. K.; Salem, C. S.

    2012-07-01

    We use a large, statistical set of measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU, and supporting synthetic spacecraft data based on kinetic plasma theory, to show that the compressible component of inertial range solar wind turbulence is primarily in the kinetic slow mode. The zero-lag cross-correlation C({delta}n, {delta}B{sub ||}) between proton density fluctuations {delta}n and the field-aligned (compressible) component of the magnetic field {delta}B{sub ||} is negative and close to -1. The typical dependence of C({delta}n, {delta}B{sub ||}) on the ion plasma beta {beta}{sub i} is consistent with a spectrum of compressible wave energy that is almost entirely in the kinetic slow mode. This has important implications for both the nature of the density fluctuation spectrum and for the cascade of kinetic turbulence to short wavelengths, favoring evolution to the kinetic Alfven wave mode rather than the (fast) whistler mode.

  13. Multiple scattering of slow ions in a partially degenerate electron fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popoff, Romain; Maynard, Gilles; Deutsch, Claude

    2009-10-15

    We extend former investigation to a partially degenerate electron fluid at any temperature of multiple slow ion scattering at T=0. We implement an analytic and mean-field interpolation of the target electron dielectric function between T=0 (Lindhard) and T{yields}{infinity} (Fried-Conte). A specific attention is given to multiple scattering of proton projectiles in the keV energy range, stopped in a hot-electron plasma at solid density.

  14. Observation of slow dangling-bond relaxation in [ital p]-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlen, M.W.; Xu, Y.; Crandall, R.S. )

    1995-01-15

    Using junction-capacitance methods, we study the thermal charge emission of holes trapped in the dangling-bond defect [ital D] of [ital p]-type [ital a]-Si:H. Over a significant temperature range, we find a linear temperature-independent relation between emission time and the residence time of the hole on the [ital D] defect. We attribute this characteristic to a structural-relaxation process that is slow in disordered materials.

  15. D0 Superconducting Solenoid Quench Data and Slow Dump Data Acquisition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1998-06-09

    This Dzero Engineering note describes the method for which the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid Fast Dump and Slow Dump data are accumulated, tracked and stored. The 2 Tesla Solenoid has eleven data points that need to be tracked and then stored when a fast dump or a slow dump occur. The TI555(Texas Instruments) PLC(Programmable Logic Controller) which controls the DC power circuit that powers the Solenoid, also has access to all the voltage taps and other equipment in the circuit. The TI555 constantly logs these eleven points in a rotating memory buffer. When either a fast dump(dump switch opens) or a slow dump (power supply turns off) occurs, the TI555 organizes the respective data and will down load the data to a file on DO-CCRS2. This data in this file is moved over ethernet and is stored in a CSV (comma separated format) file which can easily be examined by Microsoft Excel or any other spreadsheet. The 2 Tesla solenoid control system also locks in first fault information. The TI555 decodes the first fault and passes it along to the program collecting the data and storing it on DO-CCRS2. This first fault information is then part of the file.

  16. Monte Carlo analysis of neutron slowing-down-time spectrometer for fast reactor spent fuel assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jianwei; Lineberry, Michael

    2007-07-01

    Using the neutron slowing-down-time method as a nondestructive assay tool to improve input material accountancy for fast reactor spent fuel reprocessing is under investigation at Idaho State University. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to simulate the neutron slowing down process in different slowing down spectrometers, namely, lead and graphite, and determine their main parameters. {sup 238}U threshold fission chamber response was simulated in the Monte Carlo model to represent the spent fuel assay signals, the signature (fission/time) signals of {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu were simulated as a convolution of fission cross sections and neutron flux inside the spent fuel. {sup 238}U detector signals were analyzed using linear regression model based on the signatures of fissile materials in the spent fuel to determine weight fractions of fissile materials in the Advanced Burner Test Reactor spent fuel. The preliminary results show even though lead spectrometer showed a better assay performance than graphite, graphite spectrometer could accurately determine weight fractions of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu given proper assay energy range were chosen. (authors)

  17. The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Ling-Bao; Wang, Hong-Yu; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Jin, Hai-Bo; Du, Chao-Hai

    2013-12-15

    The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

  18. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; et al

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component)more » using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.« less

  19. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrón-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velázquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section dσ/dΩ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  20. Measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grammer, K. B.; Alarcon, R.; Barrn-Palos, L.; Blyth, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Calarco, J.; Crawford, C.; Craycraft, K.; Evans, D.; Fomin, N.; Fry, J.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hamblen, J.; Hayes, C.; Kucuker, S.; Mahurin, R.; Maldonado-Velzquez, M.; Martin, E.; McCrea, M.; Mueller, P. E.; Musgrave, M.; Nann, H.; Penttil, S. I.; Snow, W. M.; Tang, Z.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2015-05-08

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many-body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function g(r) inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section d?/d? from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43 and 16.1 meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6 K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1 meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra nonequilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. Furthermore, we describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  1. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  2. MODELING RESONANCE INTERFERENCE BY 0-D SLOWING-DOWN SOLUTION WITH EMBEDDED SELF-SHIELDING METHOD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MODELING RESONANCE INTERFERENCE BY 0-D SLOWING-DOWN SOLUTION WITH EMBEDDED SELF-SHIELDING METHOD Yuxuan Liu and William Martin Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 yuxuanl@umich.edu; wrm@umich.edu Kang-Seog Kim and Mark Williams Oak Ridge National Laboratory One Bethel Valley Road, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172, USA kimk1@ornl.gov; williamsml@ornl.gov ABSTRACT The resonance integral table based

  3. One dimensional full wave analysis of slow-to-fast mode conversion in lower hybrid frequencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Guo-Zhang; Gao, Zhe

    2014-12-15

    The linear conversion from the slow wave to the fast wave in the lower hybrid range of frequencies is analyzed numerically by using the set of field equations describing waves in a cold plane-stratified plasma. The equations are solved as a two-point boundary value problem, where the polarizations of each mode are set consistently in the boundary conditions. The scattering coefficients and the field patterns are obtained for various density profiles. It is shown that, for large density scale length, the results agree well with the traditional cognitions. In contrast, the reflected component and the probable transmitted-converted component from the conversion region, which are neglected in the usual calculations, become significant when the scale length is smaller than the wavelength of the mode. The inclusion of these new components will improve the accuracy of the simulated propagation and deposition for the injected rf power when the conversion process is involved within a sharp-varying density profile. Meanwhile, the accessibility of the incident slow wave for the low frequency case is also affected by the scale length of the density profile.

  4. Enhanced traveling wave amplification of co-planar slow wave structure by extended phase-matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palm, Andrew; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar; Shin, Young-Min

    2015-09-15

    The electron beam co-propagating with slow waves in a staggered double grating array (SDGA) efficiently amplifies millimeter and sub-millimeter waves over a wide spectrum. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show that the power amplification in the fundamental passband is enhanced by the extended beam-wave phase-matching. Particle-in-cell simulations on the SDGA slow wave structure, designed with 10.4 keV and 50–100 mA sheet beam, indicate that maintaining beam-wave synchronization along the entire length of the circuit improves the gain by 7.3% leading to a total gain of 28 dB, corresponding to 62 W saturated power at the middle of operating band, and a 3-dB bandwidth of 7 GHz with 10.5% at V-band (73.5 GHz center frequency) with saturated peak power reaching 80 W and 28 dB at 71 GHz. These results also show a reasonably good agreement with analytic calculations based on Pierce small signal gain theory.

  5. Development for fissile assay in recycled fuel using lead slowing down spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Je Park, C.; Kim, Ho-Dong; Song, Kee Chan

    2013-07-01

    A future nuclear energy system is under development to turn spent fuels produced by PWRs into fuels for a SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) through the pyrochemical process. The knowledge of the isotopic fissile content of the new fuel is very important for fuel safety. A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS) is under development to analyze the fissile material content (Pu{sup 239}, Pu{sup 241} and U{sup 235}) of the fuel. The LSDS requires a neutron source, the neutrons will be slowed down through their passage in a lead medium and will finally enter the fuel and will induce fission reactions that will be analysed and the isotopic content of the fuel will be then determined. The issue is that the spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by spontaneous fission. The threshold fission detector screens the prompt fast fission neutrons and as a result the LSDS is not influenced by the high level radiation background. The energy resolution of LSDS is good in the range 0.1 eV to 1 keV. It is also the range in which the fission reaction is the most discriminating for the considered fissile isotopes. An electron accelerator has been chosen to produce neutrons with an adequate target through (e{sup -},γ)(γ,n) reactions.

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

  7. Frequency-dependent damping in propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Banerjee, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2014-07-10

    Propagating slow magneto-acoustic waves are often observed in polar plumes and active region fan loops. The observed periodicities of these waves range from a few minutes to a few tens of minutes and their amplitudes were found to decay rapidly as they travel along the supporting structure. Previously, thermal conduction, compressive viscosity, radiation, density stratification, and area divergence were identified to be some of the causes for change in the slow wave amplitude. Our recent studies indicate that the observed damping in these waves is frequency-dependent. We used imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly to study this dependence in detail and for the first time via observations we attempted to deduce a quantitative relation between the damping length and frequency of these oscillations. We developed a new analysis method to obtain this relation. The observed frequency dependence does not seem to agree with the current linear wave theory and it was found that the waves observed in the polar regions show a different dependence from those observed in the on-disk loop structures despite the similarity in their properties.

  8. Slowing of Femtosecond Laser-Generated Nanoparticles in a Background Gas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rouleau, Christopher M.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.

    2014-11-25

    The slowing of Pt nanoparticles in argon background gas was characterized by Rayleigh scattering imaging using a plume of nanoparticles generated by femtosecond laser through thin film ablation (fs-TTFA) of 20 nanometers-thick Pt films. The ablation was performed at threshold laser energy fluences for complete film removal to provide a well-defined plume consisting almost entirely of nanoparticles traveling with a narrow velocity distribution, providing a unique system to unambiguously characterize the slowing of nanoparticles during interaction with background gases. Nanoparticles of ~200 nm diameter were found to decelerate in background Ar gas with pressures less than 50 Torr in goodmore » agreement with a linear drag model in the Epstein regime. Based on this model, the stopping distance of small nanoparticles in the plume was predicted and tested by particle collection in an off-axis geometry, and size distribution analysis by transmission electron microscopy. These results permit a basis to interpret nanoparticle propagation through background gases in laser ablation plumes that contain mixed components.« less

  9. CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

  10. Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peng, Ze [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  11. A 0.14 THz relativistic coaxial overmoded surface wave oscillator with metamaterial slow wave structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Weijie; Wang, Jianguo Chen, Zaigao; Cai, Libing; Wang, Yue; Wang, Guangqiang; Qiao, Hailiang

    2014-12-15

    This paper presents a new kind of device for generating the high power terahertz wave by using a coaxial overmoded surface wave oscillator with metamaterial slow wave structure (SWS). A metallic metamaterial SWS is used to avoid the damage of the device driven by a high-voltage electron beam pulse. The overmoded structure is adopted to make it much easy to fabricate and assemble the whole device. The coaxial structure is used to suppress the mode competition in the overmoded device. Parameters of an electron beam and geometric structure are provided. Particle-in-cell simulation results show that the high power terahertz wave at the frequency of 0.14 THz is generated with the output power 255 MW and conversion efficiency about 21.3%.

  12. All-metal metamaterial slow-wave structure for high-power sources with high efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yanshuai; Duan, Zhaoyun Tang, Xianfeng; Wang, Zhanliang; Zhang, Yabin; Gong, Yubin; Feng, Jinjun

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we have proposed a metamaterial (MTM) which is suitable for the compact high-power vacuum electron devices. For example, an S-band slow-wave structure (SWS) based on the all-metal MTMs has been studied by both simulation and experiment. The results show that this MTM SWS is very helpful to miniaturize the high-power vacuum electron devices and largely improve the output power and the electronic efficiency. The simulation model of an S-band MTM backward wave oscillator (BWO) is built, and the particle-in-cell simulated results are presented here: a 2.454 GHz signal is generated and its peak output power is 4.0 MW with a higher electronic efficiency of 31.5% relative to the conventional BWOs.

  13. Ion thermal effects on slow mode solitary waves in plasmas with two adiabatic ion species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsengiyumva, F. Hellberg, M. A. Mace, R. L.

    2015-09-15

    Using both the Sagdeev and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) methods, ion thermal effects on slow mode ion acoustic solitons and double layers are investigated in a plasma with two adiabatic positive ion species. It is found that reducing the gap between the two ion thermal speeds by increasing the relative temperature of the cool ions increases the typical soliton/double layer speeds for all values of the ion-ion density ratio and reduces the range in the density ratio that supports double layers. The effect of increasing the relative cool ion temperature on the soliton/double layer amplitudes depends on the relative densities. For lower values of the ion density ratio, an increase in cool ion temperature leads to a significant decrease in soliton/double layer amplitude, so one may find that solitons of all permissible speeds lie within the range of KdV theory.

  14. Two energy scales and slow crossover in YbAl3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence, J.M.; Ebihara, T.; Riseborough, P.S.; Booth, C.H.; Pagliuso, P.G.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.

    2002-01-15

    We present results for YbAl{sub 3} which show that the susceptibility {chi}(T), 4f occupation number n{sub f}(T) and the entropy S(T) exhibit a slow crossover between the Fermi liquid and local moment regimes. In addition both {chi}(T) and the linear specific heat coefficient {gamma} = C/T exhibit low temperature peaks that imply that in addition to the Kondo scale (T{sub K} {approx} 500K) there is a second low temperature scale (T{sub coh} {approx} 50K) for the onset of coherence. We discuss these results in the context of Nozieres' exhaustion in the Anderson lattice.

  15. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry Analysis of Data from Measurements on Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Gavron, Victor A.; Harris, Jason; Stewart, Trevor N.

    2015-01-12

    Improved non-destructive assay of isotopic masses in used nuclear fuel would be valuable for nuclear safeguards operations associated with the transport, storage and reprocessing of used nuclear fuel. Our collaboration is examining the feasibility of using lead slowing down spectrometry techniques to assay the isotopic fissile masses in used nuclear fuel assemblies. We present the application of our analysis algorithms on measurements conducted with a lead spectrometer. The measurements involved a single fresh fuel pin and discrete 239Pu and 235U samples. We are able to describe the isotopic fissile masses with root mean square errors over seven different configurations to 6.35% for 239Pu and 2.7% for 235U over seven different configurations. Funding Source(s):

  16. Microorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microorganisms to Speed Production of Biofuels Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryResearchers at ORNL developed microorganisms that can quickly overcome the resistance of biomass to breakdown, and improved both the cost and efficiency of the biofuel conversion process.DescriptionConventional biomass pretreatment methods release sugars, weak acids, and metabolic by-products that slow down or even stop fermentation, resulting in slower

  17. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Casella, Andrew M.; Haight, R. C.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Danon, Yaron; Hatchett, D.; Becker, Bjorn; Devlin, M.; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.; Gavron, A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; O'Donnell, J. M.

    2011-08-01

    Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 collaboration activities. Progress made by the collaboration in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS techniques applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model demonstrated the potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space. Similar results were obtained using a perturbation approach developed by LANL. Benchmark measurements have been successfully conducted at LANL and at RPI using their respective LSDS instruments. The ISU and UNLV collaborative effort is focused on the fabrication and testing of prototype fission chambers lined with ultra-depleted 238U and 232Th, and uranium deposition on a stainless steel disc using spiked U3O8 from room temperature ionic liquid was successful, with improving thickness obtained. In FY2012, the collaboration plans a broad array of activities. PNNL will focus on optimizing its empirical model and minimizing its reliance on calibration data, as well continuing efforts on developing an analytical model. Additional measurements are

  18. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dethlefsen, R.

    1985-10-01

    The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

  19. SPECTRAL SLOPE VARIATION AT PROTON SCALES FROM FAST TO SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.; Telloni, D.

    2014-09-20

    We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high-resolution time intervals from the WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at 1 AU and 0.56 AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high-speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between –3.75 and –1.75 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge, where the speed is higher, and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated with the fluctuations within the inertial range; the higher the power, the steeper the slope. Our results support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

  20. Simplified treatment of exact resonance elastic scattering model in deterministic slowing down equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, M.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T.

    2012-07-01

    Simplified treatment of resonance elastic scattering model considering thermal motion of heavy nuclides and the energy dependence of the resonance cross section was implemented into NJOY [1]. In order to solve deterministic slowing down equation considering the effect of up-scattering without iterative calculations, scattering kernel for heavy nuclides is pre-calculated by the formula derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [2], and neutron spectrum in up-scattering term is expressed by NR approximation. To check the verification of the simplified treatment, the treatment is applied to U-238 for the energy range from 4 eV to 200 eV. Calculated multi-group capture cross section of U-238 is greater than that of conventional method and the increase of the capture cross sections is remarkable as the temperature becomes high. Therefore Doppler coefficient calculated in UO{sub 2} fuel pin is calculated more negative value than that on conventional method. The impact on Doppler coefficient is equivalent to the results of exact treatment of resonance elastic scattering reported in previous studies [2-7]. The agreement supports the validation of the simplified treatment and therefore this treatment is applied for other heavy nuclide to evaluate the Doppler coefficient in MOX fuel. The result shows that the impact of considering thermal agitation in resonance scattering in Doppler coefficient comes mainly from U-238 and that of other heavy nuclides such as Pu-239, 240 etc. is not comparable in MOX fuel. (authors)

  1. Vibronic structure of VO{sub 2} probed by slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongjin B.; Weichman, Marissa L.; Neumark, Daniel M.

    2014-01-21

    We report high-resolution anion photoelectron spectra of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}{sup −}) obtained by slow electron velocity-map imaging of trapped and cryogenically cooled anions. Vibrationally resolved spectra are obtained for photodetachment to the first three neutral electronic states, giving an electron affinity of 1.8357(5) eV for the X-tilde{sup 2} A{sub 1} ground state and term energies of 0.1845(8) eV and 0.8130(5) eV for the A-tilde{sup 2}B{sub 1} and B-tilde{sup 2}A{sub 1} excited states, respectively. The vibrational fundamentals ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 2} are obtained for all three states. Experimental assignments are confirmed by energies from electronic structure calculations and Franck-Condon spectral simulations. These simulations support assigning the anion ground state as the X-tilde{sup 3}B{sub 1} state. With this assignment, photodetachment to the B-tilde{sup 2}A{sub 1} state involves a nominally forbidden two-electron transition, suggesting extensive configuration interaction in neutral VO{sub 2}.

  2. Statistical detection of slow-mode waves in solar polar regions with SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, J. T.

    2014-10-01

    Observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory are utilized to statistically investigate the propagating quasi-periodic oscillations in the solar polar plume and inter-plume regions. On average, the periods are found to be nearly equal in the three coronal channels of AIA 171 Å, 193 Å, and 211 Å, and the wavelengths increase with temperature from 171 Å, 193 Å, and 211 Å. The phase speeds may be inferred from the above parameters. Furthermore, the speed ratios of v {sub 193}/v {sub 171} and v {sub 211}/v {sub 171} are derived, e.g., 1.4 ± 0.8 and 2.0 ± 1.9 in the plume regions, respectively, which are equivalent to the theoretical ones for acoustic waves. We find that there are no significant differences for the detected parameters between the plume and inter-plume regions. To our knowledge, this is the first time that we have simultaneously obtained the phase speeds of slow-mode waves in the three channels in the open coronal magnetic structures due to the method adopted in the present work, which is able to minimize the influence of the jets or eruptions on wave signals.

  3. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  4. Pad polishing for rapid production of large flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, R.R.; Schmell, R.A.

    1997-11-01

    Pad polishing is an efficient technique for polishing-out a ground surface and reaching a figure better than one wave, ready for completion with less than an hour on a planetary polisher. For the 350 mm square piece of BK-7, removal was one micrometer every 10 minutes. Polishing-out from a 5 micrometer grind took less than 3 hours, to a surface smoothness of one nm rms. Other tests verified that the pad leaves no unusual subsurface damage. Following completion on a pitch planetary polisher, surface finish is the same as obtained for conventional processing. Unlike pitch, the pad retains its surface figure, producing a uniform result when used on a production basis. Coupled with the speed of production and low capital cost of overarm machines, it provides a cost-effective approach.

  5. Non-contiguous finished genome sequence and contextual data of the filamentous soil bacterium Ktedonobacter racemifer type strain (SOSP1-21T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Fiebig, Anne [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Ktedonobacter racemifer corrig. Cavaletti et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Ktedo- nobacter, which in turn is the type genus of the family Ktedonobacteraceae, the type family of the order Ktedonobacterales within the class Ktedonobacteria in the phylum Chloroflexi . Although K. racemifer shares some morphological features with the actinobacteria, it is of special interest because it was the first cultivated representative of a deep branching unclassi- fied lineage of otherwise uncultivated environmental phylotypes tentatively located within the phylum Chloroflexi . The aerobic, filamentous, non-motile, spore-forming Gram-positive heterotroph was isolated from soil in Italy. The 13,661,586 bp long non-contiguous finished genome consists of ten contigs and is the first reported genome sequence from a member of the class Ktedonobacteria. With its 11,453 protein-coding and 87 RNA genes, it is the largest prokaryotic genome reported so far. It comprises a large number of over-represented COGs, particularly genes associated with transposons, causing the genetic redundancy within the genome being considerably larger than expected by chance. This work is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. Cooling energy performance and installation of a retrofitted exterior insulation and finish system on masonry residences in the southwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ternes, M.P.; Wilkes, K.E.; McLain, H.A.

    1992-12-31

    A field test involving eight single-family houses was performed during the summer of 1991 in Scottsdale, Arizona to evaluate the potential of reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption and demand by insulating their exterior masonry walls using a site-fabricated (non-commercially available) insulation and finish system. The exterior insulation system developed for the field test was easily performed and should result in a durable installation. Total per house costs to perform the installations ranged from $3610 to $4550. The average annual savings was estimated to be 491 kWh, or 9% of pre-retrofit consumption. Peak demands without and with insulation on the hottest day of an average weather year for Phoenix were estimated to be 4.26 and 3.61 kill, for a demand reduction of 0.65 kill (15%). We conclude that exterior masonry wall insulation offers the greatest potential for air-conditioning electricity savings and peak demand reductions in hot, dry climates similar to that of Phoenix. Retrofit economics need to be thoroughly examined from societal, utility, and consumer perspectives and must consider other benefits such as space-heating energy savings and improved house value.

  7. Imprinting high-gradient topographical structures onto optical surfaces using magnetorheological finishing: Manufacturing corrective optical elements for high-power laser applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Menapace, Joseph A.; Ehrmann, Paul E.; Bayramian, Andrew J.; Bullington, Amber; Di Nicola, Jean -Michel G.; Haefner, Constantin; Jarboe, Jeffrey; Marshall, Christopher; Schaffers, Kathleen I.; Smith, Cal

    2016-03-15

    Corrective optical elements form an important part of high-precision optical systems. We have developed a method to manufacture high-gradient corrective optical elements for high-power laser systems using deterministic magnetorheological finishing (MRF) imprinting technology. Several process factors need to be considered for polishing ultraprecise topographical structures onto optical surfaces using MRF. They include proper selection of MRF removal function and wheel sizes, detailed MRF tool and interferometry alignment, and optimized MRF polishing schedules. Dependable interferometry also is a key factor in high-gradient component manufacture. A wavefront attenuating cell, which enables reliable measurement of gradients beyond what is attainable using conventional interferometry,more » is discussed. The results of MRF imprinting a 23 μm deep structure containing gradients over 1.6 μm / mm onto a fused-silica window are presented as an example of the technique’s capabilities. As a result, this high-gradient element serves as a thermal correction plate in the high-repetition-rate advanced petawatt laser system currently being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  8. ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heber, Veronika S.; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer; Bochsler, Peter; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Neugebauer, Marcia; Reisenfeld, Daniel B.; Wiens, Roger C.

    2012-11-10

    NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over {approx}2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 {+-} 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ne and 2.6 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

  9. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  10. Near-infrared structure of fast and slow-rotating disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Bershady, Matthew A.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate the stellar disk structure of six nearby edge-on spiral galaxies using high-resolution JHK {sub s}-band images and three-dimensional radiative transfer models. To explore how mass and environment shape spiral disks, we selected galaxies with rotational velocities between 69 km s{sup 1} 150 km s{sup 1}) galaxies, only NGC 4013 has the super-thin+thin+thick nested disk structure seen in NGC 891 and the Milky Way, albeit with decreased oblateness, while NGC 1055, a disturbed massive spiral galaxy, contains disks with h{sub z} ? 200 pc. NGC 4565, another fast-rotator, contains a prominent ring at a radius ?5 kpc but no super-thin disk. Despite these differences, all fast-rotating galaxies in our sample have inner truncations in at least one of their disks. These truncations lead to Freeman Type II profiles when projected face-on. Slow-rotating galaxies are less complex, lacking inner disk truncations and requiring fewer disk components to reproduce their light distributions. Super-thin disk components in undisturbed disks contribute ?25% of the total K {sub s}-band light, up to that of the thin-disk contribution. The presence of super-thin disks correlates with infrared flux ratios; galaxies with super-thin disks have f{sub K{sub s}}/f{sub 60} {sub ?m}?0.12 for integrated light, consistent with super-thin disks being regions of ongoing star-formation. Attenuation-corrected vertical color gradients in (J K {sub s}) correlate with the observed disk structure and are consistent with population gradients with young-to-intermediate ages closer to the mid-plane, indicating that disk heatingor coolingis a ubiquitous phenomenon.

  11. Isotopes Products

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotopes Products Isotopes Products Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Products stress and rest Stress and rest Rb-82 PET images in a patient with dipyridamole stress-inducible lateral wall and apical ischemia. (http://www.fac.org.ar/scvc/llave/image/machac/machaci.htm#f2,3,4) Strontium-82 is supplied to our customers for use in Sr-82/Rb-82 generator technologies. The generators in turn are supplied to

  12. Forest Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Purchased energy remains the third largest manufacturing cost for the forest products industry–despite its extensive use of highly efficient co-generation technology. The industry has worked with...

  13. Hydrogen Production

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

  14. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-09-28

    Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e

  15. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.

    2011-09-30

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today's confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model, which accounts for self-shielding effects using empirical basis vectors calculated from the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a matrix containing the true self-shielding functions of the used fuel assembly models. The potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space was demonstrated. Also, in FY2011, PNNL continued to develop an analytical model. Such efforts included the addition of six more non-fissile absorbers in the analytical shielding function and the non-uniformity of the neutron flux across the LSDS assay chamber. A hybrid analytical-empirical approach was developed to determine the mass of total Pu (sum of the masses of 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu), which is an important quantity in safeguards. Results using this hybrid method were of approximately the same accuracy as the pure

  16. Identification of genetically homozygous rapid and slow acetylators of drugs and environmental carcinogens among established inbred rabbit strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hein, D.W.; Smolen, T.N.; Fox, R.R.; Weber, W.W.

    1982-10-01

    Liver and gut mucosa N-acetyltransferase (NAT) cytosol (105,000 x g) was prepared from selected lines of New Zealand White rapid and slow acetylator rabbits bred and housed at the University of Michigan, and from inbred and partially inbred rabbits obtained from The Jackson Laboratory. Liver NAT activity was determined with p-aminobenzoic acid, p-aminosalicylic acid, procainamide, sulfamethazine, isoniazid and 2-aminofluorene as substrates. Gut mucosal NAT activity was determined with 2-aminofluorene. A gene dose-response relationship was observed for both liver NAT and gut mucosa NAT with all substrates tested. Highest levels were always observed in homozygous rapid acetylator inbred strains (B/J, III/J, IIIC/J, III/DwJ, IIIEP/J and IIIVO/J), lower levels in obligate heterozygous rapid acetylator rabbits and lowest levels in homozygous slow acetylator inbred (ACEP/J, III/cdJ, IIIVO/ahJ, and IIIVO/vptJ) and outbred rabbits. The differences in magnitude of liver NAT activity level between acetylator genotypes was dependent on the substrate employed, progressively increasing in the following order: p-aminobenzoic acid, p-aminosalicyclic acid, procainamide, sulfamethazine, isoniazid, 2-aminofluorene. The determination of kinetic constants for liver p-aminosalicyclic acid NAT activity indicated a 2-fold difference in apparent Vmax between rapid acetylator genotypes and a 30-fold difference between rapid and slow acetylator phenotypes. In addition, the apparent Km for p-aminosalicyclic acid was significantly lower in the slow acetylators than in the rapid acetylators.

  17. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M.? J.; Li, C.? K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.? B.; Stoeckl, C.; Sguin, F.? H.; Frenje, J.? A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly-driven, ? ? 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvnic electron jets (Vjet~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.

  18. Flux enhancement of slow-moving particles by Sun or Jupiter: Can they be detected on Earth?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patla, Bijunath R.; Nemiroff, Robert J.; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Zioutas, Konstantin

    2014-01-10

    Slow-moving particles capable of interacting solely with gravity might be detected on Earth as a result of the gravitational lensing induced focusing action of the Sun. The deflection experienced by these particles is inversely proportional to the square of their velocities, and as a result their focal lengths will be shorter. We investigate the velocity dispersion of these slow-moving particles, originating from distant point-like sources, for imposing upper and lower bounds on the velocities of such particles in order for them to be focused onto Earth. Stars, distant galaxies, and cluster of galaxies, etc., may all be considered as point-like sources. We find that fluxes of such slow-moving and non-interacting particles must have speeds between ?0.01 and .14 times the speed of light, c. Particles with speeds less than ?0.01c will undergo way too much deflection to be focused, although such individual particles could be detected. At the caustics, the magnification factor could be as high as ?10{sup 6}. We impose lensing constraints on the mass of these particles in order for them to be detected with large flux enhancements that are greater than 10{sup 9} eV. An approximate mass density profile for Jupiter is used to constrain particle velocities for lensing by Jupiter. We show that Jupiter could potentially focus particles with speeds as low as ?0.001c, which the Sun cannot.

  19. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M.  J.; Li, C.  K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.  B.; Stoeckl, C.; Séguin, F.  H.; Frenje, J.  A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly-driven, β ≲ 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. Themore » absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.« less

  20. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M.  J.; Li, C.  K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.  B.; Stoeckl, C.; Séguin, F.  H.; Frenje, J.  A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly-driven, β ≲ 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.

  1. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M.? J.; Li, C.? K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.? B.; Stoeckl, C.; Sguin, F.? H.; Frenje, J.? A.; Petrasso, R.? D.

    2015-05-20

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, ? ? 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvnic electron jets (Vjet ~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early inmoretime. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.less

  2. Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beliaev, Alex S; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2013-08-27

    A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumption and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.

  3. Plutonium Finishing Plant - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... At an event to commemorate the removal of the plutonium, for the first time ever, some members of the public were given the chance to see the once top-secret vaults where the ...

  4. Bottom production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baines, J.; Baranov, S.P.; Bartalini, P.; Bay, A.; Bouhova, E.; Cacciari, M.; Caner, A.; Coadou, Y.; Corti, G.; Damet, J.; Dell-Orso, R.; De Mello Neto, J.R.T.; Domenech, J.L.; Drollinger, V.; Eerola, P.; Ellis, N.; Epp, B.; Frixione, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gavrilenko, I.; Gennai, S.; George, S.; Ghete, V.M.; Guy, L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Iengo, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jones, R.; Kharchilava, A.; Kneringer, E.; Koppenburg, P.; Korsmo, H.; Kramer, M.; Labanca, N.; Lehto, M.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Mele, S.; Nairz, A.M.; Nakada, T.; Nikitin, N.; Nisati, A.; Norrbin, E.; Palla, F.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robins, S.; Rousseau, D.; Sanchis-Lozano, M.A.; Shapiro, M.; Sherwood, P.; Smirnova, L.; Smizanska, M.; Starodumov, A.; Stepanov, N.; Vogt, R.

    2000-03-15

    In the context of the LHC experiments, the physics of bottom flavoured hadrons enters in different contexts. It can be used for QCD tests, it affects the possibilities of B decays studies, and it is an important source of background for several processes of interest. The physics of b production at hadron colliders has a rather long story, dating back to its first observation in the UA1 experiment. Subsequently, b production has been studied at the Tevatron. Besides the transverse momentum spectrum of a single b, it has also become possible, in recent time, to study correlations in the production characteristics of the b and the b. At the LHC new opportunities will be offered by the high statistics and the high energy reach. One expects to be able to study the transverse momentum spectrum at higher transverse momenta, and also to exploit the large statistics to perform more accurate studies of correlations.

  5. South Pacific: Another slow year is ahead. [Oil and gas industry outlook in the South Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langley, B. )

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes the oil and gas exploration activities in Australia, Papua New Guinea, and New Zealand in the 1992--1993 period and projects the near-future market and development of these resources. It provides statistics on numbers of new wells drilled, footage involved, number or completions, and production information. The paper also describes the main geographical areas of exploration, types of exploration equipment involved.

  6. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, A.; Haight, R. C.; Harris, Jason; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Stewart, T.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Executive Summary The Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign is supporting a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of using Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) to conduct direct, independent and accurate assay of fissile isotopes in used fuel assemblies. The collaboration consists of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Idaho State University (ISU). There are three main challenges to implementing LSDS to assay used fuel assemblies. These challenges are the development of an algorithm for interpreting the data with an acceptable accuracy for the fissile masses, the development of suitable detectors for the technique, and the experimental benchmarking of the approach. This report is a summary of the progress in these areas made by the collaboration during FY2012. Significant progress was made on the project in FY2012. Extensive characterization of a “semi-empirical” algorithm was conducted. For example, we studied the impact on the accuracy of this algorithm by the minimization of the calibration set, uncertainties in the calibration masses, and by the choice of time window. Issues such a lead size, number of required neutrons, placement of the neutron source and the impact of cadmium around the detectors were also studied. In addition, new algorithms were developed that do not require the use of plutonium fission chambers. These algorithms were applied to measurement data taken by RPI and shown to determine the 235U mass within 4%. For detectors, a new concept for a fast neutron detector involving 4He recoil from neutron scattering was investigated. The detector has the potential to provide a couple of orders of magnitude more sensitivity than 238U fission chambers. Progress was also made on the more conventional approach of using 232Th fission chambers as fast neutron detectors. For

  7. Ash-Based Building Panels Production and Demonstration of Aerock Decking Building Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan E. Bland; Jesse Newcomer

    2007-06-30

    Western Research Institute (WRI) of Laramie, Wyoming and AeRock, LLC of Eagar, Arizona (formerly of Bellevue, Washington) partnered, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE-NETL), to support the development of rapid-setting, ash-based, fiber-incorporated ''green'' building products. Green building materials are a rapidly growing trend in the building and construction industry in the US. A two phase project was implemented wherein Phase I assessed, through chemical and physical testing, ash, ash-based cement and fiber composites exhibiting superior structural performance when applied to the AeRock mixing and extrusion process and involved the conduct of pilot-scale production trials of AeRock products, and wherein Phase II involved the design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale plant to confirm production issues and to produce panels for performance evaluations. Phase I optimized the composite ingredients including ash-based cement, Class F and Class C DFGD ash, and various fiber reinforcements. Additives, such as retardants and accelerators, were also evaluated as related to extruder performance. The optimized composite from the Phase I effort was characterized by a modulus of rupture (MOR) measured between 1,931 and 2,221 psi flexural strength, comparable to other wood and non-wood building materials. Continuous extrusion of the optimum composite in the AeRock pilot-scale facility produced an excellent product that was assembled into a demonstration for exhibit and durability purposes. Finishes, from plain to marbled, from bright reds to muted earth tones and with various textures, could easily be applied during the mixing and extrusion process. The successful pilot-scale demonstration was in turn used to design the production parameters and extruder dies for a commercial scale demonstration at Ultrapanel Pty, Ltd of Ballarat, Australia under Phase II. The initial commercial-scale production

  8. Issues in Value-Added Products from Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2001-11-01

    While biomass conversion to energy products has been the primary focus of most development efforts over the past 30 years, process development for chemical products is an area of increasing effort more recently. Although the fuels market is likely to allow the largest impact for renewable resources in the world economy, chemical products can also be more than just niche market applications. However, the specific chemical processing required for refined chemical products requires improved chemical handling methods for separations and purifications, as well as improved catalyst systems. Development of these unit operations has lagged behind the process research focused on the finished products. This paper will describe some of the critical processing issues that need to be addressed to allow biomass feedstocks to make a real impact in the chemicals market. The paper will also describe some of the process research which has been performed or is now underway in our laboratory and others'. Areas to be discussed include biomass component separation, catalyst development for aqueous processing, and trace component effects in catalytic processing of biomass feedstocks.

  9. Oil Production

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1989-07-01

    A horizontal and slanted well model was developed and incorporated into BOAST, a black oil simulator, to predict the potential production rates for such wells. The HORIZONTAL/SLANTED WELL MODEL can be used to calculate the productivity index, based on the length and location of the wellbore within the block, for each reservoir grid block penetrated by the horizontal/slanted wellbore. The well model can be run under either pressure or rate constraints in which wellbore pressuresmore » can be calculated as an option of infinite-conductivity. The model can simulate the performance of multiple horizontal/slanted wells in any geometric combination within reservoirs.« less

  10. Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Hydrogen can be produced using diverse, domestic resources. Fossil fuels, such as natural gas and coal, can be converted to produce hydrogen, and the use of carbon capture, utilization, and storage can reduce the carbon footprint of these processes. Hydrogen can also be produced from low carbon and renewable resources, including biomass grown from non-food crops and splitting water using electricity from wind, solar, geothermal, nuclear, and hydroelectric. This diversity of potential