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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Product Supplied for Finished Gasoline  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S.Feet) Year JanProduct Guide435 8,610

2

Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96NebraskaWells (MillionProductionFirst Second QuarterData

3

Transplanckian energy production and slow roll inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we investigate how the energy density due to a non-standard choice of initial vacuum affects the expansion of the universe during inflation. To do this we introduce source terms in the Friedmann equations making sure that we respect the relation between gravity and thermodynamics. We find that the energy production automatically implies a slow rolling cosmological constant. Hence we also conclude that there is no well defined value for the cosmological constant in the presence of sources. We speculate that a non-standard vacuum can provide slow roll inflation on its own.

Ulf H. Danielsson

2004-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in NonproducingAdditions to Capacity on Cokers Catalytic CrackersProduct: Total

5

Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

N. Zurlo; M. Amoretti; C. Amsler; G. Bonomi; C. Carraro; C. L. Cesar; M. Charlton; M. Doser; A. Fontana; R. Funakoshi; P. Genova; R. S. Hayano; L. V. Jorgensen; A. Kellerbauer; V. Lagomarsino; R. Landua; E. Lodi Rizzini; M. Macrì; N. Madsen; G. Manuzio; D. Mitchard; P. Montagna; L. G. Posada; H. Pruys; C. Regenfus; A. Rotondi; G. Testera; D. P. Van der Werf; A. Variola; L. Venturelli; Y. Yamazaki

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

6

Simulations of slow positron production using a low-energy electron accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monte Carlo simulations of slow positron production via energetic electron interaction with a solid target have been performed. The aim of the simulations was to determine the expected slow positron beam intensity from a low-energy, high-current electron accelerator. By simulating (a) the fast positron production from a tantalum electron-positron converter and (b) the positron depth deposition profile in a tungsten moderator, the slow positron production probability per incident electron was estimated. Normalizing the calculated result to the measured slow positron yield at the present AIST linear accelerator, the expected slow positron yield as a function of energy was determined. For an electron beam energy of 5 MeV (10 MeV) and current 240 {mu}A (30 {mu}A), production of a slow positron beam of intensity 5 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} is predicted. The simulation also calculates the average energy deposited in the converter per electron, allowing an estimate of the beam heating at a given electron energy and current. For low-energy, high-current operation the maximum obtainable positron beam intensity will be limited by this beam heating.

O'Rourke, B. E.; Kinomura, A.; Kuroda, R.; Ohdaira, T.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST-Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Minehara, E. J. [The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Centre, 64-52-1 Nagatani, Tsuruga, Fukui 941-0821 (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Simulations of slow positron production using a low energy electron accelerator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monte Carlo simulations of slow positron production via energetic electron interaction with a solid target have been performed. The aim of the simulations was to determine the expected slow positron beam intensity from a low energy, high current electron accelerator. By simulating (a) the fast positron production from a tantalum electron-positron converter and (b) the positron depth deposition profile in a tungsten moderator, the slow positron production probability per incident electron was estimated. Normalizing the calculated result to the measured slow positron yield at the present AIST LINAC the expected slow positron yield as a function of energy was determined. For an electron beam energy of 5 MeV (10 MeV) and current 240 $\\mu$A (30 $\\mu$A) production of a slow positron beam of intensity 5 $\\times$ 10$^{6}$ s$^{-1}$ is predicted. The simulation also calculates the average energy deposited in the converter per electron, allowing an estimate of the beam heating at a given electron energy and current. For...

O'Rourke, B E; Kinomura, A; Kuroda, R; Minehara, E; Ohdaira, T; Oshima, N; Suzuki, R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading Ahead of Schedule Y-12 Finishes Initial HEUMF Loading...

9

Progress Continues Toward Demolition of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Piece by piece, workers are safely and compliantly preparing to demolish a relic of Cold War plutonium production at the Hanford site. The Plutonium Finishing Plant was the final...

10

Running Jobs Intermittently Slow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jobs Intermittently Slow Running Jobs Intermittently Slow October 2, 2014 (0 Comments) Symptom: User jobs are seeing intermittent slowness, jobs can run very slow in certain stages...

11

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 May 2012 Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford...

12

Semi-finished modular cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis subject is a pre-fabricated element (cell): a system that employs natural, light, and economic materials to produce a near-finished portion of a building. The intent is to introduce sustainable design into ...

Bachelder, Laura Govoni, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Deacon Sweeney on "the Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Sweeney, Deacon [OpGen, Inc.

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

Economics of specialized integrated swine finishing operation in the Texas Panhandle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Department (Member) (Member) C (Member) December 1971 ABSTRACT Economics of Specialized Swine Finishing Operation in the Texas Panhandle. (December 1971) Guyle Earl Cavin, B. S. , Texas Afd1 University Directed by: Dr. Donald E. Ferris The purpose... and finishing stage of production. The objectives of the study were to determine: (1) if a supply of good quality relatively disease-free feeder pigs is available in a supply sufficient to furnish an expanded increase in the swine finishing industry, (2...

Cavin, Guyle Earl

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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16

Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant Workers Create Demolition Zone at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant August 28, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

18

Plutonium finishing plant dangerous waste training plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

ENTROP, G.E.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Team project summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NCMS PWB Surface Finishes Consortium is just about at the end of the five year program. Dozens of projects related to surface finishes and PWB solder-ability were performed by the team throughout the program, and many of them are listed in this paper. They are listed with a cross reference to where and when a technical paper was presented describing the results of the research. However, due to time and space constraints, this paper can summarize the details of only three of the major research projects accomplished by the team. The first project described is an ``Evaluation of PWB Surface Finishes.`` It describes the solderability, reliability, and wire bondability of numerous surface finishes. The second project outlined is an ``Evaluation of PWB Solderability Test Methods.`` The third project outlined is the ``Development and Evaluation of Organic Solderability Preservatives.``

Kokas, J.; DeSantis, C. [United Technologies Corp., Farmington, CT (United States). Hamilton Standard Div.; Wenger, G. [AT and T, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data 2010Feet) Year JanInformation& Blender

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Grow Iron, Slow Pollution | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Scientists connect previous studies on electron transport in hematite Making a Deposit: Scanning electron micrographs of...

22

Improved Microbe Assembly and Finishing Using 454 8kb Libraries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Christian Buhay from Baylor College of Medicine's Human Genome Sequencing Center discusses microbial genome finishing strategies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Buhay, Christian [Baylor College of Medicine's Human Genome Sequencing Center

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Perspective on plating for precision finishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is intended as an overview on platings for precision finishing operations. After a brief review of the two processes (polishing and precision machining) by which a coating on a part can be converted to a precision surface, the coatings which work successfully in these applications will be discussed. Then adhesion and stress aspects of deposits will be covered. Electroless nickel, which is a particularly attractive coating for precision finishing applications, will be discussed in some detail, from its early years as the Kanigen'' process to the present. Since microstructural changes in deposits are important for precision parts, this aspect will be covered for electroless nickel, copper and silver deposits. Lastly, some words will be directed at potential future electrodeposited coatings including nickel-phosphorus alloys, and various silver alloys. 41 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

Dini, J.W.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Wearability of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Finishes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major Subject: Civil Engineering NEARABILITY OF PORTLAND CENENT CONCRETE PAPFNENT FIVISNFS A Thesis by Nilliam Rem NcKeen Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ e) (Nember) August 1971 ABSTRACT Hearabil'tv of Portland Cement... portland cement, and an air entrainment admixture. Standard laboratory tests were performed on all aggregates to determine their properties. iv The test specimens were molded in a controlled environmental room and the anpropriate surface finish (burlap...

McKeen, William Rew

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Assessment of circuit board surface finishes for electronic assembly with lead-free solders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suitability of various metallic printed wiring board surface finishes was assessed for new technology applications that incorporate assembly with Lead-free solders. The manufacture of a lead-free product necessitates elimination of lead (Pb) from the solder, the circuit board as well as the component lead termination. It is critical however for the selected interconnect Pb-free solder and the corresponding printed wiring board (PWB) and component lead finishes to be mutually compatible. Baseline compatibility of select Pb-free solders with Pb containing PWB surface finish and components was assessed. This was followed by examining the compatibility of the commercially available CASTIN{trademark} (SnAgCuSb) Pb-free solder with a series of PWB metallic finishes: Ni/Au, Ni/Pd, and Pd/Cu. The compatibility was assessed with respect to assembly performance, solder joint integrity and long term attachment reliability. Solder joint integrity and mechanical behavior of representative 50 mil pitch 20I/O SOICs was determined before and after thermal stress. Mechanical pull test studies demonstrated that the strength of SnAgCuSb solder interconnections is notably greater than that of SnPb interconnections.

Ray, U.; Artaki, I.; Finley, D.W.; Wenger, G.M. [Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States). Lucent Technologies; Pan, T.; Blair, H.D.; Nicholson, J.M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States); Vianco, P.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Plutonium finishing plant safety systems and equipment list  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Equipment List (SEL) supports Analysis Report (FSAR), WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 and the Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010. The SEL is a breakdown and classification of all Safety Class 1, 2, and 3 equipment, components, or system at the Plutonium Finishing Plant complex.

Bergquist, G.G.

1995-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of liquid brewery by-products for finishing cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

auction sales. The cattle arrived at the Texas ARM Uni ver sity Farm Feedlot on June 9, 1978. The hei fers were vaccinated for blackleg and malignant edema, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and para influenza. Each animal was injected with one million...

Hobbs, Dane Allie

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomicper8,170Thousand2.442 3.028 3.8032009 2010 2011 2012

31

Refiner and Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S.Feet)

32

Saturable absorption and 'slow light'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative evaluation of some recent 'slow light' experiments based on coherent population oscillations (CPO) shows that they can be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. Therefore they do not provide an unambiguous demonstration of 'slow light'. Indeed a limiting condition on the spectral bandwidth is not generally satisfied, such that the requirements for burning a narrow spectral hole in the homogeneously broadened absorption line are not met. Some definitive tests of 'slow light' phenomena are suggested, derived from analysis of phase shift and pulse delay for a saturable absorber

Adrian C Selden

2006-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Use of Optical Mapping in Bacterial Genome Finishing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dibyendu Kumar from the University of Florida discusses whole-genome optical mapping to help validate bacterial genome assemblies on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Kumar, Dibyendu [University of Florida

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

avaetapi finish oli: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Akvil? 2012-01-01 12 Wearability of Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Finishes Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: fine aggregate types: a siliceous sand (SF), also...

35

Worker Involvement Improves Safety at Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Employees at the Hanford site are working together to find new and innovative ways to stay safe at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, one of the site’s most complex decommissioning projects.

36

Pollution prevention and water conservation in metals finishing operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attleboro, Massachusetts is the headquarters of the Materials and Controls Group of Texas Instruments Incorporated (Texas Instruments). In support of their activities, Texas Instruments operates a number of metal finishing and electroplating processes. The water supply and the wastewater treatment requirements are supplied throughout the facility from a central location. Water supply quality requirements varies with each manufacturing operation. As a result, manufacturing operations are classified as either high level or a lower water quality. The facility has two methods of wastewater treatment and disposal. The first method involves hydroxide and sulfide metals precipitation prior to discharge to a surface water. The second method involves metals precipitation, filtration, and discharge via sewer to the Attleboro WTF. The facility is limited to a maximum wastewater discharge of 460,000 gallons per day to surface water under the existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. There is also a hydraulic flow restriction on pretreated wastewater that is discharged to the Attleboro WTF. Both of these restrictions combined with increased production could cause the facility to reach the treatment capacity. The net effect is that wastewater discharge problems are becoming restrictive to the company`s growth. This paper reviews Texas Instruments efforts to overcome these restrictions through pollution prevention and reuse practices rather than expansion of end of pipe treatment methods.

O`Shaughnessy, J.; Clark, W. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States); Lizotte, R.P. Jr.; Mikutel, D. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The chemistry of tributyl phosphate at elevated temperatures in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Process Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potentially violent chemical reactions of the tributyl phosphate solvent used by the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Site were investigated. There is a small probability that a significant quantity of this solvent could be accidental transferred to heated process vessels and react there with nitric acid or plutonium nitrate also present in the solvent extraction process. The results of laboratory studies of the reactions show that exothermic oxidation of tributyl phosphate by either nitric acid or actinide nitrates is slow at temperatures expected in the heated vessels. Less than four percent of the tributyl phosphate will be oxidized in these vented vessels at temperatures between 125{degrees}C and 250{degrees}C because the oxidant will be lost from the vessels by vaporization or decomposition before the tributyl phosphate can be extensively oxidized. The net amounts of heat generated by oxidation with concentrated nitric acid and with thorium nitrate (a stand-in for plutonium nitrate) were determined to be about -150 and -220 joules per gram of tributyl phosphate initially present, respectively. This is not enough heat to cause violent reactions in the vessels. Pyrolysis of the tributyl phosphate occurred in these mixtures at temperatures of 110{degrees}C to 270{degrees}C and produced mainly 1-butene gas, water, and pyrophosphoric acid. Butene gas generation is slow at expected process vessel temperatures, but the rate is faster at higher temperatures. At 252{degrees}C the rate of butene gas generated was 0.33 g butene/min/g of tributyl phosphate present. The measured heat absorbed by the pyrolysis reaction was 228 J/g of tributyl phosphate initially present (or 14.5 kcal/mole of tributyl phosphate). Release of flammable butene gas into process areas where it could ignite appears to be the most serious safety consideration for the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Solder flow over fine line PWB surface finishes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rapid advancement of interconnect technology has stimulated the development of alternative printed wiring board (PWB) surface finishes to enhance the solderability of standard copper and solder-coated surfaces. These new finishes are based on either metallic or organic chemistries. As part of an ongoing solderability study, Sandia National Laboratories has investigated the solder flow behavior of two azole-based organic solderability preservations, immersion Au, immersion Ag, electroless Pd, and electroless Pd/Ni on fine line copper features. The coated substrates were solder tested in the as-fabricated and environmentally-stressed conditions. Samples were processed through an inerted reflow machine. The azole-based coatings generally provided the most effective protection after aging. Thin Pd over Cu yielded the best wetting results of the metallic coatings, with complete dissolution of the Pd overcoat and wetting of the underlying Cu by the flowing solder. Limited wetting was measured on the thicker Pd and Pd over Ni finishes, which were not completely dissolved by the molten solder. The immersion Au and Ag finishes yielded the lowest wetted lengths, respectively. These general differences in solderability were directly attributed to the type of surface finish which the solder came in contact with. The effects of circuit geometry, surface finish, stressing, and solder processing conditions are discussed.

Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Slow modes in Keplerian disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-mass disks orbiting a massive body can support "slow" normal modes, in which the eigenfrequency is much less than the orbital frequency. Slow modes are lopsided, i.e., the azimuthal wavenumber m=1. We investigate the properties of slow modes, using softened self-gravity as a simple model for collective effects in the disk. We employ both the WKB approximation and numerical solutions of the linear eigenvalue equation. We find that all slow modes are stable. Discrete slow modes can be divided into two types, which we label g-modes and p-modes. The g-modes involve long leading and long trailing waves, have properties determined by the self-gravity of the disk, and are only present in narrow rings or in disks where the precession rate is dominated by an external potential. In contrast, the properties of p-modes are determined by the interplay of self-gravity and other collective effects. P-modes involve both long and short waves, and in the WKB approximation appear in degenerate leading/trailing pairs. Disks support a finite number---sometimes zero---of discrete slow modes, and a continuum of singular modes.

Scott Tremaine

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

40

Gas Slow Control System Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMS-02 TRD Gas Slow Control System Specifications v 4.2 26-06-2006 A. Bartoloni, B. Borgia, F. Bucci, F. R. Spada INFN Sezione di Roma 1- Roma, Italy #12;2/45 #12;3/45 1. ABSTRACT 5 2. GAS SYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION 5 3. GAS CONTROL SYSTEM 8 4. CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS 12 a. Universal Control System

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Digestible threonine requirement of starter and finisher swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

initially, 42 d trial duration) pigs, and two digestion trials (five starter and four finishei pigs) were conducted to determine the digestible threonine (Thr) requirement of starter and finisher pigs. Each trial evaluated control and basal diets..., and the basal diet plus four incr cmental additions of L-Thr (. 04, . 08, . 12 or . 16? for star ter and . 05, , 10, , 15, or . 20'7. for finisher diets). The basal diet used in the growth trial with starter pigs contained . 60%%u Thr, 17. 6A CP, and 1. 258...

Saldana, Carlos Ivan

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cycle Time Prediction: When Will This Case Finally Be Finished?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

number. Instead, this is usually the average cycle time of a case, combined with a certain marginCycle Time Prediction: When Will This Case Finally Be Finished? B.F. van Dongen, R.A. Crooy, and W into the remaining cycle time of a case, the current case can be compared to all past ones. The most trivial way

van der Aalst, Wil

43

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components: Tin Whisker Growth METALS This project degraded by the switch to lead- free technology. In particular, the state of compressive stress and the localized creep response (whisker growth) of tin-based lead-free electrodeposits are being measured

44

Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) product removal can containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety evaluation for packaging allows the transport of nine Product Removal (PR) Cans with their Containers from the PUREX Facility to the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Boettger, J.S.

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cost-effectiveness analysis of effluent standards and limitations for the metal finishing industry. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes the results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of the metal finishing industry. The analysis considers the cost-effectiveness of the final metal finishing regulations for direct and indirect dischargers.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The EcoCAR Challenege is a competition that challenges participating students from across North America to re-engineer a vehicle donated by General Motors. With the goal of minimizing the vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions, while maintaining its utility, safety and performance, teams had to find the best combination of cutting-edge technologies to meet these objectives. In the final year, the vehicles ran through a series of safety and technical tests at GM's Proving Ground in Milford, Michigan very similar to those GM's own production vehicles undergo. As EcoCAR wraps up, it is only the beginning for the next chapter in the DOE's 23-year history of advanced vehicle technology competitions. In April, Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow announced the launch of EcoCAR 2: Plugging into the Future http://www.ecocar2.org/index.html . We look forward to seeing the new and innovative designs that students bring to this challenge and know they will find a way to exceed even our highest expectations.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fast Food with Slow Cookers SESSION GOALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast Food with Slow Cookers SESSION GOALS: Participants will learn how to use a slow cooker to help cooker. SESSION OBJECTIVES: By participating in today's session, participants will be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of key food safety principles when using a slow cooker. 2. Prepare more

48

Middle East: Slow year on the Gulf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article surveys the petroleum outlook in the Middle East area. Observations include: Saudi Arabia's money crunch continues to keep the lid on exploration, production work; Abu Dhabi has also curtailed operations because of low oil prices, reduced budgets; Followup drilling has been disappointing around recent gas strikes in Sharjah, Dubai; Oman's aggressive EandP program will result in a 30% drilling increase this year; Kuwait isn't slowing down its development of light oil either; the goal is 40 new wells; Iran and Iraq are still boosting export capacities despite attacks on oil facilities; North Yemen's Alief field is a major find. Numerous structures remain to be drilled; Syria, Bahrain have development projects underway. Turkey is attracting U.S. majors.

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Slow speed object detection for haul trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

NONE

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Slow light microfluidics: a proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The resonant slow light structures created along a thin-walled optical capillary by nanoscale deformation of its surface can perform comprehensive simultaneous detection and manipulation of microfluidic components. This concept is illustrated with a model of a 0.5 millimeter long 5 nm high triangular bottle resonator created at a 50 micron radius silica capillary containing floating microparticles. The developed theory shows that the microparticle positions can be determined from the bottle resonator spectrum. In addition, the microparticles can be driven and simultaneously positioned at predetermined locations by the localized electromagnetic field created by the optimized superposition of eigenstates of this resonator, thus, exhibiting a multicomponent near field optical tweezers.

Sumetsky, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Method and system for processing optical elements using magnetorheological finishing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of finishing an optical element includes mounting the optical element in an optical mount having a plurality of fiducials overlapping with the optical element and obtaining a first metrology map for the optical element and the plurality of fiducials. The method also includes obtaining a second metrology map for the optical element without the plurality of fiducials, forming a difference map between the first metrology map and the second metrology map, and aligning the first metrology map and the second metrology map. The method further includes placing mathematical fiducials onto the second metrology map using the difference map to form a third metrology map and associating the third metrology map to the optical element. Moreover, the method includes mounting the optical element in the fixture in an MRF tool, positioning the optical element in the fixture; removing the plurality of fiducials, and finishing the optical element.

Menapace, Joseph Arthur; Schaffers, Kathleen Irene; Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

52

Aerobic treatability of waste effluent from the leather finishing industry. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seton Company supplies finished leather products exclusively for the automotive industry. In the process of finishing leather, two types of wastewaters are generated. The majority of the wastewater is composed of water-based paint residuals while the remainder is composed of solvent-based coating residuals. Aerobic treatability studies were conducted using water-based and solvent-based waste recirculatory waters from the Seton Company's Saxton, Pennsylvania processing plant. The specific objective was to determine the potential for using aerobic biological processes to biodegrade the industry's wastes and determine the potential for joint treatment at the local publicly owned treatment works (POTW). This study was accomplished in two phases. Phase I was conducted during the Spring Semester 1993 and consisted of aerobic respirometer tests of the raw wastes and mass balance analysis. The results of Phase I were published in a report to the Seton Company as Environmental Resources Research Institute project number 92C.II40R-1. Phase II was conducted during the Summer Semester 1993 and consisted of bench-scale reactor tests and additional aerobic respirometer tests. The aerobic respirometer batch tests and bench-scale reactor tests were used to assess the treatability of solvent-based and water-based wastewaters and determine the degree of biodegradability of the wastewaters. Mass balance calculations were made using measured characteristics.

Vinger, J.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Effectiveness and Serviceability of Four Home-applied Cotton Fabric Finishes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subjected to physical and chemical tests to determine the effect of each finish on strength, color, cellulose degradation and other properties. At intervals throughout the study, the men who wore the shirts recorded their opinions of each finish..., stiffness, vrinltle recovery and cellulose degradation. Since there is no laboratory test method that ?;ill simulate actual wear, the fabric was made into sport shirts and the serviceability of the home-applied finishes was determined by a realistic...

Werman, Carolyn A.; Grimes, Mary Anna

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

DTRA Algorithm Prize (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Christian Whitchurch on the "DTRA Algorithm Prize" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Whitechurch, Christian [Defense Threat Reduction Agency

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Project- May 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Plutonium Finishing Plant Closure Project is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

56

Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Removal Rate Model for Magnetorheological Finishing of Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic subaperture polishing process. The process uses a magntorheological (MR) fluid that consists of micrometer-sized, spherical, magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) particles, nonmagnetic polishing abrasives, water, and stabilizers. Material removal occurs when the CI and nonmagnetic polishing abrasives shear material off the surface being polished. We introduce a new MRF material removal rate model for glass. This model contains terms for the near surface mechanical properties of glass, drag force, polishing abrasive size and concentration, chemical durability of the glass, MR fluid pH, and the glass composition. We introduce quantitative chemical predictors for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, into an MRF removal rate model. We validate individual terms in our model separately and then combine all of the terms to show the whole MRF material removal model compared with experimental data. All of our experimental data were obtained using nanodiamond MR fluids and a set of six optical glasses.

DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; WIlson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

58

Computer Aided Design of Automotive Finishes Gary Meyer and Clement Shimizu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Aided Design of Automotive Finishes Gary Meyer and Clement Shimizu Department of Computer The principles of computer aided design were applied to the creation of new automotive finishes. A computer of an automotive paint and visualize the appearance of that paint on a three dimensional surface. The program gives

Minnesota, University of

59

Hanford Workers Achieve Success in Difficult Glove Box Project at Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) recently finished safely separating three glove boxes for removal from Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after months of planning and preparation.

60

Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus IAD - Technical University of Darmstadt interactiondesign@steffi.beckhaus.de ABSTRACT Slow technology is technology that actively influences our well): Miscellaneous General Terms Slow Technology SLOW TECHNOLOGY IS... Slow technology is technology that actively

Beckhaus, Steffi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Slow motion responses of compliant offshore structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient method is developed to predict slow motion responses of slender compliant offshore structures in the unidirectional irregular waves and currents. The environmental loads are computed using the modified Morison equation based on slender...

Cao, Peimin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the...

63

Maintenance implementation plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines the Maintenance Implementation Plan (MIP) for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located at the Hanford site at Richland, Washington. This MIP describes the PFP maintenance program relative to DOE order 4330.4B. The MIP defines the key actions needed to meet the guidelines of the Order to produce a cost-effective and efficient maintenance program. A previous report identified the presence of significant quantities of Pu-bearing materials within PFP that pose risks to workers. PFP`s current mission is to develop, install and operate processes which will mitigate these risks. The PFP Maintenance strategy is to equip the facility with systems and equipment able to sustain scheduled PFP operations. The current operating run is scheduled to last seven years. Activities following the stabilization operation will involve an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine future plant activities. This strategy includes long-term maintenance of the facility for safe occupancy and material storage. The PFP maintenance staff used the graded approach to dictate the priorities of the improvement and upgrade actions identified in Chapter 2 of this document. The MIP documents PFP compliance to the DOE 4330.4B Order. Chapter 2 of the MIP follows the format of the Order in addressing the eighteen elements. As this revision is a total rewrite, no sidebars are included to highlight changes.

Meldrom, C.A.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fire hazard analysis for Plutonium Finishing Plant complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fire hazards analysis (FHA) was performed for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Complex at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The scope of the FHA focuses on the nuclear facilities/structures in the Complex. The analysis was conducted in accordance with RLID 5480.7, [DOE Directive RLID 5480.7, 1/17/94] and DOE Order 5480.7A, ''Fire Protection'' [DOE Order 5480.7A, 2/17/93] and addresses each of the sixteen principle elements outlined in paragraph 9.a(3) of the Order. The elements are addressed in terms of the fire protection objectives stated in paragraph 4 of DOE 5480.7A. In addition, the FHA also complies with WHC-CM-4-41, Fire Protection Program Manual, Section 3.4 [1994] and WHC-SD-GN-FHA-30001, Rev. 0 [WHC, 1994]. Objectives of the FHA are to determine: (1) the fire hazards that expose the PFP facilities, or that are inherent in the building operations, (2) the adequacy of the fire safety features currently located in the PFP Complex, and (3) the degree of compliance of the facility with specific fire safety provisions in DOE orders, related engineering codes, and standards.

MCKINNIS, D.L.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Establishing an authorization basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer of 1998, Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) project prepared to restart its thermal stabilization process after 1(1/2)-yr suspension in operations. The facility had overcome a number of operational and safety problems, yet it had been unable to achieve appropriate update, approval, and implementation of an appropriate, current authorization basis. This problem threatened to prevent a timely restart, which, in turn, could have caused a loss in momentum and dampened enthusiasm within the facility. The authors describe the approach taken by B and W Hanford Company (BWHC) in conjunction with its partners, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office and Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (FDH), to establish a defensible authorization basis, which allowed the facility to resume its mission of stabilizing reactive plutonium materials. The approach incorporates methods used within the DOE complex for short-term activities and those undergoing deactivation and implements principles of integrated safety management (ISM), as described in ``Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board [(DNFSB)] Recommendation 95-2'' and related documents.

Roege, P.E.; Ramble, A.L.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite Cultural Resourcestepidum FMO *IncreasingSlow Dynamics ofSlow

67

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus Tom Fletcher, Assistant7/2013 LogisticalSlow Dynamics ofSlow

68

Use of Optical Mapping to Aid in Assembly and Finishing of Human Microbiome Genome Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trevor Wagner of OpGen, Inc. discusses the use of optical mapping to validate the assembly of HMP genomes on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Wagner, Trevor [OpGen, Inc

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

69

35461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& MKTG",3,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED",1803,"JACKSONVILLE, FL","FLORIDA",1,428,"GERMANY",190,0,0,,,,, 35461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",4,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER...

70

Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bruce Walker on "Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Walker, Bruce (Broad Institute) [Broad Institute

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feeding Value of Wet Sorghum Distillers Grains for Growing and Finishing Beef Cattle Ethanol, but sorghum grain is commonly either blended with corn before use or used as the sole grain for ethanol

72

Metagenomics for Etiologic Agent Discovery (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Matthew Ross on "Metagenomics for etiological agent discovery" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Ross, Matthew [Baylor College of Medicine

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

McMahon, Ben [LANL

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Bruce Walker on "Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Walker, Bruce (Broad Institute)

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

75

History and stabilization of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 231-Z Isolation Building or Plutonium Metallurgy Building is located in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area, approximately 300 yards north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) (234-5 Building). When the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) built it in 1944 to contain the final step for processing plutonium, it was called the Isolation Building. At that time, HEW used a bismuth phosphate radiochemical separations process to make `AT solution,` which was then dried and shipped to Los Alamos, New Mexico. (AT solution is a code name used during World War II for the final HEW product.) The process was carried out first in T Plant and the 224-T Bulk Reduction Building and B Plant and the 224-B Bulk Reduction Building. The 224-T and -B processes produced a concentrated plutonium nitrate stream, which then was sent in 8-gallon batches to the 231-Z Building for final purification. In the 231-Z Building, the plutonium nitrate solution underwent peroxide `strikes` (additions of hydrogen peroxide to further separate the plutonium from its carrier solutions), to form the AT solution. The AT solution was dried and shipped to the Los Alamos Site, where it was made into metallic plutonium and then into weapons hemispheres.` The 231-Z Building began `hot` operations (operations using radioactive materials) with regular runs of plutonium nitrate on January 16, 1945.

Gerber, M.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

JONES, R.A.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

78

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

ULLAH, M K

2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Digital production pipelines: examining structures and methods in the computer effects industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer animated films require collaboration: blending artistic concept with technical skill, meeting budget constraints and adhering to deadlines. The path which production follows from initial idea to finished product is known as the pipeline...

Bettis, Dane Edward

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Channelization architecture for wide-band slow light in atomic vapors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a ``channelization'' architecture to achieve wide-band electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and ultra-slow light propagation in atomic Rb-87 vapors. EIT and slow light are achieved by shining a strong, resonant ``pump'' laser on the atomic medium, which allows slow and unattenuated propagation of a weaker ``signal'' beam, but only when a two-photon resonance condition is satisfied. Our wideband architecture is accomplished by dispersing a wideband signal spatially, transverse to the propagation direction, prior to entering the atomic cell. When particular Zeeman sub-levels are used in the EIT system, then one can introduce a magnetic field with a linear gradient such that the two-photon resonance condition is satisfied for each individual frequency component. Because slow light is a group velocity effect, utilizing differential phase shifts across the spectrum of a light pulse, one must then introduce a slight mismatch from perfect resonance to induce a delay. We present a model which accounts for diffusion of the atoms in the varying magnetic field as well as interaction with levels outside the ideal three-level system on which EIT is based. We find the maximum delay-bandwidth product decreases with bandwidth, and that delay-bandwidth product ~1 should be achievable with bandwidth ~50 MHz (~5 ns delay). This is a large improvement over the ~1 MHz bandwidths in conventional slow light systems and could be of use in signal processing applications.

Zachary Dutton; Mark Bashkansky; Michael Steiner; John Reintjes

2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite Cultural Resourcestepidum FMO *Increasing solarSlideshow:Slow

84

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite Cultural Resourcestepidum FMO *IncreasingSlow Dynamics of

85

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite Cultural Resourcestepidum FMO *IncreasingSlow Dynamics

86

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus Tom Fletcher, Assistant7/2013 LogisticalSlow Dynamics of

87

Use of cottonseed hulls, rice hulls, and ammoniated rice hulls for finishing calves commercially  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USE OF COTTONSEED HULLS, RICE HULLS, AND AMMONIATED RICE HULLS FOR FINISHING CALVES COMMERCIALLY A Theste NORMAN FINLEY VESTAL Subxnttted to the Graduate CoIlege of the Teaac W hhf Uxdvers@y;M -: partfal AdBHaioct:if the reqsh;~ Air. the.... degree-. -cf MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 MaJor Subject: ' Anginal Science . USE OF COTTONSEED HULLS, RICE HULLS, AND AMMONIATED RICE HULLS FOR FINISHING CALVES COMMERCIALLY A Tbesls NORMAN FINLEY VESTAL Approved as to style and content by. ) I...

Vestal, Norman Finley

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Au microstructure and the functional properties of Ni/Au finishes on ceramic IC packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni/Au plated finishes used on thick-film metallized multilayer ceramic packages for integrated circuits must meet functional requirements such as bondability, sealability, and solderability. Their ability to do so is dependent, among other things, on the ability of the Au deposit to inhibit the grain boundary diffusion and subsequent surface oxidation of Ni. In this study, the relation between functional performance, Ni diffusionr ate, and Au microstructure was examined. Extent of Ni diffusion during heating was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy for several electrolytic and electroless Ni/Au finishing processes. Results were correlated with differences in Au microstructures determined by SEM, atomic force microscopy, and XRD.

Winters, E.D.; Baxter, W.K. [Coors Electronic Package Co., Chattanooga, TN (United States); Braski, D.N.; Watkins, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Estimation and characterization of decontamination and decommissioning solid waste expected from the Plutonium Finishing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of the study was to estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant is decontaminated and decommissioned. (Building structure and soil are not covered.) Results indicate that {approximately}5,500 m{sup 3} of solid waste is expected to result from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Pu Finishing Plant. The breakdown of the volumes and percentages of waste by category is 1% dangerous solid waste, 71% low-level waste, 21% transuranic waste, 7% transuranic mixed waste.

Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Stratton, T.J. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Third and fourth limiting amino acids in sorghum for growing and finishing swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-methionine (Met) and L-isoleucine (Ile) were added individually and in all combinations to a vitamin, mineral, lysine and threonine fortified sorghum basal diet (B) and fed to growing and finishing pigs (18. 1 and 50. 0 kg average initial weight, respectively...). The B diet was formulated with equimolar additions of glycine (Gly) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) to provide 12. 0 and 11. 5X crude protein (N x 6. 25) for growing and finish- ing diets, respectively. Trp, Met and Ile were added at the expense of Gly...

Purser, Kenneth Wayne

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of five roofing systems against a control roof using dark shingles. The intent of the testing is to evaluate how roofing systems impact residential cooling energy use. Recent testing emphasizes evaluation of how increasingly popular metal roofing systems...

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

01-02-2003 - Hazards from Modifying Finished Products | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrinceton Plasmareactions. | EMSLPhysicsEIHazards

93

Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Management, United States (2008)" #12;2 1 Introduction Industrial aqueous pollution (heavy metals) accounts sludge (MHS) during the treatment of their liquid effluents charged with heavy metals. Generally, a small for 30 to 40% of industrial pollution. Metal finishing is one of the sectors which contributes mostly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

94

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Research Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. The LSDS collaborations suggests that the next step to in empirically testing the feasibility is to conduct measurements on fresh fuel assemblies to understand investigate self-attenuation and fresh mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rodlets so we may betterto understand extraction of masses for 235U and 239Pu. While progressing toward these goals, the collaboration also strongly suggests the continued development of enabling technology such as detector development and algorithm development, thatwhich could provide significant performance benefits.

Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

95

Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Campbell, Catherine [Noblis

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Crude oil and finished fuel storage stability: An annotated review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art review and assessment of storage effects on crude oil and product quality was undertaken through a literature search by computer accessing several data base sources. Pertinent citations from that literature search are tabulated for the years 1980 to the present. This 1990 revision supplements earlier reviews by Brinkman and others which covered stability publications through 1979 and an update in 1983 by Goetzinger and others that covered the period 1952--1982. For purposes of organization, citations are listed in the current revision chronologically starting with the earliest 1980 publications. The citations have also been divided according to primary subject matter. Consequently 11 sections appear including: alternate fuels, gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, residual fuel, crude oil, biodegradation, analyses, reaction mechanisms, containment, and handling and storage. Each section contains a brief narrative followed by all the citations for that category.

Whisman, M.L.; Anderson, R.P.; Woodward, P.W.; Giles, H.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters] [Biomatters

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

100

Project plan remove special nuclear material from PFP project plutonium finishing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

BARTLETT, W.D.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Grain sorghum, reconstituted in whole and in ground forms, in finishing rations for beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the grain, is kept by the embryo, the . , only tissue capable of growth. All of the methods described in this work have brought about increases in feed efficiency. It appears that reconstituting brings into play mechanisms similar to those observed... GRAIN SORGHUM, RECONSTITUTED IN WHOLE AND IN GROUND BOHMS, IN FINISHING RATIONS FOR BEEF CATTLE A Thesis PETER PENIC Submitted to the Graduate College of' the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Penic, Peter

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ESH) standards/requirements for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

Maddox, B.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fracture mechanics analysis of slow crack growth in polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow crack growth in polyethylene is often the limiting factor in long-term service of plastic pipe or other structural applications. A new test method and analysis method was developed to study slow crack growth in polyethylene. Two high density...

Self, Robert Alan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Bioinspired Slowness for Robotic Systems Ronald C. Arkin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bio­inspired Slowness for Robotic Systems Ronald C. Arkin Mobile Robot Laboratory School of Interactive Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA USA 30332 arkin@gatech.edu Abstract: Slowness in robotic systems is a quality that is typically undervalued. It is our contention

106

Bio-inspired Slowness for Robotic Systems Ronald C. Arkin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bio-inspired Slowness for Robotic Systems Ronald C. Arkin Mobile Robot Laboratory School of Interactive Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA USA 30332 arkin@gatech.edu Abstract: Slowness in robotic systems is a quality that is typically undervalued. It is our contention

107

Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Sexton, David [Baylor

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

108

The PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Todd Smith of the PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory gives a talk about his lab and its work at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Smith, Todd [PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Crow, John [National Center for Genome Resources

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

3. Have the products been legally produced?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

appropriate environmental controls been applied? Recycled ber Has recycled fiber been used appropriately? Other resources Have other resources been used appropriately? Local communities and indigenous peoples the international trade either as finished products or raw materials (Seneca Creek and Wood Resources International

112

Computation of Slow Invariant Manifolds for Hydrogen-Air Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Summary #12;Introduction Motivation and background · Detailed kinetics are essential for accurate modeling systems · ILDM, CSP, and ICE-PIC are approximations of the reaction slow invariant manifold. · MEPT

113

Alfalfa leaf meal in finishing steer diets. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ninety-six medium frame, Angus and Angus cross steer calves (average initial weight 540 lb.) were allotted to a heavy or light weight block and then randomly assigned to one of four dietary treatments for a 167 or 189-day finishing phase, respectively. Treatments were control (supplemental soybean meal), alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) providing 33%, 66%, 100% of supplemental protein. Finishing diets were formulated to contain .61 Mcal NE{sub g}/lb dry matter, 12.5% crude protein, .6 % Ca and .3 % P. There were no significant (P >.05) effects of dietary treatments on daily gain or dry matter required /lb of gain. Steers fed 100 % ALM consumed more (P <.05) dry matter than steers fed either of the other three treatments. Dry matter consumption increased linearly (P >.05) with increasing ALM. There was no significant (P >.05) dietary treatment effect on marbling, KPH %, yield grade, quality grade, or liver abscesses. There was an apparent trend in reduced liver abscess incidence in steers fed 100 % ALM. Steers fed 66 % ALM had significantly (P <.05) greater backfat measurements, backfat also had a cubic effect (P <.05). Hot carcass weight had a quadratic relation (P <.05) with level of ALM. Substituting alfalfa leaf meal for soybean meal in diets of finishing steers increased DM intake, but this increase was accompanied by an increase in gain which resulted in similar feed efficiency. There may be an advantage in blending ALM and soybean meal as feed efficiency was improved when cattle were fed the blend. Also, feeding ALM may result in lower incidence of liver abscess.

Zehnder, C.M.; DiCostanzo, A.; Smith, L.B.; Brown, D.B.; Hall, J.M.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling Roman Barták Charles, the first machine pre-processes the item (3 time units) that is finished in the second machine (additional 3 in parallel and a worker is required (left) or via a serial production when the item is pre- processed

Bartak, Roman

115

Roughage and roughage substitutes in high concentrate finishing mixtures for beef cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different levels of roughage, showed that maximum levels of 20 to 30% cottonseed hulls, 20 to 30% coastal bermuda hay, 10 to 20/o rice hulls (ammoniated or non-ammoniated) or 10/o flax shives should be used in finishing mixtures if high gain and feed... into four uniform groups on the basis of weight and grade. These groups received four different feed mixtures as follows: all concentrate, 2 and 4%%uo oyster shell flakes and 10% ammoniated rice hulls. The second and third experiments were part of Texas...

Leigh, Jorge Eduardo

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Damage profile and ion distribution of slow heavy ions in compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a significant concentration of defects and lattice disorder in solids during their slowing-down process via ion-solid interactions. For irradiation effects research and many industrial applications, atomic defect production, ion range, and doping concentration are commonly estimated by the stopping and range of ions in matter (SRIM) code. In this study, ion-induced damage and projectile ranges of low energy Au ions in SiC are determined using complementary ion beam and microscopy techniques. Considerable errors in both disorder profile and ion range predicted by the SRIM code indicate an overestimation of the electronic stopping power, by a factor of 2 in most cases, in the energy region up to 25 keV/nucleon. Such large discrepancies are also observed for slow heavy ions, including Pt, Au, and Pb ions, in other compound materials, such as GaN, AlN, and SrTiO{sub 3}. Due to the importance of these materials for advanced device and nuclear applications, better electronic stopping cross section predictions, based on a reciprocity principle developed by Sigmund, is suggested with fitting parameters for possible improvement.

Zhang Yanwen; Wang Chongmin; Zhu Zihua; Jiang Weilin; Weber, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Bae, I.-T. [Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center, State University of New York at Binghamton, P.O. Box 6000, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Sun Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Ishimaru, Manabu [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Formalising the Slow-Roll Approximation in Inflation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The meaning of the inflationary slow-roll approximation is formalised. Comparisons are made between an approach based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equations, governing the evolution of the Hubble parameter, and the usual scenario based on the evolution of the potential energy density. The vital role of the inflationary attractor solution is emphasised, and some of its properties described. We propose a new measure of inflation, based upon contraction of the comoving Hubble length as opposed to the usual e-foldings of physical expansion, and derive relevant formulae. We introduce an infinite hierarchy of slow-roll parameters, and show that only a finite number of them are required to produce results to a given order. The extension of the slow-roll approximation into an analytic slow-roll expansion, converging on the exact solution, is provided. Its role in calculations of inflationary dynamics is discussed. We explore rational-approximants as a method of extending the range of convergence of the slow-roll expansion up to, and beyond, the end of inflation.

Andrew R. Liddle; Paul Parsons; John D. Barrow

1994-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, J. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluating an Exterior Insulation and Finish System for Deep Energy Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exterior insulation and finish systems (EIFS) are proprietary synthetic formulations that are applied to the exterior walls of buildings to serve as insulation and exterior cladding. The insulation thickness can vary from less than one inch to a foot or more. In this project the applicability of EIFS for residential deep energy retrofits was investigated through modeling and a case study home. The home was retrofitted using a site-applied four-inch-thick EIFS. Site-specific details were developed as required for the residential retrofit application. Site work and the costs of the EIFS system were documented. The demonstration home was modeled using Building Energy Optimization energy and cost analysis software to explore cost effectiveness of various EIFS insulation thicknesses in two climate locations.

Dentz, J.; Podorson, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Characterization of past and present solid waste streams from the plutonium finishing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the next two decades the transuranic (TRU) wastes now stored in the burial trenches and storage facilities at the Hanford Site are to be retrieved, processed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility, and shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico for final disposal. Over 50% of the TRU waste to be retrieved for shipment to the WIPP has been generated at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), also known as the Plutonium Processing and Storage Facility and Z Plant. The purpose of this report is to characterize the radioactive solid wastes generated by the PFP since its construction in 1947 using process knowledge, existing records, and history-obtained from interviews. The PFP is currently operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Duncan, D R; Mayancsik, B A [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pottmeyer, J A; Vejvoda, E J; Reddick, J A; Sheldon, K M; Weyns, M I [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States)] [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Kennewick, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Role of surface finishing on pitting corrosion of a duplex stainless steel in seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized corrosion of duplex UNS S32550 stainless steel in seawater was investigated in the laboratory and in field trials for several surface finish conditions: polished, ground, and sandblasted. Electrochemical data obtained by polarization curves showed that the smoother, polished surface had better characteristics (higher pitting and protection potentials) than the ground or sandblasted surfaces. However, despite its high degree of roughness, the sandblasted surface was the most resistant in field conditions, exhibiting the lowest number of sites attacked. Internal compressive stresses created by sandblasting seem also to have an unsensitizing effect on sensitized zones that exist in cast steel (due to repairs of mold defects), reducing its susceptibility to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Such stresses are not generated in polished or ground surfaces, and localized MIC attack can occur.

Salah-Rousset, N.B.; Chaouachi, M.A. [ENIT, Tunis (Tunisia). Lab. of Metallurgy and Materials; Chellouf, A. [STEG, Tunis (Tunisia)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Project plan international atomic energy agency (IAEA) safeguards project plutonium finishing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the PFP Integrated Project Management Plan (PMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP IAEA project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the IAEA project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process.

BARTLETT, W.D.

1999-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

123

Evaluating sealed storage of high moisture sorghum grain for a beef finishing program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bedaced coNan and rice, . cro. ge has resulted in a search for crops of hip& ecoiiomic return. har;w corsages h. =ve bean pi". uted to grain sor, -hum and, h ve proluced nigh yields. T%s, problem of, attkising this sorghum grain has sparked 4 grominp...~:fora ~ainee rn aver -j. ?s. of 2. l6 pounIls ~sr Dog, rhile thnie fel, ~nle ~in ~ in& 2. . 'I6 . ". our8O-~er 8:g. . i hi~her i -i . , Qsgres'o'f finish pgihishnr aellin, , price ve"s ohtcinel an 'ths steers fe4 tho' prounIi gs, g, ', Ponos statee. that enr...

Cross, Julian Frederick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

124

Interactions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or oscillations can be explained by interactions between calcium- and voltage-dependent channels. At the networkInteractions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations A: Oscillations and Bursts Emerging From the Interplay of Intrinsic Conductances in Single Neurons 1404 A

Destexhe, Alain

125

Slowing Amazon deforestation through public policy and interventions in beef  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW Slowing Amazon deforestation through public policy and interventions in beef and soy supply 70% decline in deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon suggests that it is possible to manage, as did a decline in the demand for new deforestation. The supply chain interventions that fed

Napp, Nils

126

Robust concatenated codes for the slow Rayleigh fading channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we design a robust concatenated code for the Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) system in the presence of slow Rayleigh fading with no channel side information at the transmitter (no CSIT) and perfect channel side information...

Hsu, Teh-Hsuan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Slow-light enhancement of Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption measurements widely employed in analytical chemistry.

Niels Asger Mortensen; Sanshui Xiao

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Energy-Saving Landscaping for Your Passive Solar Home Landscaping is often regarded as a finishing touch to enhance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Saving Landscaping for Your Passive Solar Home Landscaping is often regarded as a finishing at 30o north of east. When the sun reaches its maximum height, again at solar noon when it is directly Energy Office North Carolina Department of Administration Industrial Extension Service College

129

An Overview of Surface Finishes and Their Role in Printed Circuit Board Solderability and Solder Joint Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A overview has been presented on the topic of alternative surface finishes for package I/Os and circuit board features. Aspects of processability and solder joint reliability were described for the following coatings: baseline hot-dipped, plated, and plated-and-fused 100Sn and Sn-Pb coatings; Ni/Au; Pd, Ni/Pd, and Ni/Pd/Au finishes; and the recently marketed immersion Ag coatings. The Ni/Au coatings appear to provide the all-around best option in terms of solderability protection and wire bondability. Nickel/Pal ftishes offer a slightly reduced level of performance in these areas that is most likely due to variable Pd surface conditions. It is necessmy to minimize dissolved Au or Pd contents in the solder material to prevent solder joint embrittlement. Ancillary aspects that included thickness measurement techniques; the importance of finish compatibility with conformal coatings and conductive adhesives; and the need for alternative finishes for the processing of non-Pb bearing solders were discussed.

Vianco, P.T.

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Exterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry to engineer durable, moisture-tolerant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry the insulating value of walls and the energy efficiency of buildings. The EIFS concept came to America from in both moisture control and insulating value. EIFS's are inherently superior on thermal performance

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

132

Association of length-slow silica with evaporites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1971, Folk and Pittman described the common occurrence of length-slow quartz (or lutecite) with evaporitic minerals, and they suggested that lutecite might be a useful indicator for vanished evaporites. However, the subsequent discoveries of length-slow silica in carbonate turbidites and in abyssal Pacific cherts revealed that lutecite is not restricted to near-surface deposits. Moreover, Kastner found that length-slow quartz could be crystallized in slightly alkaline solutions enriched in Mg[sup 2+], Na[sup +], and SO[sub 4][sup [minus]2]. Following these studies, researchers have cited the presence of lutecite in rock samples as suggestive but not compelling evidence for an evaporitic origin, and the precise nature of this form of silica has remained somewhat enigmatic. Investigations of chert nodules from evaporitic and non-evaporitic regimes support an identification of length-slow quartz'' with the mineral moganite, a polymorph of silica that is fibrous and optically length slow. Results are based upon X-ray powder diffraction of the chert, followed by Rietveld refinement of the X-ray patterns to quantify the weight fraction of quartz and moganite in each specimen. Most non-evaporitic chert appears to contain between 5 and 15 wt. % moganite, but evaporitic cherts often contain more than 20 wt. %. Cherts that have transformed from precursor magadiite can be particularly rich in moganite; samples from Lake Magadi, Kenya and from Harney Lake, Oregon revealed about equal parts moganite and quartz. However, the observation of decreasing abundances of moganite in rocks of increasing age indicates that moganite is metastable relative to quartz.

Heaney, P.J. (Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geology); Sheppard, R.A. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center); Post, J.E. (Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Mineral Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

MHD Turbulence: Properties of Alfven, Slow and Fast Modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarise basic properties of MHD turbulence. First, MHD turbulence is not so messy as it is believed. In fact, the notion of strong non-linear coupling of compressible and incompressible motions along MHD cascade is not tenable. Alfven, slow and fast modes of MHD turbulence follow their own cascades and exhibit degrees of anisotropy consistent with theoretical expectations. Second, the fast decay of turbulence is not related to the compressibility of fluid. Rates of decay of compressible and incompressible motions are very similar. Third, the properties of Alfven and slow modes are similar to their counterparts in the incompressible MHD. The properties of fast modes are similar to accoustic turbulence, which does require more studies. Fourth, the density at low Mach numbers and logarithm of density at higher Mach numbers exhibit Kolmogorov-type spectrum.

A. Lazarian; A. Beresnyak

2005-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

A comparison of several surface finish measurement methods as applied to ground ceramic and metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface finish is one of the most common measures of surface quality of ground ceramics and metal parts and a wide variety of methods and parameters have been developed to measure it. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the surface roughness parameters obtained on the same two specimens from three different types of measuring instruments: a traditional mechanical stylus system, a non-contact laser scanning system, and the atomic force microscope (two different AFM systems were compared). The same surface-ground silicon nitride and Inconel 625 alloy specimens were used for all measurements in this investigation. Significant differences in arithmetic average roughness, root-mean-square roughness, and peak-to-valley roughness were obtained when comparing data from the various topography measuring instruments. Non-contact methods agreed better with the others on the metal specimen than on the ceramic specimen. Reasons for these differences include the effective dimensions and geometry of the probe with respect to the surface topography; the reflectivity of the surface, and the type of filtering scheme Results of this investigation emphasize the importance of rigorously specifying the manner of surface roughness measurement when either reporting roughness data or when requesting that roughness data be provided.

Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Riester, L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-performance wall system is under development to improve wall thermal performance to a level of U-factor of 0.19 W/(m2 K) (R-30 [h ft2 F]/Btu) in a standard wall thickness by incorporating vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) into an exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Such a system would be applicable to new construction and will offer a solution to more challenging retrofit situations as well. Multiple design options were considered to balance the need to protect theVIPs during construction and building operation, while minimizing heat transfer through the wall system. The results reported here encompass an indepth assessment of potential system performances including thermal modeling, detailed laboratory measurements under controlled conditions on the component, and system levels according to ASTM C518 (ASTM 2010). The results demonstrate the importance of maximizing the VIP coverage over the wall face. The results also reveal the impact of both the design and execution of system details, such as the joints between adjacent VIPs. The test results include an explicit modeled evaluation of the system performance in a clear wall.

Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Carbary, Lawrence D [Dow Corning Corporation, Midland, MI

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Comparison of Photoluminescence Imaging on Starting Multi-Crystalline Silicon Wafers to Finished Cell Performance: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) imaging techniques can be applied to multicrystalline silicon wafers throughout the manufacturing process. Both band-to-band PL and defect-band emissions, which are longer-wavelength emissions from sub-bandgap transitions, are used to characterize wafer quality and defect content on starting multicrystalline silicon wafers and neighboring wafers processed at each step through completion of finished cells. Both PL imaging techniques spatially highlight defect regions that represent dislocations and defect clusters. The relative intensities of these imaged defect regions change with processing. Band-to-band PL on wafers in the later steps of processing shows good correlation to cell quality and performance. The defect band images show regions that change relative intensity through processing, and better correlation to cell efficiency and reverse-bias breakdown is more evident at the starting wafer stage as opposed to later process steps. We show that thermal processing in the 200 degrees - 400 degrees C range causes impurities to diffuse to different defect regions, changing their relative defect band emissions.

Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Dorn, D.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Ounadjela, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

From: Sells_List_Server%DOELNC@DOE.GOV Subject: YELLOW/Caution: Hazards from Modifying Finished Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"OfficeTourFrom clustersMon, 0507 Jan

140

The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow ({approx}3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10{sup 8} positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin [Nuclear Engineering/Nuclear Reactor Program, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard [Physics Department, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States); Xu, Jun [Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electron electric dipole moment experiment using electric-field quantized slow cesium atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eld quantized slow cesium atoms Jason M. Amini, ? Charles T.experiment using slow cesium atoms, nulled magnetic ?elds,magnetic ?elds seen by the atoms reduced to less than 200

Amini, Jason M.; Munger Jr., Charles T.; Gould, Harvey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Slow Dynamics of Earth Materials: An Experimental Overview JAMES A. TENCATE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ascertain the role of water as a potential mechanism. Key words: Slow dynamics, emergent creep, creep. A careful study of slow dynamics may make it possible to learn about emergent behavior, e.g., subcritical

143

Neutron Slowing Down in a Detector with Absorption Sara A. Pozzi*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron Slowing Down in a Detector with Absorption Sara A. Pozzi* Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P of scattering collisions undergone by fast neutrons as they slow down until they are absorbed was presented realistic case of neutron slowing down in a homogeneous mixture. The formulas are derived and evaluated

Pázsit, Imre

144

THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Report on First Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On Feb. 17 and 18 2011, six items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer. After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials, with the exception of silver. We observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours, except for 198Au which has a half-life of 2.7 d.

Warren, Glen A.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Stave, Sean; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Extending magnetohydrodynamics to the slow dynamics of collisionless plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fluid approach aimed to provide a consistent description of the slow dynamics of a collisionless plasma, is presented. In this regime, both Landau damping and finite Larmor radius effects cannot be ignored. Two models are discussed; one retains the dynamics at sub-ionic scales, while the other is restricted to scales larger than the ion gyroscale. Special attention is paid to the capability of these approaches to accurately reproduce the properties of linear waves that are known to play an important role, for example, in the small-scale dynamics of solar wind turbulence.

Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L. [Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Hunana, P. [Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

A study on the contribution of slow reaction in detonation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interface velocimetry and plate push experiments of the TATB-based explosives investigated so far show the presence of nonsteady detonation; namely, the initial velocity history increases with increasing explosive charge length, a condition generally attributed to the variation of effective CJ pressure. A multistage reaction model is used to simulate these experiments. For these explosives, we find that the reaction must include a slow process stage so that the numerical results can be brought into good agreement with experimental observation. 8 refs., 7 figs.

Tang, P.K.; Seitz, W.L.; Stacy, H.L.; Wackerle, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

A low-neutron background slow-positron source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of a thermionic rf gun [1] and a photocathode rf gun will allow the Advanced Photon Source (APS) linear accelerator (linac) [2] [3] to become a free-electron laser (FEL) driver [4]. As the FEL project progresses, the existing high-charge DC thermionic gun will no longer be critical to APS operation and could be used to generate high-energy or low-energy electrons to drive a slow-positron source. We investigated possibilities to create a useful low-energy source that could operate semi-independently and would have a low neutron background.

White, M. M.

1998-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Gravitational red-shift and deflection of slow light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the nature of the classical propagation of light through media with strong frequency-dependent dispersion in the presence of a gravitational field. In the weak field limit, gravity causes a redshift of the optical frequency, which the slow-light medium converts into a spatially-varying index of refraction. This results in the bending of a light ray in the medium. We further propose experimental techniques to amplify and detect the phenomenon using weak value measurements. Independent heuristic and rigorous derivations of this effect are given.

J. Dressel; S. G. Rajeev; J. C. Howell; A. N. Jordan

2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Slow Waveguide Structures for Particle Accelerators - Energy Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite Cultural Resourcestepidum FMO *IncreasingSlow

151

Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus Tom Fletcher, Assistant7/2013 LogisticalSlow Dynamics

152

DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY FOR THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT COMPLEX, HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintaining compliance with environmental regulatory requirements is a significant priority in successful completion of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Nuclear Material Stabilization (NMS) Project. To ensure regulatory compliance throughout the deactivation and decommissioning of the PFP complex, an environmental regulatory strategy was developed. The overall goal of this strategy is to comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and/or compliance agreements during PFP stabilization, deactivation, and eventual dismantlement. Significant environmental drivers for the PFP Nuclear Material Stabilization Project include the Tri-Party Agreement; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA); the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA); the Clean Air Act (CAA), and the Clean Water Act (CWA). Recent TPA negotiation s with Ecology and EPA have resulted in milestones that support the use of CERCLA as the primary statutory framework for decommissioning PFP. Milestones have been negotiated to support the preparation of Engineering Evaluations/Cost Analyses for decommissioning major PFP buildings. Specifically, CERCLA EE/CA(s) are anticipated for the following scopes of work: Settling Tank 241-Z-361, the 232-Z Incinerator, , the process facilities (eg, 234-5Z, 242, 236) and the process facility support buildings. These CERCLA EE/CA(s) are for the purpose of analyzing the appropriateness of the slab-on-grade endpoint Additionally, agreement was reached on performing an evaluation of actions necessary to address below-grade structures or other structures remaining after completion of the decommissioning of PFP. Remaining CERCLA actions will be integrated with other Central Plateau activities at the Hanford site.

Hopkins, A.M.; Heineman, R.; Norton, S.; Miller, M.; Oates, L.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evaluation of glandless cottonseed meal plus lysine as a substitute for soybean meal in swine starter and growing-finishing diets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF GLANDIZSS COTTONSEED MEAL PLUS LYSINE AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR SOYBEAN MEAL IN SWINE STARTER AND GROWING-FINISHING DIETS A Thesis by DAVID CHARLES LARUE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Nutrition EVALUATION OF GLANDLESS COTTONSEED MEAL PLUS LYSINE AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR SOYBEAN MEAL IN SWINE STARTER AND GROWING-FINISHING DIETS A Thesis by DAVID CHARLES LARUE...

LaRue, David Charles

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Report on Second Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary On August 18 and 19 2011, five items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS). After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials. As during the first activation run, we observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation of the samples was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours to days, except for 60Co which has a half-life of 5.3 y.

Stave, Sean C.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces, possessing slightly distinctive SRR resonances. Our results show that the interplay between the strengths of electric and magnetic dipoles, modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the near field coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the coupled system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Bettiol, Andrew A; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Slow stress relaxation in randomly disordered nematic elastomers and gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Randomly disordered (polydomain) liquid crystalline elastomers align under stress. We study the dynamics of stress relaxation before, during and after the Polydomain-Monodomain transition. The results for different materials show the universal ultra-slow logarithmic behaviour, especially pronounced in the region of the transition. The data is approximated very well by an equation Sigma(t) ~ Sigma_{eq} + A/(1+ Alpha Log[t]). We propose a theoretical model based on the concept of cooperative mechanical resistance for the re-orientation of each domain, attempting to follow the soft-deformation pathway. The exact model solution can be approximated by compact analytical expressions valid at short and at long times of relaxation, with two model parameters determined from the data.

S. M. Clarke; E. M. Terentjev

1998-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

157

Amplitude death in coupled slow and fast dynamical systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how mismatch between dynamical time scales of interacting identical systems can result in the suppression of collective dynamics leading to amplitude death. We find that the inability of the interacting systems to fall in step leads to difference in phase as well as change in amplitude. If the mismatch is small, the systems settle to a frequency synchronised state with constant phase difference. But as mismatch in time scale increases, the systems have to compromise to a state of no oscillations. We establish that this regime of amplitude death exists in a net work of identical systems also for sufficient number of slow systems. For standard nonlinear systems, the regions of quenched dynamics in the parameter plane and the transition curves are studied analytically and confirmed by numerical simulations.

Kajari Gupta; G. Ambika

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

158

PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

JOHNSTON GA

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Compatibility of lead-free solders with lead containing surface finishes as a reliability issue in electronic assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enhanced performance goals and environmental restrictions have heightened the consideration for use of alternative solders as replacements for the traditional tin-lead (Sn-Pb) eutectic and near-eutectic alloys. However, the implementation of non-Pb bearing surface finishes may lag behind solder alloy development. A study was performed which examined the effect(s) of Pb contamination on the performance of Sn-Ag-Bi and Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb lead-free solders by the controlled addition of 63Sn-37Pb solder at levels of 0.5 {minus} 8.0 wt.%. Thermal analysis and ring-in-plug shear strength studies were conducted on bulk solder properties. Circuit board prototype studies centered on the performance of 20I/O SOIC gull wing joints. Both alloys exhibited declines in their melting temperatures with greater Sn-Pb additions. The ring-in-plug shear strength of the Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb solder increased slightly with Sn-Pb levels while the Sn-Ag-Bi alloy experienced a strength loss. The mechanical behavior of the SOIC (Small Outline Integrated Circuit) Sn-Ag-Bi solder joints reproduced the strength levels were insensitive to 10,106 thermal cycles. The Sn-Ag-Cu-Sb solder showed a slight decrease in the gull wing joint strengths that was sensitive to the Pb content of the surface finish.

Vianco, P.; Rejent, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Artaki, I.; Ray, U.; Finley, D.; Jackson, A. [AT and T Bell Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Characterization of slow rusting components in maize (Zea mays) inbreds and single crosses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Gompertz model The logistic model Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIII INHERITANCE OF SLOW RUSTING IN MAIZE Introduction Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIV IDENTIFICATION OF THE COMPONENTS OF SLOW RUSTING... (30) working with oats, found out that the Gompertz transformation was more consistent at detecting degrees of slow rusting than the logistic model. Vanderplank (61) stressed the concept of disease increase as a function of time. This theory implies...

Ngoko

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The effect of feeding silage treated with an inoculum of Lactobacillus plantarum on beef production from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of feeding silage treated with an inoculum of Lactobacillus plantarum on beef production, Cleveland, TS231 YN, England The positive effects on fermentation of treating forage with bacterial and finishing beef animals fed untreated and ECOSYL (ECOSUR in France) treated silage. A similar review has

Boyer, Edmond

162

Modeling the latency on production grids with respect to the execution context.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments on EGEE, authors of [ABEHG08] report 8% of non finished jobs (pending forever), 27% of aborted% were correctly completed, due to different problems: file transfer errors, file catalog error, uploads and installation problems. Production grids are characterized by high and non-stationary load and by a large

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

163

Electron electric dipole moment experiment using electric-field quantized slow cesium atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-51xxx Electron electric dipole momentexperiment using electric-?eld quantized slow cesium atomsA proof-of-principle electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM)

Amini, Jason M.; Munger Jr., Charles T.; Gould, Harvey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Slow neutron leakage spectra from spallation neutron sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems. These modifications were introduced into the VIM low energy neutron transport code, representing the spatial and energy distributions of the source neutrons approximately as those of evaporation neutrons generated through the spallation process by protons of various energies. The intensity of slow neutrons leaking from various reflected moderators was studied for various neutron source arrangements. These include computations relating to early measurements on a mockup-assembly, a brief survey of moderator materials and sizes, and a survey of the effects of varying source and moderator configurations with a practical, liquid metal cooled uranium source Wing and slab, i.e., tangential and radial moderator arrangements, and Be vs CH/sub 2/ reflectors are compared. Results are also presented for several complicated geometries which more closely represent realistic arrangements for a practical source, and for a subcritical fission multiplier such as might be driven by an electron linac. An adaptation of the code was developed to enable time dependent calculations, and investigated the effects of the reflector, decoupling and void liner materials on the pulse shape.

Das, S.G.; Carpenter, J.M.; Prael, R.E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The 2006 aseismic slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico: New results Kristine M. Larson,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2006 aseismic slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico: New results from GPS Kristine M. Larson,1. Miyazaki, and J. A. S. Santiago (2007), The 2006 aseismic slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico: New results from Guerrero, Mexico were made with continuous GPS instrumentation. This network spans 75 km along

Larson, Kristine

166

Measurements with the high flux lead slowing-down spectrometer at LANL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

slow down by scattering interactions with the lead and thus enable measurements of neutron.40.Sc Keywords: Lead-slowing-down spectrometer; Lithium; Alpha; Cross section; Neutron reactions 1.elsevier.com/locate/nimb Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 261 (2007) 953­955 NIM BBeam Interactions

Danon, Yaron

167

Ultrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WAVEGUIDE Ultraintense laser­plasma interaction applications in- cluding x-ray lasers, coherentUltrahigh-intensity optical slow-wave structure for direct laser electron acceleration Andrew G of corrugated slow-wave plasma guiding structures with application to quasi- phase-matched direct laser

Milchberg, Howard

168

The slow start power controlled MAC protocol for mobile ad hoc networks and its performance analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is achieved by allowing more transmissions to take place simultaneously. The slow start principle used energy consumption and increase network throughput and lifetime. In our scheme the transmission power used for the RTS frames is not constant, but follows a slow start principle. The CTS frames, which

Varvarigo, Emmanouel "Manos"

169

Characterization of Co-planar Silicon Transmission Lines with and without Slow-waveEffect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of Co-planar Silicon Transmission Lines with and without Slow-waveEffect Woopoung and package transmission lines has been explained showing that the slow-wave mode cannot be represented only][2][3][4], characterization methods for package transmission lines have been applied to silicon transmission lines under

Swaminathan, Madhavan

170

Dancoff's solution for the number of collisions necessary to slow down  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A succession of authors, following in the footsteps of Glasstone and Edlund, have perpetuated the same estimate for the number of collisions to slow down. Investigation of the slowing down distribution by Dancoff and others has been shown to correspond to a more meaningful estimate. Dancoff's treatment, probably the most concise of any thus far proposed, is discussed in detail.

Ruby, L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer FY2013 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project, funded by the Materials Protection And Control Technology campaign, has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. This report is a high level summary of the progress completed in FY2013. This progress included: • Fabrication of a 4He scintillator detector to detect fast neutrons in the LSDS operating environment. Testing of the detector will be conducted in FY2014. • Design of a large area 232Th fission chamber. • Analysis using the Los Alamos National Laboratory perturbation model estimated the required number of neutrons for an LSDS measurement to be 10 to the 16th source neutrons. • Application of the algorithms developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to LSDS measurement data of various fissile samples conducted in 2012. The results concluded that the 235U could be measured to 2.7% and the 239Pu could be measured to 6.3%. Significant effort is yet needed to demonstrate the applicability of these algorithms for used-fuel assemblies, but the results reported here are encouraging in demonstrating that we are making progress toward that goal. • Development and cost-analysis of a research plan for the next critical demonstration measurements. The plan suggests measurements on fresh fuel sub assemblies as a means to experimentally test self-attenuation and the use of fresh mixed-oxide fuel as a means to test simultaneous measurement of 235U and 239Pu.

Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

172

Characterization of Feeding Behavior Traits and Associations with Performance and Feed Efficiency in Finishing Beef Cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

productivity and sickness for a long time (Weary et al., 2009). However, until the recent advances in RFID systems, it was difficult to evaluate behavioral traits in large groups of animals. Computerized systems that use RFID-based technologies allow more.... It may also reduce the time and labor needed to analyze the data when compared to current methods such as video and visual evaluations (Eradus and Jansen, 1999; Schwartzkopf-Genswein et al., 2002). Radio frequency identification (RFID) systems have...

Mendes, Egleu Diomedes Marinho

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

Slow isocharged sequence ions with helium collisions: Projectile core dependence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collisions of the isocharged sequence ions of q=6 (C{sup 6+}, N{sup 6+}, O{sup 6+}, F{sup 6+}, Ne{sup 6+}, Ar{sup 6+}, and Ca{sup 6+}), q=7 (F{sup 7+}, Ne{sup 7+}, S{sup 7+}, Ar{sup 7+}, and Ca{sup 7+}), q=8 (F{sup 8+}, Ne{sup 8+}, Ar{sup 8+}, and Ca{sup 8+}), q=9 (F{sup 9+}, Ne{sup 9+}, Si{sup 9+}, S{sup 9+}, Ar{sup 9+}, and Ca{sup 9+}) and q=11 (Si{sup 11+}, Ar{sup 11+}, and Ca{sup 11+}) with helium at the same velocities were investigated. The cross-section ratios of the double-electron transfer (DET) to the single-electron capture (SEC) {sigma}{sup DET}/{sigma}{sup SEC} and the true double-electron capture (TDC) to the double-electron transfer {sigma}{sup TDC}/{sigma}{sup DET} were measured. It shows that for different ions in an isocharged sequence, the experimental cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup DET}/{sigma}{sup SEC} varies by a factor of 3. The results confirm that the projectile core is another dominant factor besides the charge state and the collision velocity in slow (0.35-0.49v{sub 0}; v{sub 0} denotes the Bohr velocity) highly charged ions (HCIs) with helium collisions. The experimental cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup DET}/{sigma}{sup SEC} is compared with the extended classical over-barrier model (ECBM) [A. Barany et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 9, 397 (1985)], the molecular Coulombic barrier model (MCBM) [A. Niehaus, J. Phys. B 19, 2925 (1986)], and the semiempirical scaling laws (SSL) [N. Selberg et al., Phys. Rev. A 54, 4127 (1996)]. It also shows that the projectile core properties affect the initial capture probabilities as well as the subsequent relaxation of the projectiles. The experimental cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup TDC}/{sigma}{sup DET} for those lower isocharged sequences is dramatically affected by the projectile core structure, while for those sufficiently highly isocharged sequences, the autoionization always dominates, hence the cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup TDC}/{sigma}{sup DET} is always small.

Yu Deyang; Cai Xiaohong; Shao Caojie; Lu Jun; Yang Zhihu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lu Rongchun; Ruan Fangfang [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Hongqiang; Cui Ying; Xu Xu; Shao Jianxiong; Ding Baowei; Chen Ximeng; Liu Zhaoyuan [Department of Modern Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Drying and curing of stains and lacquers used in furniture finishing 1 DRYING AND CURING OF STAINS AND LACQUERS USED IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nexus engaged a consultant to design a semi-automated finishing line, so as to remove inefficiencies. In cold or humid weather white milky patches may appear in the surface fin- ish. This is known as blooming-spray booth which consists of an open area of the factory backed by a wall of filters; fans behind thi

Stokes, Yvonne

175

PanFunPro: Bacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Based on the Functional Profiles (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Lukjancenko, Oksana [Technical University of Denmark

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Faculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding transferred students) by AY (As of May 1, 2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holdover H OthersI) Total + early admission Total GraduatesC) over-term within designated term Rate outside school Reasons to leaveF) Leaving RateG) Holdover H within designated term over-term GraduatesCFaculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding

Banbara, Mutsunori

177

New measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow neutron scattering provides quantitative information on the structure and dynamics of materials of interest in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, geology, and other fields. Liquid hydrogen is a widely-used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. In particular the rapid drop of the slow neutron scattering cross section of liquid parahydrogen below 14.5~meV is especially interesting and important. We have measured the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43~meV and 16.1~meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6~K using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At 1~meV this measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work which has been used in the design of liquid hydrogen moderators at slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements, compare them with previous work, and discuss the implications for designing more intense slow neutron sources.

K. B. Grammer; R. Alarcon; L. Barrón-Palos; D. Blyth; J. D. Bowman; J. Calarco; C. Crawford; K. Craycraft; D. Evans; N. Fomin; J. Fry; M. Gericke; R. C. Gillis; G. L. Greene; J. Hamblen; C. Hayes; S. Kucuker; R. Mahurin; M. Maldonado-Velázquez; E. Martin; M. McCrea; P. E. Mueller; M. Musgrave; H. Nann; S. I. Penttilä; W. M. Snow; Z. Tang; W. S. Wilburn

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

178

The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I. [Nuclear Reactor Program, Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors), so in peat pots; they are slow to germinate, so be patient. Seedlings may be transplanted in June. Crowns

Liskiewicz, Maciej

180

THE CREATIVE APPLICATION OF SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & WORK FORCE INNOVATIONS TO THE D&D OF PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) consists of a number of process and support buildings for handling plutonium. Building construction began in the late 1940's to meet national priorities and became operational in 1950 producing refined plutonium salts and metal for the United States nuclear weapons program. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material for fabrication into a nuclear device for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race. PFP has now completed its mission and is fully engaged in deactivation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). At this time the PFP buildings are planned to be reduced to ground level (slab-on-grade) and the site remediated to satisfy national, Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington state requirements. The D&D of a highly contaminated plutonium processing facility presents a plethora of challenges. PFP personnel approached the D&D mission with a can-do attitude. They went into D&D knowing they were facing a lot of challenges and unknowns. There were concerns about the configuration control associated with drawings of these old process facilities. There were unknowns regarding the location of electrical lines and process piping containing chemical residues such as strong acids and caustics. The gloveboxes were highly contaminated with plutonium and chemical residues. Most of the glovebox windows were opaque with splashed process chemicals that coated the windows or etched them, reducing visibility to near zero. Visibility into the glovebox was a serious worker concern. Additionally, all the gloves in the gloveboxes were degraded and unusable. Replacing gloves in gloveboxes was necessary to even begin glovebox cleanout. The sheer volume of breathing air needed was also an issue. These and other challenges and PFP's approach to overcome these challengers are described. Many of the challenges to the D&D work at PFP were met with innovative approaches based on new science and/or technology and many were also based on the creativity and motivation of the work force personnel.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nonlinear theory of resonant slow waves in anisotropic and dispersive plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar corona is a typical example of a plasma with strongly anisotropic transport processes. The main dissipative mechanisms in the solar corona acting on slow magnetoacoustic waves are the anisotropic thermal conductivity and viscosity. Ballai et al. [Phys. Plasmas 5, 252 (1998)] developed the nonlinear theory of driven slow resonant waves in such a regime. In the present paper the nonlinear behaviour of driven magnetohydrodynamic waves in the slow dissipative layer in plasmas with strongly anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity is expanded by considering dispersive effects due to Hall currents. The nonlinear governing equation describing the dynamics of nonlinear resonant slow waves is supplemented by a term which describes nonlinear dispersion and is of the same order of magnitude as nonlinearity and dissipation. The connection formulae are found to be similar to their non-dispersive counterparts.

Christopher Clack; Istvan Ballai

2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

Efficient tunable switch from slow light to fast light in quantum opto-electromechanical system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The control of slow and fast light propagation, in the probe transmission in a single experiment, is a challenging task. This type of control can only be achieved through highly nonlinear interactions and additional interfering pathway(s), which is therefore seldom reported. Here, we devise a scheme in which slow light, and a tunable switch from slow light to fast light can be achieved in the probe transmission based on a hybrid setup, which is composed of an optical cavity with two charged nano mechanical resonators (MRs). The two MRs are electrostatically coupled via tunable Coulomb coupling strength ($g_{c}$) making a quantum opto-electromechanical system (QOEMS). The parameter $g_{c}$ that couples the two MRs can be switched on and off by controlling the bias voltages on the MRs, and acts as a tunable switch that allows the propagation of transmitted probe field as slow light ($g_{c} \

M. Javed Akram; Khalid Naseer; Farhan Saif

2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

183

Slow vacuolar channels from barley mesophyll cells are regulated by 14-3-3 proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow vacuolar channels from barley mesophyll cells are regulated by 14-3-3 proteins Paul W.J. van den Wijngaarda , Tom D. Bunneya , Ilja Roobeeka , Gerald Scho«nknechtbY1 , Albertus H. de Boera

Schönknecht, Gerald

184

Development of an alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process for microelectromechanical systems micropore x-ray optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray astronomy research is often limited by the size, weight, complexity, and cost of functioning x-ray optics. Micropore optics promises an economical alternative to traditional (e.g., glass or foil) x-ray optics; however, many manufacturing difficulties prevent micropore optics from being a viable solution. Ezoe et al. introduced microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micropore optics having curvilinear micropores in 2008. Made by either deep reactive ion etching or x-ray lithography, electroforming, and molding (LIGA), MEMS micropore optics suffer from high micropore sidewall roughness (10-30nmrms) which, by current standards, cannot be improved. In this research, a new alternating magnetic-field-assisted finishing process was developed using a mixture of ferrofluid and microscale abrasive slurry. A machine was built, and a set of working process parameters including alternating frequency, abrasive size, and polishing time was selected. A polishing experiment on a LIGA-fabricated MEMS micropore optic was performed, and a change in micropore sidewall roughness of 9.3{+-}2.5nmrms to 5.7{+-}0.7nmrms was measured. An improvement in x-ray reflectance was also seen. This research shows the feasibility and confirms the effects of this new polishing process on MEMS micropore optics.

Riveros, Raul E.; Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Takagi, Utako; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Kato, Fumiki; Sugiyama, Susumu; Yamasaki, Noriko; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Evaluation of high- and low-protein sorghum grains supplemented with lysine and lysine plus threonine as a feed for finishing swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or methionine content are below the finishing pigs' requirements for these amino acids. Sorghum grain supplemented with these amino acids, either singularly or in combination, plus needed vitamins and minerals should theoretically provide optimum growth..., there was no significant difference in retained nitrogen. The nutritive value of two sorghum grains containing 7. 9 and 11. 8% protein was compared on the basis of rat growth and amino acid analyses by Waggle eX nf. (1966). The high protein sorghum grain had higher...

Kinslow, William Freddie

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The effects of various levels of coastal bermudagrass and alfalfa hays on feedlot performance, carcass composition and net energy for finishing steers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS LEVELS OF COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS AND ALFALFA HAYS ON FEEDLOT PERFORMANCE, CARCASS COMPOSITION AND NET ENERGY FOR FINISHING STEERS A Thesis by WILLIAM EMMETT BROWN, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Animal Science THE EFFECTS OF VARIOUS LEVELS OF COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS AND ALFALFA HAYS ON FEEDLOT PERFORMANCE, CARCASS COMPOSITION...

Brown, William Emmett

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Faculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding transferred students) by AY (As of May 1, 2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Law Number of students who has finished (with a degree) and early leavers (excluding or less more than 1 year Law 180 227 227 155 65 220 68% 29% 97% 5 2% 0 2 Total 180 227 227 155 65 220 68% 29% 97% 5 2% 0 2 Law 180 184 184 139 37 176 76% 20% 96% 6 3% 2 0 Total 180 184 184 139 37 176 76% 20

Banbara, Mutsunori

188

TRAINING SME'S FOR NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT N. Bialis (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRAINING SME'S FOR NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT N. Bialis (1) , A. Antoniadis (2) , K. A product developments. SME's are rather slow in adopting practices arising from large companies experiences. A toolkit (the PROMISE toolkit), suitable for SME's has been developed. It contains a series of inter

Aristomenis, Antoniadis

189

Developing Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF) Technology for the Manufacture of Large-Aperture Optics in Megajoule Class Laser Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last eight years we have been developing advanced MRF tools and techniques to manufacture meter-scale optics for use in Megajoule class laser systems. These systems call for optics having unique characteristics that can complicate their fabrication using conventional polishing methods. First, exposure to the high-power nanosecond and sub-nanosecond pulsed laser environment in the infrared (>27 J/cm{sup 2} at 1053 nm), visible (>18 J/cm{sup 2} at 527 nm), and ultraviolet (>10 J/cm{sup 2} at 351 nm) demands ultra-precise control of optical figure and finish to avoid intensity modulation and scatter that can result in damage to the optics chain or system hardware. Second, the optics must be super-polished and virtually free of surface and subsurface flaws that can limit optic lifetime through laser-induced damage initiation and growth at the flaw sites, particularly at 351 nm. Lastly, ultra-precise optics for beam conditioning are required to control laser beam quality. These optics contain customized surface topographical structures that cannot be made using traditional fabrication processes. In this review, we will present the development and implementation of large-aperture MRF tools and techniques specifically designed to meet the demanding optical performance challenges required in large-aperture high-power laser systems. In particular, we will discuss the advances made by using MRF technology to expose and remove surface and subsurface flaws in optics during final polishing to yield optics with improve laser damage resistance, the novel application of MRF deterministic polishing to imprint complex topographical information and wavefront correction patterns onto optical surfaces, and our efforts to advance the technology to manufacture large-aperture damage resistant optics.

Menapace, J A

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Chemical Hazards Assessments Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Nuclear Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All Hanford facilities, including the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) were evaluated for chemical hazards in 1997, 1998 and 2000. The hazard evaluation, known as the PFP Facility Vulnerability Assessment (FVA), was prompted when chemicals in Tank A-109 in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) exploded in May 1997. Actions were undertaken to eliminate or reduce what were thought to be the worst hazards following that evaluation. In 2001, a new PFP team was organized to review the progress to date in reducing hazards and to reassess hazards that might still remain within the facility. This reassessment continued into 2002 and is referred to as the 2002 PFP Residual Chemical Hazards Reassessment (RCHR). This report explains the results of the 2001/2002 reassessment of the chemical hazards at PFP. This reassessment effort forms the basis of the RCHR. The RCHR relied on previous assessments as the starting point for the 2001/2002 evaluation and used ranking criteria very similar to previous efforts. The RCHR team was composed of professionals representing Industrial Hygiene, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Hazardous Materials Handling Specialists, Solid Waste Management Specialists and Environmental Specialists. All areas of concern that could be accessed were physically examined and photographed where possible. Information from processing records, facility drawings and documents, design engineers, process engineers and work packages were compiled. The PFP vessel inventory was examined and expanded where required. New items listed in the vessel inventory were investigated. All items investigated were ranked using the hazard ranking criteria developed. This information was put on data sheets and compiled in a database.

FITCH, L.R.; HOPKINS, A.M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Different microbial species are thought to occupy distinct ecological niches, subjecting each species to unique selective constraints, which may leave a recognizable signal in their genomes. Thus, it may be possible to extract insight into the genetic basis of ecological differences among lineages by identifying unusual patterns of substitutions in orthologous gene or protein sequences. We use the ratio of substitutions in slow versus fast-evolving sites (nucleotides in DNA, or amino acids in protein sequence) to quantify deviations from the typical pattern of selective constraint observed across bacterial lineages. We propose that elevated S:F in one branch (an excess of slow-site substitutions) can indicate a functionally-relevant change, due to either positive selection or relaxed evolutionary constraint. In a genome-wide comparative study of gamma-proteobacterial proteins, we find that cell-surface proteins involved with motility and secretion functions often have high S:F ratios, while information-processing genes do not. Change in evolutionary constraints in some species is evidenced by increased S:F ratios within functionally-related sets of genes (e.g., energy production in Pseudomonas fluorescens), while other species apparently evolve mostly by drift (e.g., uniformly elevated S:F across most genes in Buchnera spp.). Overall, S:F reveals several species-specific, protein-level changes with potential functional/ecological importance. As microbial genome projects yield more species-rich gene-trees, the S:F ratio will become an increasingly powerful tool for uncovering functional genetic differences among species.

Alm, Eric; Shapiro, B. Jesse

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Enhanced four-wave mixing in graphene-silicon slow-light photonic crystal waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the enhanced four-wave mixing of monolayer graphene on slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides. 200-?m interaction length, a four-wave mixing conversion efficiency of ?23?dB is achieved in the graphene-silicon slow-light hybrid, with an enhanced 3-dB conversion bandwidth of about 17?nm. Our measurements match well with nonlinear coupled-mode theory simulations based on the measured waveguide dispersion, and provide an effective way for all-optical signal processing in chip-scale integrated optics.

Zhou, Hao, E-mail: hz2299@columbia.edu, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu [College of Electronic Information, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Gu, Tingyi, E-mail: hz2299@columbia.edu, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; McMillan, James F.; Wong, Chee Wei, E-mail: hz2299@columbia.edu, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Petrone, Nicholas; Zande, Arend van der; Hone, James C. [Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee [The Institute of Microelectronics, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Feng, Guoying [College of Electronic Information, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhou, Shouhuan [College of Electronic Information, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); North China Research Institute of Electro-Optics, Beijing 100015 (China)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Slow dynamics of nanocomposite polymer aerogels as revealed by X-ray photocorrelation spectroscopy (XPCS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a novel slow dynamics of polymer xerogels, aerogels, and nanocomposite aerogels with iron oxide nanoparticles, as revealed by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The polymer aerogel and its nanocomposite aerogels, which are porous in nature, exhibit hyper-diffusive dynamics at room temperature. In contrast, non-porous polymer xerogels exhibit an absence of this peculiar dynamics. This slow dynamical process has been assigned to a relaxation of the characteristic porous structure of these materials and not to the presence of nanoparticles.

Hernández, Rebeca, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Mijangos, Carmen [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nogales, Aurora, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sprung, Michael [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

Slow-MAS NMR: A New Technology for In Vivo Metabolomic Studies. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite Cultural Resourcestepidum FMO *IncreasingSlowSlow-MAS NMR: A

195

Description Early Finish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.00 Level 2 Milestones 1070 Friction Stir-Weld Coil Leads TF Conductors 0 08DEC11 53 05JAN12 B 0 0.00 1150

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

196

Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics through linear energy-preserving coupling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chaotic multiscale dynamical systems are common in many areas of science, one of the examples being the interaction of the low-frequency dynamics in the atmosphere with the fast turbulent weather dynamics. One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger mixing system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

Rafail V. Abramov

2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

Assessment of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Criticality Alarm System U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the Assistant Manager for Safety and Engineering, the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) Engineering Support Division, performed an oversight review of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) nuclear Criticality Alarm System (CAS). The review was conducted to satisfy requirements and agreements associated with Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2000-2, ''Vital Safety Systems.'' The PFP is managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. for RL. The field assessment and staff interviews were conducted August 12 through August 19,2002. This was a limited scope assessment that consisted of a review of the nuclear CAS operations, maintenance, and compliance with National Consensus Standards Requirements. The main purpose of the assessment was to determine the adequacy of the existing alarm system and its associated infrastructure to support the PFP facility mission through the remaining facility lifetime. The Review Plan was modeled upon Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRAD) developed for DNFSB Recommendation 2000-2 reviews conducted across the Hanford Site. Concerns regarding component degradation and failure, increasing numbers of occurrence reports associated with the alarm system, and reliability issues were addressed. Additionally, RL performed a review of the engineering aspects of the CAS including the functions of design authorities and aspects of systems engineering. However, the focus of the assessment was on operations, maintenance, and reliability of the CAS, associated procurement practices, adequacy of safety and engineering policies and procedures, safety documentation, and fundamental engineering practices including training, qualification, and systems engineering. This assessment revealed that the PFP CAS and its associated infrastructure, administrative procedures, and conduct of operations are generally effective. There are no imminent criticality safety issues associated with the operation of the existing CAS. The Assessment Team believes that the CAS, as it presently exists at the PFP facility, is adequate to support the remaining mission lifetime of the facility while continuing to ensure personnel safety. This conclusion is dependent upon a continued level of funding adequate to support the required maintenance and occasional system upgrade. Two findings were identified during this assessment. Additionally, the report identified eight observations and two recommendations. The assessment revealed that recent changes to OSR compliance procedures and other documents do not contain the signature of the CSR as required by procedure. Lack of appropriate approval signatures is a noncompliance with site-level procedures.

NIRIDER, L.T.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modelling propagation of sinkhole, in both slow and dynamic modes, using the UDEC computer code.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling propagation of sinkhole, in both slow and dynamic modes, using the UDEC computer code RISques) : Adresse* : Ecole des mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy-Cedex, France ; Adresse sinkhole forms and to propose a prediction model. The UDEC code is used. An actual case of sinkhole

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

199

Soft-ratchet modeling of slow dynamics in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft-ratchet modeling of slow dynamics in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary rocks of Physics 0-7354-0330-9/06/$23.00 CREDIT LINE (BELOW) TO BE INSERTED ONLY ON THE FIRST PAGE OF THE #12;SOFT-RATCHET

200

Introduction: the concept of the MOC Climate models project a slow down of the Atlantic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be sustained. Also the `pull' by small-scale mixing, that gradually lightens the deep waters, is necessary water cools and sinks, forming North Atlantic Deep Water which spreads southward into the deep ocean78 Introduction: the concept of the MOC Climate models project a slow down of the Atlantic

Drijfhout, Sybren

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling and Trapping Atoms Atoms are slowed and cooled by radiation pressure from laser light and then trapped in a bottle whose "walls" are magnetic fields. Cooled atoms are ideal for exploring basic. research has traditionally been the study of the intrinsic prop erties of isolated atoms. In the early part

Johannesson, Henrik

202

Dynamic control of slow water transport by aquaporin 0: Implications for hydration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic control of slow water transport by aquaporin 0: Implications for hydration and junction as the primary water channel in this tissue but also appears to mediate the formation of thin junctions between fiber cells. AQP0 is remarkably less water perme- able than other aquaporins, but the structural basis

Shaw, David E.

203

Slow Roll Reconstruction: Constraints on Inflation from the 3 Year WMAP Dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the constraints on the inflationary parameter space derived from the 3 year WMAP dataset using ``slow roll reconstruction'', using the SDSS galaxy power spectrum to gain further leverage where appropriate. This approach inserts the inflationary slow roll parameters directly into a Monte Carlo Markov chain estimate of the cosmological parameters, and uses the inflationary flow hierarchy to compute the parameters' scale-dependence. We work with the first three parameters (epsilon, eta and xi) and pay close attention to the possibility that the 3 year WMAP dataset contains evidence for a ``running'' spectral index, which is dominated by the xi term. Mirroring the WMAP team's analysis we find that the permitted distribution of xi is broad, and centered away from zero. However, when we require that inflationary parameters yield at least 30 additional e-folds of inflation after the largest observable scales leave the horizon, the bounds on xi tighten dramatically. We make use of the absence of an explicit pivot scale in the slow roll reconstruction formalism to determine the dependence of the computed parameter distributions on the pivot. We show that the choice of pivot has a significant effect on the inferred constraints on the inflationary variables, and the spectral index and running derived from them. Finally, we argue that the next round of cosmological data can be expected to place very stringent constraints on the region of parameter space open to single field models of slow roll inflation.

Hiranya Peiris; Richard Easther

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

204

Environment Agency volunteers and Forestry Commission working together to Slow the Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment Agency volunteers and Forestry Commission working together to Slow the Flow A team of Environment Agency staff from the York office recently volunteered for a day building timber dams in Cropton. As part of their `environmental leave day' programme Environment Agency staff are encouraged to get out

205

Quadratic voltage profiles in lead acid cells during slow, steady processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is standard lore that the voltage profile varies linearly in space within the electrolyte of a lead acid cell under slow, steady discharge. However, this hypothesis has never been put to the test. A recent theory predicts a uniform, non...

Haaser, Robert Anthony

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Novel Results on Slow Coherency in Consensus and Power Networks Diego Romeres Florian Dorfler Francesco Bullo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Results on Slow Coherency in Consensus and Power Networks Diego Romeres Florian D¨orfler, Florian D¨orfler, and Francesco Bullo are with the Center for Control, Dynamical Systems and Computation, University of California at Santa Barbara. Email: diego.romeres@gmail.com and {dorfler

Bullo, Francesco

207

Influence of Impurity Segregation on Temper Embrittlement and on Slow Fatigue Crack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of segregated impurity atoms (temper embrittlement) and hydrogen atoms, evolved from crack tip surface reactions with water vapor in the moist air environment (hydrogen embrittlement). The signifi- cance of crack closureInfluence of Impurity Segregation on Temper Embrittlement and on Slow Fatigue Crack Growth

Ritchie, Robert

208

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Receptive Field Positions in Area MT during Slow Eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Receptive Field Positions in Area MT during Slow Eye Movements Till S across eye movements. We first tested the hypothesis that motion signals are integrated by neurons whose receptive fields (RFs) do not move with the eye but stay fixed in the world. Specifically, we measured

Krekelberg, Bart

209

Slow-Rate Utility-Based Resource Allocation in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a network [6]. Utility-based resource allocation has recently received atten- tion both for wire-line [41 Slow-Rate Utility-Based Resource Allocation in Wireless Networks Peijuan Liu, Randall Berry are specified via a utility function that depends on the received data rate. The allocation of power across

Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

210

Friction experiments with elastography: the slow slip and the super-shear regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction experiments with elastography: the slow slip and the super-shear regimes S. Cathelinea , S technique derived from elastography, is used to follow the dynamic of the interface failure in a friction by Amontons in 1699 [1], the resistance to slip of an interface can be modeled by two main frictional states

Boyer, Edmond

211

ON QUASI-ELASTIC SCATTERING OF SLOW NEUTRONS IN MOLECULAR LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L-317 ON QUASI-ELASTIC SCATTERING OF SLOW NEUTRONS IN MOLECULAR LIQUIDS M. UTSURO Research Reactor de neutrons avec élargissement par rotation moléculaire dans le liquide sont étudiés dans le cadre du du benzène liquide. Abstract. 2014 The rotational broadened quasi-elastic scattering spectrum

Boyer, Edmond

212

Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow waves in fractures filled with viscous fluid Valeri Korneev1 ABSTRACT Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves; therefore, their properties, a simple dispersion equa- tion for wave-propagation velocity is obtained. This velocity is much smaller

Korneev, Valeri A.

213

TOWARDS BENCHMARK MEASUREMENTS FOR USED NUCLEAR FUEL ASSAY USING A LEAD SLOWING-DOWN SPECTROMETER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for spent fuel testing. The characterization of spent fuel is particularly important for nuclear safeguardsTOWARDS BENCHMARK MEASUREMENTS FOR USED NUCLEAR FUEL ASSAY USING A LEAD SLOWING-DOWN SPECTROMETER B) is considered as a possible option for non- destructive assay of fissile material in used nuclear fuel

Danon, Yaron

214

Nematode faunal analysis in an aquic brown soil fertilised with slow-release urea, Northeast China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nematode faunal analysis in an aquic brown soil fertilised with slow-release urea, Northeast China, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, PR China b Department of Earth of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, PR China Received 14 May 2004; received in revised form 15

Neher, Deborah A.

215

Rethinking Query Processing for Energy Efficiency: Slowing Down to Win the Race  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rethinking Query Processing for Energy Efficiency: Slowing Down to Win the Race Willis Lang of an energy efficiency metric along with traditional performance metrics. This change is fueled by the growing, real, and urgent demand for energy-efficient database processing. Database query processing engines

Patel, Jignesh

216

Locating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds Wenbo Tang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the origin of atmospheric particle pollution from dispersed particle positions, provided that diffusion efLocating an atmospheric contamination source using slow manifolds Wenbo Tang,1 George Haller,2,a-dimensional atmospheric wind field in an urban street canyon. © 2009 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10

Tang, Wenbo

217

Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

Fritz, Harald

218

CBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Slow Recovery in Nevada's Economy Continues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the seasonally adjusted data reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Nevada Coincident Employment IndexCBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Indexes1 Slow Recovery in Nevada's Economy Continues The Nevada Coincident Employment Index measures the ups and downs of the Nevada economy using

Ahmad, Sajjad

219

CBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Employment Recovery in Nevada Continues Its Slow Pace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The Nevada Coincident Employment Index includes four employment measuresCBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Indexes1 Employment Recovery in Nevada Continues Its Slow Pace The Nevada Coincident Employment Index measures the ups and downs of the Nevada economy

Ahmad, Sajjad

220

Slow exhumation of UHP terranes: Titanite and rutile ages of the Western Gneiss Region, Norway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow exhumation of UHP terranes: Titanite and rutile ages of the Western Gneiss Region, Norway A: titanite rutile geochronology ultrahigh-pressure Norway U­Pb ages of titanite and rutile were obtained from of the Western Gneiss UHP terrane. Approximately half of the titanite ages are concordant, the majority of which

Hacker, Bradley R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Digestibility of amino acids and energy in three soybean products measured at the end of the small intestine and over the entire track of growing-finishing swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and feces by the method of Kimura and Miller (1957) and lanthanides by the method of Conner (1977). Amino acids were measured by ion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis using a modified Beckman 120C amino acid auto- analyzer (Spackman st al...

Rudolph, Bryan Charles

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Plutonium production story at the Hanford site: processes and facilities history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document tells the history of the actual plutonium production process at the Hanford Site. It contains five major sections: Fuel Fabrication Processes, Irradiation of Nuclear Fuel, Spent Fuel Handling, Radiochemical Reprocessing of Irradiated Fuel, and Plutonium Finishing Operations. Within each section the story of the earliest operations is told, along with changes over time until the end of operations. Chemical and physical processes are described, along with the facilities where these processes were carried out. This document is a processes and facilities history. It does not deal with the waste products of plutonium production.

Gerber, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Herein, we show that a simple trigonal prismatic uranium(III) complex can indeed display slow magnetic

224

Productivity of the U.S. freight rail industry: a review of the past and prospects for the future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Productivity growth in the U.S. freight rail industry has slowed in recent years, raising the issue of the sustainability of the significant improvements achieved during the past three decades. Indeed, between 1979 and ...

Kriem, Youssef

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The slow-mode nature of compressible wave power in solar wind turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use a large, statistical set of measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU, and supporting synthetic spacecraft data based on kinetic plasma theory, to show that the compressible component of inertial range solar wind turbulence is primarily in the kinetic slow mode. The zero-lag cross correlation C(delta n, delta B_parallel) between proton density fluctuations delta n and the field-aligned (compressible) component of the magnetic field delta B_parallel is negative and close to -1. The typical dependence of C(delta n,delta B_parallel) on the ion plasma beta_i is consistent with a spectrum of compressible wave energy that is almost entirely in the kinetic slow mode. This has important implications for both the nature of the density fluctuation spectrum and for the cascade of kinetic turbulence to short wavelengths, favoring evolution to the kinetic Alfven wave mode rather than the (fast) whistler mode.

Howes, G G; Klein, K G; Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; TenBarge, J M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has recently been shown that in single field slow-roll inflation the total volume cannot grow by a factor larger than e{sup S{sub dS}/2} without becoming infinite. The bound is saturated exactly at the phase transition to eternal inflation where the probability to produce infinite volume becomes non zero. We show that the bound holds sharply also in any space-time dimensions, when arbitrary higher-dimensional operators are included and in the multi-field inflationary case. The relation with the entropy of de Sitter and the universality of the bound strengthen the case for a deeper holographic interpretation. As a spin-off we provide the formalism to compute the probability distribution of the volume after inflation for generic multi-field models, which might help to address questions about the population of vacua of the landscape during slow-roll inflation.

Dubovsky, Sergei; Senatore, Leonardo; Villadoro, Giovanni

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

227

Multiple scattering of slow ions in a partially degenerate electron fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We extend former investigation to a partially degenerate electron fluid at any temperature of multiple slow ion scattering at T=0. We implement an analytic and mean-field interpolation of the target electron dielectric function between T=0 (Lindhard) and T{yields}{infinity} (Fried-Conte). A specific attention is given to multiple scattering of proton projectiles in the keV energy range, stopped in a hot-electron plasma at solid density.

Popoff, Romain; Maynard, Gilles; Deutsch, Claude [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR 8578, Universite Paris-Sud XI, Orsay 91400 (France)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FAILURE OF ALLOYS X-750 AND 625 UNDER SLOW STRAIN-RATE CONDITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FAILURE OF ALLOYS X-750 AND 625 UNDER SLOW STRAIN-RATE CONDITIONS R.S. Daum, A-purity, deaerated water in order to determine whether hydrogen embrittlement occurs in these alloys at room psig nitrogen (0 cc H2/kg H2O STP) and 40 psig hydrogen (60 cc H2/kg H2O STP), on Alloy X-750 in two

Motta, Arthur T.

229

Inflating Fat Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies by Precessing Massive Slow Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We conduct hydrodynamical numerical simulations and find that precessing massive slow jets can inflate fat bubble, i.e., more or less spherical, attached to the center of clusters of galaxies. To inflate a fat bubble the jet should precess fast. The precessing angle $\\theta$ should be large, or change over a large range $ 0 \\le \\theta \\le \\theta_{\\max} \\sim 30-70 ^\\circ$ (depending also on other parameters), where $\\theta=0$ is the symmetry axis. The constraints on the velocity and mass outflow rate are similar to those on wide jets to inflate fat bubbles. The velocity should be $v_j \\sim 10^4 \\km \\s^{-1}$, and the mass loss rate of the two jets should be $ 2 \\dot M_j \\simeq 1-50 \\dot M_\\odot \\yr^{-1} $. These results and our results from a previous paper dealing with slow wide jets support the claim that a large fraction of the feedback heating in cooling flow clusters and in the processes of galaxy formation is done by slow massive jets.

Sternberg, Assaf

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Inflating Fat Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies by Precessing Massive Slow Jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We conduct hydrodynamical numerical simulations and find that precessing massive slow jets can inflate fat bubbles, i.e., more or less spherical bubbles, that are attached to the center of clusters of galaxies. To inflate a fat bubble the jet should precess fast. The precessing angle $\\theta$ should be large, or change over a large range $ 0 \\le \\theta \\le \\theta_{\\max} \\sim 30-70 ^\\circ$ (depending also on other parameters), where $\\theta=0$ is the symmetry axis. The constraints on the velocity and mass outflow rate are similar to those on wide jets to inflate fat bubbles. The velocity should be $v_j \\sim 10^4 \\kms$, and the mass loss rate of the two jets should be $ 2 \\dot M_j \\simeq 1-50 \\dot M_\\odot \\yr^{-1} $. These results, and our results from a previous paper dealing with slow wide jets, support the claim that a large fraction of the feedback heating in cooling flow clusters and in the processes of galaxy formation is done by slow massive jets.

Assaf Sternberg; Noam Soker

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with inclusion of the beam velocity spread  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) with an initially straight electron beam is developed. The evolution equation of the nonlinear beam electron energy is derived. The numerical studies of the slow-wave ECM efficiency with inclusion of Gaussian beam velocity spread are presented. It is shown that the velocity spread reduces the interaction efficiency. -- Highlights: •The theory of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers is considered. •The calculation of efficiency under the resonance condition is presented. •The efficiency under Gaussian velocity spreads has been obtained.

Kong, Ling-Bao, E-mail: konglingbao@gmail.com [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Hong-Yu [School of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China)] [School of Physics, Anshan Normal University, Anshan 114005 (China); Hou, Zhi-Ling, E-mail: houzl@mail.buct.edu.cn [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China) [School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jin, Hai-Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Du, Chao-Hai [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

233

Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 90, Nos. 5/6, 1998 We study the nucleation and growth of flame fronts in slow combustion. This  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fronts in slow combustion. This is modeled by a set of reaction-diffusion equations for the temperature: Nucleation; reaction-diffusion systems; flame fronts. Nucleation, Growth, and Scaling in Slow Combustion applied to understand some aspects of slow combustion. We use a phase-field model of two coupled reaction

Grant, Martin

234

Slow-light propagation using mode locking of spin precession in quantum dots  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose using mode locking to enable coherent nonlinear optical effects in inhomogenously broadened spin ensembles. We carry out detailed calculations for quantum dot systems in which increased spin coherence via mode locking has been recently observed [A. Greilich et al., Science 313, 341 (2006); 317, 1896 (2007)]. We show how, in the presence of spin locking, a strong pulse-matching effect occurs, providing a powerful tool for high-bandwidth linear optical processing. We then go on to study 'slow light' in this system and show that high-bandwidth pulses can be controllably delayed by a time comparable to the pulse width.

Shabaev, A. [George Mason University, Fairfax Virginia 22030 (United States); Dutton, Z. [Raytheon BBN Technologies, 10 Moulton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Kennedy, T. A.; Efros, Al. L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Qubit transfer between photons at telecom and visible wavelengths in a slow-light atomic medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a method that enables efficient conversion of quantum information frequency between different regions of spectrum of light based on recently demonstrated strong parametric coupling between two narrow-band single-photon pulses propagating in a slow-light atomic medium [1]. We show that an input qubit at telecom wavelength is transformed into another at visible domain in a lossless and shape-conserving manner while keeping the initial quantum coherence and entanglement. These transformations can be realized with a quantum efficiency close to its maximum value.

A. Gogyan

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

NLO Dispersion Laws for Slow-Moving Quarks in HTL QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We determine the next-to-leading order dispersion laws for slow-moving quarks in hard-thermal-loop perturbation of high-temperature QCD where weak coupling is assumed. Real-time formalism is used. The next-to-leading order quark self-energy is written in terms of three and four HTL-dressed vertex functions. The hard thermal loops contributing to these vertex functions are calculated ab initio and expressed using the Feynman parametrization which allows the calculation of the solid-angle integrals involved. We use a prototype of the resulting integrals to indicate how finite results are obtained in the limit of vanishing regularizer.

Abada, Abdessamad; Benchallal, Karima

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Huge enhancement of backward second-harmonic generation with slow light in photonic crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study theoretically forward and backward second-harmonic generation in a two-dimensional photonic crystal structure made of lithium niobate. The aim of this article is twofold: First, we propose a reliable modal algorithm for describing the light propagation taking into account the vectorial character of the interacting fields as well as the tensorial character of the nonlinearity and verify it by means of the nonlinear finite-difference time-domain method. Second, we propose a photonic crystal where we obtain a giant efficiency increase for backward second-harmonic generation with slow light.

Iliew, Rumen [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Solid State Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Etrich, Christoph; Pertsch, Thomas [Institute of Applied Physics/Ultra Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Lederer, Falk [Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Solid State Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kivshar, Yuri S. [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Rainman: Renowned rainwater harvester Billy Kniffen may be retired, but he's not slowing down anytime soon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 tx H2O Summer 2011 Story by Leslie Lee One week a#31;er his o#23;cial retirement from the Texas AgriLife Extension Service on April #27;#24;, Billy Kni#28;en could be found crisscrossing the United States#30;bringing rainwater harvesting... harvester Billy Kni#31;en may be retired, but he?s not slowing down anytime soon Summer 2011 tx H2O 19 Left: Billy Kniffen travels around the country, teaching people to make rain barrels for rainwater harvesting. Photo by Leslie Lee, Texas Water...

Lee, Leslie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Peng, Ze [DOE JGI] [DOE JGI

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Peng, Ze [DOE JGI

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Nutrient digestibility of 44% soybean meal, extruded whole soybeans, and an extruded soybean mixture for growing-finishing swine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The difference found by subtracting ileal amino acid digestibilities from total tract amino acid digestibilities (Table 10) indicates a net loss (positive value) or synthesis Inegative value) of an amino acid in the large intestine. The observed differences... show a net loss of all amino acids in the diets, except for a synthesis ot methionine in the 44'o SBM and the extruded mixture. Disappearance of amino acids from the large intestine of pigs fed soy products (Holmes cL aL. , 1974; Rudolph, 1979...

Boggs, Lynne S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.

Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, Vilnius 01108 (Lithuania); Fachbereich Physik and Research Center OPTIMAS, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern D-67663 (Germany)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Large Deviations and Importance Sampling for Systems of Slow-Fast Motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we develop the large deviations principle and a rigorous mathematical framework for asymptotically efficient importance sampling schemes for general, fully dependent systems of stochastic differential equations of slow and fast motion with small noise in the slow component. We assume periodicity with respect to the fast component. Depending on the interaction of the fast scale with the smallness of the noise, we get different behavior. We examine how one range of interaction differs from the other one both for the large deviations and for the importance sampling. We use the large deviations results to identify asymptotically optimal importance sampling schemes in each case. Standard Monte Carlo schemes perform poorly in the small noise limit. In the presence of multiscale aspects one faces additional difficulties and straightforward adaptation of importance sampling schemes for standard small noise diffusions will not produce efficient schemes. It turns out that one has to consider the so called cell problem from the homogenization theory for Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations in order to guarantee asymptotic optimality. We use stochastic control arguments.

Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos, E-mail: kspiliop@dam.brown.edu [Brown University, Division of Applied Mathematics (United States)] [Brown University, Division of Applied Mathematics (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Can Light Echoes Account for the Slow Decay of Type IIn Supernovae?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectra of type IIn supernovae indicate the presence of apre-existing slow, dense circumstellar wind (CSW). If the CSW extends sufficiently far from the progenitor star, then dust formation should occur in the wind. The light from the supernova explosion will scatter off this dust and produce a light echo. Continuum emission seen after the peak will have contributions from both this echo as well as from the shock of the ejecta colliding with the CSW, with a fundamental question of which source dominates the continuum. We calculate the brightness of the light echo as a function of time for a range of dust shell geometries, and use our calculations to fit to the light curves of SN 1988Z and SN 1997ab, the two slowest declining IIn supernovae on record. We find that the light curves of both objects can be reproduced by the echo model. However, their rate of decay from peak, color at peak and their observed peak absolute magnitudes when considered together are inconsistent with the echo model. Furthermore, when the observed values of M$_{B}$ are corrected for the effects of dust scattering, the values obtained imply that these supernovae have unrealistically high luminosities. We conclude that light echoes cannot properly account for the slow decline seen in some IIn's, and that the shock interaction is likely to dominate the continuum emission.

B. Roscherr; B. E. Schaefer

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

Slow bainite: an opportunity to determine the carbon content of the bainitic ferrite during growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of carbon in solid solution in bainitic ferrite at the early stage of transformation has been directly determined by atom probe tomography at 200 C, taking advantage of the extremely slow transformation kinetics of a novel nanocrystalline steel. Results demonstrated that the original bainitic ferrite retains much of the carbon content of the parent austenite providing strong evidence that bainite transformation is essentially displacive in nature. In this work, the carbon content of the bainitic ferrite away from any carbon-enriched regions has been determined by atom probe tomography as the bainite transformation progresses at 200 C in this nanocrystalline steel. Results provide experimental evidence for the mechanism controlling bainitic ferrite growth in steels.

Caballero, Francesca G. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Garcia-Mateo, C. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Spectral Slope Variation at Proton Scales from Fast to Slow Solar Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high resolution time intervals from WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at $1$ AU and $0.56$ AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between $-3.75$ and $-1.75$ and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge where the speed is higher and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated to the fluctuations within the inertial range, higher the power steeper the slope. Our result support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

Bruno, R; Telloni, D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

An explanation for the kHz-QPO twin peaks separation in slow and fast rotators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Letter we further explore the idea, suggested previously by Klu{\\'z}niak and collaborators, that the high frequency QPOs may be explained as a resonant coupling between the neutron star spin and two epicyclic modes of accretion disk oscillations. We confirm result of Lee, Abramowicz and Klu{\\'z}niak (\\cite{Lee2004}) that the strongest response occurs when the frequency difference of the two modes equals either the spin frequency (for ``slow rotators'') or half of it (for ``fast rotators''). New points discussed in this Letter are: (1) We suggest that the coupling is gravitational, and due to a non-axially symmetric structure of the rotating neutron star. (2) We found that two excited modes may be both connected to vertical oscillations of the disk, and that strong gravity is not needed to excite the modes.

J. Petri

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

An elastic, plastic, viscous model for slow shear of a liquid foam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We suggest a scalar model for deformation and flow of an amorphous material such as a foam or an emulsion. To describe elastic, plastic and viscous behaviours, we use three scalar variables: elastic deformation, plastic deformation rate and total deformation rate; and three material specific parameters: shear modulus, yield deformation and viscosity. We obtain equations valid for different types of deformations and flows slower than the relaxation rate towards mechanical equilibrium. In particular, they are valid both in transient or steady flow regimes, even at large elastic deformation. We discuss why viscosity can be relevant even in this slow shear (often called "quasi-static") limit. Predictions of the storage and loss moduli agree with the experimental literature, and explain with simple arguments the non-linear large amplitude trends.

Philippe Marmottant; François Graner

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

Testing T Invariance in the Interaction of Slow Neutrons with Aligned Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of five-fold (P even, T odd) correlation in the interaction of slow polarized neutrons with aligned nuclei is a possible way of testing the time reversal invariance due to the expected enhancement of T violating effects in compound resonances. Possible nuclear targets are discussed which can be aligned both dynamically as well as by the "brute force" method at low temperature. A statistical estimation is performed of the five-fold correlation for low lying p wave compound resonances of the $^{121}$Sb, $^{123}$Sb and $^{127}$I nuclei. It is shown that a significant improvement can be achieved for the bound on the intensity of the fundamental parity conserving time violating (PCTV) interaction.

A. L. Barabanov; A. G. Beda

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

250

Slow Strain Rate Testing of Alloy 22 in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed engineering barriers for the high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain include a double walled container and a detached drip shield. The candidate material for the external wall of the container is Alloy 22 (N06022). One of the anticipated degradation modes for the containers could be environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the effect of applied potential and temperature on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to EAC in simulated concentrated water (SCW) and other environments using the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). Results show that the temperature and applied potential have a strong influence on the susceptibility of Alloy 22 to suffer EAC in SCW solution. Limited results show that sodium fluoride solution is more detrimental than sodium chloride solution.

King, K J; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

251

A scheme comparison of Autler-Townes based slow light in inhomogeneously broadened quantum dot media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a method to achieve significant optical signal delays exploiting the effect of Autler-Townes splitting in an inhomogeneously broadened quantum dot medium. The absorption and slow-down effects are compared for three schemes i.e. $\\Xi$, V and $\\Lambda$, corresponding to different excitation configurations. Qualitative differences of the V-scheme compared to the $\\Xi$- and $\\Lambda$-scheme are found, which show that features of Autler-Townes splitting are only revealed in the V-scheme. The underlying physical mechanisms causing this discrepancy are analyzed and discussed. Finally we compare field propagation calculations of the schemes showing significantly larger achievable signal delays for the V-scheme despite finite absorption of the coupling field. This opens the possibility for using waveguide structures for both coupling and probe fields, thus significantly increasing the achievable signal delays.

Per Lunnemann; Jesper Mørk

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

252

$Om$ diagnostic applied to scalar field models and slowing down of cosmic acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the $Om$ diagnostic to models for dark energy based on scalar fields. In case of the power law potentials, we demonstrate the possibility of slowing down the expansion of the Universe around the present epoch for a specific range in the parameter space. For these models, we also examine the issues concerning the age of Universe. We use the $Om$ diagnostic to distinguish the $\\Lambda$CDM model from non minimally coupled scalar field, phantom field and generic quintessence models. Our study shows that the $Om$ has zero, positive and negative curvatures for $\\Lambda$CDM, phantom and quintessence models respectively. We use an integrated data base (SN+Hubble+BAO+CMB) for bservational analysis and demonstrate that $Om$ is a useful diagnostic to apply to observational data.

Shahalam, M; Agarwal, Abhineet

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

New Technology drafts: production and Improvements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alla Lapidus, head of the DOE Joint Genome Institute's Finishing group, gives a talk on how the DOE JGI's microbial genome sequencing pipeline has been adapted to accommodate next generation sequencing platforms at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

Lapidus, Alla [DOE Joint Genome Institute

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

254

The interrelationship between environmental goals, productivity improvement, and increased energy efficiency in integrated paper and steel plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an investigation into the interrelationships between plant-level productivity, energy efficiency, and environmental improvements for integrated pulp and paper mills and integrated steel mills in the US. Integrated paper and steel plants are defined as those facilities that use some form of onsite raw material to produce final products (for example, paper and paperboard or finished steel). Fully integrated pulp and paper mills produce onsite the pulp used to manufacture paper from virgin wood fiber, secondary fiber, or nonwood fiber. Fully integrated steel mills process steel from coal, iron ore, and scrap inputs and have onsite coke oven facilities.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Product Demonstrations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Consortium will pursue a number of demonstrations following the general procedure used by DOE's GATEWAY demonstration program. Specific products to be featured in a demonstration may be...

256

Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumption and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.

Beliaev, Alex S; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Fredrickson, Jim K

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 collaboration activities. Progress made by the collaboration in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS techniques applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model demonstrated the potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space. Similar results were obtained using a perturbation approach developed by LANL. Benchmark measurements have been successfully conducted at LANL and at RPI using their respective LSDS instruments. The ISU and UNLV collaborative effort is focused on the fabrication and testing of prototype fission chambers lined with ultra-depleted 238U and 232Th, and uranium deposition on a stainless steel disc using spiked U3O8 from room temperature ionic liquid was successful, with improving thickness obtained. In FY2012, the collaboration plans a broad array of activities. PNNL will focus on optimizing its empirical model and minimizing its reliance on calibration data, as well continuing efforts on developing an analytical model. Additional measurements are planned at LANL and RPI. LANL measurements will include a Pu sample, which is expected to provide more counts at longer slowing-down times to help identify discrepancies between experimental data and MCNPX simulations. RPI measurements will include the assay of an entire fresh fuel assembly for the study of self-shielding effects as well as the ability to detect diversion by detecting a missing fuel pin in the fuel assembly. The development of threshold neutron sensors will continue, and UNLV will calibrate existing ultra-depleted uranium deposits at ISU.

Warren, Glen A.; Casella, Andrew M.; Haight, R. C.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Danon, Yaron; Hatchett, D.; Becker, Bjorn; Devlin, M.; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.; Gavron, A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; O'Donnell, J. M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Detection of slow atoms confined in a Cesium vapor cell by spatially separated pump and probe laser beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of slow atoms confined in a Cesium vapor cell by spatially separated pump and probe laser distribution of atoms in a thermal gas is usually described through a Maxwell-Boltzman distribution of energy, and assumes isotropy. As a consequence, the probability for an atom to leave the surface under an azimuth

Boyer, Edmond

259

Slow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the ramp current-voltage curves, oscillated and was larger during the silent phase than during the activeSlow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations Jianhua Ren,1 Arthur Sherman,2 Richard Bertram,3 Paulette B

Bertram, Richard

260

The role of linear and voltage-dependent ionic currents in the generation of slow wave oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of linear and voltage-dependent ionic currents in the generation of slow wave oscillations voltages, re- spectively. Oscillations are created by inward currents driving the cell away from rest voltages and one outward current that repolarizes the cell. Such currents have traditionally been assumed

Bose, Amitabha

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

On a slow drift of a massive piston in an ideal gas that remains at mechanical equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On a slow drift of a massive piston in an ideal gas that remains at mechanical equilibrium N@math.uab.edu Fax: 1-205-934-9025 February 18, 2004 Abstract We consider a heavy piston in an infinite cylinder surrounded by ideal gases on both sides. The piston moves under elastic collisions with gas atoms. We assume

Chernov, Nikolai

262

WHAT TO DO ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE? Slowing the rate of carbon burning won't stop global warming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHAT TO DO ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE? #12;Slowing the rate of carbon burning won't stop global warming: most CO2 stays in the air over a century, though individual molecules come and go. Global warming. But we need to research it -- starting now. If global warming gets bad, public opinion may suddently flip

Baez, John

263

Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray{velocity surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray The contravariant components of the wave{propagation metric tensor equal half the second{order partial derivatives. The relations of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvature matrix and Gaussian curvature

Cerveny, Vlastislav

264

Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

New Hampshire, University of

265

Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 7 2002 228 234 Slow dynamics in glasses, gels and foams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 7 2002 228 234 Slow dynamics in glasses, gels and foams Luca CipellettiU , Laurence Ramos Groupe de Dynamique des Phases Condensees, Uni. Keywords: Aging; Lightscattering; Glass; Gel; Colloids; Rheolgy 1. Introduction Disordered, out

Weeks, Eric R.

266

Slow positron annihilation spectroscopy and electron microscopy of electron beam evaporated cobalt and nickel silicides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal silicide thin films on single-crystal silicon substrates are the subject of much research, due to their applications as electrical contacts and interconnects, diffusion barriers, low resistance gates, and field-assisted positron moderators, among others. Defects within the silicide layer and/or at the silicide/silicon interface are detrimental to device performance, since they can act as traps for charge carriers, as well as positrons. Pinholes penetrating the film are another detriment particularly for cobalt silicide films, since they allow electrons to permeate the film, rather than travel ballistically, in addition to greatly increasing surface area for recombination events. A series of epitaxial cobalt and nickel silicide thin films, deposited via electron-beam evaporation and annealed at various temperatures, have been grown on single-crystal silicon (111) substrates, in an effort to establish a relationship between deposition and processing parameters and film quality. The films have been analyzed by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, sputter depth profile Auger, and slow positron annihilation spectroscopy. The latter has been shown to both correlate and complement the traditional electron microscopy results.

Frost, R.L.; DeWald, A.B. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (USA)); Zaluzec, M.; Rigsbee, J.M. (University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA)); Nielsen, B.; Lynn, K.G. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Last Passage Percolation with a Defect Line and the Solution of the Slow Bond Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We address the question of how a localized microscopic defect, especially if it is small with respect to certain dynamic parameters, affects the macroscopic behavior of a system. In particular we consider two classical exactly solvable models: Ulam's problem of the maximal increasing sequence and the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. For the first model, using its representation as a Poissonian version of directed last passage percolation on $\\mathbb R^2$, we introduce the defect by placing a positive density of extra points along the diagonal line. For the latter, the defect is produced by decreasing the jump rate of each particle when it crosses the origin. The powerful algebraic tools for studying these processes break down in the perturbed versions of the models. Taking a more geometric approach we show that in both cases the presence of an arbitrarily small defect affects the macroscopic behavior of the system: in Ulam's problem the time constant increases, and for the exclusion process the flux of particles decreases. This, in particular, settles the longstanding Slow Bond Problem.

Riddhipratim Basu; Vladas Sidoravicius; Allan Sly

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

Dethlefsen, R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Glass-like slow dynamics in a colloidal solid with multiple ground states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phase ordering dynamics of a two dimensional model colloidal solid using molecular dynamics simulations. The colloid particles interact with each other with a Hamaker potential modified by the presence of equatorial "patches" of attractive and negative regions. The total interaction potential between two such colloids is, therefore, strongly directional and has three-fold symmetry. Working in the canonical ensemble, we determine the tentative phase diagram in the density-temperature plane which features three distinct crystalline ground states viz, a low density honeycomb solid followed by a rectangular solid at higher density, which eventually transforms to a close packed triangular structure as the density is increased further. We show that when cooled rapidly from the liquid phase along isochores, the system undergoes a transition to a "strong glass" while slow cooling gives rise to crystalline phases. We claim that geometrical frustration arising from the presence of many crystalline ground states causes glassy ordering and dynamics in this solid. Our results may be easily confirmed by suitable experiments on patchy colloids.

Chandana Mondal; Smarajit Karmakar; Surajit Sengupta

2014-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

270

Inverse patchy colloids with small patches: fluid structure and dynamical slowing down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse Patchy Colloids (IPCs) differ from conventional patchy particles because their patches repel (rather than attract) each other and attract (rather than repel) the part of the colloidal surface that is free of patches. These particular features occur, .e.g., in heterogeneously charged colloidal systems. Here we consider overall neutral IPCs carrying two, relatively small, polar patches. Previous studies of the same model under planar confinement have evidenced the formation of branched, disordered aggregates composed of ring-like structures. We investigate here the bulk behavior of the system via molecular dynamics simulations, focusing on both the structure and the dynamics of the fluid phase in a wide region of the phase diagram. Additionally, the simulation results for the static observables are compared to the Associative Percus Yevick solution of an integral equation approach based on the multi-density Ornstein-Zernike theory. A good agreement between theoretical and numerical quantities is observed even in the region of the phase diagram where the slowing down of the dynamics occurs.

Silvano Ferrari; Emanuela Bianchi; Yura V. Kalyuzhnyi; Gerhard Kahl

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

273

Precise inversion of logged slownesses for elastic parameters in a gas shale formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dipole sonic log data recorded in a vertical pilot well and the associated production well are analyzed over a 200×1100-ft section of a North American gas shale formation. The combination of these two wells enables angular ...

Miller, Douglas E.

274

Ash-Based Building Panels Production and Demonstration of Aerock Decking Building Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) of Laramie, Wyoming and AeRock, LLC of Eagar, Arizona (formerly of Bellevue, Washington) partnered, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE-NETL), to support the development of rapid-setting, ash-based, fiber-incorporated ''green'' building products. Green building materials are a rapidly growing trend in the building and construction industry in the US. A two phase project was implemented wherein Phase I assessed, through chemical and physical testing, ash, ash-based cement and fiber composites exhibiting superior structural performance when applied to the AeRock mixing and extrusion process and involved the conduct of pilot-scale production trials of AeRock products, and wherein Phase II involved the design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale plant to confirm production issues and to produce panels for performance evaluations. Phase I optimized the composite ingredients including ash-based cement, Class F and Class C DFGD ash, and various fiber reinforcements. Additives, such as retardants and accelerators, were also evaluated as related to extruder performance. The optimized composite from the Phase I effort was characterized by a modulus of rupture (MOR) measured between 1,931 and 2,221 psi flexural strength, comparable to other wood and non-wood building materials. Continuous extrusion of the optimum composite in the AeRock pilot-scale facility produced an excellent product that was assembled into a demonstration for exhibit and durability purposes. Finishes, from plain to marbled, from bright reds to muted earth tones and with various textures, could easily be applied during the mixing and extrusion process. The successful pilot-scale demonstration was in turn used to design the production parameters and extruder dies for a commercial scale demonstration at Ultrapanel Pty, Ltd of Ballarat, Australia under Phase II. The initial commercial-scale production trials showed green product sagging, as a result of the die design. After the third die was acquired and fitted to the extruder, satisfactory decking and structural panels were produced. Cured decking was shipped to the US but experienced significant breakage and damage during transport. Subsequent evaluations concluded that an alternative die design was needed that would produce a more robust product resistant to damage. In summary, AeRock Decking can be a commercially-viable non-wood alternative decking product. This project has provided WRI and AeRock the knowledge and understanding to make AeRock Decking a commercial success. However, a commercial demonstration that produces quality product and the subsequent evaluation of its performance is needed before commercial acceptance of the AeRock product.

Alan E. Bland; Jesse Newcomer

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Issues in Value-Added Products from Biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While biomass conversion to energy products has been the primary focus of most development efforts over the past 30 years, process development for chemical products is an area of increasing effort more recently. Although the fuels market is likely to allow the largest impact for renewable resources in the world economy, chemical products can also be more than just niche market applications. However, the specific chemical processing required for refined chemical products requires improved chemical handling methods for separations and purifications, as well as improved catalyst systems. Development of these unit operations has lagged behind the process research focused on the finished products. This paper will describe some of the critical processing issues that need to be addressed to allow biomass feedstocks to make a real impact in the chemicals market. The paper will also describe some of the process research which has been performed or is now underway in our laboratory and others'. Areas to be discussed include biomass component separation, catalyst development for aqueous processing, and trace component effects in catalytic processing of biomass feedstocks.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Resistance of fast-and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone-induced attack by western balsam bark beetle (Coleoptera  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resistance of fast- and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone- induced attack by western balsam the resistance of fast- and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone-induced attack by western balsam bark beetle at two sites in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. 2 Attack success by the beetle and subsequent

Lindgren, Staffan

277

Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slow” growth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g}?/?T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g}?/?T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max}?/?T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

Orava, J.; Greer, A. L., E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan and Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Plutonium Finishing Plant - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design Passive SolarCenterYou are here:and Protein/RNA

279

Assessing the Significance of Above- and Belowground Carbon Allocation of Fast- and Slow-Growing Families of Loblolly Pine - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this project we experimentally evaluated the below-ground biomass and carbon allocation and partitioning of four different fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine located in Scotland County, NC, in an effort to increase the long-term performance of the crop. The trees were subjected to optimal nutrition and control since planting in 1993. Destructive harvests in 1998 and 2000 were used for whole?plant biomass estimates and to identify possible family differences in carbon acquisition (photosynthesis) and water use efficiency. At regular intervals throughout each year we sampled tissues for carbohydrate analyses to assess differences in whole-tree carbon storage. Mini rhizotron observation tubes were installed to monitor root system production and turnover. Stable isotope analysis was used to examine possible functional differences in water and nutrient acquisition of root systems between the various families. A genetic dissection of root ontogenic and architectural traits, including biomass partitioning, was conducted using molecular markers to better understand the functional implications of these traits on resource acquisition and whole-plant carbon allocation.

Topa, M. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Retzlaff, W. A.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Exercise overloading in the equine: cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to a combined long, slow, distance and interval training exercise regimen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXERCISE OVERLOADING IN THE EQUINE CARDIORESPIRATORY AND METABOLIC RESPONSE TO A COMBINED LONG& SLOW, DISTANCE AND INTERVAL TRAINING EXERCISE REGIMEN A Thesis by LEANN FRANCINE DROZD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... AND INTERVAL TRAINING EXERCISE REGIMEN A Thesis by LEANN FRANCINE DROZD Approved as to style and content by: Gary . P er (Chair of Committee) George T. Jessup (Member) James G. Anderson (Member) G. C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1988 ABSTRACT...

Drozd, Leann Francine

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The use of starch matrices in slow release fungicide formulations and their efficacy in controlling Phymatotrichum omnivorum on cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. omnivorum 23 First Experiment ? In Vitro Analysis of Hyphal Inhibition. Second Experiment - In Vitro Analysis of Inhib1tion of Sclerotial Germination. . . . . 23 24 Evaluation of the Release of Propiconazole from the Starch Matrices under... pesticide. . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Growth of Ph matotr1chum omnivorum hyphae on potato dextrose agar amended w1th decanted incubation water of slow release starch matrices with entrapped propiconazo le. . . . . . . . 46 Ouench curves for three starch...

Small, Theresa Marie

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Maximizing net income for pork producers by determining the interaction between dietary energy concentration and stocking density on finishing pig performance, welfare, and carcass composition.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Marketplace volatility in the pork industry demands that producers re-evaluate production practices in order to remain profitable. Stocking density and dietary energy concentration independently affect… (more)

Rozeboom, Garrett

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

First Measurements with a Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometer at LANSCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the 750 µs proton pulses from the linac into pulses of typically 250-300 ns. The neutron production is realized by spallation in a tungsten target. The tungsten target is a cylinder 25 cm long and 736 CP769. The neutron spectrum from the tungsten is a typical spallation neutron flux, with a maximum at 2 MeV. Energy

Danon, Yaron

284

Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a numerical scheme to study the dynamics of slow light and light storage in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) medium at finite temperatures. Allowing for the motional coupling, we derive a set of coupled Schroedinger equations describing a boosted closed three-level EIT system according to the principle of Galilean relativity. The dynamics of a uniformly moving EIT medium can thus be determined by numerically integrating the coupled Schroedinger equations for atoms plus one ancillary Maxwell-Schroedinger equation for the probe pulse. The central idea of this work rests on the assumption that the loss of ground-state coherence at finite temperatures can be ascribed to the incoherent superposition of density matrices representing the EIT systems with various velocities. Close agreements are demonstrated in comparing the numerical results with the experimental data for both slow light and light storage. In particular, the distinct characters featuring the decay of ground-state coherence can be well verified for slow light and light storage. This warrants that the current scheme can be applied to determine the decaying profile of the ground-state coherence as well as the temperature of the EIT medium.

Su, Shih-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Yu, Ite A. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Gou, Shih-Chuan [Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 50058, Taiwan (China); Horng, Tzyy-Leng [Department of Applied Mathematics, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40074, Taiwan (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today's confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model, which accounts for self-shielding effects using empirical basis vectors calculated from the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a matrix containing the true self-shielding functions of the used fuel assembly models. The potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space was demonstrated. Also, in FY2011, PNNL continued to develop an analytical model. Such efforts included the addition of six more non-fissile absorbers in the analytical shielding function and the non-uniformity of the neutron flux across the LSDS assay chamber. A hybrid analytical-empirical approach was developed to determine the mass of total Pu (sum of the masses of 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu), which is an important quantity in safeguards. Results using this hybrid method were of approximately the same accuracy as the pure empirical approach. In addition, total Pu with much better accuracy with the hybrid approach than the pure analytical approach. In FY2012, PNNL will continue efforts to optimize its empirical model and minimize its reliance on calibration data. In addition, PNNL will continue to develop an analytical model, considering effects such as neutron-scattering in the fuel and cladding, as well as neutrons streaming through gaps between fuel pins in the fuel assembly.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

PRODUCTION CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE CLASSICAL PET NUCLIDES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Medicine is the specialty of medical imaging, which utilizes a variety of radionuclides incorporated into specific compounds for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. During recent years, research efforts associated with this discipline have concentrated on the decay characteristics of particular radionuclides and the design of unique radiolabeled tracers necessary to achieve time-dependent molecular images. The specialty is expanding with specific Positron emission tomography (PET) and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals allowing for an extension from functional process imaging in tissue to pathologic processes and nuclide directed treatments. PET is an example of a technique that has been shown to yield the physiologic information necessary for clinical oncology diagnoses based upon altered tissue metabolism. Most PET drugs are currently produced using a cyclotron at locations that are in close proximity to the hospital or academic center at which the radiopharmaceutical will be administered. In November 1997, a law was enacted called the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 which directed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to establish appropriate procedures for the approval of PET drugs in accordance with section 505 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and to establish current good manufacturing practice requirements for such drugs. At this time the FDA is considering adopting special approval procedures and cGMP requirements for PET drugs. The evolution of PET radiopharmaceuticals has introduced a new class of ''drugs'' requiring production facilities and product formulations that must be closely aligned with the scheduled clinical utilization. The production of the radionuclide in the appropriate synthetic form is but one critical component in the manufacture of the finished radiopharmaceutical.

FINN,R.; SCHLYER,D.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

288

A synthetic medium for the production of candidin by Streptomyces viridoflavus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, glucose, and the nitrogen source, soybean meal, were sixty-five and twenty-two grams per liter respectively. The maximum yield of candidin produced using these concentrations was 3. 69 grams per liter. Eight days incubation were required. Slow feed... Effect of Glucose Concentration on Production and Final pH 37 Effect of Asparagine Concentration on Production and Final pH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Factorial Experiment, Effect of Various Concentra- tions...

Bailey, Don Wayne

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Manufacturing Ultra-Precision Meso-scale Products by Coining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for replicating ultra-precision, meso-scale features onto a near-net-shape metallic blank has been demonstrated. The 'coining' technology can be used to imprint a wide range of features and/or profiles into two opposing surfaces. The instrumented system provides the ability to measure and control the product thickness and total thickness variation (TTV). The coining mechanism relies on kinematic principles to accurately and efficiently produce ultra-precision work pieces without the production of by products such as machining chips, or grinding swarf while preserving surface finish, material structure and overall form. Coining has been developed as a niche process for manufacturing difficult to machine, millimeter size components made from materials that may present hazardous conditions. In the case described in this paper a refractory metal part, tantalum (Ta) was produced with 4 {micro}m peak to valley 50 {micro}m special wavelength sine wave coined into the surface of 50 {micro}m blank. This technique shows promise for use on ductile materials that cannot be precision machined with conventional single crystal diamond tooling and/or has strict requirements on subsurface damage, surface impurities and grain structure. As a production process, it can be used to reduce manufacturing costs where large numbers of ultra-precision, repetitive designs are required and produce parts out of hazardous materials without generating added waste.

Seugling, R M; Davis, P J; Rickens, K; Osmer, J; Brinksmeier, E

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

related sets of genes (e.g. energy production in PseudomonasProteins involved in energy production (function C) tend toan excess of high-S:F energy production genes (Figure 3B).

Shapiro, B. Jesse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Enhancing Neutron Beam Production with a Convoluted Moderator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a new concept for a neutron moderating assembly resulting in the more efficient production of slow neutron beams. The Convoluted Moderator, a heterogeneous stack of interleaved moderating material and nearly transparent single-crystal spacers, is a directionally-enhanced neutron beam source, improving beam effectiveness over an angular range comparable to the range accepted by neutron beam lines and guides. We have demonstrated gains of 50% in slow neutron intensity for a given fast neutron production rate while simultaneously reducing the wavelength-dependent emission time dispersion by 25%, both coming from a geometric effect in which the neutron beam lines view a large surface area of moderating material in a relatively small volume. Additionally, we have confirmed a Bragg-enhancement effect arising from coherent scattering within the single-crystal spacers. We have not observed hypothesized refractive effects leading to additional gains at long wavelength. In addition to confirmation of the validity of the Convoluted Moderator concept, our measurements provide a series of benchmark experiments suitable for developing simulation and analysis techniques for practical optimization and eventual implementation at slow neutron source facilities.

Iverson, Erik B [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, David V [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University] [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University; Muhrer, Guenter [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ansell, Stuart [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL] [ORNL; Dalgliesh, Robert [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS)] [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Lu, Wei [ORNL] [ORNL; Kaiser, Helmut [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University] [Center for the Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary The Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign is supporting a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of using Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) to conduct direct, independent and accurate assay of fissile isotopes in used fuel assemblies. The collaboration consists of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Idaho State University (ISU). There are three main challenges to implementing LSDS to assay used fuel assemblies. These challenges are the development of an algorithm for interpreting the data with an acceptable accuracy for the fissile masses, the development of suitable detectors for the technique, and the experimental benchmarking of the approach. This report is a summary of the progress in these areas made by the collaboration during FY2012. Significant progress was made on the project in FY2012. Extensive characterization of a “semi-empirical” algorithm was conducted. For example, we studied the impact on the accuracy of this algorithm by the minimization of the calibration set, uncertainties in the calibration masses, and by the choice of time window. Issues such a lead size, number of required neutrons, placement of the neutron source and the impact of cadmium around the detectors were also studied. In addition, new algorithms were developed that do not require the use of plutonium fission chambers. These algorithms were applied to measurement data taken by RPI and shown to determine the 235U mass within 4%. For detectors, a new concept for a fast neutron detector involving 4He recoil from neutron scattering was investigated. The detector has the potential to provide a couple of orders of magnitude more sensitivity than 238U fission chambers. Progress was also made on the more conventional approach of using 232Th fission chambers as fast neutron detectors. For benchmarking measurements, we continue to improve our understanding of the experimental setup by studying issues such as the effect of room return and impurities in the lead. RPI performed a series of experiments with a fresh fuel pin and various 235U and 239Pu sources. A comparison between simulations and measurements shows significant deviations after 200 µs for both 235U and 239Pu samples, as well as significant deviations at earlier times for the 239Pu sample. The FY2013 effort will shift focus to planning for a Technical Readiness Level 5 demonstration. The primary deliverable for the year will be a plan on how to do this demonstration. The plan will include measurement design, sample acquisition, sample handling, cost estimate, schedule and assumptions. Research will continue on the 4He detector, algorithms development, thorium fission chambers and benchmarking measurements involving sub assemblies of fresh fuel.

Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, A.; Haight, R. C.; Harris, Jason; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Stewart, T.; Weltz, Adam

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

RMOTC - Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQuality AssuranceProduction RMOTC

294

Insulin-like Growth Factor-I and Slow, Bi-directional Perfusion Enhance the Formation of Tissue-Engineered Cardiac Grafts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could ...

Cheng, Mingyu

295

Rate coefficient for the chemi-ionization in slow Li*(n)+Li and Na*(n)+Na collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemi-ionization processes in slow-atom-Rydberg-atom collisions are considered in this paper. A version of the semiclassical method of rate coefficient calculation that is free of the presumptions which significantly limited its applicability previously is presented. The method is applied to the cases of Li*(n)+Li and Na*(n)+Na collisions for the principal quantum numbers 5{<=}n{<=}25 and temperatures 600{<=}T{<=}1200 K. The results of calculation of the rate coefficients of the corresponding chemi-ionization processes are compared to the existing experimental data from the literature.

Ignjatovic, Lj.M.; Mihajlov, A.A. [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Slow motions detection in polybutadiene through novel analyses of MSE refocusing efficiency and spin-lattice relaxation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel methods to analyze NMR signals dominated by dipolar interaction are applied to the study of slow relaxation motions in polybutadiene approaching its glass transition temperature. The analysis is based on a recently developed model where the time dependence in an ensemble of dipolar interacting spin pairs is described without resorting to the Anderson-Weiss approximation. The ability to catch relevant features of the $\\alpha$ relaxation process is emphasized. In particular, it is shown that the temperature profile of the Magic Sandwich Echo efficiency carries information on the frequency profile of the $\\alpha$-process. The analysis is corroborated by the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time.

Simone Sturniolo; Marco Pieruccini; Maurizio Corti; Attilio Rigamonti

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

Floods on Nottely River and Martin, Peachtree, and Slow Creeks in Cherokee County, North Carolina. Flood report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the flood situation along the Nottely River from the North Carolina-Georgia State line, at stream mile 18.72, downstream to the head of Hiwassee Reservoir backwater, stream mile 6.50; Martin Creek from mile 6.12 downstream to mile 1.38; Peachtree Creek from Ammon Bottom at mile 4.78 downstream to its mouth at Hiwassee River mile 100,68; and Slow Creek from mile 3.15 downstream to its mouth at Peachtree Creek mile 1.98.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nulljob product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on the authors' Central VAX Cluster led them to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NULLJOB product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on our Central VAX Cluster led us to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working Document 9. Economics of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed feasibility study of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida encompasses all phases of production - from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The project includes the following components: (1) production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; (2) establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; and (3) engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-year methanol production facility. In addition, the potential environmental impacts of the whole project were examined, safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol were analyzed, and site specific cost estimates were made. The economics of the project are presented here. Each of the three major components of the project - tissue culture lab, energy plantation, and methanol refinery - are examined individually. In each case a site specific analysis of the potential return on investment was conducted.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A A L B O R G U N I V E R S I T Y Finishing report for the `SolcelleInverter' project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Module is an electrical product and is the combination of a single module and a single power electronic inverter-Module Inverter W.3 Analysis of Possible Solutions for Inverter W.4 Development And Simulation of New Topologies W-03-05 (Automatic updated) Path: U:\\SolcelleInverter\\Word\\SOTA.doc Contact: M.Sc.E.E. ­ Power Electronics Developer

302

Language Production General Points about Speech Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Language Production #12;General Points about Speech Production 15 speech sounds per second => 2, shall I say `t' or `d'' (Levelt) Production side has gotten less attention in Psycholinguistics than the comprehension side. Evidence for speech production behaviour has until recently relied heavily on speech errors

Coulson, Seana

303

Introduction of a method for presenting health-based impacts of the emission from products, based on emission measurements of materials used in manufacturing of the products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for presenting the health impact of emissions from furniture is introduced, which could be used in the context of environmental product declarations. The health impact is described by the negative indoor air quality potential, the carcinogenic potential, the mutagenic and reprotoxic potential, the allergenic potential, and the toxicological potential. An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed by testing both the materials used for production of the furniture and the complete piece of furniture, in order to compare the results gained by adding emissions of material with results gained from testing the finished piece of furniture. Calculating the emission from a product based on the emission from materials used in the manufacture of the product is a new idea. The relation between calculated results and measured results from the same products differ between the four pieces of furniture tested. Large differences between measured and calculated values are seen for leather products. More knowledge is needed to understand why these differences arise. Testing materials allows us to compare different suppliers of the same material. Four different foams and three different timber materials are tested, and the results vary between materials of the same type. If the manufacturer possesses this type of knowledge of the materials from the subcontractors it could be used as a selection criterion according to production of low emission products. -- Highlights: • A method for presenting health impact of emissions is introduced. • An experimental study of emissions from four pieces of furniture is performed. • Health impact is calculated based on sum of contribution from the materials used. • Calculated health impact is compared to health impact of the manufactured product. • The results show that health impact could be useful in product development and for presentation in EPDs.

Jørgensen, Rikke Bramming, E-mail: rikke.jorgensen@iot.ntnu.no

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cosmogenic radionuclide production in NaI(Tl) crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of long-lived radioactive isotopes in materials due to the exposure to cosmic rays on Earth surface can be an hazard for experiments demanding ultra-low background conditions, typically performed deep underground. Production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in all the materials present in the experimental set-up, as well as the corresponding cosmic rays exposure history, must be both well known in order to assess the relevance of this effect in the achievable sensitivity of a given experiment. Although NaI(Tl) scintillators are being used in experiments aiming at the direct detection of dark matter since the first nineties of the last century, very few data about cosmogenic isotopes production rates have been published up to date. In this work we present data from two 12.5 kg NaI(Tl) detectors, developed in the frame of the ANAIS project, which were installed inside a convenient shielding at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory just after finishing surface exposure to cosmic rays. The very fast start of data taking allowed to identify and quantify isotopes with half-lives of the order of tens of days. Initial activities underground have been measured and then production rates at sea level have been estimated following the history of detectors; values of about a few tens of nuclei per kg and day for Te isotopes and 22Na and of a few hundreds for I isotopes have been found. These are the first direct estimates of production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in NaI crystals. A comparison of the so deduced rates with calculations using typical cosmic neutron flux at sea level and a carefully selected description of excitation functions will be also presented together with an estimate of the corresponding contribution to the background at low and high energies, which can be relevant for experiments aiming at rare events searches.

J. Amaré; S. Cebrián; C. Cuesta; E. García; C. Ginestra; M. Martínez; M. A. Oliván; Y. Ortigoza; A. Ortiz de Solórzano; C. Pobes; J. Puimedón; M. L. Sarsa; J. A. Villar; P. Villar

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

Universal slow fall-off to the unique AdS infinity in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the following two propositions are proven under the dominant energy condition for the matter field in the higher-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant {lambda}. First, for {lambda}{<=}0 and {alpha}{>=}0 without a fine-tuning to give a unique anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum, where {alpha} is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant, vanishing generalized Misner-Sharp mass is equivalent to the maximally symmetric spacetime. Under the fine-tuning, it is equivalent to the vacuum class I spacetime. Second, under the fine-tuning with {alpha}>0, the asymptotically AdS spacetime in the higher-dimensional Henneaux-Teitelboim sense is only a special class of the vacuum class I spacetime. This means the universal slow fall-off to the unique AdS infinity in the presence of physically reasonable matter.

Maeda, Hideki [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Product service transformation in product-centric firms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In slow or no-growth economies, firms cannot rely solely on recurring business from large, core customers who often delay or cancel capital investments in belt-tightening times. To achieve growth, firms must lever domain ...

Levitt, Benjamin (Benjamin P.)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

309

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Aesculap, Inc. Air Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aesculap, Inc. Air Products Air Products Foundation Alaric Compliance Services, LLC Alvin H. Butz & Herger, Inc. Sodexo Campus Services Sodexo Inc. and Affiliates Stupp Bros., Inc. Sugarbush Products, Inc

Napier, Terrence

311

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

312

A new Energy Saving method of manufacturing ceramic products from waste glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the activities of the DOE Inventions and Innovations sponsored project, ''A New Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Waste Glass.'' The project involved an innovative method of lowering energy costs of manufacturing ceramic products by substituting traditional raw materials with waste glass. The processing method is based on sintering of glass powder at {approx}750 C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 C. The key to the new method is the elimination of previous processing problems, which have greatly limited the use of recycled glass as a ceramic raw material. The technology is aligned with the DOE-OIT Glass Industry Vision and Roadmap, and offers significant energy savings and environmental benefits compared to current technologies. A U.S. patent (No. 6,340,650) covering the technology was issued on January 22, 2002. An international PCT Patent Application is pending with designations made for all PCT regions and countries. The goal of the project was to provide the basis for the design and construction of an energy-efficient manufacturing plant that can convert large volumes of waste glass into high-quality ceramic tile. The main objectives of the project were to complete process development and optimization; construct and test prototype samples; and conduct market analysis and commercialization planning. Two types of ceramic tile products were targeted by the project. The first type was developed during the first year (Phase I) to have a glazed-like finish for applications where slip resistance is not critical, such as wall tile. The processing method optimized in Phase I produces a glossy surface with a translucent appearance, without the extra glazing steps required in traditional tile manufacturing. The second type of product was developed during the second year (Phase II). This product was designed to have an unglazed appearance for applications requiring slip resistance, such as floor tile. The coarser matte finish of this product type was produced by modifying the basic process to include crystalline fillers and partial crystallization of the glass. Additional details of the project results are discussed in Section III.

Haun Labs

2002-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

313

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

314

Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 59, No. 2, August 2011, pp. 16491653 Fission Physics and Cross Section Measurements with a Lead Slowing down  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of methods for assay of used nuclear fuel. The effective energy range for the LSDS is 0.1 eV to 10 ke) A Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS) provides a high neutron flux environment that en- ablesV with energy resolution of about 35%. Two new LSDS applications were recently developed at RPI; the first

Danon, Yaron

315

Two-photon-absorption photodiodes in Si photonic-crystal slow-light Ryo Hayakawa, Norihiro Ishikura, Hong C. Nguyen, and Toshihiko Baba  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-photon-absorption photodiodes in Si photonic-crystal slow-light waveguides Ryo Hayakawa enhancement and non-linear behavior in avalanche photodiodes under high power condition J. Appl. Phys. 113, 044509 (2013) Near-infrared photodetection of -FeSi2/Si heterojunction photodiodes at low temperatures

Baba, Toshihiko

316

Continuous Production of Biodiesel Via an Intensified Reactive/Extractive Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is considered as a means to diversify our supply of transportation fuel, addressing the goal of reducing our dependence on oil. For a number of reasons ranging from production issues to end use, biodiesel represents only a small fraction of the transportation fuel used worldwide. This work addresses the aspect of biodiesel production that limits it to a slow batch process. Conventional production methods are batch in nature, based on the assumption that the rates of the key chemical reactions are slow. The hypothesis motivating this work is that the reaction kinetics for the transesterification of the reagent triglyceride is sufficiently fast, particularly in an excess of catalyst, and that interfacial mass transfer and phase separation control the process. If this is the case, an intensified two-phase reactor adapted from solvent extraction equipment may be utilized to greatly increase biodiesel production rates by increasing interphase transport and phase separation. To prove this idea, we are investigating two aspects: (1) determining the rate-limiting step in biodiesel production by evaluating the reaction kinetics, and (2) enhancing biodiesel production rates by using an intensified reactor. A centrifugal contactor combining interphase mass transfer, chemical reaction, and phase separation is employed for process intensification.

Tsouris, Costas [ORNL] [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL] [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL] [ORNL; Jennings, Hal L [ORNL] [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Measurement and Analysis Plan for Investigation of Spent-Fuel Assay Using Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under funding from the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Materials, Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) program (formerly the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are collaborating to study the viability of lead slowing-down spectroscopy (LSDS) for spent-fuel assay. Based on the results of previous simulation studies conducted by PNNL and LANL to estimate potential LSDS performance, a more comprehensive study of LSDS viability has been defined. That study includes benchmarking measurements, development and testing of key enabling instrumentation, and continued study of time-spectra analysis methods. This report satisfies the requirements for a PNNL/LANL deliverable that describes the objectives, plans and contributing organizations for a comprehensive three-year study of LSDS for spent-fuel assay. This deliverable was generated largely during the LSDS workshop held on August 25-26, 2009 at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). The workshop itself was a prominent milestone in the FY09 MPACT project and is also described within this report.

Smith, Leon E.; Haas, Derek A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Imel, G. R.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Danon, Y.; Beller, D.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

Acoustic waves in a Biot-type porous snow model: The fast slow wave in light snow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wave velocities, attenuation and reflection coefficients in snow can not be explained by the widely used elastic or viscoelastic models for wave propagation. Instead, Biot's model of wave propagation in porous materials should be used. However, the application of Biot's model is difficult due to the large property space of the underlying porous material. Here we use the properties of ice and air as well as empirical relationships to define the properties of snow as a function of porosity. This reduction allows to predict phase velocities and attenuation of the shear- and compressional-waves as functions of porosity or density. For light snow the peculiarity was found that the velocity of the compressional wave of the first kind is lower than the compressional wave of the second kind that is commonly referred to as the "slow" wave. The reversal of the velocities comes with an increase of attenuation for the first compressional wave. This is in line with the common observation that sound is strongly absorbed af...

Sidler, Rolf

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

D-Factor: A Quantitative Model of Application Slow-Down in Multi-Resource Shared Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scheduling multiple jobs onto a platform enhances system utilization by sharing resources. The benefits from higher resource utilization include reduced cost to construct, operate, and maintain a system, which often include energy consumption. Maximizing these benefits comes at a price - resource contention among jobs increases job completion time. In this paper, we analyze slow-downs of jobs due to contention for multiple resources in a system; referred to as dilation factor. We observe that multiple-resource contention creates non-linear dilation factors of jobs. From this observation, we establish a general quantitative model for dilation factors of jobs in multi-resource systems. A job is characterized by a vector-valued loading statistics and dilation factors of a job set are given by a quadratic function of their loading vectors. We demonstrate how to systematically characterize a job, maintain the data structure to calculate the dilation factor (loading matrix), and calculate the dilation factor of each job. We validate the accuracy of the model with multiple processes running on a native Linux server, virtualized servers, and with multiple MapReduce workloads co-scheduled in a cluster. Evaluation with measured data shows that the D-factor model has an error margin of less than 16%. We also show that the model can be integrated with an existing on-line scheduler to minimize the makespan of workloads.

Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL] [ORNL; Huh, Jae-Seok [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Slow Moving Debt Crises  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What circumstances or policies leave sovereign borrowers at the mercy of self-fulfilling increases in interest rates? To answer this question, we study the dynamics of debt and interest rates in a model where default is ...

Lorenzoni, Guido

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Slow Gravitino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When the supersymmetry breaking sector is a fluid background, Lorentz invariance is broken spontaneously. The super-Higgs mechanism leads to a gravitino Lagrangian with Lorentz symmetry violating terms. We analyse the resulting field equations and constraints. We identify the physical spin 3/2 and spin 1/2 helicity states, derive their equations of motion and construct the propagator. The violation of Lorentz symmetry implies that the longitudinal mode has a non-relativistic dispersion relation, whose speed is lower than the speed of light. We briefly comment on possible implications to gravitino cosmology and phenomenology.

Karim Benakli; Luc Darmé; Yaron Oz

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Running Jobs Intermittently Slow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 Resource ProgramEnergyMaterials:Bill WilcoxSpear.0 35.0 55.05

324

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

325

Cryogenic pellet production developments for long-pulse plasma operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long pulse plasma operation on large magnetic fusion devices require multiple forms of cryogenically formed pellets for plasma fueling, on-demand edge localized mode (ELM) triggering, radiative cooling of the divertor, and impurity transport studies. The solid deuterium fueling and ELM triggering pellets can be formed by extrusions created by helium cooled, twin-screw extruder based injection system that freezes deuterium in the screw section. A solenoid actuated cutter mechanism is activated to cut the pellets from the extrusion, inserting them into the barrel, and then fired by the pneumatic valve pulse of high pressure gas. Fuel pellets are injected at a rate up to 10 Hz, and ELM triggering pellets are injected at rates up to 20 Hz. The radiative cooling and impurity transport study pellets are produced by introducing impurity gas into a helium cooled section of a pipe gun where it deposits in-situ. A pneumatic valve is opened and propellant gas is released downstream where it encounters a passive punch which initially accelerates the pellet before the gas flow around the finishes the pellet acceleration. This paper discusses the various cryogenic pellet production techniques based on the twin-screw extruder, pipe gun, and pellet punch designs.

Meitner, S. J.; Baylor, L. R.; Combs, S. K.; Fehling, D. T.; McGill, J. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; McGinnis, W. D.; Rasmussen, D. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1Bethel Valley Rd Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

The response of self-graviting protostellar discs to slow reduction in cooling timescale: the fragmentation boundary revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A number of previous studies of the fragmentation of self-gravitating protostellar discs have modeled radiative cooling with a cooling timescale (t_{cool}) parameterised as a simple multiple (beta_{cool}) of the local dynamical timescale. Such studies have delineated the `fragmentation boundary' in terms of a critical value of beta_{cool} (beta_{crit}), where the disc fragments if beta_{cool} < beta_{crit}. Such an approach however begs the question of how in reality a disc could ever be assembled with beta_{cool} < beta_{crit}. Here we adopt the more realistic approach of gradually reducing beta_{cool}, as might correspond to changes in thermal regime due to secular changes in the disc density profile. We find that when beta_{cool} is gradually reduced (on a timescale longer than t_{cool}), the disc is stabilised against fragmentation, compared with models in which beta_{cool} is reduced rapidly. We therefore conclude that a disc's ability to remain in a self-regulated, self-gravitating state (without fragmentation) is partly dependent on its thermal history, as well as its current cooling rate. Nevertheless, a slow reduction in t_{cool} appears only to lower the fragmentation boundary by about a factor two in t_{cool} and thus only permits maximum alpha values (parameterising the efficiency of angular momentum transfer in the disc) that are about a factor two higher than determined hitherto. Our results therefore do not undermine the notion of a fundamental upper limit to the heating rate that can be delivered by gravitational instabilities before the disc is subject to fragmentation. An important implication of this work, therefore, is that self-gravitating discs can enter into the regime of fragmentation via secular evolution and it is not necessary to invoke rapid (impulsive) events to trigger fragmentation.

C. Clarke; E. Harper-Clark; G. Lodato

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

328

PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM) Lian Ding environments and the entire product lifecycle. There are new requirements for product representations, including: platform/application independence, support for the product lifecycle, rapidly sharing information

Rzepa, Henry S.

329

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization DRAFT REPORT CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS-MILWAUKEE #12;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS Progress Report by Tarun R. Naik, Rakesh of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Technologies

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

331

Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Kinard, W.F. [Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Relative yields of U-235 fission products measured in a high level radioactive sludge at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at Savannah River Site. The 42 fision products make up 98% of the waste sludge. We used inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for the analysis. The relative yields for most of the fission products are in complete agreement with the known relative yields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. Disagreements can be reconciled based on the chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses. This paper presents measurements of the concentrations of 42 (98%) of the long-lived U-235 fission products in a high-level radioactive waste sludge stored at the Savannah River Site. We analyzed the sludge with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The relative yields for most of the fission products agree completely with the known relative vields for the beta decay chains of the two asymmetric: branches of the slow neutron fission of U-235. The chemistry of the fission products in the caustic waste sludges, the neutron fluences in SRS reactors, or interferences in the ICP-MS analyses explain the differences in the measured and calculated results.

Bibler, N.E.; Coleman, C.J. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Kinard, W.F. (Charleston Coll., SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Productivity & Energy Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Productivity & Energy Flow Ecosystem approach, focuses: on flow of energy, water, and nutrients (capture) of energy by autotrophs Gross (total) Net (total ­ costs) Secondary productivity- capture of energy by herbivores http://sciencebitz.com/?page_id=204 What Controls the Primary Productivity

Mitchell, Randall J.

334

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

335

Hydrogen Production CODES & STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS for 2010 · Reduce the cost of distributed production of hydrogen from natural gas and/or liquid fuels to $1 SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pete Devlin #12;Hydrogen

336

Strangeness Production at COSY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

338

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

339

Product Designation Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The process for designating products was developed to maximize energy savings within Federal agencies, which are required by law to purchase products designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Products that meet FEMP-designated efficiency requirements are in the upper 25% of their class in energy efficiency.

340

Covered Product Categories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies are required by law to purchase products that are designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP-designated) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Choose a product category for information about purchasing, installing, and using energy-efficient products.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MECO Production Target Developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be reoptimized Tungsten target Simulations of design parameters with GEANT3 indicate that both production targetMECO Production Target Developments James L. Popp University of California, Irvine NuFact'03 Columbia, June, 2003 #12;June, 2003J.L.Popp, UCI MECO Production Target 2 MECO Collaboration Institute

McDonald, Kirk

342

Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

Burnham, A K

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

Product development practices that matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Product Development consists of activities to transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. Several waves of improvements in technological innovation and product development have ...

Gupta, Nisheeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook Ecosystem Science and Management College ........................................................................................................................... 2 Wood Products Undergraduate Program ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Careers for Wood Products Majors

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

345

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

Sheridan, Jennifer

346

Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design* Emre.ac.uk kazu@umich.edu .Abstract ­ This paper presents a simulation-based method to aid multi-period production capacity planning by quantifying the trade-off between product quality and production cost. The product

Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

347

A Review on Biomass Torrefaction Process and Product Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass Torrefaction is gaining attention as an important preprocessing step to improve the quality of biomass in terms of physical properties and chemical composition. Torrefaction is a slow heating of biomass in an inert or reduced environment to a maximum temperature of approximately 300 C. Torrefaction can also be defined as a group of products resulting from the partially controlled and isothermal pyrolysis of biomass occurring in a temperature range of 200-280 C. Thus, the process can be called a mild pyrolysis as it occurs at the lower temperature range of the pyrolysis process. At the end of the torrefaction process, a solid uniform product with lower moisture content and higher energy content than raw biomass is produced. Most of the smoke-producing compounds and other volatiles are removed during torrefaction, which produces a final product that will have a lower mass but a higher heating value. The present review work looks into (a) torrefaction process and different products produced during the process and (b) solid torrefied material properties which include: (i) physical properties like moisture content, density, grindability, particle size distribution and particle surface area and pelletability; (ii) chemical properties like proximate and ultimate composition; and (iii) storage properties like off-gassing and spontaneous combustion.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Process Intensification in Base-Catalyzed Biodiesel Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel is considered a means to diversify our supply of transportation fuel, addressing the goal of reducing our dependence on oil. Recent interest has resulted in biodiesel manufacture becoming more widely undertaken by commercial enterprises that are interested in minimizing the cost of feedstock materials and waste production, as well as maximizing the efficiency of production. Various means to accelerate batch processing have been investigated. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has experience in developing process intensification methods for nuclear separations, and this paper will discuss how technologies developed for very different applications have been modified for continuous reaction/separation of biodiesel. In collaboration with an industrial partner, this work addresses the aspect of base-catalyzed biodiesel production that limits it to a slow batch process. In particular, we have found that interfacial mass transfer and phase separation control the transesterification process and have developed a continuous two-phase reactor for online production of a methyl ester and glycerol. Enhancing the mass transfer has additional benefits such as being able to use an alcohol-to-oil phase ratio closer to stoichiometric than in conventional processing, hence minimizing the amount of solvent that has to be recycled and reducing post-processing clean up costs. Various technical issues associated with the application of process intensification technology will be discussed, including scale-up from the laboratory to a pilot-scale undertaking.

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL] [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL] [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL] [ORNL; Jennings, Hal L [ORNL] [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

EcoCAR Reaches the Finish Line  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Virginia Tech takes the checkered flag as the inaugural EcoCar competition comes to a close in Washington, D.C.

350

EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The EcoCAR Challenege is a competition that challenges participating students from across North America to re-engineer a vehicle donated by General Motors. With the goal of minimizing the vehicle...

351

Final Environmental Impact Statement - Plutonium Finishing Plant...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

defense to environmental restoration. Current levels of radioactivity in environmental media within and in the vicinity of the Hanford Site reflect contributions from naturally...

352

Flame retardant finishing of cotton fleece.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this research, an inorganic phosphorus-containing flame retardant system was developed for cotton fleece. The aluminum hydroxyphosphate (AHP) formed in situ on cotton by the… (more)

Wu, Xialing

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS April 1, 2011 Mr. Daniel Cohen U.S. Department of Energy Assistant General Council for Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency Office of the General...

354

Furfuryl alcohol cellular product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-extinguishing rigid foam products are formed by polymerization of furfuryl alcohol in the presence of a lightweight, particulate, filler, zinc chloride and selected catalysts.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

355

Sustainable hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Microsystem product development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

Polosky, Marc A.; Garcia, Ernest J.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Biogas Production Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biogas Production Technologies Ruihong Zhang, Professor Biological and Agricultural Engineering University of California, Davis Email: rhzhang@ucdavis.edu Biogas and Fuel Cell...

358

Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Inner product and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Unit II-1 Inner product and orthogonality Unit II-1 Inner products 2 Real inner product · V is a real vector space · for u,vV define a scalar satisfying: linear: symmetric: positive definite: · is called an inner product of u and v · V with an inner product defined is called

Birkett, Stephen

359

Understanding and Improving Software Productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding and Improving Software Productivity Walt Scacchi Institute for Software Research;2 Introduction · What affects software productivity? ­ Software productivity has been one of the most studied aspects of software engineering ­ Goal: review sample of empirical studies of software productivity

Scacchi, Walt

360

The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations.

Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering/Tripoli University, Tripoli (Libya); Abosdell, Alajale M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering/Mergeb University, Garaboli (Libya)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution: A slow positron beam study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

Liu, Y.F. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Qin, Q.L. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Yang, W. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Wen, W. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Zhai, T. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Yu, B. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Liu, D.Y. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Luo, A. [GM Research and Development Center] [GM Research and Development Center; Song, GuangLing [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

363

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-first Century, Hyderabad, India, February 1999. Department of Civil EngineeringandMechanics College) of foundry by-products, including foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

364

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include workability, water requirement, bleeding, segregation, air content, time of set, and temperature with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

365

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-strength materials (CLSM); and, future research needs. The fresh concrete properties discussed are workability, water with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

366

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

367

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash or CFAs. Based on these properties, a number of constructive use options such as #12;pollution by saw mills, pulp mills, and the wood-products industry, by burning a combination of wood products control [3], land application [9,10,11], construction materials [13,14], have been reported. However, most

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

368

WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION V #12;#12;443USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Section Overview Wood Products and Utilization1 John R. Shelly2 Forests are obviously a very important asset to California, and their economic and social value to the state is well documented. Wood

Standiford, Richard B.

369

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION In the United States hydropower supplies 12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity

370

Phenomenology of ``Onium'' Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenology of heavy quarkonia production in hadron collisions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared to data. Commonly used production models are shown to fail in explaining all the experimental findings. The shortcomings of these models are analysed and possible improvements are discussed.

Matteo Cacciari

1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

371

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori- Lynn C. Pennock, and Bruce Ramme Report No. CBU-2001 with numerous projects on the use of by-product materials including utilization of used foundry sand and fly ash;2 INTRODUCTION Wood FA is generated due to combustion of wood for energy production at pulp and paper mills, saw

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

372

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

373

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

374

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

375

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

376

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2004 of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting Concrete Principle Investigator Name. For this proposed project, self-compacting concrete mixtures will be developed for prototype production that utilize

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

377

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik and Rakesh Kumar Report No. CBU-2003-15 REP-509 April 2003 CONCRETE April 2003 REP-509 #12;ii Use of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting in the production of economical self-compacting concrete. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

378

Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An alternative approach to accelerated PF curing can be accomplished with the addition amines or amides. The later functionality undergoes base catalyzed hydrolysis yielding the corresponding carboxyl ate and free amine which rapidly reacts with the phenolic methylol groups facilitating polymerization and curing of the PF resin (Pizzi, 1997).

Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

7. Refinery Net Production of Finished Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ... 576 -7...

380

Indecomposable Fusion Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyse the fusion products of certain representations of the Virasoro algebra for c=-2 and c=-7 which are not completely reducible. We introduce a new algorithm which allows us to study the fusion product level by level, and we use this algorithm to analyse the indecomposable components of these fusion products. They form novel representations of the Virasoro algebra which we describe in detail. We also show that a suitably extended set of representations closes under fusion, and indicate how our results generalise to all (1,q) models.

Matthias R. Gaberdiel; Horst G. Kausch

1996-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Biomass-Derived Energy Products and Co-Products Market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass-Derived Energy Products and Co-Products Market This report identifies the bio-fuels and co & Earth Science & Technology ­ University of Hawai`i at Manoa #12;Biomass-Derived Energy Products and Co agency thereof. #12;Biomass Derived Energy Products and Co- Products Market and Off-take Study Hawaii

382

Texas Alfalfa Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With proper management, alfalfa will produce forage with the highest protein and total digestible nutrient of any hay crop. To aid in alfalfa production, this publication provides information on pre-plant factors, planting and stand establishment...

Stichler, Charles

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%) were used in producing the concrete mixtures. The water to cementitious materials ratio was kept with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

384

Composite production riser assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of a deep water composite production riser from a system perspective is presented, and its advantages are articulated through comparisons with a typical steel riser under identical service conditions. The composite riser joints...

Kim, Won Ki

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

Biomass Energy Production Incentive  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2007 South Carolina enacted the ''Energy Freedom and Rural Development Act'', which provides production incentives for certain biomass-energy facilities. Eligible systems earn $0.01 per kilowatt...

386

Power production and ADS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the power production process in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical systems employing Thorium-232 and Uranium-238 as fuel and examine the demands on the power of the accelerator required.

Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Products Utilization E-mail: ymchun@uwm.edu and F. D. Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute 5776 Coal, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

388

Production of Shale Oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intensive pre-project feasibility and engineering studies begun in 1979 have produced an outline plan for development of a major project for production of shale oil from private lands in the Piceance Basin in western Colorado. This outline plan...

Loper, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

BPA Power Products Catalog (pbl/products)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t iBudget2/4/139/4/2012 BnotMeteringProducts

390

Transmission Losses Product (pbl/products)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfordefault Sign In AboutProducts

391

FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pretreated densified biomass products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A product comprising at least one densified biomass particulate of a given mass having no added binder and comprised of a plurality of lignin-coated plant biomass fibers is provided, wherein the at least one densified biomass particulate has an intrinsic density substantially equivalent to a binder-containing densified biomass particulate of the same given mass and h a substantially smooth, non-flakey outer surface. Methods for using and making the product are also described.

Dale, Bruce E; Ritchie, Bryan; Marshall, Derek

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ethyl Alcohol Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+------.-----.------.------.-----.------.-- o 2 3 4 5 6 Time (hrs.) Batch 29 Cooking and Fermenting Log Corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 682 pounds (12.2 bushels) Natural gas used Meter measures in increments of 100 cubic feet. Cooking.... The following general production steps are the ones presently used and may change with future production experience. 1. The grain is ground in a hammermill with a 1/8- inch screen. Each of the 350 gallon cooker fermenter tanks normally handles a 12...

O'Neal, Henry

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Ethanol production from lignocellulose  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Productivity prediction model based on Bayesian analysis and productivity console  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in poor planning and defies effective control of time and budgets in project management. In this research, we have built a productivity prediction model which uses productivity data from an ongoing project to reevaluate the initial productivity estimate...

Yun, Seok Jun

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

396

Energy Saving Method of Manufacturing Ceramic Products from Fiber Glass Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. fiber glass industry disposes of more than 260,000 tons of industrial fiber glass waste in landfills annually. New technology is needed to reprocess this industrial waste into useful products. A low-cost energy-saving method of manufacturing ceramic tile from fiber glass waste was developed. The technology is based on sintering fiber glass waste at 700-900 degrees C to produce products which traditionally require firing temperatures of >1200 degrees C, or glass-melting temperatures >1500 degrees C. The process also eliminates other energy intensive processing steps, including mining and transportation of raw materials, spray-drying to produce granulated powder, drying pressed tile, and glazing. The technology completely transforms fiber glass waste into a dense ceramic product, so that all future environmental problems in the handling and disposal of the fibers is eliminated. The processing steps were developed and optimized to produce glossy and matte surface finishes for wall and floor tile applications. High-quality prototype tile samples were processed for demonstration and tile standards testing. A Market Assessment confirmed the market potential for tile products produced by the technology. Manufacturing equipment trials were successfully conducted for each step of the process. An industrial demonstration plant was designed, including equipment and operating cost analysis. A fiber glass manufacturer was selected as an industrial partner to commercialize the technology. A technology development and licensing agreement was completed with the industrial partner. Haun labs will continue working to transfer the technology and assist the industrial partner with commercialization beyond the DOE project.

Michael J. Haun

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Design of product development systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of successful new products in less time and using fewer resources is key to the financial success of most consumer product companies. In this thesis we have studied the development of new products and how ...

Aguirre Granados, Adrian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Adding Value to Agricultural Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

You can significantly increase farm income by adding value to agricultural products and marketing those products effectively. This publication explains how to design a value-added product based on consumer preferences and how to build a business...

Anderson, David P.; Hanselka, Daniel

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

JGI Lab Ergo Products Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35 Page 1 of 35 Laboratory Ergonomics Product Arm Supports/Page 2 of 35 Laboratory Ergonomics Product Features/OptionsPage 3 of 35 Laboratory Ergonomics Product SoftEdge Corners

Alexandre, Melanie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Technology's Impact on Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Covered Product Categories (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Energy-Efficient Product Procurement Program and its designated product category list.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

GMP- Biomass Electricity Production Incentive  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Green Mountain Power Corporation (GMP), Vermont's largest electric utility, offers a production incentive to farmers who own systems utilizing anaerobic digestion of agricultural products,...

403

A Quantum Production Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production system is a theoretical model of computation relevant to the artificial intelligence field allowing for problem solving procedures such as hierarchical tree search. In this work we explore some of the connections between artificial intelligence and quantum computation by presenting a model for a quantum production system. Our approach focuses on initially developing a model for a reversible production system which is a simple mapping of Bennett's reversible Turing machine. We then expand on this result in order to accommodate for the requirements of quantum computation. We present the details of how our proposition can be used alongside Grover's algorithm in order to yield a speedup comparatively to its classical counterpart. We discuss the requirements associated with such a speedup and how it compares against a similar quantum hierarchical search approach.

Luís Tarrataca; Andreas Wichert

2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

Home Fruit Production - Figs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TDOC Z TA245.7 B873 NO.1591 B-1591 Texas Agricultural Extension Service HOM? FRUIT PRODUCTION FIGS LIBRARY SEP 2 7 1988 ( A&M Univer it Texas Agricultural Extension Service. Zerle L. Carpenter, Director. The Texas A&M University System.... College Station, Texas / (Blank Pa.ge -ill Original BBDetial . r .. ; :.' l , ::; .: .? HOME FRUIT PRODUCTION - FIGS Calvin G. Lyons and George Ray McEachern* Figs have been a part of Texas homesteads since the early development of the state...

Lyons, Calvin G.; McEachern, George Ray

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Barley Production in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nutrients. It is lower in nitrogenh extract and productive energy per I00 pounds lr feed, Table 4. Research Extension I] area sts 1-1 I" I uv I I - Y Barley is an excellent winter pasture, Figure ; While the total seasonal production for barley... from C.I. 7404, a Korean barley Wintex x Texan Sunrise x Bolivia Comfort, Purdue 1101, Wisconsin barbless, Chevron, Bolivia, Kentucky 1, Purdue 400-17 Texas x Ludwig [(Hooded 16 x Sunrise) x Tenwase] x Wong-Jet Juliaca x Peatland Selection from...

Atkins, I. M.; Gardenshire, J. H.; McDaniel, M. E.; Porter, K. B.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

15 Software Product Line Engineering with the UML: Deriving Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 Software Product Line Engineering with the UML: Deriving Products T. Ziadi and J.-M. Jézéquel Abstract Software product line engineering introduces two new dimensions into the traditional engineering of software-based systems: the variability modeling and the product derivation. The variability gathers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

407

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

408

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a combination with a number of fuels including coal, petroleum coke, natural gas, etc. In the mid 1990s, the unit was firing a combination of coal and petroleum coke to generate energy. It has been established;1 PROJECT 1 - COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OPTIONS Introduction An AFBC system

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

409

Air Products effective way  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PE O A e s a b O T A O ENNST Overview Air Products effective way standard me Departm Shipping has recently y of shipping eans. Air Pro ontainer that es of this pro onduct mark eep accelera eep the cost tilize widely a earch and m m visited Air er needs wer model was cr m approache ms

Demirel, Melik C.

410

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different types of compressed gases, compressed air, carbon dioxide, and a mixed gas. This mixed gas the compressive strength and binding the carbon dioxide in the carbonation-reaction products. The carbonation-reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired power plant

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

411

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presentationand Publicationat the CBIP International Conference onFly Ash Disposal & Utilization,New Delhi, India, January 1998 foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option because it not only causes huge

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

412

Productivity increases in science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today`s scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

Danko, J.E. [ed.; Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Productivity increases in science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study quantifies the impact on the cost of experimentation of synergistic advancements in instrumentation, theory, and computation over the last two decades. The study finds that the productivity of experimental investigation (experimental results/$) is increasing as science is transformed from a linear, isolated approach to a hierarchical, multidisciplinary approach. Developments such as massively parallel processors coupled with instrumental systems with multiple probes and diverse data analysis capabilities will further this transformation and increase the productivity of scientific studies. The complexities and scale of today's scientific challenges are much greater than in the past, however, so that the costs of research are increasing. Even though science is much more productive in terms of the experimental results, the challenges facing scientific investigators are increasing at an even faster pace. New approaches to infrastructure investments must capitalize on the changing dynamics of research and allow the scientific community to maximize gains in productivity so that complex problems can be attacked cost-effectively. Research strategies that include user facilities and coordinated experimental, computational, and theoretical research are needed.

Danko, J.E. (ed.); Young, J.K.; Molton, P.M.; Dirks, J.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Lithium Ion Production NDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lithium Ion Electrode Production NDE and QC Considerations David Wood, Debasish Mohanty, Jianlin Li, and Claus Daniel 12/9/13 EERE Quality Control Workshop #12;2 Presentation name Lithium Ion Electrode to be meaningful and provide electrode and cell QC. #12;3 Presentation name New Directions in Lithium Ion Electrode

415

Covered Product Category: Displays  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including displays, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

416

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project 02-1/3.1D-2 Department of Civil Engineering of technology and market development for controlled low-strength material (CLSM) slurry using Illinois coal ashCenter for By-Products Utilization IMPLEMENTATION OF FLOWABLE SLURRY TECHNOLOGY IN ILLINOIS

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

417

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SOxand NOxcontrol technologies, and FBC that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocks conventional and clean-coal technologies. Fifteen high-sulfur coal ash samples were obtained from eight

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

418

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and paper mills in concrete. INTRODUCTION Concrete is a porous solid that is created by combining four basicCenter for By-Products Utilization CURING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON HIGH-PERFORMANCE CONCRETE By Tarun For presentation and publication at the symposium entitled "High-Performance Concrete and Concrete for Marine

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

419

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-burning electricity gene-ration is the current principal energy source. The total amounts of fly ash and bottom ash, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee #12;The bar graph (Fig. 1) compares the production and utilization of fly shows the percentage of various usage of fly ash in China in 1988 [1]. Fig. 2 Percentage of Fly Ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

420

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Products Utilization University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ABSTRACT This project consisted of performance testing at a typical electric power plant. One of the goals of this project was to determine the feasibility of using. The carbonation reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL #12;-1- CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLYASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL ASHFOR CEMENT -Milwaukee (UWM) Daniel D.Banerjee, Project Manager,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

422

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manager at the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI). He is involved in implementing and monitoring) coal-ash and by replacing up to 9% of aggregates with wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash. Cast of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete and cast-concrete products

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

423

MAIL DISTRIBUTION MAIL PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permit. The use of this permit has numerous restrictions. 2. Any use of the special permit-profit organization postage rate and bulk mailing permit and may result in revocation of said permit. University of the University non-profit permit. 3. All bulk mailings must be coordinated with Mail Production at the earliest

424

Product Information Transparent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, transformers, amplifiers, high voltage resistor packs, and relays; adhesive/encapsulant for solar cellsProduct Information Solar FEATURES · Transparent · Cures to flexible elastomer · Constant cure rate elastomer, which is suited for the protection of electrical/electronic devices in solar applications. HOW

Yoo, S. J. Ben

425

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT By Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Fethullah Canpolat This paper presents a detailed experimental study on the sequestration

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

426

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

427

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and Ronald H. Carty Director Illinois Clean Coal Institute Carterville, IL ABSTRACT, Naik and Singh [16] summarized various applications of fly ash generated from conventional and clean coal technologies. Uses of coal combustion by- products can be categorized into three classes: high-volum

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

428

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat #12;USE OF FLY ASH AND LIMESTONE QUARRY BY-PRODUCTS FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class C fly ash was also used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

429

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF- LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC - MILWAUKEE #12;2 SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF ­LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC) INTRODUCTION Self-compacting as the concrete which can be placed and compacted into every corner of a form work, purely by means of its self

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

430

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE by Tarun R. Naik* , Rudolph N. Kraus** , Yoon-moon Chun*** , Fethullah of limestone-quarry by-product material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

431

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. Paving applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, parking lots be used in Self-Consolidating Concrete applications. This type of concrete requires additional fines that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made with the Corn Products' coal ash. Additionally

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

432

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, compressive strength, concrete testing, fly ash, high-performance concrete, hot weather, permeability, silica Testing of Concrete", Committee 214, "Evaluation of Results of Strength Tests of Concrete", and CommitteeCenter for By-Products Utilization STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF HIGH- PERFORMANCE CONCRETE SUBJECTED

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

433

MSENGR Product Design Program Proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSENGR Product Design Program Proposal Rev 6/2007 p. 1 New Proposal Revision First graduate Language 3 ME216A Advanced Product Design: Need Finding 4 ME312 Advanced Product Design: Form Giving 4 ARTSTUDI160 Design II: The Bridge 3 ME216B Advanced Product Design: Implementation 4 ME316

Prinz, Friedrich B.

434

Tantalum ingots and flat mill products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specification covers unalloyed tantalum in the following grades: R05200, unalloyed tantalum (vacuum-arc melt or electron-beam furnace melt); R05400, unalloyed tantalum (powder metallurgy consolidation); R05255, tantalum alloy (90% Ta to 10% W, vacuum-arc melt or electron-beam furnace melt). The tantalum can be in the form of ingot, bar, plate, sheet, or strip. The specification includes ordering information, manufacture, chemical requirements, tensile properties, dimensional tolerances, workmanship and finish, sampling, certification, marking and packaging. (JMT)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Quarkonium Production in PHENIX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quarkonia provide a sensitive probe of the properties of the hot dense medium created in high energy heavy ion collisions. Hard scattering processes result in the production of heavy quark pairs that interact with the collision medium during hadronization. These in medium interactions convey information about the fundamental properties of the medium itself and can be used to examine the modification of the QCD confining potential in the collision environment. Baseline measurements from the d+Au and p+p collision systems can be used to distinguish cold nuclear matter effects while measurements from heavy ion collision systems, Au+Au and Cu+Cu, can be used to quantify in-medium effects. PHENIX results for the production of the $J/\\psi$ for a diverse set of collision systems and energies and for the $\\Upsilon$ in p+p collisions are presented.

Abigail Bickley; for the PHENIX Collaboration

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

436

Joined ceramic product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to the present invention, a joined product is at least two ceramic parts, specifically bi-element carbide parts with a bond joint therebetween, wherein the bond joint has a metal silicon phase. The bi-element carbide refers to compounds of MC, M.sub.2 C, M.sub.4 C and combinations thereof, where M is a first element and C is carbon. The metal silicon phase may be a metal silicon carbide ternary phase, or a metal silicide.

Henager, Jr., Charles W [Kennewick, WA; Brimhall, John L. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mitigation of ASR by the use of LiNO{sub 3}—Characterization of the reaction products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of the LiNO{sub 3} on the ASR product was studied both in a model system and in mortars. In the model system, the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases the dissolution rate and the solubility of silica. Lithium changes the 2-dimensional cross-linked (Q{sub 3} dominated) network of the ASR product into a less structured, Q{sub 2} dominated product, likely by adopting the role of calcium. In the mortar samples the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases expansion and significantly influences the chemical composition and the morphology of the reaction product. Lithium decreases the calcium, sodium and potassium content and changes the relatively porous plate-like reaction product into a dense one without texture. The findings in the mortars indicate that the ASR-suppressing effect of lithium is caused by the lower potential of the reaction product to swell. Furthermore, it forms a protective barrier after an initial reaction slowing down ASR. - Highlights: • Detection of lithium in ASR product by ToF-SIMS • Relation between composition of pore solution and ASR product • Identification of ASR suppressing mechanisms of LiNO{sub 3}.

Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lörtscher, Luzia [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bernard, Laetitia; Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstr. 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M. [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

EPA's designated products in eight categories: Construction Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transportation Products Channelizers Delineators Flexible delineators Parking stops Traffic barricades Traffic Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is required for the purchase of chemicals or products containing chemicals" program and Comprehensive Procurement Guideline (CPG), designates items that MUST contain recycled

439

Essays on Product Recalls, New Product Preannouncements, and Shareholder Value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................... 1 CHAPTER II DETERMINANTS OF THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF PRODUCT RECALLS ON SHAREHOLDER VALUE: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF THE AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY ................................................ 4 Introduction... ............................................................................... 101 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Companies increasingly face crises involving harm created by their products, ranging from defective automobile recalls, lead paint in toys, faulty medical devices, and contaminated food products, which often...

Yun, Wonjoo

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop technologies for carbon products from coal-derived feed-stocks. Carbon products can include precursor materials such as solvent extracted carbon ore (SECO) and synthetic pitch (Synpitch). In addition, derived products include carbon composites, fibers, foams and others.

Dady Dadyburjor; Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off few-nucleon systems: Tagging the EMC effect and hadronization mechanisms with detection of slow recoiling nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons off {sup 2}H and {sup 3}He with detection of slow protons and deuterons, respectively, i.e., the processes {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X and {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}d)X, are calculated within the spectator mechanism, taking into account the final state interaction of the nucleon debris with the detected protons and deuterons. It is shown that by a proper choice of the kinematics the origin of the EMC effect and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which cannot be reached by inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. A comparison of the results of our calculations, containing no adjustable parameters, with recently available experimental data on the process {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X shows a good agreement in the backward hemisphere of the emitted nucleons. Theoretical predictions at energies that will be available at the upgraded Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are presented, and the possibility to investigate the proposed semi-inclusive processes at electron-ion colliders is briefly discussed.

Ciofi degli Atti, C.; Kaptari, L. P. [Department of Physics, University of Perugia, Piazza dell' Universita 1, I-06123 Perugia (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using similar methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The "as received" feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be "reactor ready". This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed prep, fast pyrolysis, and upgrading. Stabilized, upgraded pyrolysis oil is transferred to the refinery for separation and finishing into motor fuels. The off-gas from the hydrotreaters is also transferred to the refinery, and in return the refinery provides lower-cost hydrogen for the hydrotreaters. This reduces the capital investment. Production costs near $2/gal (in 2007 dollars) and petroleum industry infrastructure-ready products make the production and upgrading of pyrolysis oil to hydrocarbon fuels an economically attractive source of renewable fuels. The study also identifies technical areas where additional research can potentially lead to further cost improvements.

Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

443

Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass via Fast Pyrolysis, Hydrotreating and Hydrocracking: A Design Case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a processing pathway for converting biomass into infrastructure-compatible hydrocarbon biofuels. This design case investigates production of fast pyrolysis oil from biomass and the upgrading of that bio-oil as a means for generating infrastructure-ready renewable gasoline and diesel fuels. This study has been conducted using the same methodology and underlying basis assumptions as the previous design cases for ethanol. The overall concept and specific processing steps were selected because significant data on this approach exists in the public literature. The analysis evaluates technology that has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale or is in early stages of commercialization. The fast pyrolysis of biomass is already at an early stage of commercialization, while upgrading bio-oil to transportation fuels has only been demonstrated in the laboratory and at small engineering development scale. Advanced methods of pyrolysis, which are under development, are not evaluated in this study. These may be the subject of subsequent analysis by OBP. The plant is designed to use 2000 dry metric tons/day of hybrid poplar wood chips to produce 76 million gallons/year of gasoline and diesel. The processing steps include: 1.Feed drying and size reduction 2.Fast pyrolysis to a highly oxygenated liquid product 3.Hydrotreating of the fast pyrolysis oil to a stable hydrocarbon oil with less than 2% oxygen 4.Hydrocracking of the heavy portion of the stable hydrocarbon oil 5.Distillation of the hydrotreated and hydrocracked oil into gasoline and diesel fuel blendstocks 6. Hydrogen production to support the hydrotreater reactors. The “as received” feedstock to the pyrolysis plant will be “reactor ready.” This development will likely further decrease the cost of producing the fuel. An important sensitivity is the possibility of co-locating the plant with an existing refinery. In this case, the plant consists only of the first three steps: feed prep, fast pyrolysis, and upgrading. Stabilized, upgraded pyrolysis oil is transferred to the refinery for separation and finishing into motor fuels. The off-gas from the hydrotreaters is also transferred to the refinery, and in return the refinery provides lower-cost hydrogen for the hydrotreaters. This reduces the capital investment. Production costs near $2/gal (in 2007 dollars) and petroleum industry infrastructure-ready products make the production and upgrading of pyrolysis oil to hydrocarbon fuels an economically attractive source of renewable fuels. The study also identifies technical areas where additional research can potentially lead to further cost improvements.

Jones, Susanne B.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Stevens, Don J.; Kinchin, Christopher; Czernik, Stefan

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

APT radionuclide production experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium ({sup 3}H, a heavy isotope of hydrogen) is produced by low energy neutron-induced reactions on various elements. One such reaction is n+{sup 3}He {yields}>{sup 3}H+{sup 1}H in which {sup 3}He is transmuted to tritium. Another reaction, which has been used in reactor production of tritium, is the n+{sup 6}Li {yields}> {sup 3}H+{sup 4}He reaction. Accelerator Production of Tritium relies on a high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy proton beam to produce these neutrons using the spallation reaction, in which high-energy protons reacting with a heavy nucleus produce a shower of low-energy neutrons and a lower-mass residual nucleus. It is important to quantify the residual radionuclides produced in the spallation target for two reasons. From an engineering point of view, one must understand short-lived isotopes that may contribute to decay heat. From a safety viewpoint, one must understand what nuclei and decay gammas are produced in order to design adequate shielding, to estimate ultimate waste disposal problems, and to predict possible effects due to accidental dispersion during operation. The authors have performed an experiment to measure the production of radioisotopes in stopping-length W and Pb targets irradiated by a 800 MeV proton beam, and are comparing the results to values obtained from calculations using LAHET and MCNP. The experiment was designed to pay particular attention to the short half-life radionuclides, which have not been previously measured. In the following, they present details of the experiment, explain how they analyzed the data and obtain the results, how they perform the calculations, and finally, how the experimental data agree with the calculations.

Ullmann, J.L.; Gavron, A.; King, J.D. [and others

1994-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

Challenges facing production grids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today's global communities of users expect quality of service from distributed Grid systems equivalent to that their local data centers. This must be coupled to ubiquitous access to the ensemble of processing and storage resources across multiple Grid infrastructures. We are still facing significant challenges in meeting these expectations, especially in the underlying security, a sustainable and successful economic model, and smoothing the boundaries between administrative and technical domains. Using the Open Science Grid as an example, I examine the status and challenges of Grids operating in production today.

Pordes, Ruth; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Slaughter Calf Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

slaughter calves. The most effective tool for selecting and improving a breeding herd is a set of records Figure 1. Quality in sire and dam is passed on to the calf. -. of production on every cow in the herd. To be profitable, a breeding herd of beef..., isolation accination are parts of this phase of man- ent. Although slaughter calves are pro- principaily on pastures, some cleanup ,nes need attention. Sanitation is the most important factor in the control of animal diseases. Muddy areas around...

Thompson, Uel D.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Barley Production in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inclusive, an average of 14 6,O 0 0 acres of barley was planted, producing an average annual production of 2,445,000 bushels. The acreage and pro- duction fluctuate widely, being influenced by spring moisture conditions in west Texas and by winterkilling... the winter months, than on un- protected land. In west Texas it also may aid in reducing soil blowing. Barley may be used for hay or green manure crops, and in other sec- tions is used extensively in the brewing industry. At present very little barley...

Dunkle, P. B. (Paul Burtch); Atkins, Irvin Milburn

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Procurable Products, Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentationsSRS RespondsLift PlanProcurable Products,

449

Weekly Blender Net Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version) Themonthly4Blender Net Production

450

Shale Gas Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. Natural GasquestionnairesquestionnairesGasA.San JuanGas Production

451

Productivity Achievement Award  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16Hamada wins Gerald Hahn Quality and Productivity

452

Covered Product Categories (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal mandates require that Federal agencies purchase energy-efficient products. To help agency buyers meet these requirements, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) maintains a list of FEMP-designated and ENERGY STAR-qualified product categories.

Not Available

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The Productivity Dilemma in Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industry's needs, improve productivity, and reduce costs is known, but the technology transfer needed to impact our industrial productivity has not taken place. A key factor in accomplishing technology transfer and implementation is the availability...

Byrer, T. G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

455

Enabling effective product launch decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present work looks into the question of optimizing the performance of product launch decisions-in particular, the decisions of product development duration and manufacturing ramp-up. It presents an innovative model for ...

Akamphon, Sappinandana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

SLOW SAND FILTRATIONSLOW SAND FILTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control valve Effluent flow control structure #12;Characteristic Features of aCharacteristic Features effective size(dSmall effective size(d1010)) and largeand large uniformity coefficient (duniformity coefficient (d6060/d/d1010) of sand) of sand No filter media fluidizationNo filter media fluidization Relative

457

Hopper /scratch file system slow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas inPortal StartupdefaultTheGraduatesHopper

458

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

459

Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Fossil-Based Hydrogen Production Praxair Praxair SNL TIAX · Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for H2

460

Covered Product Categories (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

List of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)-designated product categories for energy-efficient procurement requirements.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL AND OIL UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR · FISH ON OF FISH MEAL AND OIL , ESPECIALLY DUR ING 1953 TO 1959, THE PRI NC IPAL MARKET S FOR THE PRODUCTS- DICATE WHAT IS INCLUDED BESIDES FISHMEAL AND FISH BODY OIL. #12;WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL

462

Creating Value Wood Products Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;2 Louisiana is blessed with quality timberland for the Wood Products Industry The forest industry contributes more than 50 percent of the total value of all for quality information, research and education in forest products in Louisiana, recognized regionally

463

Upsilon Productions at STAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S)\\to e^{+}e^{-}$ cross section is measured at mid-rapidity ($y$) in $p+p$ collisions and in d$+Au$ collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. In $p+p$, the measured cross section is found to be consistent with the world data trend as a function of $\\sqrt{s}$, in agreement with the Color Evaportaion Model (CEM), and underestimated by the Color Singlet Model (CSM) up to the Next-to-Leading-Order Quantum Chromodynamics (NLO QCD) calculations. In d+$Au$, the measured cross section is in agreement with the CEM prediction with anti-shadowing effects, and the nuclear modification factor indicates that $\\Upsilon(1S+2S+3S)$ production follows binary scaling within the current uncertainties. These measurements provide a benchmark for the future measurements of $\\Upsilon$ production in $Au+Au$ collisions.

A. M. Hamed

2010-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

Homological Product Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum codes with low-weight stabilizers known as LDPC codes have been actively studied recently due to their simple syndrome readout circuits and potential applications in fault-tolerant quantum computing. However, all families of quantum LDPC codes known to this date suffer from a poor distance scaling limited by the square-root of the code length. This is in a sharp contrast with the classical case where good families of LDPC codes are known that combine constant encoding rate and linear distance. Here we propose the first family of good quantum codes with low-weight stabilizers. The new codes have a constant encoding rate, linear distance, and stabilizers acting on at most $\\sqrt{n}$ qubits, where $n$ is the code length. For comparison, all previously known families of good quantum codes have stabilizers of linear weight. Our proof combines two techniques: randomized constructions of good quantum codes and the homological product operation from algebraic topology. We conjecture that similar methods can produce good stabilizer codes with stabilizer weight $n^a$ for any $a>0$. Finally, we apply the homological product to construct new small codes with low-weight stabilizers.

Sergey Bravyi; Matthew B. Hastings

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

Method for production of magnesium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400 C or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products. 12 figs.

Diaz, A.F.; Howard, J.B.; Modestino, A.J.; Peters, W.A.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Method for production of magnesium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous process for the production of elemental magnesium is described. Magnesium is made from magnesium oxide and a light hydrocarbon gas. In the process, a feed stream of the magnesium oxide and gas is continuously fed into a reaction zone. There the magnesium oxide and gas are reacted at a temperature of about 1400.degree. C. or greater in the reaction zone to provide a continuous product stream of reaction products, which include elemental magnesium. The product stream is continuously quenched after leaving the reaction zone, and the elemental magnesium is separated from other reaction products.

Diaz, Alexander F. (Cambridge, MA); Howard, Jack B. (Winchester, MA); Modestino, Anthony J. (Hanson, MA); Peters, William A. (Lexington, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Production of zinc pellets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Production of zinc pellets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Uniform zinc pellets are formed for use in batteries having a stationary or moving slurry zinc particle electrode. The process involves the cathodic deposition of zinc in a finely divided morphology from battery reaction product onto a non-adhering electrode substrate. The mossy zinc is removed from the electrode substrate by the action of gravity, entrainment in a flowing electrolyte, or by mechanical action. The finely divided zinc particles are collected and pressed into pellets by a mechanical device such as an extruder, a roller and chopper, or a punch and die. The pure zinc pellets are returned to the zinc battery in a pumped slurry and have uniform size, density and reactivity. Applications include zinc-air fuel batteries, zinc-ferricyanide storage batteries, and zinc-nickel-oxide secondary batteries. 6 figs.

Cooper, J.F.

1996-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Light cone matrix product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Production of magnesium metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

Blencoe, James G. (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A. (Oliver Springs, TN) [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S. (Martinsville, VA) [Martinsville, VA

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hydroprocessing Bio-oil and Products Separation for Coke Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis of biomass can be used to produce a raw bio-oil product, which can be upgraded by catalytic hydroprocessing to hydrocarbon liquid products. In this study the upgraded products were distilled to recover light naphtha and oils and to produce a distillation resid with useful properties for coker processing and production of renewable, low-sulfur electrode carbon. For this hydroprocessing work, phase separation of the bio-oil was applied as a preparatory step to concentrate the heavier, more phenolic components thus generating a more amenable feedstock for resid production. Low residual oxygen content products were produced by continuous-flow, catalytic hydroprocessing of the phase separated bio-oil.

Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

473

Production design for plate products in the steel industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 5, 2007 ... The use of these tools provides two types of benefits: improvements in the productivity of the plant and an approach to making the key business ...

Sanjeeb Dash

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

474

Hydrogen production from carbonaceous material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogen is produced from solid or liquid carbon-containing fuels in a two-step process. The fuel is gasified with hydrogen in a hydrogenation reaction to produce a methane-rich gaseous reaction product, which is then reacted with water and calcium oxide in a hydrogen production and carbonation reaction to produce hydrogen and calcium carbonate. The calcium carbonate may be continuously removed from the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone and calcined to regenerate calcium oxide, which may be reintroduced into the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction zone. Hydrogen produced in the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction is more than sufficient both to provide the energy necessary for the calcination reaction and also to sustain the hydrogenation of the coal in the gasification reaction. The excess hydrogen is available for energy production or other purposes. Substantially all of the carbon introduced as fuel ultimately emerges from the invention process in a stream of substantially pure carbon dioxide. The water necessary for the hydrogen production and carbonation reaction may be introduced into both the gasification and hydrogen production and carbonation reactions, and allocated so as transfer the exothermic heat of reaction of the gasification reaction to the endothermic hydrogen production and carbonation reaction.

Lackner, Klaus S.; Ziock, Hans J.; Harrison, Douglas P.

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

475

Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

476

Optimization Online - Robust Production Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 23, 2011 ... Abstract: The problem of production management can often be cast in the form ... We then give the quality of robust solutions obtained by using ...

Vincent Guigues

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

477

Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

478

Toda Cathode Materials Production Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cathode Materials Production Facility 2013 DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 13-17, 2013 David Han, Yasuhiro Abe Toda America Inc. Project ID: ARRAVT017...

479

Coalbed methane production case histories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

AGENDA: PETROLEUM PRODUCT TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The agenda for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) public stakeholder meeting in New Orleans on petroleum product transmission, distribution, and storage.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Video Production Checklist Gear needed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Production Checklist Gear needed: · Camera · Tripod · Headphones · Microphone · Memory cards (sunlight, tungsten, fluorescent, etc.) Camera should have an auto white balance setting. · Mic the person

Jacobs, Laurence J.

482

FISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Per -capita sales likely will be near 11.2 pounds--down from 11.4 pounds in 1970. Consumption had beenFISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex- pected to be off a little in 1971 to attract more imports in 1971 . Since U.S. fish consumption is about 550/0-de- pendent on imports

483

Production of carboxylic acid and salt co-products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provide processes for producing carboxylic acid product, along with useful salts. The carboxylic acid product that is produced according to this invention is preferably a C.sub.2-C.sub.12 carboxylic acid. Among the salts produced in the process of the invention are ammonium salts.

Hanchar, Robert J.; Kleff, Susanne; Guettler, Michael V.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

484

Universal Product Design: Transforming User Activity Into Product Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many people have disabilities and would like to have all of the amenities typical of daily life. Universal product design is important in designing for the disabled and creating user-friendly products for all people. The goal of this thesis...

Kostovich, Vincent

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

485

Product Development Practices for Meeting Financial Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports product development practices that separate the most successful product development programs from the rest. A detailed understanding of best product development practices is important because product ...

Makumbe, Pedzi

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

Productivity Improvement of a Manual Assembly Line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current project addresses the productivity improvement of a manual assembly line by making use of operations analysis in the framework of Lean production. A methodology is proposed that helps to improve the productivity of any production process...

Yerasi, Pranavi

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

487

Fission product solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH): Thermochemic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH): Thermochemical Cycle Selection and Investment Priority Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Research (STCH):...

489

A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > A Photosynthetic Hydrogel for Catalytic Hydrogen Production...

490

Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was initiated by an Institute of Paper Science and Technology finding that heating softwood in a low-headspace environment removed much of the VOCs without removing the water. This offered the possibility of removing VOCs from wet wood, capturing them as a product, and then drying the VOC-depleted wood conventionally with little or no VOC controls. Two means of low-headspace heating were explored: steam and radiofrequency (RF). It was found in the previous year, that while both steam and RF were able to drive out VOCs, steam was impracticably slow for lumber. Hence the effect of RF or microwave on wood was the principal focus of the work reported here. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of VOC release, the transport of the VOCs in wood was studied, together with the seasonal effects that influence VOC concentration in trees.

Su, W.; Yan, H.; Hooda, U.; Wild, M.P.; Banerjee, S. [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)] [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Production System DesignProduction System DesignProduction System DesignProduction System Design ContestContestContestContest I&ME 458 Spring 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production System DesignProduction System DesignProduction System DesignProduction System Design ContestContestContestContest I&ME 458 ­ Spring 2010 The Production System Design Contest is a chance" during the final exam period. Objectives Each team will design a production system to meet customer

Sobek II, Durward K.

492

Productivity improvement for longwall development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industry survey reveals coal operators thoughts about the use of different techniques to keep development ahead of longwall production. Factors considered that can optimise productivity include mine design (the number of entries, size of pillars etc.), work schedules, preventative maintenance programs and good management. The article was adapted from a presentation to Longwall USA 2005, in June 2005 (Pittsburgh, PA, USA). 3 figs.

Whipkey, K. [Norwest, Ashland, KY (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Diboson production at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF and D{null} detectors at the Tevatron Collider are being used to measure {ital WW}, {ital WZ}, and {ital ZZ} production as well as {ital W}{sub {gamma}} and {ital Z}{sub {gamma}} production in order to study Trilinear Gauge Couplings. Improved limits on nonstandard coupling parameters are given and prospects for further improvement are discussed.

Nodulman, L.J.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA.S. Energy Information Administration | 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report iii Preface The U.S. Energy://www.eia.doe.gov/glossary/. #12;U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2013 Domestic Uranium Production Report iv Contents

495

Transverse Energy Production at RHIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the mechanism of transverse energy (E_T) production in Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The time evolution starting from the initial energy loss to the final E_T production is closely examined in transport models. The relationship between the experimentally measured E_T distribution and the maximum energy density achieved is discussed.

Qun Li; Yang Pang; Nu Xu

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

496

Silviculture Forest Productivity and Nutrition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

15 Silviculture Forest Productivity and Nutrition Fire and Fuel Load Management Tree crops for bio-energy Productivity of Semi-mature Cape Pines Across Gradients of Water and Nutrient Availability The nutrient as optimise the period of their release to use in controlled release fertilizer mixtures. This will make large

Geldenhuys, Jaco

497

Consensus Coal Production Forecast for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the consensus forecast produced in 2006, primarily from the decreased demand as a result of the current nationalConsensus Coal Production Forecast for West Virginia 2009-2030 Prepared for the West Virginia Summary 1 Recent Developments 2 Consensus Coal Production Forecast for West Virginia 10 Risks

Mohaghegh, Shahab

498

Demand Forecasting of New Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Forecasting of New Products Using Attribute Analysis Marina Kang A thesis submitted Abstract This thesis is a study into the demand forecasting of new products (also referred to as Stock upon currently employed new-SKU demand forecasting methods which involve the processing of large

Sun, Yu

499

Grain Sorghum Production in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . .- - . . paper 1 the s corn with a rghum rctrose, FIGURE 3. THE BLUEBONNET PLANT OF THE CORN PRODUCTS REFINING COMPANY, CORPUS CHRISTI, TEI'"" 6 clextrose sirup, edible oil, several by-products and t~o livestock feed?. Plants at Plainview, Texas, 1... ................................................................ ................. Industrial Uses %. 6 ................................................................. ................ Sorghum Culture -; . :: 7 ...................................................... Land Preparation . Planting and Cultivation 7...

Quinby, J. R.; Kramer, N. W.; Stephens, J. C.; Lahr, K. A.; Karper, R. E.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Ballasts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including fluorescent ballasts, which are a FEMP-designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.