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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

2

Finished Motor Gasoline Net Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Series: Finished Motor Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline (less Adj.) Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blenede w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Other Conventional Gasoline Finished Motor Gasoline Adjustment Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Jet, Commercial Kerosene-Type Jet, Military Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Distillate Fuel Oil > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate Fuel Oil > 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Propane/Propylene Period: Weekly 4-Week Average

3

Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Special Naphthas Lubricants Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

4

Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Recommended finishing procedures...spirally sewn sections 150 or 180 Polishing tallow or No. 180 emergy grease cake 30??40 6000??7500 Grease coloring 88??88 unbleached sheeting, spirally sewn or

5

Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Recommended finishing procedures for nickel alloys...spiral-sewn sections 150 or 180 Polishing tallow or No. 180 emery grease cake 30??40 6,000??7,500 Grease coloring 88-88 unbleached sheeting, spiral-sewn or loose disk;

6

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha For Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils For Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

7

U.S. Exports of Finished Petroleum Products (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Exports of Finished Petroleum Products (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov ... U.S. Exports of Crude Oil ...

8

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Finished Product Storage and Handling from the book ...

9

Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Misc. Products - Fuel Use Misc. Products - Nonfuel...

10

Product Supplied for Finished Gasoline - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

11

Refiner and Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

12

Progressive Powder Coating: New Infrared Curing Oven at Metal Finishing Plant Increases Production by 50%  

SciTech Connect

Progressive Powder Coating in Mentor, Ohio, is a metal finishing plant that uses a convection oven in its manufacturing process. In an effort to save energy and improve production, the company installed an infrared oven in between the powder coating booth and the convection oven on its production line. This installation allowed the plant to increase its conveyor line speed and increase production by 50 percent. In addition, the plant reduced its natural gas consumption, yielding annual energy savings of approximately$54,000. With a total project cost of$136,000, the simple payback is 2.5 years.

Not Available

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

N. Zurlo; M. Amoretti; C. Amsler; G. Bonomi; C. Carraro; C. L. Cesar; M. Charlton; M. Doser; A. Fontana; R. Funakoshi; P. Genova; R. S. Hayano; L. V. Jorgensen; A. Kellerbauer; V. Lagomarsino; R. Landua; E. Lodi Rizzini; M. Macr; N. Madsen; G. Manuzio; D. Mitchard; P. Montagna; L. G. Posada; H. Pruys; C. Regenfus; A. Rotondi; G. Testera; D. P. Van der Werf; A. Variola; L. Venturelli; Y. Yamazaki

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Finishing in the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of qualities Metagenomic assemblies Genome Finishing: Finishing systems and pipelines (automated, manual, etc.) Next generation finishing tools and technologies Quality...

15

Slow proton production in semi-inclusive DIS off nuclei: the role of final state interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of the final state interaction on the production of slow protons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic lepton scattering off nuclei is considered within the spectator mechanism and a realistic approach in which the rescattering in the medium of both the recoiling proton and the hadronizing nucleon debris are taken into account.

M. Alvioli; C. Ciofi degli Atti; V. Palli

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Finishing in the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single cell and metagenomic assemblies Genome Finishing: Finishing systems and pipelines (automated, manual, etc.) Next generation finishing tools and technologies Quality...

17

Finishing in the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single cell and metagenomic assemblies Genome Finishing: Finishing systems and pipelines (automated, manual, etc.) Next generation finishing tools and technologies Human...

18

Mass Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8 Operating conditions for mass finishing...Brass screw-machine parts Aluminum oxide or granite 6.4-19 0.25-0.75 [MathExpression] -6 Light matte or bright Light cutting (a) Brass stampings or screws (b) Limestone 3.2-13 0.13-0.50 2-6 Bright (a) Submerged tumbling is used for fragile and precision parts. (b) Screw-machine parts...

19

Comparative Summer Thermal Performance of Finished and Unfinished Metal Roofing Products with Composition Shingles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of results from experimental research conducted at FSEC's Flexible Roofing Facility in the summer of 2002. The Flexible Roof Facility (FRF) is a test facility in Cocoa, Florida designed to evaluate a combination of five roofing systems against a control roof using dark shingles. The intent of the testing is to evaluate how roofing systems impact residential cooling energy use. Recent testing emphasizes evaluation of how increasingly popular metal roofing systems, both finished and unfinished, might compare with other more traditional roofing types. All of the test cells had R-19 insulation installed on the attic floor except in the double roof configuration which had R-19 of open cell foam blown onto the underside of the roof decking. The test results were used to determine relative thermal performance of various roofing systems under typical Florida summer conditions. Measured impacts included changes to ceiling heat flux and attic air temperature which influences loads from unintended attic air leakage and duct heat gain. We also develop an analysis method to estimate total cooling energy benefits of different roofing systems considering the various impacts. The results show that all the options perform better than dark composition shingles. White metal performs best with an estimated cooling energy reduction of about 15%, but the spectrally selective metal shingles (12%) and unfinished Galvalume roofs (11%) do surprisingly well. Galvanized roofing did less well than Galvalume (7% reduction) and worse performance in the second year of exposure was observed due to corrosion of the zinc surface. The sealed attic with a double roof produced an estimated cooling energy reduction of only 2% -- largely due to increases in ceiling flux.

Parker, D. S.; Sherwin, J.; Sonne, J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970's: 2,111,349: 2,195,268: 2,333,778: 2,436,156: ... Motor Gasoline Supply and Disposition; ... U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The production planning and inventory management of finished goods for a pharmaceutical company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is the result of a three month internship at TCG Pharmaceuticals, Singapore. With the worldwide initiative of lean in TCG, it has implemented the TCG Production System which finds its roots in the famous Toyota ...

Gupta, Sumit, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1970's: 5,785: 6,014: 6,376: 6,674: 6,537: 6,675: 6,978: 7,177: ... Motor Gasoline Supply and Disposition; ... U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum ...

23

Finishing in the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies (454, Solexa, etc.) Finishing Processes: Finishing systems and pipelines (automated, manual, etc.) Solving genome gaps, hard stops & other difficult areas...

24

Finishing Wood Decks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood decks have become an important part of residential construction in recent years. However, there is considerable confusion regarding how these structures should be protected with finish. This paper summarizes the types, application techniques, and expected service lives of various finishes on both preservative treated and untreated lumber. Recommendations are made on the basis of decades of research on various wood species using a wide variety of finishes.

R. Sam Williams; et al.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Product Supplied for Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Data may not add to ...

26

Semi-finished modular cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis subject is a pre-fabricated element (cell): a system that employs natural, light, and economic materials to produce a near-finished portion of a building. The intent is to introduce sustainable design into ...

Bachelder, Laura Govoni, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Losses and Costs Associated with Coal vs. Natural Gas Firing at Hanes Dye and Finishing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to decreasing production and rising coal prices, the engineering and management staff at Hanes Dye and Finishing in Winston Salem, NC have been investigating (more)

Gibides, Justin Tyler

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deacon Sweeney on "the Best Finish First: Sequence Finishing with Whole Genome Mapping" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Sweeney, Deacon [OpGen, Inc.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Refinery Net Production of Finished Aviation Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

30

Product Supplied for Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Data may not add to ...

31

Refinery Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

La. Gulf Coast: 6,478: 8,150: 8,125: 7,209: 7,676: 7,807: 2005-2013: N. La., Ark: 222: 358: 274: 337: 284: 321: 2005-2013: New Mexico: 1,533: 1,555: ...

32

Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE`s independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Slow liner fusion  

SciTech Connect

{open_quotes}Slow{close_quotes} liner fusion ({approximately}10 ms compression time) implosions are nondestructive and make repetitive ({approximately} 1 Hz) pulsed liner fusion reactors possible. This paper summarizes a General Atomics physics-based fusion reactor study that showed slow liner feasibility, even with conservative open-line axial magnetic field confinement and Bohm radial transport.

Shaffer, M.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery and Blender Net Production of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery and Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels per Day)

35

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 11 Bar Soap Finishing from ...

36

Slow-light solitons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of soliton with controllable speed is constructed generalizing the theory of slow-light propagation to an integrable regime of nonlinear dynamics. The scheme would allow the quantum-information transfer between optical solitons and atomic media.

Ulf Leonhardt

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

37

Metal Finishing: A Small-business Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the challenges faced by small business owners can be addressed through efficient use of electric technology. Each volume in the Small-business Guide describes the current state of a business type and details new or alternative electric equipment that can help it meet its characteristic problems. The "Metal Finishing" guide is intended to familiarize readers with the business of metal finishing by providing descriptions of basic processes and practices and summaries of the key challenges faced by ...

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

38

Colorado Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

39

Michigan Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Finished Motor Gasoline Stocks at Refineries, Bulk Terminals, and Natural Gas Plants (Thousand Barrels)

40

Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

La. Gulf Coast: 3,339: 3,007: 2,779: 2,633: 2,523: 2,416: 2005-2012: N. La., Ark: 188: 181: 164: 192: 216: 173: 2005-2012: New Mexico: 101: 102: 95: ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Refinery Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

La. Gulf Coast: 2,474: 2,468: 2,551: 2,556: 2,541: 2,565: 2005-2013: N. La., Ark: 171: 177: 177: 174: 170: 177: 2005-2013: New Mexico: 120: 124: 123: ...

42

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Petroleum Products (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 16,801: 15,395: 14,522: 14,165: 14,006: 14,980: 14,594: 14,256: 14,417: 14,416: 14,299: 15,111: 1982 ...

43

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Petroleum Products (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 5,381,761: 5,094,576: 5,034,553: 5,177,495: 5,185,544: 5,444,720: 5,518,448 ...

44

Control of Dimensions, Finish, and Weight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The breaker cam shown in Fig. 7 was made of 3.25/3.18 mm (0.128/0.125 in.) thick 1010 cold-rolled special-killed steel. Strips 86 mm (3 in.) wide and 2.4 m (96 in.) long with a maximum hardness of 65 HRB and a No. 2 bright finish were purchased....

45

Vibratory finishing as a decontamination process  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this research is to develop vibratory finishing into a large-scale decontamination technique that can economicaly remove transuranic and other surface contamination from large volumes of waste produced by the operation and decommissioning of retired nuclear facilities. The successful development and widespread application of this decontamination technique would substantially reduce the volume of waste requiring expensive geologic disposal. Other benefits include exposure reduction for decontamination personnel and reduced risk of environmental contamination. Laboratory-scale studies showed that vibratory finishing can rapidly reduce the contamination level of transuranic-contaminated stainless steel and Plexiglas to well below the 10-nCi/g limit. The capability of vibratory finishing as a decontamination process was demonstrated on a large scale. The first decontamination demonstration was conducted at the Hanford N-Reactor, where a vibratory finisher was installed to reduce personnel exposure during the summer outage. Items decontaminated included fuel spacers, process-tube end caps, process-tube inserts, pump parts, ball-channel inspection tools and miscellaneous hand tools. A second demonstration is currently being conducted in the decontamination facility at the Hanford 231-Z Building. During this demonstration, transuranic-contaminated material from decommissioned plutonium facilities is being decontaminated to <10 nCi/g to minimize the volume of material that will require geologic disposal. Items that are being decontaminated include entire glove boxes, process-hood structural material and panels, process tanks, process-tank shields, pumps, valves and hand tools used during the decommissioning work.

McCoy, M.W.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Allen, R.P.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Marketing Guide for Metal Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-business strategy is among the important issues energy suppliers are considering as deregulation approaches. Businesses engaged in metal finishing constitute a priority customer segment for many utilities. Success in retaining these customers, by delivering valued services, demands in-depth knowledge of their business issues and assistance needs.

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

Automation in modeling: using automation for finishing room capacity planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capacity planning of a furniture finishing system using both deterministic analysis and stochastic simulation is conveniently performed with the aid ActiveX Automation. Users interactively build a complete model of a finishing system with an Excel interface, ...

Ryan Heath Melton; C. Thomas Culbreth; Stephen D. Roberts; Jeffrey A. Joines

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost from LANL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost from LANL Plasma technology for textile finishing applications gets a boost from LANL APJeT received a $100,000 Venture Acceleration Fund award from LANS helping to complete design and engineering of a commercial-scale production unit. April 3, 2012 image description Gary Selwyn conducts product quality assurance on dual-functional, plasma-treated fabric at APJeT's Santa Fe lab: LANL technology may transform performance apparel. Contact CEO John Emrich (505) 471-6399 Future applications of APJet may include depositing thin films for architectural glass, semiconductors, flooring, and solar panels. "A big part of our current challenge has been selecting this one use for the technology and putting all of our energy and resources into that," Selwyn

49

Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant- May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant [HIAR-RL-2012-05-14

51

Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Michael Fitzsimmons from Los Alamos National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Nearly Finished Genomes Produced Using Gel Microdroplet Culturing" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Fitzsimmons, Michael [LANL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Slow-light solitons revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate propagation of slow-light solitons in atomic media described by the nonlinear $\\Lambda$-model. Under a physical assumption, appropriate to the slow light propagation, we reduce the $\\Lambda$-scheme to a simplified nonlinear model, which is also relevant to 2D dilatonic gravity. Exact solutions describing various regimes of stopping slow-light solitons can then be readily derived.

A. V. Rybin; I. P. Vadeiko; A. R. Bishop

2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

Green Racing - Where Clean Cars Finish First  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology R&D Center INVENTING THE FUTURE. efficient. clean. safe. Green Racing Where Clean Cars Finish First In green racing, speed is a factor, but the overall winner is determined by a formula that also takes the car's environmental footprint into consideration. Race organizers calculated a principal component of each car's score by using Argonne's Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. Research funding provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program. Did you know... Opportunity The racetrack is a proving ground that often leads to innovations in consumer vehicles. Green

54

Problems and methods for multiproduct inventory control in production conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Problems and methods for control of multiproduct inventory of finished product in the conditions of fixed and random demand and problems of in-process storage of components, billets, and accessories for assembling finished products are considered. Special ...

E. N. Khobotov

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Figure and finish of grazing incidence mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Great improvement has been made in the past several years in the quality of optical components used in synchrotron radiation (SR) beamlines. Most of this progress has been the result of vastly improved metrology techniques and instrumentation permitting rapid and accurate measurement of the surface finish and figure on grazing incidence optics. A significant theoretical effort has linked the actual performance of components used as x-ray wavelengths to their topological properties as measured by surface profiling instruments. Next-generation advanced light sources will require optical components and systems to have sub-arc second surface figure tolerances. This paper will explore the consequences of these requirements in terms of manufacturing tolerances to see if the present manufacturing state-of-the-art is capable of producing the required surfaces. 15 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Takacs, P.Z. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Church, E.L. (Picatinny Arsenal, Dover, NJ (USA). Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center)

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Slope exploration slow but hopes remain high  

SciTech Connect

Alaska North Slope exploratory drilling has been sparse this winter. Attention focused on a pair of ARCO alaska Inc. wildcats in the West Colville high sector west of Kuparuk River oil field and two BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. wildcats in the Badami area at Mikkelson Bay. In both prospects, the drilling effort was to prove up more production that could support commercial development of the respective areas. Though there has been relatively little exploratory drilling this winter, both of the slope`s major producers have indicated they are far from finished with exploration in Alaska. The paper discusses the debate over the use of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, leasing and licensing, the federal leasing outlook, and Russian-US leasing.

NONE

1995-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future Meeting Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future Meeting Wednesday - Friday, May 29 - 31, 2013 La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, NM Overview "Sequencing, Finishing and Analysis in the Future" (SFAF) is an annual meeting dedicated to bringing together experts in the field of genomic sequencing, finishing and analysis-including representatives from the industries that serve this specialized scientific community. The meeting focuses on laboratory methods and computational tools used to help sequence, assemble, and finish genomes, including new sequencing technologies, which promise high-throughput results by sequencing more base-pairs per run at longer read-lengths. In the past, companies have presented different techniques they have developed to achieve maximum balance for researchers.

58

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 May 2012 Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant [HIAR-RL-2012-05-14] The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a criticality safety information meeting with Hanford site criticality safety engineers on May 14, 2012, to discuss criticality safety issues and experiences principally with respect to the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). These discussions also included aspects of Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) in support of criticality safety evaluations.

59

Automatic tool path generation for finish machining  

SciTech Connect

A system for automatic tool path generation was developed at Sandia National Laboratories for finish machining operations. The system consists of a commercially available 5-axis milling machine controlled by Sandia developed software. This system was used to remove overspray on cast turbine blades. A laser-based, structured-light sensor, mounted on a tool holder, is used to collect 3D data points around the surface of the turbine blade. Using the digitized model of the blade, a tool path is generated which will drive a 0.375 inch diameter CBN grinding pin around the tip of the blade. A fuzzified digital filter was developed to properly eliminate false sensor readings caused by burrs, holes and overspray. The digital filter was found to successfully generate the correct tool path for a blade with intentionally scanned holes and defects. The fuzzified filter improved the computation efficiency by a factor of 25. For application to general parts, an adaptive scanning algorithm was developed and presented with simulation results. A right pyramid and an ellipsoid were scanned successfully with the adaptive algorithm.

Kwok, Kwan S.; Loucks, C.S.; Driessen, B.J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Exports of Finished Petroleum Products ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

456: 364: 1990: 209: 358: 328: 306: 292: 329: 263: 308: 447: 413: 477: 464: 1991: 592: 699: 385: 295: 519: 377: 411: 401: 376: 439: 456: 511: 1992: 584: 396: 365: 420 ...

62

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954: 84,697: 80,745: 95,229: 98,007: 98,705: 106,226: 106,171: 103,984: 98,462: 99,807: 95,984: 97,610: 1955: 92,460: 84,778: 100,948: 106,216: ...

63

Weekly U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1991-Feb : 02/08 : 6,621 : 02/15 : 6,433

64

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions ...

65

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

La. Gulf Coast: 1,279: 1,050: 859: 598: 428: 364: 1993-2012: N. La., Ark: 48: 62: 85: 160: 222: 213: 1993-2012: New Mexico: 49: 50: 49: 65: 57: 60: ...

66

Weekly U.S. Refiner and Blender Adjusted Net Production of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Weekly U.S. Refiner and Blender Adjusted Net Production of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels per Day)

67

Final Environmental Impact Statement - Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization, May 1996  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization, May 1996 - Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization, May 1996 file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0244-FEIS-1996/eis0244f_1.html[6/27/2011 2:33:34 PM] 1.0 INTRODUCTION This Introduction contains the following information: Background of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Facility Scope of this Environmental Impact Statement Contents of this Environmental Impact Statement The presence of significant quantities of plutonium-bearing materials in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Facility, Hanford Site, Washington, poses unacceptable risks to workers, the public, and the environment. On October 24, 1994, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) announced, in an initial mailing to 1,500 interested parties, its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National

68

Oak Ridge Finishes Site's Largest Demolition Project to Date | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finishes Site's Largest Demolition Project to Date Finishes Site's Largest Demolition Project to Date Oak Ridge Finishes Site's Largest Demolition Project to Date July 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis BEFORE: An aerial photo shows Building K-33 before demolition. BEFORE: An aerial photo shows Building K-33 before demolition. AFTER: This photo shows the site of Building K-33 following completion of the demolition project. AFTER: This photo shows the site of Building K-33 following completion of the demolition project. BEFORE: An aerial photo shows Building K-33 before demolition. AFTER: This photo shows the site of Building K-33 following completion of the demolition project. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - This month, the Oak Ridge Environmental Management (EM) program finished the final phase of the Building K-33 demolition

69

U.S. Exports of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Exports of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1930's: 30,613: 28,646 ...

70

Slow light enhanced photon echoes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a slow light-enhanced photon echo method, whose retrieval efficiency is two orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional photon echoes. The enhanced photon echo efficiency is due to lengthened interaction time given by ultraslow group velocity.

J. Hahn; B. S. Ham

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

71

A Sub-femtosecond Stop Watch for 'Photon Finish' Races  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Migdall. Photon Tunneling through Evanescent Gaps and Bandgaps, Slow and Fast Light, Salt Lake City, Utah, July 2007.

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Finished Prokaryotic Genome Assemblies from a Low-cost Combination of Short and Long Reads (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shuangye Yin on "Finished prokaryotic genome assemblies from a low-cost combination of short and long reads" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Yin, Shuangye (Broad Institute)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

EcoCAR Reaches the Finish Line | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EcoCAR Reaches the Finish Line EcoCAR Reaches the Finish Line EcoCAR Reaches the Finish Line June 21, 2011 - 2:09pm Addthis The EcoCAR Challenege is a competition that challenges participating students from across North America to re-engineer a vehicle donated by General Motors. With the goal of minimizing the vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions, while maintaining its utility, safety and performance, teams had to find the best combination of cutting-edge technologies to meet these objectives. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program Last Thursday, the Library of Congress's vaunted halls were filled with undergraduate and graduate students on the edge of their seats, waiting to hear the first place winner of the EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge competition. As Patrick Davis, Vehicle Technologies Program Manager for the Department

74

EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line EcoCAR Challenge: Finish Line Addthis Description The EcoCAR Challenege is a competition that challenges participating students from across North America to re-engineer a vehicle donated by General Motors. With the goal of minimizing the vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions, while maintaining its utility, safety and performance, teams had to find the best combination of cutting-edge technologies to meet these objectives. Speakers Secretary Steven Chu; MIchael Bly, Lynn Gnatt, Carlos Cubero-Ponce, Ryan Melsert, Eric Schacht, Andrew Eldridge, Duration 4:23 Topic Alternative Fuel Vehicles Fuel Economy Batteries Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Credit Energy Department Video (Music.) LYNN GANTT (Virginia Tech): There are 16 universities that compete in the

75

EcoCAR Reaches the Finish Line | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reaches the Finish Line Reaches the Finish Line EcoCAR Reaches the Finish Line June 21, 2011 - 2:09pm Addthis The EcoCAR Challenege is a competition that challenges participating students from across North America to re-engineer a vehicle donated by General Motors. With the goal of minimizing the vehicle's fuel consumption and emissions, while maintaining its utility, safety and performance, teams had to find the best combination of cutting-edge technologies to meet these objectives. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program Last Thursday, the Library of Congress's vaunted halls were filled with undergraduate and graduate students on the edge of their seats, waiting to hear the first place winner of the EcoCAR: The NeXt Challenge competition. As Patrick Davis, Vehicle Technologies Program Manager for the Department

76

Genomics Presentations from DOE JGI's Fourth Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting, 2009  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tMedicago trunculata Resequencing of 384 lines, Joann Mudge \tPerformance Comparison of Two Genome Partitioning Platforms, Jon Armstrong \tPrescreening Illumina Data Results in High-Quality Genome Polishing, Cliff Han \tGenePRIMP: Improving Microbial Gene Prediction Quality, Amrita Pati \tIMG Systems for Comparative Analysis of Microbial Genomes and Metagenomes, Victor Markowitz \tAutomated Microbial Genome Annotation, Miriam Land \tNew Technology Drafts: Production and Improvements, Alla Lapidus \tHuman Microbiome Finishing, Jessica Hostetler

77

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead-Free Surface Finishes for Electronic Components: Tin Whisker Growth METALS This project degraded by the switch to lead- free technology. In particular, the state of compressive stress and the localized creep response (whisker growth) of tin-based lead-free electrodeposits are being measured

Magee, Joseph W.

78

Light transmission through and its complete stoppage in an ultra slow wave optical medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light Wave transmission -- its compression, amplification, and the optical energy storage -- in an Ultra Slow Wave Medium (USWM) is studied analytically. Our phenomenological treatment is based entirely on the continuity equation for the optical energy flux, and the well known distribution-product property of Dirac delta-function. The results so obtained provide a clear understanding of some recent experiments on light transmission and its complete stoppage in an USWM. Keywords : Ultra slow light, stopped light, slow wave medium, EIT.

V., Ranjith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Product Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1 Wrought alloy products and tempers...or cold-finished Rivets Forgings and forging stock Foil Fin stock Drawn Extruded Rod Bar Wire 1050 . . . . . . . . . H112 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1060 O, H12, H14, H16, H18 O, H12, H14, H112 O, H12, H14, H18, H113 O, H112 . . . .

80

Excitation of a slow wave structure  

SciTech Connect

The Green's function on a slow wave structure is constructed. The Green's function includes all radial modes, and for each radial mode, all space harmonics. We compare the analytic solution of the frequency response on the slow wave structure with that obtained from a particle-in-cell code. Favorable comparison is obtained when the first few lower order modes are resonantly excited. This gives some confidence in the prediction of converting a pulse train into radiation using a slow wave structure.

Zhang Peng; Lau, Y. Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Hoff, Brad; French, D. M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Luginsland, J. W. [Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

VIDEOS: Slow motion video of Charpy impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 25, 2007 ... This slow motion video of an actual Charpy impact test shows the sample fracturing. The VIMS web resource offers a detailed description of an...

82

Standard Slowness Log | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Standard Slowness Log edit Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration...

83

Authorization basis supporting documentation for plutonium finishing plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identification and definition of the authorization basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility and operations are essential for compliance to DOE Order 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions. The authorization basis, as defined in the Order, consists of those aspects of the facility design basis, i.e., the structures, systems and components (SSCS) and the operational requirements that are considered to be important to the safety of operations and are relied upon by DOE to authorize operation of the facility. These facility design features and their function in various accident scenarios are described in WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), Chapter 9, `Accident Analysis.` Figure 1 depicts the relationship of the Authorization Basis to its components and other information contained in safety documentation supporting the Authorization Basis. The PFP SSCs that are important to safety, collectively referred to as the `Safety Envelope` are discussed in various chapters of the FSAR and in WHC-SD-CP-OSR-010, Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements. Other documents such as Criticality Safety Evaluation Reports (CSERS) address and support some portions of the Authorization Basis and Safety Envelope.

King, J.P., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Understanding slow BGP routing table transfers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers and network operators often say that BGP table transfers are slow. Despite this common knowledge, the reasons for slow BGP transfers are not well understood. This paper explains BGP table transfer delays by combining BGP messages collected ... Keywords: bgp, route propagation, routing convergence

Zied Ben Houidi; Mickael Meulle; Renata Teixeira

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Slow Waveguide Structures for Particle Accelerators  

ORNL 2010-G00971/jcn UT-B ID 200802074 Slow Waveguide Structures for Particle Accelerators Technology Summary A waveguide design that can save time and money in the ...

86

Flame retardant finishing for cotton using a hydroxy-functional organophosphorus oligomer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??New durable flame retardant finishing systems based on a hydroxy-functional organophosphorus oligomer (HFPO) and a bonding agent have been developed for cotton. In this research, (more)

Wu, Weidong

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

DTRA Algorithm Prize (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Christian Whitchurch on the "DTRA Algorithm Prize" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Whitechurch, Christian [Defense Threat Reduction Agency

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

GENII dose calculations for offsite maximum individual and populations from Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Document describes the potential dose consequences to the offsite maximum individual and population for ground and stack level releases at the offsite receptors from the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Nguyen, L.V.

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Slow light" and specialized metamaterials 'Slow light' advance could speed optical computing, telecommunications Researchers have made the first demonstration of rapidly switching...

90

U.S. exports of petroleum products increase as markets become more ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total U.S. exports of finished petroleum products have increased more than 60% since 2007 as markets have become more globally integrated. This trend is driven ...

91

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System Component Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) WAC System includes sub-systems 25A through 25K. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-005, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Ventilation System Confinement Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.'' This document lists safety class and safety significant components for the Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning and specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items, as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item.

DICK, J.D.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System Component Index  

SciTech Connect

This document lists safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) components for the Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC) and specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI), as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-18 19. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System includes sub-systems 25A through 25K. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-005, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Ventilation System Confinement Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.''

DIAZ, E.N.

2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the researchers were able to map the complexity of a "half-doped" manganite into a far-field speckle diffraction pattern to study the manganite's domain dynamics. Their results suggest the material undergoes a transition characterized by the competition between a pinned orbital domain topology that remains static and mobile domain boundaries that exhibit slow, temporal fluctuations.

95

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the researchers were able to map the complexity of a "half-doped" manganite into a far-field speckle diffraction pattern to study the manganite's domain dynamics. Their results suggest the material undergoes a transition characterized by the competition between a pinned orbital domain topology that remains static and mobile domain boundaries that exhibit slow, temporal fluctuations.

96

Slow motion responses of compliant offshore structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient method is developed to predict slow motion responses of slender compliant offshore structures in the unidirectional irregular waves and currents. The environmental loads are computed using the modified Morison equation based on slender-body approximation. The Hybrid Wave Model, which considers the nonlinear wave-wave interactions, is used to predict wave kinematics accurately up to the second order of wave steepness. Other second-order forces due to convective acceleration, free-surface fluctuation, time-varying structural displacement and axial divergence effects are also included. An iterative-incremental Newmark-,3 scheme is employed to simulate the structural responses in the time domain. It is observed that the predicted slow-drift motions of a Joint, Industry Project Spar and a Floating Jacket Platform are in excellent agreement with the model test measurements. However, the predicted slow-drift motions using Wheeler Stretching and Linear Extrapolation wave kinematics models do not agree with the measurements well.

Cao, Peimin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the correlated motion of groups of self-assembled, outer-lying electrons in the extremely complex electronic system found in manganites. The manganite family of materials has puzzled physicists for years by defying standard models for the motion of electrons in crystals. By controlling the properties of the incident x rays, the researchers were able to map the complexity of a "half-doped" manganite into a far-field speckle diffraction pattern to study the manganite's domain dynamics. Their results suggest the material undergoes a transition characterized by the competition between a pinned orbital domain topology that remains static and mobile domain boundaries that exhibit slow, temporal fluctuations.

98

Surface treatment and finishing of aluminum and its alloys. Volumes 1 and 2 (5th revised and enlarged edition)  

SciTech Connect

Currently available technologies for treating and finishing Al and Al-alloy surfaces are surveyed in an introduction and reference handbook. Chapters are devoted to the properties, alloys, and finishes of Al; mechanical treatments and finishes; electrolytic and chemical polishing; chemical cleaning and etching; chemical conversion coatings; theoretical models of anodizing; decorative and protective anodizing; and anodizing in architecture. Also included are: hard anodizing, coloring anodic oxide coatings (AOCs) with dyes and pigments, sealing AOCs, properties and tests of AOCs, plating on Al, organic finishing, vitreous enameling, and effluents from Al-finishing operations. Diagrams, drawings, graphs, photographs, micrographs, and tables of national finish specifications are provided.

Sheasby, P.G.; Wernick, S.; Pinner, R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Steam Turbine Efficiency and Corrosion: Effects of Surface Finish, Deposits, and Moisture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The causes of steam turbine losses have been recognized for over 50 years. In practice, deposits and surface finish account for major losses during turbine blade path audits. This report presents new experimental information on the effects of surface finish, moisture removal, and deposits.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip  

SciTech Connect

Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred triggered slow-slip on the San Andreas Fault at Parkfield, CA., due to December, 2003 Mw6.5 San Simeon Earthquake (Breguier et al., Science 321, p.1478, 2008) shows very similar characteristics to what we observe in the laboratory, suggesting an extremely low in situ effective stress or a weak fault and a nonlinear-dynamical triggering mechanism.

Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tool Path Planning Generation For Finish Machining of Freeform Surfaces in the Cybercut Process Planning Pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CYBERCUT PROCESS PLANNING PIPELINE Paul K. Wright, David A.describes part of a "Pipeline of De- sign and Manufacturingversus surface finish. 2.5D PIPELINE AND 3D SURFACES Figure

Wright, Paul K; Dornfeld, David; Sundararajan, V.; Misra, Debananda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ben McMahon of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) presents "Signature Peptide-Enabled Metagenomics" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

McMahon, Ben [LANL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Metagenomics for Etiologic Agent Discovery (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matthew Ross on "Metagenomics for etiological agent discovery" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Ross, Matthew [Baylor College of Medicine

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bruce Walker on "Pilon: Automated Assembly Improvement Software" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Walker, Bruce (Broad Institute)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

U.S. Imports from Venezuela of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Imports from Venezuela of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 1,856: 1,700: 945: 1,181: 1,074 ...

106

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Waste Analysis Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document waste analysis activities associated with the Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment and Storage Unit (PFP Treatment and Storage Unit) to comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-300(1), (2), (4)(a) and (5). The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is an interim status container management unit for plutonium bearing mixed waste radiologically managed as transuranic (TRU) waste. TRU mixed (TRUM) waste managed at the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore is not subject to land disposal restrictions [WAC 173-303-140 and 40 CFR 268]. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland Washington (Figure 1). Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

History and stabilization of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex, Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 231-Z Isolation Building or Plutonium Metallurgy Building is located in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area, approximately 300 yards north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) (234-5 Building). When the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) built it in 1944 to contain the final step for processing plutonium, it was called the Isolation Building. At that time, HEW used a bismuth phosphate radiochemical separations process to make `AT solution,` which was then dried and shipped to Los Alamos, New Mexico. (AT solution is a code name used during World War II for the final HEW product.) The process was carried out first in T Plant and the 224-T Bulk Reduction Building and B Plant and the 224-B Bulk Reduction Building. The 224-T and -B processes produced a concentrated plutonium nitrate stream, which then was sent in 8-gallon batches to the 231-Z Building for final purification. In the 231-Z Building, the plutonium nitrate solution underwent peroxide `strikes` (additions of hydrogen peroxide to further separate the plutonium from its carrier solutions), to form the AT solution. The AT solution was dried and shipped to the Los Alamos Site, where it was made into metallic plutonium and then into weapons hemispheres.` The 231-Z Building began `hot` operations (operations using radioactive materials) with regular runs of plutonium nitrate on January 16, 1945.

Gerber, M.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

JONES, R.A.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

109

Analysis and Experiments with a Slow-Start Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slow-start procedures were developed decades ago in order to provide a smoother evolution in numerical simulations performed with three-time-level integration schemes. The advantages of a slow start versus a conventional forward start should ...

Harold Ritchie; Anne-Marie Leduc

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

IMPROVED TECHNIQUE OF HYDROGEN CONTENT ANALYSIS BY SLOW NEUTRON SCATTERING  

SciTech Connect

A slow-neutron-transmission method fro dertermining the hydrogen content of fluorcarbons is described (G.Y.).

Rainwater, L.J.; Havens, W.W. Jr.

1945-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

Improved Technique of Hydrogen Content Analysis by Slow Neutron Scattering  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A slow-neutron-transmission method fro determining the H content of fluorcarbons is described (G.Y.)

Rainwater, L. J.; Havens, W. W. Jr.

1945-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

113

Stocks of Finished Motor Gasoline - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reformulated and conventional gasoline production excludes adjustments for fuel ethanol and motor gasoline blending components. Historical data prior to June 4, ...

114

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Research Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. The LSDS collaborations suggests that the next step to in empirically testing the feasibility is to conduct measurements on fresh fuel assemblies to understand investigate self-attenuation and fresh mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rodlets so we may betterto understand extraction of masses for 235U and 239Pu. While progressing toward these goals, the collaboration also strongly suggests the continued development of enabling technology such as detector development and algorithm development, thatwhich could provide significant performance benefits.

Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slow sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.

Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to RHA.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

As Auto X Reaches the Finish Line, a New Race Begins | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

As Auto X Reaches the Finish Line, a New Race Begins As Auto X Reaches the Finish Line, a New Race Begins As Auto X Reaches the Finish Line, a New Race Begins September 17, 2010 - 4:20pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs When the Automotive X Prize competition began back in March of 2008, the organizers laid out an ambitious goal: inspire a new generation of viable, safe and super fuel-efficient vehicles capable of achieving 100 miles per gallon or the energy equivalent (MPGe). The response they received was staggering -- 136 vehicle design proposals from teams across the globe, all eager to innovate and set a new standard for energy efficiency. In the two years since the competition was announced, the field thinned through various stages of competition, evaluation and testing. Not content

118

4-Week Avg U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1991-Mar : 03/08 : 6,779 : 03/15 : 6,907

119

U.S. Product Supplied of Finished Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1940's: 1,587: 1,979: 2,119: 2,280: 2,410: 1950's: 2,616: 2,985: 2,954: 3,110: 3,194 ...

120

Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are serious concerns about the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy and nutrient and water use efficiency of large-scale, first generation bio-energy feedstocks currently in use. A major question is whether biofuels obtained from these feedstocks are effective in combating climate change and what impact they will have on soil and water resources. Another fundamental issue relates to the magnitude and nature of their impact on food prices and ultimately on the livelihoods of the poor. A possible solution to overcome the current potentially large negative effects of large-scale biofuel production is developing second and third generation conversion techniques from agricultural residues and wastes and step up the scientific research efforts to achieve sustainable biofuel production practices. Until such sustainable techniques are available governments should scale back their support for and promotion of biofuels. Multipurpose feedstocks should be investigated making use of the bio-refinery concept (bio-based economy). At the same time, the further development of non-commercial, small scale

Science Council Secretariat

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Crude oil and finished fuel storage stability: An annotated review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art review and assessment of storage effects on crude oil and product quality was undertaken through a literature search by computer accessing several data base sources. Pertinent citations from that literature search are tabulated for the years 1980 to the present. This 1990 revision supplements earlier reviews by Brinkman and others which covered stability publications through 1979 and an update in 1983 by Goetzinger and others that covered the period 1952--1982. For purposes of organization, citations are listed in the current revision chronologically starting with the earliest 1980 publications. The citations have also been divided according to primary subject matter. Consequently 11 sections appear including: alternate fuels, gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, residual fuel, crude oil, biodegradation, analyses, reaction mechanisms, containment, and handling and storage. Each section contains a brief narrative followed by all the citations for that category.

Whisman, M.L.; Anderson, R.P.; Woodward, P.W.; Giles, H.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons Learned from CRISPR Analysis Using Next-Generation Draft Sequences ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

SciTech Connect

Catherine Campbell on "Finishing and Special Motifs: Lessons learned from CRISPR analysis using next-generation draft sequences" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Campbell, Catherine [Noblis

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit Interim Status Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Treatment and Storage Unit. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit is located within the 234-52 Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based upon Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit manages transuranic mixed (TRUM) waste, there are many controls placed on management of the waste. Based on the many controls placed on management of TRUM waste, releases of TRUM waste are not anticipated to occur in the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP Treatment and Storage Unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. The PFP Treatment and Storage Unit will be operated to immobilize and/or repackage plutonium-bearing waste in a glovebox process. The waste to be processed is in a solid physical state (chunks and coarse powder) and will be sealed into and out of the glovebox in closed containers. The containers of immobilized waste will be stored in the glovebox and in additional permitted storage locations at PFP. The waste will be managed to minimize the potential for spills outside the glovebox, and to preclude spills from reaching soil. Containment surfaces will be maintained to ensure integrity. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the glovebox, operating methods and administrative controls will require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation will be made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Slow Electrons Generated by Intense High-Frequency Laser Pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A very slow electron is shown to emerge when an intense high-frequency laser pulse is applied to a hydrogen negative ion. This counterintuitive effect cannot be accounted for by multiphoton or tunneling ionization mechanisms. We explore the effect and show that in the high-frequency regime the atomic electron is promoted to the continuum via a nonadiabatic transition caused by slow deformation of the dressed potential that follows a variation of the envelope of the laser pulse. This is a general mechanism, and a slow electron peak should always appear in the photoelectron spectrum when an atom is irradiated by a high-frequency pulse of finite length.

Toyota, Koudai; Watanabe, Shinichi [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1, Chofu-ga-oka, Chofu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Tolstikhin, Oleg I. [Russian Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Kurchatov Square 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Morishita, Toru [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Electro-Communications, 1-5-1, Chofu-ga-oka, Chofu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Project Plan Remove Special Nuclear Material (SNM) from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Remove SNM Materials. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev.0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP Remove SNM Materials project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baseline to manage the execution of the Remove SNM Materials project. Any deviation to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process. The Remove SNM Materials project provides the necessary support and controls required for DOE-HQ, DOE-RL, BWHC, and other DOE Complex Contractors the path forward to negotiate shipped/receiver agreements, schedule shipments, and transfer material out of PFP to enable final deactivation.

BARTLETT, W.D.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Balance and the Slow Quasimanifold: Some Explicit Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultimate limitations of the balance, slow-manifold, and potential vorticity inversion concepts are investigated. These limitations are associated with the weak but nonvanishing spontaneous-adjustment emission, or Lighthill radiation, of ...

Rupert Ford; Michael E. McIntyre; Warwick A. Norton

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Slow Orbit Feedback at the ALS Using Matlab  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of Storage Ring Motion at the ALS," PAC [4] G.Portmann, "ALS Storage Ring Setup and Control Using MatlabSlow Orbit Feedback at the ALS Using Matlab G_ Port mann

Portmann, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) sets forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ESH) standards/requirements for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction, operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

Maddox, B.S.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

David Sexton (Baylor) gives a talk titled "Mercury: Next-gen Data Analysis and Annotation Pipeline" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Sexton, David (Baylor)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Introducing National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) Informatics (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

John Crow from the National Center for Genome Resources discusses his organization's informatics at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Crow, John [National Center for Genome Resources

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Todd Smith of the PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory gives a talk about his lab and its work at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Smith, Todd [PerkinElmer Omics Laboratory

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 2 Storage and Handling of Finished Frying Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 2 Storage and Handling of Finished Frying Oils Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pres

135

Alfalfa leaf meal in finishing steer diets. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ninety-six medium frame, Angus and Angus cross steer calves (average initial weight 540 lb.) were allotted to a heavy or light weight block and then randomly assigned to one of four dietary treatments for a 167 or 189-day finishing phase, respectively. Treatments were control (supplemental soybean meal), alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) providing 33%, 66%, 100% of supplemental protein. Finishing diets were formulated to contain .61 Mcal NE{sub g}/lb dry matter, 12.5% crude protein, .6 % Ca and .3 % P. There were no significant (P >.05) effects of dietary treatments on daily gain or dry matter required /lb of gain. Steers fed 100 % ALM consumed more (P <.05) dry matter than steers fed either of the other three treatments. Dry matter consumption increased linearly (P >.05) with increasing ALM. There was no significant (P >.05) dietary treatment effect on marbling, KPH %, yield grade, quality grade, or liver abscesses. There was an apparent trend in reduced liver abscess incidence in steers fed 100 % ALM. Steers fed 66 % ALM had significantly (P <.05) greater backfat measurements, backfat also had a cubic effect (P <.05). Hot carcass weight had a quadratic relation (P <.05) with level of ALM. Substituting alfalfa leaf meal for soybean meal in diets of finishing steers increased DM intake, but this increase was accompanied by an increase in gain which resulted in similar feed efficiency. There may be an advantage in blending ALM and soybean meal as feed efficiency was improved when cattle were fed the blend. Also, feeding ALM may result in lower incidence of liver abscess.

Zehnder, C.M.; DiCostanzo, A.; Smith, L.B.; Brown, D.B.; Hall, J.M.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

137

Linking the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter: The slow electron and its interactions  

SciTech Connect

The interfacing of the gaseous and the condensed phases of matter as effected by interphase and cluster studies on the behavior of key reactions involving slow electrons either as reacting initial particles or as products of the reactions themselves is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the measurement of both the cross sections and the energetics involved, although most of the available information to date is on the latter. The discussion is selectively focussed on electron scattering (especially the role of negative ion states in gases, clusters, and dense matter), ionization, electron attachment and photodetachment. The dominant role of the electric polarization of the medium is emphasized.

Christophorou, L.G.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

A MODEL FOR THE SOURCES OF THE SLOW SOLAR WIND  

SciTech Connect

Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to {approx}60{sup 0}, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spatial resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind, and magnetic field for a time period preceding the 2008 August 1 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results imply that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (which we term an S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere and propose further tests of the model.

Antiochos, S. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mikic, Z.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J. A., E-mail: spiro.antiochos@nasa.gov [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

The evaluation of sorghum dried distiller's grains with solubles in nursery pig diets, on finishing pig performance and meat quality, and on lactating sow performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Five experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sorghum dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) on nursery pig performance, finishing pig performance and meat (more)

Sotak, Kelly Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Origins of the slow and the ubiquitous fast solar wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present in this Letter the first coordinated radio occultation measurements and ultraviolet observations of the inner corona below 5.5 Rs, obtained during the Galileo solar conjunction in January 1997, to establish the origin of the slow solar wind. Limits on the flow speed are derived from the Doppler dimming of the resonantly scattered componentof the oxygen 1032 A and 1037 A lines as measured with the UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). White light images of the corona from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) on SOHO taken simultaneously are used to place the Doppler radio scintillation and ultraviolet measurements in the context ofcoronal structures. These combined observations provide the first direct confirmation of the view recently proposed by Woo and Martin (1997) that the slow solar wind is associated with the axes, also known as stalks, of streamers. Furthermore, the ultraviolet observations also show how the fast solar wind...

Habbal, S R; Fineschi, S; O'Neal, R; Kohl, J M; Noci, G; Korendyke, C

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Stripes, Zigzags, and Slow Dynamics in Buckled Hard Spheres  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the analogy between buckled colloidal monolayers and the triangular-lattice Ising antiferromagnet. We calculate free volume-induced Ising interactions, show how lattice deformations favor zigzag stripes that partially remove the Ising model ground-state degeneracy, and identify the Martensitic mechanism prohibiting perfect stripes. Slowly inflating the spheres yields jamming as well as logarithmically slow relaxation reminiscent of the glassy dynamics observed experimentally.

Yair Shokef; Tom C. Lubensky

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

Excitation of simple atoms by slow magnetic monopoles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present a theory of excitation of simple atoms by slow moving massive monopoles. Previously presented results for a monopole of Dirac strength on hydrogen and helium are reviewed. The hydrogen theory is extended to include arbitrary integral multiples of the Dirac pole strength. The excitation of helium by double strength poles and by dyons is also discussed. It is concluded that a helium proportional counter is a reliable and effective detector for monopoles of arbitrary strength, and for negatively charged dyons.

Kroll, N.M.; Parke, S.J.; Ganapathi, V.; Drell, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Slow Wave Excitation in the ICRF and HHFW Regimes  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical considerations and high spatial resolution numerical simulations of radio frequency (rf) wave heating in tokamaks and in spherical toruses (ST) indicate that fast waves launched into tokamaks in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) or into spherical toruses in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime may excite a short wavelength slow mode inside of the plasma discharge due to the presence of hot electrons that satisfy the condition {omega}slow wave may be related to the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave that propagates for frequencies above the fundamental ion cyclotron frequency in warm plasmas or to a high frequency version of a kinetic Alfven wave. This slow wave, if physically real, would provide another path for rf power absorption in tokamaks and ST devices.

Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Wilson, J. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL Engineering, 1066 Commerce Park Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Berry, L. A.; Ryan, P. M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Smithe, D. N. [Tech-X Corporation, 5621 Arapahoe Ave., Suite A, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

144

Origins of the slow and the ubiquitous fast solar wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present in this Letter the first coordinated radio occultation measurements and ultraviolet observations of the inner corona below 5.5 Rs, obtained during the Galileo solar conjunction in January 1997, to establish the origin of the slow solar wind. Limits on the flow speed are derived from the Doppler dimming of the resonantly scattered componentof the oxygen 1032 A and 1037 A lines as measured with the UltraViolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). White light images of the corona from the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) on SOHO taken simultaneously are used to place the Doppler radio scintillation and ultraviolet measurements in the context ofcoronal structures. These combined observations provide the first direct confirmation of the view recently proposed by Woo and Martin (1997) that the slow solar wind is associated with the axes, also known as stalks, of streamers. Furthermore, the ultraviolet observations also show how the fast solar wind is ubiquitous in the inner corona, and that a velocity shear between the fast and slow solar wind develops along the streamer stalks.

S. R. Habbal; R. Woo; S. Fineschi; R. O'Neal; J. Kohl; G. Noci; C. Korendyke

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

JGI - Product Offerings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Product Offerings Product Offerings Scientific Program Product Brief Description Deliverables FY14 target cycle time (median), days FY14 target cycle time (75th %), days Fungal Minimal Draft Low coverage whole genome shotgun sequencing for evaluation. May turn into a standard draft or improved standard draft. Assembly. Annotation optional (JGI portal); raw data submitted to SRA 250 400 Fungal Resequencing SNP and short indel calls, rearrangement detection, population analysis. Text file of SNPs (incl location in genome, coding/vs non, syn vs non-syn aa change etc) and structural rearrangements, alignment files, tracks for upload to genome browser and fastq files; raw data submitted to SRA 140 200 Fungal Standard Draft Whole genome shotgun sequencing. Exact scope items and quality of finished product depend on genome. Selected genomes will be improved based on feasibility and scientific merit. Assembly, annotation (JGI Portal + Genbank); raw data submitted to SRA 250 400

146

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for vertical calciner operation at the plutonium finishing plant  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) for construction, installation, and operation of a vertical calciner to stabilize plutonium at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)Complex, pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060. The PFP Complex activities are focused on the cleanout and stabilization of plutonium residue left from plutonium weapons material processing activities. The prime purpose of the vertical calciner is to convert plutonium acid solutions to a more stable plutonium oxide. A test calciner has been developed and put in place in the 234-5Z Building. Development testing of this vertical calciner is ongoing. A new vertical calciner will be assembled for actual stabilization operation in Room 230C of the 234-5Z Building. The test calciner may be upgraded or replaced as an alternative to building a new calciner in Room 230C.

Hays, C.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) SUB-GRADE EE/CA EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVES A NEW MODEL  

SciTech Connect

An engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) was performed at the Hanford Site's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The purpose of the EVCA was to identify the sub-grade items to be evaluated; determine the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) hazardous substances through process history and available data; evaluate these hazards; and as necessary, identify the available alternatives to reduce the risk associated with the contaminants. The sub-grade EWCA considered four alternatives for an interim removal action: (1) No Action; (2) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M); (3) Stabilize and Leave in Place (Stabilization); and (4) Remove, Treat and Dispose (RTD). Each alternative was evaluated against the CERCLA criteria for effectiveness, implementability, and cost.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

ASSESSING CHEMICAL HAZARDS AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) FOR PLANNING FUTURE D&D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents the fiscal year (FY) 2006 assessment to evaluate potential chemical and radiological hazards associated with vessels and piping in the former plutonium process areas at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Evaluations by PFP engineers as design authorities for specific systems and other subject-matter experts were conducted to identify the chemical hazards associated with transitioning the process areas for the long-term layup of PFP before its eventual final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). D and D activities in the main process facilities were suspended in September 2005 for a period of between 5 and 10 years. A previous assessment conducted in FY 2003 found that certain activities to mitigate chemical hazards could be deferred safely until the D and D of PFP, which had been scheduled to result in a slab-on-grade condition by 2009. As a result of necessary planning changes, however, D and D activities at PFP will be delayed until after the 2009 time frame. Given the extended project and plant life, it was determined that a review of the plant chemical hazards should be conducted. This review to determine the extended life impact of chemicals is called the ''Plutonium Finishing Plant Chemical Hazards Assessment, FY 2006''. This FY 2006 assessment addresses potential chemical and radiological hazard areas identified by facility personnel and subject-matter experts who reevaluated all the chemical systems (items) from the FY 2003 assessment. This paper provides the results of the FY 2006 chemical hazards assessment and describes the methodology used to assign a hazard ranking to the items reviewed.

HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.; MINETT, M.J.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanfords Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

A genetic algorithm-based method for look-ahead scheduling in the finishing phase of construction projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Genetic algorithms (GAs) are widely used in finding solutions for resource constrained multi-project scheduling problems (RCMPSP) in construction projects. In the finishing phase of a complex construction project, each room forms a confined space for ... Keywords: Genetic algorithm (GA), Look-ahead schedule (LAS), RCMPSP, RCPSP, Simulation

Ning Dong; Dongdong Ge; Martin Fischer; Zuhair Haddad

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Exterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry to engineer durable, moisture-tolerant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the insulating value of walls and the energy efficiency of buildings. The EIFS concept came to America fromExterior Insulation Finish System (EIFS) Walls ORNL provides the tools to enable industry for building materials. EIFS's are among the most cost-effective building technologies for improving

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

152

Characterization of a New Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in developing direct measurement methods to determine the plutonium content of spent nuclear fuel within a fuel assembly. One technique that may prove successful is lead slowing-down spectroscopy. Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) has been used for decades to make cross-section measurements on relatively small isotopic samples of well know masses. For spent fuel assembly measurements, LSDS will be applied in reverse; unknown masses will be determined using well-know cross-sections. In the LSDS, a pulse of neutrons (on the order of 10-100 MeV) is injected into a large lead stack (~ 1m3). The neutrons quickly down-scatter but exhibit little spread in energy about the average, continually-decreasing neutron energy making for a strong correlation between the elapsed time from the initial pulse and the average energy of the neutron. By measuring this elapsed time, it is possible to measure interactions of the neutrons with the fuel in the 0.1 to 1,000 eV range. Many of the actinides have strong resonances in this region, making it possible, through careful measurements and analysis, to extract isotopic masses from LSDS measurements. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is actively conducting research on both LSDS measurement and data analysis techniques. This paper will present results of the effort to construct and characterize a new lead slowing down spectrometer. The spectrometer was designed to begin testing both experimental measurement and data analysis techniques for determining the plutonium content of spent fuel. To characterize the spectrometer, a series of (n,?) experiments were conducted to measure the correlation between the time after the neutrons enter the lead and the energy of the interaction. Results from these measurements as well as plans for future development of the spectrometer will be discussed.

Casella, Andrew M.; Warren, Glen A.; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Overman, Cory T.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Smith, Leon E.; Stave, Sean C.; Wittman, Richard S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Slow-light photonic crystal devices for high-speed optical signal processing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This book discusses design, modeling, and the characterization of slow-light photonic crystal waveguides. Guidelines are developed to obtain slow-light waveguides with broadband characteristics and with (more)

Brosi, Jan-Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE MICROWAVE EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 A channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: sjkim@nro.nao.ac.jp [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Reheating and Cosmic String Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the string production rate at the end of inflation, using the string spectrum obtained in \\lss in a near-de Sitter space. Our result shows that highly excited strings are hardly produced, thus the simple slow-roll inflation alone does not offer a cosmic string production mechanism.

Chao-Jun Feng; Xian Gao; Miao Li; Wei Song; Yushu Song

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

ON THE LOW-FREQUENCY BOUNDARY OF SUN-GENERATED MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN THE SLOW SOLAR WIND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New aspects of the slow solar wind turbulent heating and acceleration are investigated. A physical meaning of the lower boundary of the Alfven wave turbulent spectra in the solar atmosphere and the solar wind is studied and the significance of this natural parameter is demonstrated. Via an analytical and quantitative treatment of the problem we show that a truncation of the wave spectra from the lower frequency side, which is a consequence of the solar magnetic field structure and its cyclic changes, results in a significant reduction of the heat production and acceleration rates. An appropriate analysis is presented regarding the link of the considered problem with existing observational data and slow solar wind initiation scenarios.

Shergelashvili, Bidzina M.; Fichtner, Horst [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:32:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks" "Sourcekey","MGFSXUS1","MGFSXP11","MGFSXCT1","MGFS3_SDE_1","MGFSXFL1","MGFSXGA1","MGFS3_SME_1","MGFS3_SMD_1","MGFSXMA1","MGFS3_SNH_1","MGFSXNJ1","MGFSXNY1","MGFSXNC1","MGFSXPA1","MGFSXRI1","MGFSXSC1","MGFS3_SVT_1","MGFSXVA1","MGFSXWV1","MGFSXP21","MGFSXIL1","MGFSXIN1","MGFSXIA1","MGFS3_SKS_1","MGFSXKY1","MGFSXMI1","MGFSXMN1","MGFSXMO1","MGFS3_SNE_1","MGFS3_SND_1","MGFSXOH1","MGFSXOK1","MGFS3_SSD_1","MGFSXTN1","MGFSXWI1","MGFSXP31","MGFSXAL1","MGFSXAR1","MGFSXLA1","MGFSXMS1","MGFSXNM1","MGFSXTX1","MGFSXP41","MGFSXCO1","MGFSXID1","MGFSXMT1","MGFSXUT1","MGFSXWY1","MGFSXP51","MGFSXAK1","MGFSXAZ1","MGFSXCA1","MGFSXHI1","MGFSXNV1","MGFSXOR1","MGFSXWA1"

158

Comparison of Photoluminescence Imaging on Starting Multi-Crystalline Silicon Wafers to Finished Cell Performance: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) imaging techniques can be applied to multicrystalline silicon wafers throughout the manufacturing process. Both band-to-band PL and defect-band emissions, which are longer-wavelength emissions from sub-bandgap transitions, are used to characterize wafer quality and defect content on starting multicrystalline silicon wafers and neighboring wafers processed at each step through completion of finished cells. Both PL imaging techniques spatially highlight defect regions that represent dislocations and defect clusters. The relative intensities of these imaged defect regions change with processing. Band-to-band PL on wafers in the later steps of processing shows good correlation to cell quality and performance. The defect band images show regions that change relative intensity through processing, and better correlation to cell efficiency and reverse-bias breakdown is more evident at the starting wafer stage as opposed to later process steps. We show that thermal processing in the 200 degrees - 400 degrees C range causes impurities to diffuse to different defect regions, changing their relative defect band emissions.

Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Dorn, D.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Ounadjela, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

Hopkins, A. [Fluor Hanford, Inc, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

,"Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_st_a_epm0f_str_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:32:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Finished Motor Gasoline Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks" "Sourcekey","MGFSXUS1","MGFSXP11","MGFSXCT1","MGFS3_SDE_1","MGFSXFL1","MGFSXGA1","MGFS3_SME_1","MGFS3_SMD_1","MGFSXMA1","MGFS3_SNH_1","MGFSXNJ1","MGFSXNY1","MGFSXNC1","MGFSXPA1","MGFSXRI1","MGFSXSC1","MGFS3_SVT_1","MGFSXVA1","MGFSXWV1","MGFSXP21","MGFSXIL1","MGFSXIN1","MGFSXIA1","MGFS3_SKS_1","MGFSXKY1","MGFSXMI1","MGFSXMN1","MGFSXMO1","MGFS3_SNE_1","MGFS3_SND_1","MGFSXOH1","MGFSXOK1","MGFS3_SSD_1","MGFSXTN1","MGFSXWI1","MGFSXP31","MGFSXAL1","MGFSXAR1","MGFSXLA1","MGFSXMS1","MGFSXNM1","MGFSXTX1","MGFSXP41","MGFSXCO1","MGFSXID1","MGFSXMT1","MGFSXUT1","MGFSXWY1","MGFSXP51","MGFSXAK1","MGFSXAZ1","MGFSXCA1","MGFSXHI1","MGFSXNV1","MGFSXOR1","MGFSXWA1"

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161

Abstract--Face Milling is today the most effective and productive manufacturing method for roughing and finishing large  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface Roughness in Cnc Face Milling of Cobalt-Based Alloy (Stellite 6)", The International Journal

Aristomenis, Antoniadis

162

Robust concatenated codes for the slow Rayleigh fading channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we design a robust concatenated code for the Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) system in the presence of slow Rayleigh fading with no channel side information at the transmitter (no CSIT) and perfect channel side information at the receiver (perfect CSIR). Since we are interested in the slow fading channel, outage capacity is used as the measure of performance. Good space-time codes can be designed so as to maximize the so-called rank and the determinant criteria. However, a practical system will concatenate a space-time code with an outer code at the transmitter and perform iterative decoding at the receiver. It is necessary to design the space-time code together with the outer code in practice. We will call this kind of code a concatenated space-time code. At the transmitter, we will consider the bit-to-symbol mapping and space-time code together as a space-time modulator and thus, Bit Interleaved Coded Modulation (BICM) and Multilevel coding (ML) can be applied to design outer codes for the nonbinary constellation. However, the concatenated space-time codes designed by these two methods can only be decoded with arbitrarily small error probability for a fixed channel realization and such designs are not robust over the ensemble of fading channels. Our approach of designing concatenated space-time code is to design an outer code for a space-time modulator such that the concatenated space-time code can be decoded with arbitrarily small error probability in a set of fixed channels which have the same capacity. Through this approach, we discovered a new design criterion for spacetime codes: a good space-time code should stabilize its Extrinsic Information Transfer (EXIT) charts. In other words, the robustness of a space-time code in the slow fading channel and its performance in iterative decoding can be visualized by the EXIT charts. The rank and the determinant criterion do not evaluate the performance of a space-time code in iterative decoding, but the new criterion does. Therefore, the new criterion is applicable to design concatenated space-time codes. Applying our approach and new criterion, a rate 7.2 bits/s/Hz concatenated space-time code is designed. The performance is close to the outage capacity, and the rate lost is 0.2 bits/s/Hz.

Hsu, Teh-Hsuan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

165

Slow Temperature Equilibration Behind the Shock Front of SN 1006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the observation of OVII Doppler line broadening in a compact knot at the edge of SN 1006 detected with the Reflective Grating Spectrometer on board XMM-Newton. The observed line width of sigma = 3.4+/-0.5 eV at a line energy of 574 eV indicates an oxygen temperature of kT = 528+/-150 keV. Combined with the observed electron temperature of 1.5 keV the observed broadening is direct evidence for temperature non-equilibration in high Mach number shocks, and slow subsequent equilibration. The OVII line emission allows an accurate determination of the ionization state of the plasma, which is characterized by a relatively high forbidden line contribution, indicating log(n_e t) ~ 9.2.

Vink, Jeroen C; Gu, M F; Rasmussen, A; Kaastra, J S; Vink, Jacco; Gu, Ming Feng; Rasmussen, Andrew; Kaastra, Jelle S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Slow Temperature Equilibration Behind the Shock Front of SN 1006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the observation of OVII Doppler line broadening in a compact knot at the edge of SN 1006 detected with the Reflective Grating Spectrometer on board XMM-Newton. The observed line width of sigma = 3.4+/-0.5 eV at a line energy of 574 eV indicates an oxygen temperature of kT = 528+/-150 keV. Combined with the observed electron temperature of 1.5 keV the observed broadening is direct evidence for temperature non-equilibration in high Mach number shocks, and slow subsequent equilibration. The OVII line emission allows an accurate determination of the ionization state of the plasma, which is characterized by a relatively high forbidden line contribution, indicating log(n_e t) ~ 9.2.

Jacco Vink; J. Martin Laming; Ming Feng Gu; Andrew Rasmussen; Jelle S. Kaastra

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Report on Second Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Summary On August 18 and 19 2011, five items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS). After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials. As during the first activation run, we observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation of the samples was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours to days, except for 60Co which has a half-life of 5.3 y.

Stave, Sean C.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

168

Slowing Down Near the Glass Transition | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies New Light on Improving Engine Efficiencies The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle in Virus Assembly Increasing Magnetic Response of Ferromagnetic Semiconductors under High Pressure Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics First Molecular-Level Enzyme Images Could Improve Breast-Cancer Therapy Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Slowing Down Near the Glass Transition MARCH 5, 2009 Bookmark and Share Upper panel: Capillary waves on liquid surfaces. Lower panel: Frequency ranges of capillary wave measured by XPCS far above and near Tg. Researchers using an x-ray beamline at the U.S. Department of Energy's

169

Method of electrolytically finishing spray-hole of fuel injection nozzle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of finishing at least one spray-hole bored by machining in a body of a fuel injection nozzle for an internal combustion engine by removing burrs that remain after the machining around an inside mouth of each spray-hole. The method consists of subjecting an inner surface of the nozzle body in an area containing the inside mouth of each spray-hole to an electrolytic polishing treatment. The nozzle body is made the anode by inserting a tubular electrode having an insulator cover into the nozzle body such that an end portion of the electrode comes close to each spray-hole and supplies a pressurized electrolyte liquid into the interior of the nozzle body through the tubular electrode to flow out through each spray-hole. The method is characterized in that a portion of the insulator cover is so formed as to completely cover the end portion of the electrode. An outer surface makes close contact with the area of the inner surface of the nozzle body, that for each spray-hole the insulator cover is formed with a liquid passage which communicates with the interior of the tubular electrode and has an outlet port in the outer spray-hole and is only slightly larger in diameter than the mouth of the spray-hole. During the electrolytic polishing treatment, the electrolyte liquid is supplied through the tubular electrode flow out of the insulator cover only through the passage formed for each spray-hole.

Matsui, Y.; Uchiyama, M.

1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

170

THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

THE DEACTIVATION DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING OF THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) A FORMER PLUTONIUM PROCESSING FACILITY AT DOE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) was constructed as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. The Manhattan Project was developed to usher in the use of nuclear weapons to end the war. The primary mission of the PFP was to provide plutonium used as special nuclear material (SNM) for fabrication of nuclear devices for the war effort. Subsequent to the end of World War II, the PFP's mission expanded to support the Cold War effort through plutonium production during the nuclear arms race and later the processing of fuel grade mixed plutonium-uranium oxide to support DOE's breeder reactor program. In October 1990, at the close of the production mission for PFP, a shutdown order was prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington, DC and issued to the Richland DOE field office. Subsequent to the shutdown order, a team from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) analyzed the hazards at PFP associated with the continued storage of certain forms of plutonium solutions and solids. The assessment identified many discrete actions that were required to stabilize the different plutonium forms into stable form and repackage the material in high integrity containers. These actions were technically complicated and completed as part of the PFP nuclear material stabilization project between 1995 and early 2005. The completion of the stabilization project was a necessary first step in deactivating PFP. During stabilization, DOE entered into negotiations with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Washington and established milestones for the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) of the PFP. The DOE and its contractor, Fluor Hanford (Fluor), have made great progress in deactivating, decontaminating and decommissioning the PFP at the Hanford Site as detailed in this paper. Background information covering the PFP D&D effort includes descriptions of negotiations with the State of Washington concerning consent-order milestones, milestones completed to date, and the vision of bringing PFP to slab-on-grade. Innovative approaches in planning and regulatory strategies, as well new technologies from within the United States and from other countries and field decontamination techniques developed by workforce personnel, such as the ''turkey roaster'' and the ''lazy Susan'' are covered in detail in the paper. Critical information on issues and opportunities during the performance of the work such as concerns regarding the handling and storage of special nuclear material, concerns regarding criticality safety and the impact of SNM de-inventory at PFP are also provided. The continued success of the PFP D&D effort is due to the detailed, yet flexible, approach to planning that applied innovative techniques and tools, involved a team of experienced independent reviewers, and incorporated previous lessons learned at the Hanford site, Rocky Flats, and commercial nuclear D&D projects. Multi-disciplined worker involvement in the planning and the execution of the work has produced a committed workforce that has developed innovative techniques, resulting in safer and more efficient work evolutions.

CHARBONEAU, S.L.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Growth slows in U.S. ethanol production and consumption - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

173

GREEDY HEURISTICS FOR DETERMINING A PRODUCT FAMILY BILL OF Radwan El Hadj Khalaf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explore this production policy where modules are manufactured in distant location facilities for cost in selecting a set of modules that will be manufactured in distant facilities and shipped in a nearby location on exploring the finished product set and determining the most suitable bill of materials for each one and (2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

174

Slow Strain Rate Testing to Evaluate the Susceptibility of Welded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combustion products of fossil fuels are causing great damage through pollution, acid rains and the greenhouse effect. Hydrogen can be stored in three ...

175

Positron-diffraction experiments with a brightness-enhanced slow positron beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction of a high brightness slow positron beam has enabled us to extend Low Energy Positron Diffraction (LEPD) measurements well beyond the previously accessible range of energies. Details of the design and construction of this beam, which utilizes two stages of reflection remoderation for a 500-fold increase in brightness-per-volt, are presented, with emphasis on the positron optics. The positron beam is maintained in an ultra-high vacuum environment. This, together with the inclusion of facilities for display LEED and Auger Electron Spectroscopy, make the apparatus well suited for surface studies. Two sets of experiments performed with this new apparatus are described. Measurements of the specularly diffracted intensity from Cu(001) and Cu(111) single crystals show large peaks in the previously inaccessible 10-30 volt range. These peaks are well displaced from the kinematic Bragg positions and may be influenced by the emergence of non-specular diffraction beams, but the sharp series of features characteristic of beam threshold effects has not been observed. In the second set of experiments neutral positronium atom production is measured as a function of incident positron energy. The observed positronium production is correlated to the intensity vs. energy spectrum for diffracted positrons, suggesting that positronium formation is an important channel for elastically scattered positrons. The angular distribution of positronium formed changes with incident beam energy and may contain information on the details of the potential in the surface region.

Lippel, P.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN TWO-RIBBON FLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate that disturbances observed to propagate along the axis of the arcade in two-ribbon solar flares at the speed of a few tens of km s{sup -1}, well below the Alfven and sound speeds, can be interpreted in terms of slow magnetoacoustic waves. The waves can propagate across the magnetic field, parallel to the magnetic neutral line, because of the wave-guiding effect due to the reflection from the footpoints. The perpendicular group speed of the perturbation is found to be a fraction of the sound speed, which is consistent with observations. The highest value of the group speed grows with the increase in the ratio of the sound and Alfven speeds. For a broad range of parameters, the highest value of the group speed corresponds to the propagation angle of 25 deg. - 28 deg. to the magnetic field. This effect can explain the temporal and spatial structure of quasi-periodic pulsations observed in two-ribbon flares.

Nakariakov, V. M. [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Zimovets, I. V., E-mail: V.Nakariakov@warwick.ac.uk [Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya Street 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electron electric dipole moment experiment using electric-field quantized slow cesium atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-51xxx Electron electric dipole momentexperiment using electric-?eld quantized slow cesium atomsA proof-of-principle electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM)

Amini, Jason M.; Munger Jr., Charles T.; Gould, Harvey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wind capacity additions slowed during 2010 - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Growth in wind-powered electric generating capacity slowed in 2010, increasing by 11% from 2009 after increasing 40% on an average annual basis from 2005-2009.

179

Plan for the Startup of HA-21I Furnace Operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achievement of Thermal Stabilization mission elements require the installation and startup of three additional muffle furnaces for the thermal stabilization of plutonium and plutonium bearing materials at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The release to operate these additional furnaces will require an Activity Based Startup Review. The conduct of the Activity Based Startup Review (ABSR) was approved by Fluor Daniel Hanford on October 15, 1999. This plan has been developed with the objective of identifying those activities needed to guide the controlled startup of five furnaces from authorization to unrestricted operations by adding the HA-211 furnaces in an orderly and safe manner after the approval to Startup has been given. The Startup Plan provides a phased approach that bridges the activities between the completion of the Activity Based Startup Review authorizing the use of the three additional furnaces and the unrestricted operation of the five thermal stabilization muffle furnaces. The four phases are: (1) the initiation of five furnace operations using three empty (simulated full) boat charges from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C; (2) three furnace operations (one full charge from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C); (3) four furnace operations (two full charges from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C); and (4) integrated five furnace operations and unrestricted operations. Phase 1 of the Plan will be considered as the cold runs. This Plan also provides management oversight and administrative controls that are to be implemented until unrestricted operations are authorized. It also provides a formal review process for ensuring that all preparations needed for full five furnace operations are completed and formally reviewed prior to proceeding to the increased activity levels associated with five furnace operations. Specific objectives include: (1) To ensure that activities are conducted in a safe manner. (2) To provide supplemental technical and managerial support to Thermal Stabilization activities during the initial use of the HA-211 Furnaces until the commencement of full five furnace, unrestricted operations. (3) Ensure that operations can be conducted in a manner that meets PFP and DOE expectations associated with the principles of integrated safety management. (4) To ensure that all interfacing activities needed to meet Thermal Stabilization mission objectives are completed.

WILLIS, H.T.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Integrated Safety Management System Verification Enhancement Review of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the verification enhancement review was for the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify contractor readiness for the independent DOE Integrated Safety Management System Verification (ISMSV) on the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Secondary objectives included: (1) to reinforce the engagement of management and to gauge management commitment and accountability; (2) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct public involvement; (3) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of direct worker involvement; (4) to evaluate the ''value added'' benefit of the panel-to-panel review approach; and, (5) to evaluate the utility of the review's methodology/adaptability to periodic assessments of ISM status. The review was conducted on December 6-8, 1999, and involved the conduct of two-hour interviews with five separate panels of individuals with various management and operations responsibilities related to PFP. A semi-structured interview process was employed by a team of five ''reviewers'' who directed open-ended questions to the panels which focused on: (1) evidence of management commitment, accountability, and involvement; and, (2) consideration and demonstration of stakeholder (including worker) information and involvement opportunities. The purpose of a panel-to-panel dialogue approach was to better spotlight: (1) areas of mutual reinforcement and alignment that could serve as good examples of the management commitment and accountability aspects of ISMS implementation, and, (2) areas of potential discrepancy that could provide opportunities for improvement. In summary, the Review Team found major strengths to include: (1) the use of multi-disciplinary project work teams to plan and do work; (2) the availability and broad usage of multiple tools to help with planning and integrating work; (3) senior management presence and accessibility; (4) the institutionalization of worker involvement; (5) encouragement of self-reporting and self-assessment by management; (6) the availability of multiple internal communication mechanisms; and, (7) the existence of overall facility-wide safety management goals as well as individualized project work team goals. Major opportunities for improvement identified include: (1) the enhancement of external communications relative to ISM; (2) the institutionalization of ISM-related performance agreements/incentives; (3) the strengthening of feedback loops; (4) fine-tuning the use of tools; and, (5) the formalization of good practices.

BRIGGS, C.R.

2000-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Pipeline between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline between PAD Districts Pipeline between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Renewable Diesel Fuel Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

182

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer FY2013 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project, funded by the Materials Protection And Control Technology campaign, has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. This report is a high level summary of the progress completed in FY2013. This progress included: Fabrication of a 4He scintillator detector to detect fast neutrons in the LSDS operating environment. Testing of the detector will be conducted in FY2014. Design of a large area 232Th fission chamber. Analysis using the Los Alamos National Laboratory perturbation model estimated the required number of neutrons for an LSDS measurement to be 10 to the 16th source neutrons. Application of the algorithms developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to LSDS measurement data of various fissile samples conducted in 2012. The results concluded that the 235U could be measured to 2.7% and the 239Pu could be measured to 6.3%. Significant effort is yet needed to demonstrate the applicability of these algorithms for used-fuel assemblies, but the results reported here are encouraging in demonstrating that we are making progress toward that goal. Development and cost-analysis of a research plan for the next critical demonstration measurements. The plan suggests measurements on fresh fuel sub assemblies as a means to experimentally test self-attenuation and the use of fresh mixed-oxide fuel as a means to test simultaneous measurement of 235U and 239Pu.

Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Exploring the efficacy of IT with slow learners: case studies in primary schools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study looks at the changes effected with the introduction of IT into the Learning Support Programme (LSP) in 6 Singapore primary schools. It focuses how the teaching methodologies working with slow learners (or learners at risk) changed with the ... Keywords: information technology, primary schools, slow learners

Marissa Wettasinghe; Mazlan Hasan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Global Geometry of the Slow Manifold in the LorenzKrishnamurthy Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The five-equation model introduced by Lorenz and Krishnamurthy is studied. It is shown that the question Of existence of a slow manifold for this model can be addressed by a combination of local and global analysis. Existence of a locally slow ...

Roberto Camassa; Siu-Kei Tin

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

JOHNSTON GA

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Conventional Gasoline Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

187

WHY DO TUNA MAINTAIN ELEVATED SLOW MUSCLE TEMPERATURES? POWER OUTPUT OF MUSCLE ISOLATED FROM ENDOTHERMIC AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been hypothesised that regional endothermy has evolved in the muscle of some tunas to enhance the locomotory performance of the fish by increasing muscle power output. Using the work loop technique, we have determined the relationship between cycle frequency and power output, over a range of temperatures, in isolated bundles of slow muscle fibres from the endothermic yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and its ectothermic relative the bonito (Sarda chiliensis). Power output in all preparations was highly temperature-dependent. A counter-current heat exchanger which could maintain a 10 C temperature differential would typically double maximum muscle power output and the frequency at which maximum power is generated (fopt). The deep slow muscle of the tuna was able to operate at higher temperatures than slow muscle from the bonito, but was more sensitive to Summary temperature change than more superficially located slow fibres from both tuna and bonito. This suggests that it has undergone some evolutionary specialisation for operation at higher, but relatively stable, temperatures. fopt of slow muscle was higher than the tailbeat frequency of undisturbed cruising tuna and, together with the high intrinsic power output of the slow muscle mass, suggests that cruising fish have a substantial slow muscle power reserve. This reserve should be sufficient to power significantly higher sustainable swimming speeds, presumably at lower energetic cost than if intrinsically less efficient fast fibres were recruited.

Ectothermic Fish; John D. Altringham; Barbara A. Block

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closing the gap: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural: global potential for increasing biofuel production through agricultural intensification Matt Johnston1 and biodiesel feedstock crops. With biofuels coming under increasing pressure to slow or eliminate indirect land

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

189

Slow light of an amplitude modulated Gaussian pulse in electromagnetically induced transparency medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The slow light effects of an amplitude modulated Gaussian (AMG) pulse in a cesium atomic vapor are presented. In a single-$\\Lambda$ type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) medium, more severe distortion is observed for an AMG pulse than a Gaussian one. Using Fourier spectrum analysis, we find that the distortion, as well as the loss, is dominantly caused by linear absorption than dispersion. Accordingly, a compensation method is proposed to reshape the slow light pulse based on the transmission spectrum. In addition, we find a novel way to obtain simultaneous slow and fast light.

Wenzhuo Tang; Bin Luo; Yu Liu; Hong Guo

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

AN APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING & EVALUATING ALTERNATIVES FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF SUB-GRADE STRUCTURES AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

In 2002, the Richland Operations Office (RL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) developed milestones for transitioning the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. These milestones required developing an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EF/CA) for the facility's sub-grade structures and installations as part of a series of evaluations intended to provide for the transition of the facility to a clean slab-on-grade configuration. In addition to supporting decisions for interim actions, the analyses of sub-grade structures and installations performed through this EE/CA will contribute to the remedial investigation feasibility study(ies) and subsequently to the final records of decision for the relevant operable units responsible for site closure in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site.

HOPKINS, A.M.; KLOS, D.B.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Probing the Fast and Slow Components of Global Warming by Returning Abruptly to Preindustrial Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fast and slow components of global warming in a comprehensive climate model are isolated by examining the response to an instantaneous return to preindustrial forcing. The response is characterized by an initial fast exponential decay with an ...

Isaac M. Held; Michael Winton; Ken Takahashi; Thomas Delworth; Fanrong Zeng; Geoffrey K. Vallis

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

ImplicitExplicit Multistep Methods for Fast-WaveSlow-Wave Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Implicitexplicit (IMEX) linear multistep methods are examined with respect to their suitability for the integration of fast-waveslow-wave problems in which the fast wave has relatively low amplitude and need not be accurately simulated. The ...

Dale R. Durran; Peter N. Blossey

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Design and implementation of a slow orbit control package at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the design and implementation of a C++ client/server based slow orbit and energy control package based on the CDEV software control bus. Several client applications are described and operational experience is given.

Zeijts, J. van; Witherspoon, S.; Watson, W.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy Savings at a Rock Crushing and Finishing Operation: Energy Efficiency Assessment Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A utility asked the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to conduct an energy assessment of a manufacturer of rock-based product for use in construction materials in their service area. The EPRI energy audit team worked with facility personnel and the utility to understand energy usage in the facility and to identify areas where energy could be saved. The energy audit occurred during the summer season at a location in the upper Midwest United States. The areas of attention concerned system losses, ...

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Predicted concentrations in new relocatable classrooms of volatile organic compounds emitted from standard and alternate interior finish materials  

SciTech Connect

Relocatable classrooms (RCs) are widely employed by California school districts to satisfy rapidly expanding space requirements due to population growth and class size reduction policies. There is public concern regarding indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in schools, particularly in RCs, but very little data to support or dispel these concerns. Several studies are investigating various aspects of IEQ in California schools. This laboratory-based study focused on evaluating the emissions of toxic and/or odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, from materials used to finish the interiors of new RCs. Furthermore, the study implemented a procedure for VOC source reduction by testing and selecting lower-emitting materials as substitutes for standard materials. In total, 17 standard and alternate floor coverings, wall panels and ceiling panels were quantitatively tested for emissions of VOCs using smallscale environmental chambers. Working with the largest northern California manufacturer of conventional RCs and two school districts, specifications were developed for four new RCs to be produced in early summer 2001. Two of these will be predominantly finished with standard materials. Alternate carpet systems, an alternate wall panel covering and an alternate ceiling panel were selected for the two other RCs based on the results of the laboratory study and considerations of cost and anticipated performance and maintenance. Particular emphasis was placed on reducing the concentrations of VOCs on California agency lists of toxic compounds. Indoor concentrations of toxic and odorous VOCs were estimated for the four classrooms by mass balance using the measured VOC emission factors, exposed surface areas of the materials in the RCs, and three ventilation rate scenarios. Results indicate that reductions in the concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde phenol, di(ethylene glycol) butyl ether, vinyl acetate, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene and 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone should be achieved as the result of the source reduction procedure.

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Fisk, William J.; Shendell, Derek G.; Apte, Michael G.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Weekly Refiner Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refiner Net Production Refiner Net Production (Thousand Barrels per Day) Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Product/Region 11/08/13 11/15/13 11/22/13 11/29/13 12/06/13 12/13/13 View History Finished Motor Gasoline 2,168 2,300 2,336 2,359 2,462 2,368 2010-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 54 53 52 67 71 67 2010-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 696 745 722 711 798 790 2010-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 891 916 1,010 1,053 1,011 1,021 2010-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 260 248 245 232 279 235 2010-2013 West Coast (PADD 5) 268 338 308 296 302 255 2010-2013 Reformulated 50 49 49 49 48 49 2010-2013 Blended with Ethanol 50 49 49 49 48 49 2010-2013 Other

197

Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

SciTech Connect

Kamlesh (Ken) Patel from Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, California) presents "Preparation of Nucleic Acid Libraries for Personalized Sequencing Systems Using an Integrated Microfluidic Hub Technology " at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Patel, Kamlesh D [Ken; SNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

One of the Largest Pieces of Processing Equipment Removed from Plutonium Finishing Plant- Worker involvement led to safe completion of high-hazard work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WASH. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the successful removal of one of the largest, most complex pieces of equipment from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

199

PanFunPro: Bacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Based on the Functional Profiles (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Lukjancenko, Oksana [Technical University of Denmark

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platform (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Julien Tremblay from DOE JGI presents "Evaluation of Multiplexed 16S rRNA Microbial Population Surveys Using Illumina MiSeq Platorm" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Tremblay, Julien [DOE JGI

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EFFECTS OF DIETARY CALCIUM LEVELS ON GROWTH-PERFORMANCE AND DIGESTIVE FUNCTION IN CATTLE FED A HIGH-FAT FINISHING DIET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/d Ca in steers fed a high-moisture corn-based finishing diet containing 0, 3 or 6% tallow.5% tallow or soybean oil soapstock. An interaction was observed between fat source and Ca level. In contrast, with supplemental tallow, increasing Ca level decreased ADG (9%) and feed efficiency (6%). Zinn

Delany, Mary E.

202

The Relation between Ion Temperature Anisotropy and Formation of Slow Shocks in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a two-dimensional simulation by using an electromagnetic hybrid code to study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection in low beta plasmas, and we focus on the relation between the formation of slow shocks and the ion temperature anisotropy enhanced at the shock downstream region. It is known that as magnetic reconnection develops, the parallel temperature along the magnetic field becomes large in association with the anisotropic PSBL (plasma sheet boundary layer) ion beams, and this temperature anisotropy has a tendency to suppress the formation of slow shocks. Based on our simulation result, we found that the slow shock formation is suppressed due to the large temperature anisotropy near the X-type region, but the ion temperature anisotropy relaxes with increasing the distance from the magnetic neutral point. As a result, two pairs of current structures, which are the strong evidence of dissipation of magnetic field in slow shocks, are formed at the distance x > 11...

Higashimori, Katsuaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy Accounting in Canning Tomato Products  

SciTech Connect

An energy-accounting method was used to determine energy use in various unit operations in canning tomato juice, whole-peeled tomatoes, and tomato paste. Data on steam and electric consumption were obtained from a canning plant with the use of steam flow meters and electric transducers. Unit operations associated with the following equipment were investigated: crushers, hot-break heaters, pulpers, finishers, lye-bath peelers, evaporators, and retorts. Data were analyzed to determine amount of energy used per unit of raw product. Energy-intensive operations were identified for future modifications to reduce energy consumption.

Singh, R P; Carroad, P A; Chhinnan, M S; Rose, W W; Jacob, N L

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

205

Ultrahigh sensitivity of rotation sensing beyond the trade-off between sensitivity and linewidth by the storage of light in a dynamic slow-light resonator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to employ the storage of light in a dynamically tuned add-drop resonator to realize an optical gyroscope of ultrahigh sensitivity and compact size. Taking the impact of the linewidth of incident light on the sensitivity into account, we investigate the effect of rotation on the propagation of a partially coherent light field in this dynamically tuned slow-light structure. It is demonstrated that the fundamental trade-off between the rotation-detection sensitivity and the linewidth will be overcome and the sensitivity-linewidth product will be enhanced by two orders of magnitude in comparison to that of the corresponding static slow-light structure. Furthermore, the optical gyroscope employing the storage of light in the dynamically tuned add-drop resonator can acquire ultrahigh sensitivity by extremely short fiber length without a high-performance laser source of narrow linewidth and a complex laser frequency stabilization system. Thus the proposal in this paper provides a promising and feasible scheme to realize highly sensitive and compact integrated optical gyroscopes by slow-light structures.

Zhang Xuenan; Zhang Yundong; Tian He; Wu Hao; Li Geng; Zhu Ruidong; Yuan Ping [National Key Laboratory of Tunable Laser Technology, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils | U.S. DOE Office of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » February 2013 Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils New clues emerge about microbial decomposition mechanisms. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

207

Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to ``convert`` the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

Crawford, R.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Position-sensitive detection of slow neutrons: Survey of fundamental principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper sets forth the fundamental principles governing the development of position-sensitive detection systems for slow neutrons. Since neutrons are only weakly interacting with most materials, it is not generally practical to detect slow neutrons directly. Therefore all practical slow neutron detection mechanisms depend on the use of nuclear reactions to convert'' the neutron to one or more charged particles, followed by the subsequent detection of the charged particles. The different conversion reactions which can be used are discussed, along with the relative merits of each. This is followed with a discussion of the various methods of charged particle detection, how these lend themselves to position-sensitive encoding, and the means of position encoding which can be applied to each case. Detector performance characteristics which may be of importance to the end user are discussed and related to these various detection and position-encoding mechanisms.

Crawford, R.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

DISPOSAL OF TRU WASTE FROM THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT IN PIPE OVERPACK CONTAINERS TO WIPP INCLUDING NEW SECURITY REQUIREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site or, a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, Hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS&C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

Hopkins, A.M.; Sutter, C.; Hulse, G.; Teal, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

Slow light enhanced correlated photon pair generation in photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the generation of quantum-correlated photon pairs from a Si photonic-crystal coupled-resonator optical waveguide. A slow-light supermode realized by the collective resonance of high-Q and small-mode-volume photonic-crystal cavities successfully enhanced the efficiency of the spontaneous four-wave mixing process. The generation rate of photon pairs was improved by two orders of magnitude compared with that of a photonic-crystal line defect waveguide without a slow-light effect.

Matsuda, Nobuyuki; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tokura, Yasuhiro; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya; 10.1364/OE.21.008596

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Slowness Matching Eulerian Method for Multivalued Solutions of Eikonal Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traveltime, or geodesic distance, is locally the solution of the eikonal equation of geometric optics. However traveltime between sufficiently distant points is generically multivalued. Finite difference eikonal solvers approximate only the viscosity ... Keywords: HamiltonJacobi, multivalued eikonal solvers, slowness matching, viscosity solution, weighted essentially nonoscillatory scheme (WENO)

William W. Symes; Jianliang Qian

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Slowing-in distribution of fast particles released in Maxwellian plasma  

SciTech Connect

The time-independent slowing-in distribution is evaluated for a fast beam of test particles released in an infinite Maxwellian plasma background for various situations including quantum-mechanical and classical scattering regimes. The analysis involves considerations of small angle deflection and large angle scattering events. The results are determined for plasma electrons with thermal velocities larger or smaller than the test particle and plasma ions with thermal velocities lower than the test particle. When plasma electrons and ions are slow the slowing-in distribution behaves as E/sub j//sup $sup 1$/$sub 2$/, where E/sub j/ is the test particle energy. When plasma electrons are faster than the test particles, the high-energy tail acquires a 1/E/sub j/ shape. The origin of the test particle remains arbitrary and hence the results apply for particles produced by fusion events within the plasma proper and for particles externally injected. The total energy distribution is obtained and normalized, and ranges of validity are determined. The calculations are of the Boltzmann type, which is consistent with binary scattering models. The slowing-in distributions are also obtained from the Fokker--Planck equation, and as expected, the results agree with those obtained from the Boltzmann equation for large angle scattering only. (auth)

Husseiny, A.A.; Sabri, Z.A.; Harris, D.R.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Dynamic Forcing of the Slow Transients by Synoptic-Scale Eddies: An Observational Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interactions between low-frequency transients and synoptic-scale eddies are examined. The 300-mb data from 1981 to 1986 analyzed by the ECMWF are used to calculate the height tendency of the slow transients due to vorticity forcing by ...

Jian Sheng; Jacques Derome

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of a range of machined and ground surface finishes on the simulated reactor helium corrosion of several candidate structural materials. [Inconel MA 754  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the corrosion behavior of several candidate reactor structural alloys in a simulated advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) environment over a range of lathe-machined and centerless-ground surface finishes. The helium environment contained 50 Pa H/sub 2//5 Pa CO/5 Pa CH/sub 4//<0.05 Pa H/sub 2/O (500 ..mu..atm H/sub 2//50 ..mu..atm CO/50 ..mu..atm CH/sub 4//<0.5 ..mu..atm H/sub 2/O) at 900/sup 0/C for a total exposure of 3000 h. The test alloys included two vacuum-cast superalloys (IN 100 and IN 713LC); a centrifugally cast austenitic alloy (HK 40); three wrought high-temperature alloys (Alloy 800H, Hastelloy X, and Inconel 617); and a nickel-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy (Inconel MA 754). Surface finish variations did not affect the simulated advanced-HTGR corrosion behavior of these materials. Under these conditions, the availability of reactant gaseous impurities controls the kinetics of the observed gas-metal interactions. Variations in the near-surface activities and mobilities of reactive solute elements, such as chromium, which might be expected to be affected by changes in surface finish, do not seem to greatly influence corrosion in this simulated advanced HTGR environment. 18 figures, 4 tables.

Thompson, L.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Chemical Hazards Assessments Prior to D&D of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Nuclear Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All Hanford facilities, including the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) were evaluated for chemical hazards in 1997, 1998 and 2000. The hazard evaluation, known as the PFP Facility Vulnerability Assessment (FVA), was prompted when chemicals in Tank A-109 in the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) exploded in May 1997. Actions were undertaken to eliminate or reduce what were thought to be the worst hazards following that evaluation. In 2001, a new PFP team was organized to review the progress to date in reducing hazards and to reassess hazards that might still remain within the facility. This reassessment continued into 2002 and is referred to as the 2002 PFP Residual Chemical Hazards Reassessment (RCHR). This report explains the results of the 2001/2002 reassessment of the chemical hazards at PFP. This reassessment effort forms the basis of the RCHR. The RCHR relied on previous assessments as the starting point for the 2001/2002 evaluation and used ranking criteria very similar to previous efforts. The RCHR team was composed of professionals representing Industrial Hygiene, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Hazardous Materials Handling Specialists, Solid Waste Management Specialists and Environmental Specialists. All areas of concern that could be accessed were physically examined and photographed where possible. Information from processing records, facility drawings and documents, design engineers, process engineers and work packages were compiled. The PFP vessel inventory was examined and expanded where required. New items listed in the vessel inventory were investigated. All items investigated were ranked using the hazard ranking criteria developed. This information was put on data sheets and compiled in a database.

FITCH, L.R.; HOPKINS, A.M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Distillate Fuel Oil Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

217

Residual Fuel Oil Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

218

Finished Motor Gasoline Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

219

Surface Finish Metrology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NMI's in the Inter-American Metrology System (SIM) showed good agreement of NIST results with Mexico, Brazil, Canada, and Argentina, and was ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Chemical Finishing Treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...after being sand blasted. (d) Water from steam condensate or water treated by ion exchange should

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Finishing in the Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Genome Institute, Washington University Areas of emphasis at this meeting included: Genome Sequencing: New sequencing technologies (454, illumina, SOLiD, Ion Torrent, MiSeq,...

222

Cleaning and Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Scale dip and bright dip conditions for copper-base metals...sp gr. Excess hydrochloric acid spots brass. Wood soot and activated

223

THE SLOW-MODE NATURE OF COMPRESSIBLE WAVE POWER IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use a large, statistical set of measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU, and supporting synthetic spacecraft data based on kinetic plasma theory, to show that the compressible component of inertial range solar wind turbulence is primarily in the kinetic slow mode. The zero-lag cross-correlation C({delta}n, {delta}B{sub ||}) between proton density fluctuations {delta}n and the field-aligned (compressible) component of the magnetic field {delta}B{sub ||} is negative and close to -1. The typical dependence of C({delta}n, {delta}B{sub ||}) on the ion plasma beta {beta}{sub i} is consistent with a spectrum of compressible wave energy that is almost entirely in the kinetic slow mode. This has important implications for both the nature of the density fluctuation spectrum and for the cascade of kinetic turbulence to short wavelengths, favoring evolution to the kinetic Alfven wave mode rather than the (fast) whistler mode.

Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.; TenBarge, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Bale, S. D.; Chen, C. H. K.; Salem, C. S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Limitation of cross-excitation instability in a relativistic Cerenkov generator with coaxial slow wave structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operation in the cross-excitation instability regimes for relativistic backward wave oscillators has been reported and studied in some earlier papers. In the experiment of a relativistic Cerenkov generator with coaxial slow wave structure (CRCG), the cross-excitation instability has also been observed by us. In this paper, experimental results for the CRCG operating in this regime are given, and an explanation is provided to account for the appearance of the instability. Based on this explanation, two types of reflectors, i.e., coaxial Bragg reflectors and cutoff necks, are adopted to restrain the cross-excitation instability by increasing the reflection coefficient at the entrance of the coaxial slow wave structure.

Xiao Renzhen; Zhang Lijun; Liang Tiezhu; Teng Yan; Chen Changhua; Shao Hao; Liu Guozhi [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China); Lin Yuzheng [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Intrinsic aging and effective viscosity in the slow dynamics of a soft glass with tunable elasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate by rheology and light scattering the influence of the elastic modulus, $G_0$, on the slow dynamics and the aging of a soft glass. We show that the slow dynamics and the aging can be entirely described by the evolution of an effective viscosity, $\\eta_{eff}$, defined as the characteristic time measured in a stress relaxation experiment times $G_0$. At all time, $\\eta_{eff}$ is found to be independent of $G_0$, of elastic perturbations, and of the rate at which the sample is quenched in the glassy phase. We propose a simple model that links $\\eta_{eff}$ to the internal stress built up at the fluid-to-solid transition.

Laurence Ramos; Luca Cipelletti

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

226

Analysis of a Cellular Automaton Model for Car Traffic with a Slow-to-Stop Rule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a modification of the widely known Benjamin-Johnson-Hui (BJH) cellular automaton model for single-lane traffic simulation. In particular, our model includes a slow-to-stop rule that exhibits more realistic microscopic driver behaviour than the BJH model. We present some statistics related to fuel economy and pollution generation and show that our model differs greatly in these measures. We give concise results based on extensive simulations using our system.

Adam Clarridge; Kai Salomaa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Integration of the 241-Z Building Decontamination and Decommissioning Under Cercla with RCRA Closure at the Plutonium Finishing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and Washington State Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105, , have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned under the provisions of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground piping from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions will address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks. Under the RCRA closure plan, the 241-Z TSD unit is anticipated to undergo clean closure to the performance standards of the State of Washington with respect to dangerous waste contamination from RCRA operations. The TSD unit will be clean closed if physical closure activities identified in the plan achieve clean closure standards for all 241-Z locations. Clean closed 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, equipment and/or structures will remain after RCRA clean closure for future disposition in conjunction with PFP decommissioning activities which are integrated with CERCLA. (authors)

Mattlin, E.; Charboneau, S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland WA (United States); Johnston, G.; Hopkins, A.; Bloom, R.; Skeels, B.; Klos, D.B. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland WA (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80E but decreases east of it.

Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at PFP. Samples varied in appearance depending on the original source of material. Rocky Flats items were mostly dark olive green with clumps that crushed easily with a mortar and pestle. PRF/RMC items showed more variability. These items were mostly rust colored. One sample contained white particles that were difficult to crush, and another sample was a dark grey with a mixture of fines and large, hard fragments. The appearance and feel of the fragments indicated they might be an alloy. The color of the solution samples was indicative of the impurities in the sample. The double-pass filtrate solution was a brown color indicative of the iron impurities in the sample. The other solution sample was light gray in color. Radiochemical analyses, including thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha and gamma energy analysis (AEA and GEA), and kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA), indicate that these materials are all weapons-grade plutonium with consistent plutonium isotopics. A small amount of uranium (<0.14 wt%) is also present in these samples. The isotopic composition of the uranium varied widely but was consistent among each category of material. The primary water-soluble anions in these samples were Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, and PO43-. The only major anion observed in the Rocky Flats materials was Cl-, but the PRF/RMC samples had significant quantities of all of the primary anions observed. Prompt gamma measurements provide a representative analysis of the Cl- concentration in the bulk material. The primary anions observed in the solution samples were NO3-, and PO43-. The concentration of these anions did not exceed the mixed oxide (MOX) specification limits. Cations that exceeded the MOX specification limits included Cr, Fe, Ni, Al, Cu, and Si. All of the samples exceeded at least the 75% specification limit in one element.

Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at PFP. Samples varied in appearance depending on the original source of material. Rocky Flats items were mostly dark olive green with clumps that crushed easily with a mortar and pestle. PRF/RMC items showed more variability. These items were mostly rust colored. One sample contained white particles that were difficult to crush, and another sample was a dark grey with a mixture of fines and large, hard fragments. The appearance and feel of the fragments indicated they might be an alloy. The color of the solution samples was indicative of the impurities in the sample. The double-pass filtrate solution was a brown color indicative of the iron impurities in the sample. The other solution sample was light gray in color. Radiochemical analyses, including thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha and gamma energy analysis (AEA and GEA), and kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA), indicate that these materials are all weapons-grade plutonium with consistent plutonium isotopics. A small amount of uranium (Rocky Flats materials was Cl-, but the PRF/RMC samples had significant quantities of all of the primary anions observed. Prompt gamma measurements provide a representative analysis of the Cl- concentration in the bulk material. The primary anions observed in the solution samples were NO3-, and PO43-. The concentration of these anions did not exceed the mixed oxide (MOX) specification limits. Cations that exceeded the MOX specification limits included Cr, Fe, Ni, Al, Cu, and Si. All of the samples exceeded at least the 75% specification limit in one element.

Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Glass Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, pp. 162 - 186. Glass Production, Shortland, UEE 2009AINES Short Citation: Shortland 2009, Glass Production. UEE.Andrew, 2009, Glass Production. In Willeke Wendrich (ed. ),

Shortland, Andrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Production Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hall (2005), Prices, Production, and Inventories over theProduction Targets ? Guillermo Caruana CEMFI caruana@cem?.esthe theory using monthly production targets of the Big Three

Caruana, Guillermo; Einav, Liran

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pottery Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul T. Nicholson. ) Pottery Production, Nicholson, UEE 2009Short Citation: Nicholson 2009, Pottery Production. UEE.Paul T. , 2009, Pottery Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Nicholson, Paul T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Cordage Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

294: fig. 15-3). Cordage Production, Veldmeijer, UEE 2009Short Citation: Veldmeijer, 2009, Cordage Production. UEE.Andr J. , 2009, Cordage Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Veldmeijer, Andr J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

236

Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy...

237

Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Zero energy resonance and the logarithmically slow decay of unstable multilevel systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long time behavior of the reduced time evolution operator for unstable multilevel systems is studied based on the N-level Friedrichs model in the presence of a zero energy resonance.The latter means the divergence of the resolvent at zero energy. Resorting to the technique developed by Jensen and Kato [Duke Math. J. 46, 583 (1979)], the zero energy resonance of this model is characterized by the zero energy eigenstate that does not belong to the Hilbert space. It is then shown that for some kinds of the rational form factors the logarithmically slow decay of the reduced time evolution operator can be realized.

Manabu Miyamoto

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

On the Use of Slow Ascent Meter-Scale Sampling (SAMS) Radiosondes for Observing Overturning Events in the Free Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes the development of a method for obtaining high vertical resolution (meter scale) measurements of basic meteorological quantities and turbulent overturns, using radiosondes with slow ascent rates. Although the method has some ...

Ben B. Balsley; Lakshmi Kantha; William Colgan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Productivity of the U.S. freight rail industry: a review of the past and prospects for the future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Productivity growth in the U.S. freight rail industry has slowed in recent years, raising the issue of the sustainability of the significant improvements achieved during the past three decades. Indeed, between 1979 and ...

Kriem, Youssef

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plutonium production story at the Hanford site: processes and facilities history  

SciTech Connect

This document tells the history of the actual plutonium production process at the Hanford Site. It contains five major sections: Fuel Fabrication Processes, Irradiation of Nuclear Fuel, Spent Fuel Handling, Radiochemical Reprocessing of Irradiated Fuel, and Plutonium Finishing Operations. Within each section the story of the earliest operations is told, along with changes over time until the end of operations. Chemical and physical processes are described, along with the facilities where these processes were carried out. This document is a processes and facilities history. It does not deal with the waste products of plutonium production.

Gerber, M.S., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

242

Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 90, Nos. 5/6, 1998 We study the nucleation and growth of flame fronts in slow combustion. This  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fronts in slow combustion. This is modeled by a set of reaction-diffusion equations for the temperature: Nucleation; reaction-diffusion systems; flame fronts. Nucleation, Growth, and Scaling in Slow Combustion applied to understand some aspects of slow combustion. We use a phase-field model of two coupled reaction

Grant, Martin

243

Proceedings of the workshop on opportunities for atomic physics using slow, highly-charged ions  

SciTech Connect

The study of atomic physics with highly-charged ions is an area of intense activity at the present time because of a convergence of theoretical interest and advances in experimental techniques. The purpose of the Argonne ''Workshop on Opportunities for Atomic Physics Using Slow, Highly-Charged Ions'' was to bring together atomic, nuclear, and accelerator physicists in order to identify what new facilities would be most useful for the atomic physics community. The program included discussion of existing once-through machines, advanced ion sources, recoil ion techniques, ion traps, and cooler rings. One of the topics of the Workshop was to discuss possible improvement to the ANL Tandem-Linac facility (ATLAS) to enhance the capability for slowing down ions after they are stripped to a high-charge state (the Accel/Decel technique). Another topic was the opportunity for atomic physics provided by the ECR ion source which is being built for the Uranium Upgrade of ATLAS. 18 analytics were prepared for the individual papers in this volume.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Efficient light coupling into a photonic crystal waveguide with flatband slow mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We design an efficient coupler to transmit light from a strip waveguide into the flatband slow mode of a photonic crystal waveguide with ring-shaped holes. The coupler is a section of a photonic crystal waveguide with a higher group velocity, obtained by different ring dimensions. We demonstrate coupling efficiency in excess of 95% over the 8 nm wavelength range where the photonic crystal waveguide exhibits a quasi constant group velocity vg = c/37. An analysis based on the small Fabry-P\\'erot resonances in the simulated transmission spectra is introduced and used for studying the effect of the coupler length and for evaluating the coupling efficiency in different parts of the coupler. The mode conversion efficiency within the coupler is more than 99.7% over the wavelength range of interest. The parasitic reflectance in the coupler, which depends on the propagation constant mismatch between the slow mode and the coupler mode, is lower than 0.6% within this wavelength range.

Syntjoki, A; Mulot, M; Cassagne, D; Ahopelto, J; Lipsanen, H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Elevated CO2 and plant species diversity interact to slow root decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in plant species diversity can result in synergistic increases in decomposition rates, while elevated atmospheric CO2 can slow the decomposition rates; yet it remains unclear how diversity and changes in atmospheric CO2 may interact to alter root decomposition. To investigate how elevated CO2 interacts with changes in root-litter diversity to alter decomposition rates, we conducted a 120-day laboratory incubation. Roots from three species (Trifolium repens, Lespedeza cuneata, and Festuca pratense) grown under ambient or elevated CO2 were incubated individually or in combination in soils that were exposed to ambient or elevated CO2 for five years. Our experiment resulted in two main findings: (1) Roots from T. repens and L. cuneata, both nitrogen (N) fixers, grown under elevated CO2 treatments had significantly slower decomposition rates than similar roots grown under ambient CO2 treatments; but the decomposition rate of F. pratense roots (a non-N-fixing species) was similar regardless of CO2 treatment. (2) Roots of the three species grown under ambient CO2 and decomposed in combination with each other had faster decomposition rates than when they were decomposed as single species. However, roots of the three species grown under elevated CO2 had similar decomposition rates when they were incubated alone or in combination with other species. These data suggest that if elevated CO2 reduces the root decomposition rate of even a few species in the community, it may slow root decomposition of the entire plant community.

De Graaff, Marie-Anne [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Rula, Kelly L [ORNL; Six, Johan W U A [University of California, Davis; Schweitzer, Jennifer A [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Slow dynamics, aging, and glassy rheology in soft and living matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the origins of slow dynamics, aging and glassy rheology in soft and living matter. Non-diffusive slow dynamics and aging in materials characterised by crowding of the constituents can be explained in terms of structural rearrangement or remodelling events that occur within the jammed state. In this context, we introduce the jamming phase diagram proposed by Liu and Nagel to understand the ergodic-nonergodic transition in these systems, and discuss recent theoretical attempts to explain the unusual, faster-than-exponential dynamical structure factors observed in jammed soft materials. We next focus on the anomalous rheology (flow and deformation behaviour) ubiquitous in soft matter characterised by metastability and structural disorder, and refer to the Soft Glassy Rheology (SGR) model that quantifies the mechanical response of these systems and predicts aging under suitable conditions. As part of a survey of experimental work related to these issues, we present x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) results of the aging of laponite clay suspensions following rejuvenation. We conclude by exploring the scientific literature for recent theoretical advances in the understanding of these models and for experimental investigations aimed at testing their predictions.

Ranjini Bandyopadhyay; Dennis Liang; James L. Harden; Robert L. Leheny

2006-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

248

CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

2007-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

Identification of the slow E3 transition 136mCs -> 136Cs with conversion electrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed at ISOLDE the spectroscopy of the decay of the 8- isomer in 136Cs by and conversion-electron detection. For the first time the excitation energy of the isomer and the multipolarity of its decay have been measured. The half-life of the isomeric state was remeasured to T1/2 = 17.5(2) s. This isomer decays via a very slow 518 keV E3 transition to the ground state. In addition to this, a much weaker decay branch via a 413 keV M4 and a subsequent 105 keV E2 transition has been found. Thus we have found a new level at 105 keV with spin 4+ between the isomeric and the ground state. The results are discussed in comparison to shell model calculations.

K. Wimmer; U. Koester; P. Hoff; Th. Kroell; R. Kruecken; R. Lutter; H. Mach; Th. Morgan; S. Sarkar; M. Saha Sarkar; W. Schwerdtfeger; P. C. Srivastava; P. G. Thirolf; P. Van Isacker

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

STATUS OF SLOW EXTRACTION OF HIGH INTENSITY PROTONS FROM BROOKHAVEN'S AGS.  

SciTech Connect

The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams. We have an active program of high energy physics experiments, including the high precision measurement of the muons magnetic moment [1] and the discovery of the rare Kaon decay, K+ {yields} {pi} + {nu}{bar {nu}} [2]. This program is continuing into the future with the rare symmetry violating process experiments [3] currently being designed to operate at the AGS. In this paper, we will present results from operation of high intensity slow extraction, the problems we encounter, and our solutions to those problems.

BROWN,K.A.AHRENS,L.BRENNAN,J.M.GLENN,J.W.ROSER,T.RUSSO,T.TSOUPAS,N.SMITH,K.ZENO,K.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Multiwavelength modeling the SED of very slow novae PU Vul and V723 Cas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution in the spectrum of very slow novae PU Vul and V723 Cas during their transition from the optical maximum to the nebular phase is investigated using the method of disentangling the composite UV/optical spectra. Model SEDs suggested that a transient decrease in the WD luminosity, during the decline from the maximum, was caused by a negative beaming effect, when a neutral disk around the WD was formed. When the disk disappeared, the luminosity increased again to values from the beginning of the outburst (in the case of V723 Cas, at/above the Eddington limit). This suggests the presence of a mechanism maintaining a high energy output for a much longer time than it is predicted by the current theories. Similarity of light curves, but enormous difference of the separation between the components of PU Vul and V723 Cas binaries suggest that the mechanism is basically powered by the accretor.

Skopal, Augustin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Generalized Slow Roll Conditions and the Possibility of Intermediate Scale Inflation in Scalar-Tensor Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized slow roll conditions and parameters are obtained for a general form of scalar-tensor theory (with no external sources), having arbitrary functions describing a nonminimal gravitational coupling F(\\phi), a Kahler-like kinetic function k(\\phi), and a scalar potential V(\\phi). These results are then used to analyze a simple toy model example of chaotic inflation with a single scalar field \\phi and a standard Higgs potential and a simple gravitational coupling function. In this type of model inflation can occur with inflaton field values at an intermediate scale of roughly 10^{11} GeV when the particle physics symmetry breaking scale is approximately 1 TeV, provided that the theory is realized within the Jordan frame. If the theory is realized in the Einstein frame, however, the intermediate scale inflation does not occur.

J. R. Morris

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

253

L10 structure formation in slow-cooled Fe-Au nanoclusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ordered L10 structure has been formed in near-stoichiometric Fe-Au alloy nanoparticles. The L10 structure with a?=?0.367?nm and c?=?0.360?nm was observed in nanoclusters with diameters below 10?nm after slow cooling from 600?C. The stable L10 structure formed from a parent fcc solid solution phase observed in the as-formed clusters. The fcc phase has a lattice parameter of 0.417?nm, significantly expanded compared to both Au and ?-Fe. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of both fcc and L10 structures were much lower than expected considering Fe dilution effects suggesting competing ferromagnetic and anti-ferromagnetic ordering.

Mukherjee, P.; Zhang, Ying; Kramer, Matthew J.; Lewis, L.H.; Shield, J.E.

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

Erdos, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Quasi-Periodic Releases of Streamer Blobs and Velocity Variability of the Slow Solar Wind near the Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We search for persistent and quasi-periodic release events of streamer blobs during 2007 with the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph on the \\textit{Solar and Heliospheric Observatory} and assess the velocity of the slow solar wind along the plasma sheet above the corresponding streamer by measuring the dynamic parameters of blobs. We find 10 quasi-periodic release events of streamer blobs lasting for three to four days. In each day of these events, we observe three-five blobs. The results are in line with previous studies using data observed near the last solar minimum. Using the measured blob velocity as a proxy for that of the mean flow, we suggest that the velocity of the background slow solar wind near the Sun can vary significantly within a few hours. This provides an observational manifestation of the large velocity variability of the slow solar wind near the Sun.

Song, H Q; Liu, K; Feng, S W; Xia, L D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)  

SciTech Connect

Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

Peng, Ze [DOE JGI

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

258

PADD 3 Weekly Refiner & Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

259

Lower Atlantic Weekly Refiner & Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

260

Crude Oil Domestic Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells Production of Hydrogen from Peanut Shells The goal of this project is the production of renewable hydrogen from agricultural residues, in the near-term time frame (~three years) and at a comparable cost to existing methane reforming technologies. The hydrogen produced will be blended with CNG and used to power a bus in Albany, GA. Our strategy is to produce hydrogen from biomass pyrolysis oils in conjunction with high value co-products. Activated carbon can be made from agricultural residues in a two- stage process: (1) slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce charcoal, and (2) high temperature processing to form activated carbon. The vapor by-products from the first step can be steam reformed into hydrogen. NREL has developed the technology for bio-

262

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of todays confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 collaboration activities. Progress made by the collaboration in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS techniques applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model demonstrated the potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space. Similar results were obtained using a perturbation approach developed by LANL. Benchmark measurements have been successfully conducted at LANL and at RPI using their respective LSDS instruments. The ISU and UNLV collaborative effort is focused on the fabrication and testing of prototype fission chambers lined with ultra-depleted 238U and 232Th, and uranium deposition on a stainless steel disc using spiked U3O8 from room temperature ionic liquid was successful, with improving thickness obtained. In FY2012, the collaboration plans a broad array of activities. PNNL will focus on optimizing its empirical model and minimizing its reliance on calibration data, as well continuing efforts on developing an analytical model. Additional measurements are planned at LANL and RPI. LANL measurements will include a Pu sample, which is expected to provide more counts at longer slowing-down times to help identify discrepancies between experimental data and MCNPX simulations. RPI measurements will include the assay of an entire fresh fuel assembly for the study of self-shielding effects as well as the ability to detect diversion by detecting a missing fuel pin in the fuel assembly. The development of threshold neutron sensors will continue, and UNLV will calibrate existing ultra-depleted uranium deposits at ISU.

Warren, Glen A.; Casella, Andrew M.; Haight, R. C.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Danon, Yaron; Hatchett, D.; Becker, Bjorn; Devlin, M.; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.; Gavron, A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; O'Donnell, J. M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

RMOTC - Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production RMOTC Pumpjack in action During the process of the sale of NPR-3, RMOTC will focus on maximizing the value of the NPR-3 site and will continue with its Production Optimization Projects. NPR-3 includes 9,481 acres with more than 400 oil-producing wells. Current oil production is at approximately 240 barrels of oil per day. In July 2013, RMOTC began working on a number of Production Optimization Projects within the NPR-3 field, with the goal to optimize and improve flow and efficiency. Production Optimization Projects include repairing and replacing existing infrastructure with new infrastructure in order to optimize current wells and bring additional wells online. These Production Optimization Projects will continue throughout 2013 and are focused on improving current production and creating revenue for the America tax payer.

264

Antihydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

Antihydrogen production in ATHENA is analyzed more carefully. The most important peculiarities of the different experimental situations are discussed. The protonium production via the first matter-antimatter chemical reaction is commented too.

Rizzini, Evandro Lodi; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica per l'Ingegneria e per i Materiali, Universita di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Brescia, 25133 Brescia (Italy)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Tin Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...descending order, Brazil, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Bolivia, and Australia. These countries supply more than 85% of total world production....

266

PROPAGATING SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN CORONAL LOOPS OBSERVED BY HINODE/EIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the first Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer observations of 5 minute quasi-periodic oscillations detected in a transition-region line (He II) and five coronal lines (Fe X, Fe XII, Fe XIII, Fe XIV, and Fe XV) at the footpoint of a coronal loop. The oscillations exist throughout the whole observation, characterized by a series of wave packets with nearly constant period, typically persisting for 4-6 cycles with a lifetime of 20-30 minutes. There is an approximate in-phase relation between Doppler shift and intensity oscillations. This provides evidence for slow magnetoacoustic waves propagating upward from the transition region into the corona. We find that the oscillations detected in the five coronal lines are highly correlated, and the amplitude decreases with increasing temperature. The amplitude of Doppler shift oscillations decrease by a factor of about 3, while that of relative intensity decreases by a factor of about 4 from Fe X to Fe XV. These oscillations may be caused by the leakage of the photospheric p-modes through the chromosphere and transition region into the corona, which has been suggested as the source for intensity oscillations previously observed by Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The temperature dependence of the oscillation amplitudes can be explained by damping of the waves traveling along the loop with multithread structure near the footpoint. Thus, this property may have potential value for coronal seismology in diagnostic of temperature structure in a coronal loop.

Wang, T. J.; Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, J. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)], E-mail: wangtj@helio.gsfc.nasa.gov

2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

Dethlefsen, R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Simplified treatment of exact resonance elastic scattering model in deterministic slowing down equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simplified treatment of resonance elastic scattering model considering thermal motion of heavy nuclides and the energy dependence of the resonance cross section was implemented into NJOY [1]. In order to solve deterministic slowing down equation considering the effect of up-scattering without iterative calculations, scattering kernel for heavy nuclides is pre-calculated by the formula derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [2], and neutron spectrum in up-scattering term is expressed by NR approximation. To check the verification of the simplified treatment, the treatment is applied to U-238 for the energy range from 4 eV to 200 eV. Calculated multi-group capture cross section of U-238 is greater than that of conventional method and the increase of the capture cross sections is remarkable as the temperature becomes high. Therefore Doppler coefficient calculated in UO{sub 2} fuel pin is calculated more negative value than that on conventional method. The impact on Doppler coefficient is equivalent to the results of exact treatment of resonance elastic scattering reported in previous studies [2-7]. The agreement supports the validation of the simplified treatment and therefore this treatment is applied for other heavy nuclide to evaluate the Doppler coefficient in MOX fuel. The result shows that the impact of considering thermal agitation in resonance scattering in Doppler coefficient comes mainly from U-238 and that of other heavy nuclides such as Pu-239, 240 etc. is not comparable in MOX fuel. (authors)

Ono, M.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T. [Osaka Univ., 2-1, yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A NEW METHOD FOR CLASSIFYING FLARES OF UV Ceti TYPE STARS: DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SLOW AND FAST FLARES  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a new method is presented to classify flares derived from the photoelectric photometry of UV Ceti type stars. This method is based on statistical analyses using an independent samples t-test. The data used in analyses were obtained from four flare stars observed between 2004 and 2007. The total number of flares obtained in the observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, and V1054 Oph is 321 in the standard Johnson U band. As a result flares can be separated into two types, slow and fast, depending on the ratio of flare decay time to flare rise time. The ratio is below 3.5 for all slow flares, while it is above 3.5 for all fast flares. Also, according to the independent samples t-test, there is a difference of about 157 s between equivalent durations of slow and fast flares. In addition, there are significant differences between amplitudes and rise times of slow and fast flares.

Dal, H. A.; Evren, S., E-mail: ali.dal@ege.edu.t [Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, University of Ege, Bornova, 35100 Izmir (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

The effects of strong temperature anisotropy on the kinetic structure of collisionless slow shocks and reconnection exhausts. Part II: Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations of collisionless oblique propagating slow shocks have revealed the existence of a transition associated with a critical temperature anisotropy epsilon=1-mu_0(P_parallel-P_perpendicular)/ B^2 = 0.25 (Liu, Drake and Swisdak (2011)). An explanation for this phenomenon is proposed here based on anisotropic fluid theory, in particular the Anisotropic Derivative Nonlinear-Schrodinger-Burgers equation, with an intuitive model of the energy closure for the downstream counter-streaming ions. The anisotropy value of 0.25 is significant because it is closely related to the degeneracy point of the slow and intermediate modes, and corresponds to the lower bound of the coplanar to non-coplanar transition that occurs inside a compound slow shock (SS)/rotational discontinuity (RD) wave. This work implies that it is a pair of compound SS/RD waves that bound the outflows in magnetic reconnection, instead of a pair of switch-off slow shocks as in Petschek's model. This fact might explain the rareness of in-situ obse...

Liu, Yi-Hsin; Swisdak, Marc

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Slow-Moving Vehicle Emblem The Society for engineering in agricultural, food, and biological systems (ASAE), which  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems (ASAE), which develops standards for specific agricultural equipment and materials, has a standard and durability of the yellow-orange fluorescent triangle that provides daylight identification of slow of at least 600 feet day or night. The fluorescent yellow-orange center is the most visible color in daylight

272

Lipid Metabolism, Gene Expression, Substrate Oxidation, and Meat Quality of Growing-finishing Pigs Supplemented with Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Arginine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hypothesized that supplementation of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and arginine singly or in combination would increase animal performance and meat quality by decreasing adiposity and increasing lean mass in growing-finishing pigs. Sixteen pigs (80 kg) were assigned to four treatments in a 2 x 2 factorial design, differing in dietary fatty acid and amino acid composition [control: 2.05% alanine (isonitrogenous control) plus 1% canola oil (lipid control); CLA: 2.05% alanine + 1% CLA; arginine: 1% arginine + 1% canola oil; arginine + CLA: 1% arginine + 1 CLA]. Preliminary tests indicated that up to 2% arginine was acceptable without interfering with lysine absorption. Pigs were allowed to feed free choice until reaching 110 kg. There were no significant differences across treatments in feed intake, weight gain, or feed efficiency. CLA tended to decrease carcass length (P = 0.06), whereas backfat thickness tended to be greater in pigs supplemented with arginine (P = 0.08). Arginine decreased muscle pH at 45 min postmortem (P = 0.001) and tended to increase lightness of muscle at 24 h postmortem (P = 0.07). CLA supplementation increased the concentrations of trans-isomers of 18:1 (P = 0.001) and SFA (P = 0.01) in s.c. and r.p. adipose tissue. CLA supplementation increased palmitate incorporation into total lipids in longissimus muscle (P = 0.01). Glucose oxidation to CO? in r.p. and s.c. adipose tissue were greater in pigs supplemented with CLA in the absence or presence of arginine (P = 0.03 and P = 0.04, respectively). The volume of s.c. adipocytes in s.c. and r.p. adipose tissues was greater in pigs supplemented with CLA, arginine, or CLA plus arginine than in control pigs (P = 0.001). Neither CLA nor arginine affected the expression of PGC-1[alpha],AMPK, mTOR, CPT-1A, FAS, or SCD (P > 0.05) in any tissues. We conclude that there was no significant interaction between arginine and CLA. Supplementary CLA or arginine to finishing-growing pigs did not modulate growth performance and did not reduce adiposity. CLA increased intramuscular fat content without deteriorating meat quality traits and increased saturated fatty acids and substrate oxidation in adipose tissues. In the presence of 1% of canola oil or CLA in the diet, arginine has the potential to deteriorate meat quality by reducing early postmortem pH and by increasing carcass fatness.

Go, Gwang-Woong, 1979-

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ISOTOPIC MASS FRACTIONATION OF SOLAR WIND: EVIDENCE FROM FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND COLLECTED BY THE GENESIS MISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NASA's Genesis space mission returned samples of solar wind collected over {approx}2.3 years. We present elemental and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar analyzed in diamond-like carbon targets from the slow and fast solar wind collectors to investigate isotopic fractionation processes during solar wind formation. The solar wind provides information on the isotopic composition for most volatile elements for the solar atmosphere, the bulk Sun and hence, on the solar nebula from which it formed 4.6 Ga ago. Our data reveal a heavy isotope depletion in the slow solar wind compared to the fast wind composition by 63.1 {+-} 2.1 per mille for He, 4.2 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ne and 2.6 {+-} 0.5 per mille amu{sup -1} for Ar. The three Ne isotopes suggest that isotopic fractionation processes between fast and slow solar wind are mass dependent. The He/H ratios of the collected slow and fast solar wind samples are 0.0344 and 0.0406, respectively. The inefficient Coulomb drag model reproduces the measured isotopic fractionation between fast and slow wind. Therefore, we apply this model to infer the photospheric isotopic composition of He, Ne, and Ar from our solar wind data. We also compare the isotopic composition of oxygen and nitrogen measured in the solar wind with values of early solar system condensates, probably representing solar nebula composition. We interpret the differences between these samples as being due to isotopic fractionation during solar wind formation. For both elements, the magnitude and sign of the observed differences are in good agreement with the values predicted by the inefficient Coulomb drag model.

Heber, Veronika S.; Baur, Heinrich; Wieler, Rainer [Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zurich, Clausiusstrasse 25, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bochsler, Peter [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Bern, Sidlerstasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); McKeegan, Kevin D. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Box 951567, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Neugebauer, Marcia [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Reisenfeld, Daniel B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Wiens, Roger C., E-mail: heber@ess.ucla.edu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Precise inversion of logged slownesses for elastic parameters in a gas shale formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dipole sonic log data recorded in a vertical pilot well and the associated production well are analyzed over a 2001100-ft section of a North American gas shale formation. The combination of these two wells enables angular ...

Miller, Douglas E.

275

U.S. Weekly Product Supplied  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Weekly Product Supplied Weekly Product Supplied (Thousand Barrels per Day) Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Product 12/06/13 12/13/13 12/20/13 12/27/13 01/03/14 01/10/14 View History Total 18,554 20,996 20,484 19,004 18,222 18,858 1990-2014 Finished Motor Gasoline 8,348 9,016 9,176 8,893 8,274 8,021 1991-2014 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 1,480 1,469 1,656 1,470 1,518 1,498 1991-2014 Distillate Fuel Oil 3,304 4,089 4,171 3,314 3,022 3,724 1991-2014 Residual Fuel Oil 205 265 199 221 215 214 1991-2014 Propane/Propylene 1,561 1,618 1,546 1,407 1,723 1,736 2004-2014 Other Oils 3,657 4,539 3,736 3,700 3,470 3,666 2004-2014 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

276

From Production to Education: An Analysis of Pipeline Requirements and Practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animation, visual effects, and video game studios have to manage complex and highly iterative productions. The processes, tools, and data flow that carry a production from initial idea to finished state is called a pipeline. Students in academic programs, even ones focused on educating for digital production, often do not have a well- defined pipeline and spend unnecessary time on technical details rather than creative work. Through interviews with industry professionals, analysis of published works on pipeline and digital production, and study of current academic pipelines, this thesis presents general principles for pipelines as well as suggestions for applying these principles in academic environments. Implementing these suggestions could provide a foundation for a robust academic pipeline that lets students spend more time creating and collaborating and prepares them for employment in the digital production industry.

Jarratt, Brandon Lee

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Topic: Productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... General Information: 301-975-5020 mfg@nist ... competitive in the global market, companies need to ... become more efficient in energy, production and ...

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

278

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

279

Hydrogen Production  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Research in DOE Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge Science.gov WorldWideScience.org Increase your H2IQ More information Making...

280

Silicon Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... An Investigation into the Electrochemical Production of Si by the FFC Cambridge Process: Emre Ergl1; ?shak Karakaya2; Metehan Erdo?an2;...

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281

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

282

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

283

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

284

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Tanker and Barge between PAD Districts Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual FO - Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual FO - 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual FO - Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

285

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of todays confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of todays confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Assessing the Significance of Above- and Belowground Carbon Allocation of Fast- and Slow-Growing Families of Loblolly Pine - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this project we experimentally evaluated the below-ground biomass and carbon allocation and partitioning of four different fast- and slow-growing families of loblolly pine located in Scotland County, NC, in an effort to increase the long-term performance of the crop. The trees were subjected to optimal nutrition and control since planting in 1993. Destructive harvests in 1998 and 2000 were used for whole?plant biomass estimates and to identify possible family differences in carbon acquisition (photosynthesis) and water use efficiency. At regular intervals throughout each year we sampled tissues for carbohydrate analyses to assess differences in whole-tree carbon storage. Mini rhizotron observation tubes were installed to monitor root system production and turnover. Stable isotope analysis was used to examine possible functional differences in water and nutrient acquisition of root systems between the various families. A genetic dissection of root ontogenic and architectural traits, including biomass partitioning, was conducted using molecular markers to better understand the functional implications of these traits on resource acquisition and whole-plant carbon allocation.

Topa, M. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Retzlaff, W. A.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

289

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary The Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign is supporting a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of using Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) to conduct direct, independent and accurate assay of fissile isotopes in used fuel assemblies. The collaboration consists of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Idaho State University (ISU). There are three main challenges to implementing LSDS to assay used fuel assemblies. These challenges are the development of an algorithm for interpreting the data with an acceptable accuracy for the fissile masses, the development of suitable detectors for the technique, and the experimental benchmarking of the approach. This report is a summary of the progress in these areas made by the collaboration during FY2012. Significant progress was made on the project in FY2012. Extensive characterization of a semi-empirical algorithm was conducted. For example, we studied the impact on the accuracy of this algorithm by the minimization of the calibration set, uncertainties in the calibration masses, and by the choice of time window. Issues such a lead size, number of required neutrons, placement of the neutron source and the impact of cadmium around the detectors were also studied. In addition, new algorithms were developed that do not require the use of plutonium fission chambers. These algorithms were applied to measurement data taken by RPI and shown to determine the 235U mass within 4%. For detectors, a new concept for a fast neutron detector involving 4He recoil from neutron scattering was investigated. The detector has the potential to provide a couple of orders of magnitude more sensitivity than 238U fission chambers. Progress was also made on the more conventional approach of using 232Th fission chambers as fast neutron detectors. For benchmarking measurements, we continue to improve our understanding of the experimental setup by studying issues such as the effect of room return and impurities in the lead. RPI performed a series of experiments with a fresh fuel pin and various 235U and 239Pu sources. A comparison between simulations and measurements shows significant deviations after 200 s for both 235U and 239Pu samples, as well as significant deviations at earlier times for the 239Pu sample. The FY2013 effort will shift focus to planning for a Technical Readiness Level 5 demonstration. The primary deliverable for the year will be a plan on how to do this demonstration. The plan will include measurement design, sample acquisition, sample handling, cost estimate, schedule and assumptions. Research will continue on the 4He detector, algorithms development, thorium fission chambers and benchmarking measurements involving sub assemblies of fresh fuel.

Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, A.; Haight, R. C.; Harris, Jason; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Stewart, T.; Weltz, Adam

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Production of bio-based materials using photobioreactors with binary cultures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method, device and system for producing preselected products, (either finished products or preselected intermediary products) from biobased precursors or CO.sub.2 and/or bicarbonate. The principal features of the present invention include a method wherein a binary culture is incubated with a biobased precursor in a closed system to transform at least a portion of the biobased precursor to a preselected product. The present invention provides a method of cultivation that does not need sparging of a closed bioreactor to remove or add a gaseous byproduct or nutrient from a liquid medium. This improvement leads to significant savings in energy consumption and allows for the design of photobioreactors of any desired shape. The present invention also allows for the use of a variety of types of waste materials to be used as the organic starting material.

Beliaev, Alex S; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Hill, Eric A; Fredrickson, Jim K

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

292

Coronal Heating and Acceleration of the High/Low-Speed Solar Wind by Fast/Slow MHD Shock Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate coronal heating and acceleration of the high- and low-speed solar wind in the open field region by dissipation of fast and slow magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) waves through MHD shocks. Linearly polarized \\Alfven (fast MHD) waves and acoustic (slow MHD) waves travelling upwardly along with a magnetic field line eventually form fast switch-on shock trains and hydrodynamical shock trains (N-waves) respectively to heat and accelerate the plasma. We determine one dimensional structure of the corona from the bottom of the transition region (TR) to 1AU under the steady-state condition by solving evolutionary equations for the shock amplitudes simultaneously with the momentum and proton/electron energy equations. Our model reproduces the overall trend of the high-speed wind from the polar holes and the low-speed wind from the mid- to low-latitude streamer except the observed hot corona in the streamer. The heating from the slow waves is effective in the low corona to increase the density there, and plays an important role in the formation of the dense low-speed wind. On the other hand, the fast waves can carry a sizable energy to the upper level to heat the outer corona and accelerate the high-speed wind effectively. We also study dependency on field strength, $B_0$, at the bottom of the TR and non-radial expansion of a flow tube, $f_{\\rm max}$, to find that large $B_0/f_{\\rm max}\\gtrsim 2$ but small $B_0\\simeq 2$G are favorable for the high-speed wind and that small $B_0/f_{\\rm max}\\simeq 1$ is required for the low-speed wind.

Takeru K. Suzuki

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

293

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

294

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

295

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

296

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

297

Midwest (PADD 2) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

298

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

299

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

300

The Stability of Dilute Plasmas with Thermal and Composition Gradients. I. The Slow Conduction Limit: Overstable Gravity Modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the stability of a dilute plasma with thermal and composition gradients in the limit where conduction is slow compared to the dynamical timescale. We find necessary and sufficient conditions for stability when the background magnetic field is either parallel or perpendicular to the thermal and composition gradients that are parallel to the gravitational field. We provide approximate solutions for all the relevant modes involved, which are driven by gravity, conduction, and diffusion. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our findings for a representative galaxy cluster where helium has sedimented.

Pessah, Martin E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Search for non-Newtonian force in a precision measurement of the scattering of slow neutrons in Xenon gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental search for non-newtonian, gravity-like force in a precision measurement of the scattering of slow neutrons in Xenon gas is proposed. A preliminary experiment with small statistics of 25 hours irradiation time was performed and the observed scattering distribution is consistent with the expectation with no additional forces. A 95% CL limit on the coupling strength for a hypothetical force of 1 nm interaction range was evaluated to be 2*10^-15. The expected sensitivity for a planned high statistics runs is discussed.

Yoshio Kamiya; Misato Tani; Sachio Komamiya; Guinyun Kim; Kyungsuk Kim

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ash-Based Building Panels Production and Demonstration of Aerock Decking Building Product  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Western Research Institute (WRI) of Laramie, Wyoming and AeRock, LLC of Eagar, Arizona (formerly of Bellevue, Washington) partnered, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE-NETL), to support the development of rapid-setting, ash-based, fiber-incorporated ''green'' building products. Green building materials are a rapidly growing trend in the building and construction industry in the US. A two phase project was implemented wherein Phase I assessed, through chemical and physical testing, ash, ash-based cement and fiber composites exhibiting superior structural performance when applied to the AeRock mixing and extrusion process and involved the conduct of pilot-scale production trials of AeRock products, and wherein Phase II involved the design, construction, and operation of a commercial-scale plant to confirm production issues and to produce panels for performance evaluations. Phase I optimized the composite ingredients including ash-based cement, Class F and Class C DFGD ash, and various fiber reinforcements. Additives, such as retardants and accelerators, were also evaluated as related to extruder performance. The optimized composite from the Phase I effort was characterized by a modulus of rupture (MOR) measured between 1,931 and 2,221 psi flexural strength, comparable to other wood and non-wood building materials. Continuous extrusion of the optimum composite in the AeRock pilot-scale facility produced an excellent product that was assembled into a demonstration for exhibit and durability purposes. Finishes, from plain to marbled, from bright reds to muted earth tones and with various textures, could easily be applied during the mixing and extrusion process. The successful pilot-scale demonstration was in turn used to design the production parameters and extruder dies for a commercial scale demonstration at Ultrapanel Pty, Ltd of Ballarat, Australia under Phase II. The initial commercial-scale production trials showed green product sagging, as a result of the die design. After the third die was acquired and fitted to the extruder, satisfactory decking and structural panels were produced. Cured decking was shipped to the US but experienced significant breakage and damage during transport. Subsequent evaluations concluded that an alternative die design was needed that would produce a more robust product resistant to damage. In summary, AeRock Decking can be a commercially-viable non-wood alternative decking product. This project has provided WRI and AeRock the knowledge and understanding to make AeRock Decking a commercial success. However, a commercial demonstration that produces quality product and the subsequent evaluation of its performance is needed before commercial acceptance of the AeRock product.

Alan E. Bland; Jesse Newcomer

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

The production of hydrogen by reacting an ash containing material with water and at least one halogen selected from the group consisting of chlorine, bromine and iodine to form reaction products including carbon dioxide and a corresponding hydrogen halide is claimed. The hydrogen halide is decomposed to separately release the hydrogen and the halogen. The halogen is recovered for reaction with additional carbonaceous materials and water, and the hydrogen is recovered as a salable product. In a preferred embodiment the carbonaceous material, water and halogen are reacted at an elevated temperature. In accordance with another embodiment, a continuous method for the production of hydrogen is provided wherein the carbonaceous material, water and at least one selected halogen are reacted in one zone, and the hydrogen halide produced from the reaction is decomposed in a second zone, preferably by electrolytic decomposition, to release the hydrogen for recovery and the halogen for recycle to the first zone. There also is provided a method for recovering any halogen which reacts with or is retained in the ash constituents of the carbonaceous material.

Darnell, A.J.; Parkins, W.E.

1978-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Production Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Figure 1 shows the sequence of shapes in the production of a hollow handle for a table knife formed and coined in a 410 kg (900 lb) pneumatic drop hammer. The work metal was 0.81 mm (0.032 in.) thick copper alloy C75700 (nickel silver, 65??12) annealed to a hardness of 35 to 45 HRB; blank size was 25 by...

305

Biofuel Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2011 Hiroshi Sakuragi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Large amounts of fossil fuels are consumed every day in spite of increasing environmental problems. To preserve the environment and construct a sustainable society, the use of biofuels derived from different kinds of biomass is being practiced worldwide. Although bioethanol has been largely produced, it commonly requires food crops such as corn and sugar cane as substrates. To develop a sustainable energy supply, cellulosic biomass should be used for bioethanol production instead of grain biomass. For this purpose, cell surface engineering technology is a very promising method. In biobutanol and biodiesel production, engineered host fermentation has attracted much attention; however, this method has many limitations such as low productivity and low solvent tolerance of microorganisms. Despite these problems, biofuels such as bioethanol, biobutanol, and biodiesel are potential energy sources that can help establish a sustainable society. 1.

Hiroshi Sakuragi; Kouichi Kuroda; Mitsuyoshi Ueda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

U.S. Weekly Product Supplied - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

307

U.S. Weekly Refiner & Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

308

Propane/Propylene Net Production - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

309

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief primer on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat, and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. References for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper.

Singh, S.P.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Synthetic fuels: production and products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief review on synthetic fuels is given. The paper includes brief descriptions of generic conversion technologies that can be used to convert various raw materials such as coal, oil shale, tar sands, peat and biomass into synthetic fuels similar in character to petroleum-derived fuels currently in commerce. Because the subject is vast and the space is limited, references for additional information on synthetic fuel processes and products are also given in the paper. 24 references.

Singh, S.P.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sugar Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Production Sugar Production Name: Lauren Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: This is the experiment I did: our class took 6 sugars, placed them in test tubes and put three drops of yeast in each test tube. we then placed them in the incubator for one day and the next day looked at our results. the purpose was to find out with sugar would produce the most carbon dioxide. two of the sugars that we tested were LACTOSE and STARCH. my question is, why are lactose and starch the only sugars who didn't produce any, or very very little, carbon dioxide? and how is this process related to glycolysis? Replies: Bacteria and yeast are very efficient with their enzyme systems. They don't make enzymes they can't use. Yeast don't have the enzymes necessary to metabolize lactose. Starch is a complex sugar and yeast needs certain enzymes to break starch down into sugar. Every chemical reaction needs its own enzyme.

312

Electron emission and defect formation in the interaction of slow,highly charged ions with diamond surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on electron emission and defect formation in theinteraction between slow (v~;0.3 vBohr) highly charged ions (SHCI) withinsulating (type IIa) and semiconducting (type IIb) diamonds. Electronemission induced by 31Pq+ (q=5 to 13), and 136Xeq+ (q=34 to 44) withkinetic energies of 9 kVxq increase linearly with the ion charge states,reaching over 100 electrons per ion for high xenon charge states withoutsurface passivation of the diamond with hydrogen. Yields from bothdiamond types are up to a factor of two higher then from reference metalsurfaces. Crater like defects with diameters of 25 to 40 nm are formed bythe impact of single Xe44+ ions. High secondary electron yields andsingle ion induced defects enable the formation of single dopant arrayson diamond surfaces.

Sideras-Haddad, E.; Shrivastava, S.; Rebuli, D.B.; Persaud, A.; Schneider, D.H.; Schenkel, T.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Anomalously Slow Cross Symmetry Phase Relaxation, Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter and Quantum Computing Beyond the Quantum Chaos Border  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermalization in highly excited quantum many-body system does not necessarily mean a complete memory loss of the way the system was formed. This effect may pave a way for a quantum computing, with a large number of qubits $n\\simeq 100$--1000, far beyond the quantum chaos border. One of the manifestations of such a thermalized non-equilibrated matter is revealed by a strong asymmetry around 90$^\\circ $ c.m. of evaporating proton yield in the Bi($\\gamma$,p) photonuclear reaction. The effect is described in terms of anomalously slow cross symmetry phase relaxation in highly excited quantum many-body systems with exponentially large Hilbert space dimensions. In the above reaction this phase relaxation is about eight orders of magnitude slower than energy relaxation (thermalization).

M. Bienert; J. Flores; S. Yu. Kun; T. H. Seligman

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Production Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome The Production Services site contains links to each of the division's groups with descriptions of their services. Our goal is to update this website frequently to reflect ongoing service upgrades which, by planning and design, are added so that we can continue to meet your needs in a constantly changing work environment. Note: The Graphic Design Studio has been relocated to the second floor in the north wing of the Research Support Building 400. The telephone number remains the same, X7288. If you have any questions, please call supervisor, Rick Backofen, X6183. Photography Photography services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of photography services available. Video Video services are available at no charge to BNL and Guest users. See a list of the complete range of video services available.

315

STEO December 2012 - natural gas production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 natural gas production seen at record 69 billion cubic feet per 2012 natural gas production seen at record 69 billion cubic feet per day U.S. natural gas production is expected to increase 4.5 percent this year to a record 69 billion cubic feet per day, according to the new monthly energy forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. A big portion of that natural gas is going to the U.S. electric power sector, which is generating more electricity from gas in place of coal. Consumption of natural gas for power generation this year is forecast to jump by more than 21 percent. The growth in gas production is expected to slow in 2013. And while gas use by the electric power sector is expected to decline by about 10 percent next year, it will remain high by historical standards. These trends reflect a structural shift toward using more natural gas for U.S. power generation.

316

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the author. ) Stone Tool Production, Hikade, UEE 2010Short Citation: Hikade 2010, Stone Tool Production. UEE.Thomas, 2010, Stone Tool Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production:...

318

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

319

Slow spin summary  

magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers a new tool for obtaining such information in live ... phenomenon known generally as line broadening ... Work ...

320

Fluid and drift-kinetic description of a magnetized plasma with low collisionality and slow dynamics orderings. II. Ion theory  

SciTech Connect

The ion side of a closed, fluid and drift-kinetic theoretical model to describe slow and macroscopic plasma processes in a fusion-relevant, low collisionality regime is presented. It follows the ordering assumptions and the methodology adopted in the companion electron theory [Ramos, Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010)]. To reach the frequency scale where collisions begin to play a role, the drift-kinetic equation for the ion distribution function perturbation away from a Maxwellian must be accurate to the second order in the Larmor radius. The macroscopic density, flow velocity and temperature are accounted for in the Maxwellian, and are evolved by a fluid system which includes consistently the gyroviscous part of the stress tensor and second-order contributions to the collisionless perpendicular heat flux involving non-Maxwellian fluid moments. The precise compatibility among these coupled high-order fluid and drift-kinetic equations is made manifest by showing that the evolution of the non-Maxwellian part of the distribution function is such that its first three velocity moments remain equal to zero.

Ramos, J. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Numerical Modeling of Coupled Variably-Saturated Fluid Flow and Reactive Transport with Fast and Slow Chemical Reactions  

SciTech Connect

The couplings among chemical reaction rates, advective and diffusive transport in fractured media or soils, and changes in hydraulic properties due to precipitation and dissolution within fractures and in rock matrix are important for both nuclear waste disposal and remediation of contaminated sites. This paper describes the development and application of LEHGC2.0, a mechanistically-based numerical model for simulation of coupled fluid flow and reactive chemical transport including both fast and slow reactions invariably saturated media. Theoretical bases and numerical implementations are summarized, and two example problems are demonstrated. The first example deals with the effect of precipitation-dissolution on fluid flow and matrix diffusion in a two-dimensional fractured media. Because of the precipitation and decreased diffusion of solute from the fracture into the matrix, retardation in the fractured medium is not as large as the case wherein interactions between chemical reactions and transport are not considered. The second example focuses on a complicated but realistic advective-dispersive-reactive transport problem. This example exemplifies the need for innovative numerical algorithms to solve problems involving stiff geochemical reactions.

LI, MING-HSU; SIEGEL, MALCOLM D.; YEH, GOUR-TSYH (GEORGE)

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

D-Factor: A Quantitative Model of Application Slow-Down in Multi-Resource Shared Systems  

SciTech Connect

Scheduling multiple jobs onto a platform enhances system utilization by sharing resources. The benefits from higher resource utilization include reduced cost to construct, operate, and maintain a system, which often include energy consumption. Maximizing these benefits comes at a price - resource contention among jobs increases job completion time. In this paper, we analyze slow-downs of jobs due to contention for multiple resources in a system; referred to as dilation factor. We observe that multiple-resource contention creates non-linear dilation factors of jobs. From this observation, we establish a general quantitative model for dilation factors of jobs in multi-resource systems. A job is characterized by a vector-valued loading statistics and dilation factors of a job set are given by a quadratic function of their loading vectors. We demonstrate how to systematically characterize a job, maintain the data structure to calculate the dilation factor (loading matrix), and calculate the dilation factor of each job. We validate the accuracy of the model with multiple processes running on a native Linux server, virtualized servers, and with multiple MapReduce workloads co-scheduled in a cluster. Evaluation with measured data shows that the D-factor model has an error margin of less than 16%. We also show that the model can be integrated with an existing on-line scheduler to minimize the makespan of workloads.

Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL; Huh, Jae-Seok [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working Document 9. Economics of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed feasibility study of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida encompasses all phases of production - from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The project includes the following components: (1) production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; (2) establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; and (3) engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-year methanol production facility. In addition, the potential environmental impacts of the whole project were examined, safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol were analyzed, and site specific cost estimates were made. The economics of the project are presented here. Each of the three major components of the project - tissue culture lab, energy plantation, and methanol refinery - are examined individually. In each case a site specific analysis of the potential return on investment was conducted.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

J.Phys. B: Atom. Molec. Phys., Vol. 10,No. 14, 1977. Printed in Great Britain. @ 1977 Yield spectra and the continuous-slowing-down  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history of the electron. There is a source term at the incident energy which allows for the #12;Yield. The continuous-slowing-down approximation (CSDA)and the modified discrete- energy-bin (MDEB)method are used to calculate a yield spectra U(E,Eo) in (eV s)- ' of electrons with energy E resulting from a primary of energy

Jackman, Charles H.

325

Digital production pipelines: examining structures and methods in the computer effects industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer animated films require collaboration: blending artistic concept with technical skill, meeting budget constraints and adhering to deadlines. The path which production follows from initial idea to finished product is known as the pipeline. The purpose of this thesis is to collect, study and share information regarding production pipeline practices and to derive a conceptual definition. Research focused on selected companies in the United States which have produced at least one feature-length computer generated film and continue to produce them. The key finding of this thesis is a conceptual definition of digital production pipelines: A digital production pipeline must, by definition, utilize digital computing hardware and software to facilitate human work and collaboration for the overarching purpose of producing content for film. The digital production pipeline is not a structure, but rather a malleable set of components which can be arranged, configured, and adapted into new structures as needed. These malleable components are human groups with assigned task domains, and digital hardware and software systems. The human groups are normally referred to as departments or teams. The digital hardware and software systems are operating systems, software tools and applications, networks, processors, and storage. The digital production pipeline is the synergy of these two types of components into adaptable systems and structures.

Bettis, Dane Edward

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Petroleum - Exploration & Production - EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. ... Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf.

327

Entropy production for mechanically or chemically driven biomolecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Entropy production along a single stochastic trajectory of a biomolecule is discussed for two different sources of non-equilibrium. For a molecule manipulated mechanically by an AFM or an optical tweezer, entropy production (or annihilation) occurs in the molecular conformation proper or in the surrounding medium. Within a Langevin dynamics, a unique identification of these two contributions is possible. The total entropy change obeys an integral fluctuation theorem and a class of further exact relations, which we prove for arbitrarily coupled slow degrees of freedom including hydrodynamic interactions. These theoretical results can therefore also be applied to driven colloidal systems. For transitions between different internal conformations of a biomolecule involving unbalanced chemical reactions, we provide a thermodynamically consistent formulation and identify again the two sources of entropy production, which obey similar exact relations. We clarify the particular role degenerate states have in such a description.

Tim Schmiedl; Thomas Speck; Udo Seifert

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

328

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

329

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

330

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Mg Production(Australia).pdf 49.21 KB MgProduction_Australia.mht 81.47 KB Mg Production(Brazil Israel Congo Malaysia).pdf 50.48 KB

331

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

332

ULTRA-CLEAN FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Report Abstract provides summaries of the past year's activities relating to each of the main project objectives. Some of the objectives will be expanded on in greater detail further down in the report. The following objectives have their own addition sections in the report: SFP Construction and Fuel Production, Impact of SFP Fuel on Engine Performance, Fleet Testing at WMATA and Denali National Park, Demonstration of Clean Diesel Fuels in Diesel Electric Generators in Alaska, and Economic Analysis. ICRC provided overall project organization and budget management for the project. ICRC held meetings with various project participants. ICRC presented at the Department of Energy's annual project review meeting. The plant began producing fuel in October 2004. The first delivery of finished fuel was made in March of 2004 after the initial start-up period.

Steve Bergin

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

334

Production Project Accounts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Project Accounts Production Project Accounts Overview Most NERSC login accounts are associated with specific individuals and must not be shared. Sometimes it is...

335

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

336

Century Model Product Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Century Model Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of a new model product. The model product "CENTURY: Modeling Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change, Version 4...

337

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Nuclear > Domestic Uranium Production Report Domestic Uranium Production Report Data for: 2005 Release Date: May 15, 2006 Next Release: May 15, 2007

338

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

339

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

340

Continuous Production of Biodiesel Via an Intensified Reactive/Extractive Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is considered as a means to diversify our supply of transportation fuel, addressing the goal of reducing our dependence on oil. For a number of reasons ranging from production issues to end use, biodiesel represents only a small fraction of the transportation fuel used worldwide. This work addresses the aspect of biodiesel production that limits it to a slow batch process. Conventional production methods are batch in nature, based on the assumption that the rates of the key chemical reactions are slow. The hypothesis motivating this work is that the reaction kinetics for the transesterification of the reagent triglyceride is sufficiently fast, particularly in an excess of catalyst, and that interfacial mass transfer and phase separation control the process. If this is the case, an intensified two-phase reactor adapted from solvent extraction equipment may be utilized to greatly increase biodiesel production rates by increasing interphase transport and phase separation. To prove this idea, we are investigating two aspects: (1) determining the rate-limiting step in biodiesel production by evaluating the reaction kinetics, and (2) enhancing biodiesel production rates by using an intensified reactor. A centrifugal contactor combining interphase mass transfer, chemical reaction, and phase separation is employed for process intensification.

Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Jennings, Hal L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

THE INTEGRATION OF THE 241-Z BUILDING DECONTAMINATION & DECOMMISSIONING (D&D) UNDER COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE COMPENSATION & LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) WITH RESOURCE CONSERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CLOSURE AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

The 241-Z treatment and storage tanks, a hazardous waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (TSD) unit permitted pursuant to the ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) and Washington State ''Hazardous Waste Management Act, RCW 70.105'', have been deactivated and are being actively decommissioned. The 241-Z TSD unit managed non-listed radioactive contaminated waste water, containing trace RCRA characteristic constituents. The 241-Z TSD unit consists of below grade tanks (D-4, D-5, D-7, D-8, and an overflow tank) located in a concrete containment vault, sample glovebox GB-2-241-ZA, and associated ancillary piping and equipment. The tank system is located beneath the 241-Z building. The 241-Z building is not a portion of the TSD unit. The sample glovebox is housed in the above-grade building. Waste managed at the TSD unit was received via underground mining from Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sources. Tank D-6, located in the D-6 vault cell, is a past-practice tank that was taken out of service in 1972 and has never operated as a portion of the RCRA TSD unit. CERCLA actions address Tank D-6, its containment vault cell, and soil beneath the cell that was potentially contaminated during past-practice operations and any other potential past-practice contamination identified during 241-Z closure, while outside the scope of the ''Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plant, 241-Z Treatment and Storage Tanks''.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

342

Illinois coal production pushes Illinois Basin production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal production in the Illinois Basin during the first half of 2012 (64.4 million short tons) was 13% higher than the same period in 2011. This ...

343

Mineral Wool Production Monitoring Using Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogeneity of the primary layer in mineral wool production process is required for high quality products. State-of-the-art measurement techniques for the evaluation of primary layer homogeneity are very slow and can only be applied after the product is manufactured. We present here a method that enables on-line monitoring and control and is based on experimental modeling using neural networks. The experimental method is based on image acquisition and image processing of the mineral wool primary layer structure. As a estimator of the mineral wool primary layer structure and quality, the weight of the primary wool layer is used, measured by an on- line weighting device in four locations of the conveyor belt. The instrumentation of on- line weighting device was upgraded for the purpose of the present experiment and enabled high speed acquisition of all measurement channels. The structure of the mineral wool primary layer was measured by visualization of the modified entrance to the on- line balance using a CCD camera. All data channels were simultaneously sampled. Radial basis neural networks are used for prediction. The structure of the mineral wool primary layer is predicted on the basis of experimentally provided weights data. The learning set consists of weights- images pairs. The prediction of the mineral wool primary layer structure consists of providing only weights. A good agreement between statistical properties of measured and modeled structures of the primary wool layer like spatial homogeneity of the primary mineral wool layer thickness, is shown. The results of the study confirm that the time- delayed vector of weights bears enough information for the monitoring of the production process. The modeling of primary mineral wool structure is of lesser quality due to high dimensionality of the modeled variable.

Marko Ho?evar; Brane irok; Bogdan Blagojevi?

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

345

Slow Radio-Frequency Processing of Large Oil Shale Volumes to Produce Petroleum-Like Shale Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is proposed to convert oil shale by radio frequency heating over a period of months to years to create a product similar to natural petroleum. Electrodes would be placed in drill holes, either vertical or horizontal, and a radio frequency chosen so that the penetration depth of the radio waves is of the order of tens to hundreds of meters. A combination of excess volume production and overburden compaction drives the oil and gas from the shale into the drill holes, where it is pumped to the surface. Electrical energy for the process could be provided initially by excess regional capacity, especially off-peak power, which would generate {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day of synthetic crude oil, depending on shale grade. The electricity cost, using conservative efficiency assumptions, is $4.70 to $6.30/bbl, depending on grade and heating rate. At steady state, co-produced gas can generate more than half the electric power needed for the process, with the fraction depending on oil shale grade. This would increase production to 7.3 x 10{sup 5} bbl/day for 104 l/Mg shale and 1.6 x 10{sup 6} bbl/day for 146 l/Mg shale using a combination of off-peak power and power from co-produced gas.

Burnham, A K

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Received through the CRS Web Summary Caspian Oil and Gas: Production and Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a likelihood of relatively large reserves of crude oil and natural gas in the Caspian Sea region, and a consequent large increase in oil and natural gas production from that area. Because diversity of energy sources and energy security are considerations in Congressional deliberations on energy policy, this prospect could play a role in such discussions. However, there are obstacles to increases in Caspian Sea region production of oil and gas that may slow development. This report will be updated as events warrant. The Caspian Sea is a 700-mile-long body of water in central Asia bordered by

Bernard A. Gelb

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

ROBOTICALLY ENHANCED ADVANCED MANUFACTURING CONCEPTS TO OPTIMIZE ENERGY, PRODUCTIVITY, AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE  

SciTech Connect

In the first phase of the REML project, major assets were acquired for a manufacturing line for follow-on installation, capability studies and optimization. That activity has been documented in the DE-FC36-99ID13819 final report. In this the second phase of the REML project, most of the major assets have been installed in a manufacturing line arrangement featuring a green cell, a thermal treatment cell and a finishing cell. Most of the secondary and support assets have been acquired and installed. Assets have been integrated with a commercial, machine-tending gantry robot in the thermal treatment cell and with a low-mass, high-speed gantry robot in the finish cell. Capabilities for masterless gauging of products dimensional and form characteristics were advanced. Trial production runs across the entire REML line have been undertaken. Discrete event simulation modeling has aided in line balancing and reduction of flow time. Energy, productivity and cost, and environmental comparisons to baselines have been made. Energy The REML line in its current state of development has been measured to be about 22% (338,000 kVA-hrs) less energy intensive than the baseline conventional low volume line assuming equivalent annual production volume of approximately 51,000 races. The reduction in energy consumption is largely attributable to the energy reduction in the REML thermal treatment cell where the heating devices are energized on demand and are appropriately sized to the heating load of a near single piece flow line. If additional steps such as power factor correction and use of high-efficiency motors were implemented to further reduce energy consumption, it is estimated, but not yet demonstrated, that the REML line would be about 30% less energy intensive than the baseline conventional low volume line assuming equivalent annual production volume. Productivity The capital cost of an REML line would be roughly equivalent to the capital cost of a new conventional line. The unit raw material cost for REML (through-hardened bearing steel) is somewhat greater than raw material cost for the conventional line (case-hardened bearing steel). However, changeover time, tooling costs, gauging costs, utilities and energy costs, and manning of REML are less than the conventional line. Since REML supports near single piece flow, work in process inventory and work flow time are much less on the REML line than on the conventional line. REML allows the reduction in inventory of source steel tube sizes from several hundred to a few dozen. As a result, the business model indicates that the costs incurred on the manufacturing line are less with the REML line than with the conventional line for low manufacturing run volumes. Environment The REML line, when processing through-hardenable steel, requires far less hydrocarbon and other process gases than the conventional line when processing case hardenable steel. The REML line produces fewer greenhouse gas emissions and less liquid and solid waste materials. Broad Applicability The REML benefits will in general be extendible to the manufacture of non-bearing, heat treated and finished machined metal parts in the United States.

Larry L. Keller; Joseph M. Pack; Robert V. Kolarik II

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

348

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

349

FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Central Versus Distributed Production Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of hydrogen production in photobioreactor Hydrogen, chemical symbol "H", is the simplest element on earth. An atom of hydrogen has only one proton and one electron. Hydrogen gas is a diatomic

350

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

351

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

352

Industrial Oil Products Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A forum for professionals involved in research, development, engineering, marketing, and testing of industrial products and co-products from fats and oils, including fuels, lubricants, coatings, polymers, paints, inks, cosmetics, dielectric fluids, and ad

353

The Product Creation Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Product Creation Process is described in its context. A phased model is shown, as many organisations use such a model as blueprint. The operational organisation of the product creation process is discussed, especially the role of the operational leader.

Gerrit Muller

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Casthouse Productivity and Safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2011 ... Cast Shop for Aluminum Production: Casthouse Productivity and ... performance indicator called Specific Energy Consumption [SEC] ... Improved Monolithic Materials for Lining Aluminum Holding and Melting Furnaces: Andy...

355

Bio-Based Products  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often...

356

Topic: Product Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Product Data. Event. Model-Based Enterprise Summit. TDP Standards Development Summit. Group. Life Cycle Engineering Group. ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers

358

Seamless Steel Tubular Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...). The tank also contained the search units.Fig. 6 Seamless and welded austenitic stainless steel tubular products were

359

Soy Protein Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will provide an overview of the key benefits of soy protein products in an easily understood format. ...

360

MSID Products, Tools, & Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SID Products, Tools, & Services. XML Testbed - collection of XML-Related Tools; Express Engine - STEP (ISO 10303) development ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Facsimile. 100 Bureau Drive, M/S 8220 Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8220. IEEE 1588 Products & Implementations. This page ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Table 3. Product Applications  

of all hazardous metals, low -level radioactive waste, fission products and transuranics Macroencapsulation of contaminated debris, metal and ...

363

Strangeness Production at COSY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

364

Coal production 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

365

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Word Pro - S9.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Petroleum Products to End Users (Dollars a per Gallon, Excluding Taxes) Finished Motor Gasoline b Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Kerosene No. 2 Fuel...

367

Word Pro - S9.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Prices of Petroleum Products for Resale (Dollars a per Gallon, Excluding Taxes) Finished Motor Gasoline b Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene- Type Jet Fuel Kerosene No. 2 Fuel...

368

The effects of strong temperature anisotropy on the kinetic structure of collisionless slow shocks and reconnection exhausts. Part I: PIC simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 2-D Riemann problem is designed to study the development and dynamics of the slow shocks that are thought to form at the boundaries of reconnection exhausts. Simulations are carried out for varying ratios of normal magnetic field to the transverse upstream magnetic field (i.e., propagation angle with respect to the upstream magnetic field). When the angle is sufficiently oblique, the simulations reveal a large firehose-sense (P_parallel>P_perpendicular) temperature anisotropy in the downstream region, accompanied by a transition from a coplanar slow shock to a non-coplanar rotational mode. In the downstream region the firehose stability parameter epsilon=1-mu_0(P_parallel-P_perpendicular)/ B^2 tends to lock in to 0.25. This balance arises from the competition between counterstreaming ions, which drives epsilon down, and the scattering due to ion inertial scale waves, which are driven unstable by the downstream rotational wave. At very oblique propagating angles, 2-D turbulence also develops in the downstrea...

Liu, Yi-Hsin; Swisdak, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cleaning and Finishing of Tungsten and Molybdenum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are porous. To remove these oxides, abrasive blasting is not generally required. When this process is used,

370

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from Taiwan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

371

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from Venezuela  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

372

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

373

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from Thailand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

374

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from Algeria  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

375

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from Australia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

376

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

377

Finished Motor Gasoline Exports by Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil exports are ...

378

General Design Principles Related to Surface Finishing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Summary of design limitations for selected surface-preparation processes...thin cross sections that could be damaged by

379

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from India  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

380

Finished Motor Gasoline Imports from Persian Gulf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Refinery Yield of Finished Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Totals may not equal ...

382

Midwest (PADD 2) Finished Motor Gasoline Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

383

U.S. Finished Motor Gasoline Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

384

Finished Aviation Gasoline Imports from Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

385

Tight Product Balance Pushes Up Product Spread (Spot Product - Crude  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Gasoline inventories indicate how tight the gasoline product market is in any one region. When the gasoline market is tight, it affects the portion of gasoline price is the spread between spot product price and crude oil price. Note that in late 1998-and early 1999 spreads were very small when inventories were quite high. Contrast summers of 1998 or 1999 with summer 2000. Last summer's tight markets, resulting low stocks and transition to Phase 2 RFG added price pressure over and above the already high crude price pressure on gasoline -- particularly in the Midwest. As we ended last winter, gasoline inventories were low, and the spread between spot prices and crude oil were higher than typical as a result. Inventories stayed well below average and the spread during the

386

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

Process Intensification in Base-Catalyzed Biodiesel Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is considered a means to diversify our supply of transportation fuel, addressing the goal of reducing our dependence on oil. Recent interest has resulted in biodiesel manufacture becoming more widely undertaken by commercial enterprises that are interested in minimizing the cost of feedstock materials and waste production, as well as maximizing the efficiency of production. Various means to accelerate batch processing have been investigated. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has experience in developing process intensification methods for nuclear separations, and this paper will discuss how technologies developed for very different applications have been modified for continuous reaction/separation of biodiesel. In collaboration with an industrial partner, this work addresses the aspect of base-catalyzed biodiesel production that limits it to a slow batch process. In particular, we have found that interfacial mass transfer and phase separation control the transesterification process and have developed a continuous two-phase reactor for online production of a methyl ester and glycerol. Enhancing the mass transfer has additional benefits such as being able to use an alcohol-to-oil phase ratio closer to stoichiometric than in conventional processing, hence minimizing the amount of solvent that has to be recycled and reducing post-processing clean up costs. Various technical issues associated with the application of process intensification technology will be discussed, including scale-up from the laboratory to a pilot-scale undertaking.

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL; Jennings, Hal L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A Review on Biomass Torrefaction Process and Product Properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass Torrefaction is gaining attention as an important preprocessing step to improve the quality of biomass in terms of physical properties and chemical composition. Torrefaction is a slow heating of biomass in an inert or reduced environment to a maximum temperature of approximately 300 C. Torrefaction can also be defined as a group of products resulting from the partially controlled and isothermal pyrolysis of biomass occurring in a temperature range of 200-280 C. Thus, the process can be called a mild pyrolysis as it occurs at the lower temperature range of the pyrolysis process. At the end of the torrefaction process, a solid uniform product with lower moisture content and higher energy content than raw biomass is produced. Most of the smoke-producing compounds and other volatiles are removed during torrefaction, which produces a final product that will have a lower mass but a higher heating value. The present review work looks into (a) torrefaction process and different products produced during the process and (b) solid torrefied material properties which include: (i) physical properties like moisture content, density, grindability, particle size distribution and particle surface area and pelletability; (ii) chemical properties like proximate and ultimate composition; and (iii) storage properties like off-gassing and spontaneous combustion.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; J. Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

390

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaaf, and the FLUXNET validation communities to choose sites and to identify the land products needed for validation. We also worked with MODAPS on subsetting the Land...

391

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Citation When using subsets of MODIS Land Products from the ORNL DAAC, please use the citation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC). 2011....

392

Microsystem Product Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

Polosky, M -A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Petroleum Survey Forms> Petroleum Survey Forms Tutorial Product Pipeline Reports Tutorial Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player....

394

LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and venting products for the specialty retail, residential new construction and industrial markets. LHP, based in Nashville, TN, is a business unit of Lennox...

395

Organic dairy production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis was to gain further knowledge about the performance of cows in organic dairy production and their ability to adapt to (more)

Ahlman, Therese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Coalbed Methane Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2006 2007 2008 2009...

397

PRODUCTION AND DECAY OF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

experimental observa- tion of CP violation, we briefly update the results on b quark production and lifetimes. Since this edition features separate reviews on the determination of...

398

Electromagnetic Higgs production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cross section for central diffractive Higgs production is calculated, for the LHC range of energies. The graphs for the possible mechanisms for Higgs production, through pomeron fusion and photon fusions are calculated for all possibilities allowed by the standard model. The cross section for central diffractive Higgs production through pomeron fusion, must be multiplied by a factor for the survival probability, to isolate the Higgs signal and reduce the background. Due to the small value of the survival probability $\\Lb 4 \\times 10^{-3}\\Rb $, the cross sections for central diffractive Higgs production, in the two cases for pomeron fusion and photon fusion, are competitive.

J. S. Miller

2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By:...

400

Weekly Blender Net Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production (Thousand Barrels per Day) Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Production. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Survey of Producing States and Mineral Management Service Evolving Estimate in Natural Gas Monthly.

402

Coal Combustion Products: Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products: Challenges and Opportunities American Coal Ash Association Conference St. Petersburg, FL January 27-30, 2003 Carl O. Bauer National Energy Technology Laboratory...

403

CONSOLIDATED CERAMIC PRODUCTS, INC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For 40 years, Consolidated Ceramic Products, Inc. has been of service to the aluminum industries worldwide. An innovative manufacturer and marketer of...

404

Hydrology Group - Technologies & Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies & Products Systems & Sensors Water Fluxmeter Software & Models Fish Individual-based Numerical Simulator (FINS ) FRAMES 1.x ReActive Flow and Transport of Groundwater...

405

Venezuela Gasoline Production & Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Change and Uncertainty Todays gasoline imports essential to meet ... Refinery-based MTBE production and some merchant MTBE facilities will be ...

406

Products, Services: Not Procurable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products, Services: Not Procurable As a premier national research and development laboratory, LANL seeks to do business with qualified companies that offer value and high...

407

Furfuryl alcohol cellular product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Self-extinguishing rigid foam products are formed by polymerization of furfuryl alcohol in the presence of a lightweight, particulate, filler, zinc chloride and selected catalysts.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

MESA PRODUCTS, INC. PROFILE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... services and products are energy related companies ... programs including the annual Appalachian Underground ... term and short-term outlook of the ...

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

409

Net Primary Productivity Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

some scientists still tend to confuse productivity with standing biomass or standing crop. NPP is a fundamental ecological variable, not only because it measures the energy...

410

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-851A, "Domestic Uranium Production Report"...

411

Sustainable hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Production Methodologies and Uncertainties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from the calcination process for clinker production direct emissions from fossil fuel combustion and indirect emissions from electricity consumption This paper examines in...

413

State Energy Production Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Energy Data System State Energy Data System Production Estimates Technical Notes For 1960-2011 Estimates Table of Contents Section 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 Section 2. Coal ............................................................................................................................... 5 Section 3. Crude Oil ....................................................................................................................... 7 Section 4. Natural Gas (Marketed Production) .............................................................................. 9 Section 5. Renewable Energy and Nuclear Energy ..................................................................... 13

414

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: Tarun R. Naik, Director investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

415

MTEACH: Didactic Multimedia Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia production is generally considered to be an expensive task. This is true when dealing with complex graphics, animation, artistic effects, music and high quality video editing, but didactic applications do not require such advanced features. ... Keywords: Didactic, language-based multimedia production, automatic links generation, microneurosurgery

Pier Luca Montessoro; Stefano Caschi

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Jet production at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results from jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering to investigate parton dynamics at low x are reviewed. The results on jet production in deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction used to test perturbative QCD are discussed and the values of alphas(Mz) extracted from a QCD analysis of the data are presented

C. Glasman

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

Tools and Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A look at new products on the market, including the BOXX Technologies' Apexx 4 Super-Workstation and renderBOXX Classic 7500, Dimension 3D Printers from Tekpro Group, Micronas' VCT-Premium single-chip flat panel TV processors, Cyberware Head and Face ... Keywords: graphics tools, graphics products

Carl Machover; David J. Kasik

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Production reactor characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Reactors for the production of special nuclear materials share many similarities with commercial nuclear power plants. Each relies on nuclear fission, uses uranium fuel, and produces large quantities of thermal power. However, there are some important differences in production reactor characteristics that may best be discussed in terms of mission, role, and technology.

Thiessen, C.W.; Hootman, H.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Production of Recycled Lead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...production of lead from recycled and mined (primary) sources for 1980 to 1988. At present, just under half of the total world lead production of 4.3 million metric tons (4.7 million tons) comes from recycling of scrap materials. As indicated in Table 4, there has been very little change in recent...

420

Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An alternative approach to accelerated PF curing can be accomplished with the addition amines or amides. The later functionality undergoes base catalyzed hydrolysis yielding the corresponding carboxyl ate and free amine which rapidly reacts with the phenolic methylol groups facilitating polymerization and curing of the PF resin (Pizzi, 1997).

Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gulf Coast Distillate Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 of 15 4 of 15 Notes: PADD 3 is a major source of supply for the East Coast. This graph shows how during the winter of 1997-1998 when distillate stocks were very high, production fell back. In contrast, we entered the winter of 1996-1997 with very low stocks, and refineries reached record production levels as they tried to build stocks late in the season. Notice that production is normally reduced in January as distillate stocks are used to meet demand and as refineries begin maintenance and turnovers, which continue into February. This January is no different. There is room for some production increases in January and February, if refineries postpone maintenance. But postponing maintenance and turnarounds can create problems when the gasoline production season begins in March and April.

422

Charm Production at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The latest results for open charm and $J/\\psi$ production in p-p, d-Au and Au-Au from the PHENIX and STAR experiments at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV at RHIC are presented. The preliminary data show open charm production follows binary scaling in d-Au and Au-Au collisions at RHIC. In d-Au collisions, a suppression in $J/\\psi$ production has been observed at the forward rapidity (d direction), at the backward rapidity (Au direction), $J/\\psi$ production seems strongly dependent on collisions centrality. The implications of heavy flavor production in cold (d-Au) and hot (Au-Au) nuclear media at RHIC are discussed.

Ming Xiong Liu

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production R&D Hydrogen Production R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Production: Hydrogen Production R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts

424

Coal combustion products (CCPs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

combustion products (CCPs) combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the largest segment of U.S. electricity generation (45 percent in 2010), finding a sustainable solution for CCPs is an important environmental challenge. When properly managed, CCPs offer society environmental and economic benefits without harm to public health and safety. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE) has made an important contribution in this regard. Fossil Energy Research Benefits Coal Combustion Products Fossil Energy Research Benefits

425

Monthly Biodiesel Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Biodiesel Production Monthly Biodiesel Production Report November 2013 With Data for September 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Monthly Biodiesel Production Report This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

426

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Collection 5 The MODIS data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are being reprocessed using revised algorithms beginning in September 2006. This new set of MODIS Products is called Collection 5. To view the product changes that took place in going from Collection 4 to Collection 5, please visit the following Web site: http://landweb.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/QA_WWW/newPage.cgi?fileName=MODLAND_C005_changes The ORNL DAAC provides subsets of the Collection 5 MODIS Land Products. Investigators from around the world have shown a great deal of interest in this activity, asking that over 1000 field and flux tower sites be included in Collection 5 subsetting (up from 280 sites for Collection 4 MODIS subsetting). Availability of the Collection 5 Data Products

427

production | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

production production Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

428

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Obtain MODIS data for areas centered on selected field sites or flux towers from around the world. The goal of the MODIS Subsets for Selected Field Sites is to prepare summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote sensing products and to characterize field sites. Search for data: By Site from a Map Server from Google Earth (Install Google Earth) From FTP site (ASCII) Methods Data products were first subsetted from one or more 1200x1200-km MODIS tiles to 25 x 25-km arrays by the MODIS Science Data Support Team (MODAPS). These products were further subsetted (7x7) and reformatted from their native HDF-EOS to ASCII using version 2.2 of the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) in combination with code developed at the ORNL DAAC.

429

Net Primary Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 study sites, plus a worldwide data set, have been added to the global terrestrial Net Primary Production (NPP) reference database. The NPP database has been compiled by Dick...

430

Product Family Glossary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Printed on Recycled PaperIMPORTANT NOTICE Texas Instruments (TI) reserves the right to make changes to its products or to discontinue any semiconductor product or service without notice, and advises its customers to obtain the latest version of relevant information to verify, before placing orders, that the information being relied on is current. TI warrants performance of its semiconductor products and related software to the specifications applicable at the time of sale in accordance with TIs standard warranty. Testing and other quality control techniques are utilized to the extent TI deems necessary to support this warranty. Specific testing of all parameters of each device is not necessarily performed, except those mandated by government requirements. Certain applications using semiconductor products may involve potential risks of death, personal injury, or severe property or environmental damage (Critical Applications).

Sprua Glossary; Tms Dsp; Literature Number Sprua

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Natural Gas Production,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Alabama ... 530,841 5,361 -35,808 -163,227 0 921 18 325,542...

432

Offshore Development and Production  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Natural gas production in the Federal offshore has increased substantially in recent years, gaining more than400 billion cubic feet between 1993 and 1997 to a level of 5.14 trillion cubic feet.

Information Center

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by category, 2003-2012 person-years Year Exploration Mining Milling Processing Reclamation Total 2003 W W W W 117 321 2004 18...

434

Propane Production by Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Notes: So where do we get our supplies of propane? Well, propane comes from both gas plants and refineries. Here we see data through May which shows that production at both gas...

435

Radioactivity in consumer products  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented at the conference dealt with regulations and standards; general and biological risks; radioluminous materials; mining, agricultural, and construction materials containing radioactivity; and various products containing radioactive sources.

Moghissi, A.A.; Paras, P.; Carter, M.W.; Barker, R.F. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Coal production: 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal production and related data are reported for the year 1980, with similar data for 1979 given for comparison. The data here collected on Form EIA-7A, coal production report, from 3969 US mines that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1980. Among the items covered are production, prices, employment, productivity, stocks, and recoverable reserves. Data are reported by state, county, coal producing district, type of mining, and by type of coal (anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite). Also included are a glossary of coal terms used, a map of the coal producing disricts, and form EIA-7A with instructions. 14 figures, 63 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Particle Data Group - Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720-8166 USA In Europe, Africa, Middle East, India, Pakistan, Russia and all other countries: Via Email: pdg-products@cern.ch Via postal mail:...

438

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

439

PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for the production of tritium by subjecting comminuted solid lithium fluoride containing the lithium isotope of atomic mass number 6 to neutron radiation in a self-sustaining neutronic reactor. The lithium fiuoride is heated to above 450 deg C. in an evacuated vacuum-tight container during radiation. Gaseous radiation products are withdrawn and passed through a palladium barrier to recover tritium. (AEC)

Jenks, G.H.; Shapiro, E.M.; Elliott, N.; Cannon, C.V.

1963-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Ethanol production from lignocellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Particle production at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H1 has measured a number of different known particles and compared their production to QCD models and to other reactions such as N-N collisions. ZEUS has also measured the production of K0SK0S pairs with a view to searching for glueballs. Several resonances are seen which are glueball candidates. The results on the masses and widths are compared to other experiments.

Changyi Zhou

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - How Slow is Slow? EXO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to happen and as few places to hide as possible. A detector chamber filled with 200 kilograms of liquid xenon takes care of the first strategic objective - the xenon has been...

443

Grid-based Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid-based Production Grid-based Production Grid-based Production PDSF is a Tier 2 site for ALICE and as such has the infrastructure in place to run automated grid-based ALICE production jobs. The main components of this infrastructure are listed below. Grid-Enabled Storage Elements There are currently a set of 10 servers running XRootD with a total capacity of 720TB. Included in XRootD are the data transfer tools used to transfer the input and output files for the production jobs running at PDSF. In addition to the 10 servers there is also the XRootD redirector which is currently running on pc1801.nersc.gov (pdsf5.nersc.gov). VO Box A VO (Virtual Organization) box is a dedicated node (palicevo1.nersc.gov) that coordinates the production. It runs the grid-monitoring tool MonALISA, the AliEn grid framework software, a Condor-G client and does job

444

FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

ARM - PI Product - Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsRaman lidarAERI PBL Height Product Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Raman lidarAERI PBL...

446

Slow Technology Designing for Reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computers are increasingly woven into the fabric of everyday life, interaction design may have to change from creating only fast and efficient tools to be used during a limited time in specific situations, to creating technology that surrounds ...

Lars Hallns; Johan Redstrm

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7. Refinery Net Production of Finished Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ... 576 -7...

448

Technology's Impact on Production  

SciTech Connect

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) - entitled Technology's Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level - the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: (1) Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. (2) Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. (3) Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies - Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Rachel Amann; Ellis Deweese; Deborah Shipman

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Technology's Impact on Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a cooperative agreement with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) ?? entitled Technologys Impact on Production: Developing Environmental Solutions at the State and National Level ? ? the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has been tasked with assisting state governments in the effective, efficient, and environmentally sound regulation of the exploration and production of natural gas and crude oil, specifically in relation to orphaned and abandoned wells and wells nearing the end of productive life. Project goals include: Developing (a) a model framework for prioritization and ranking of orphaned or abandoned well sites; (b) a model framework for disbursement of Energy Policy Act of 2005 funding; and (c) a research study regarding the current status of orphaned wells in the nation. Researching the impact of new technologies on environmental protection from a regulatory perspective. Research will identify and document (a) state reactions to changing technology and knowledge; (b) how those reactions support state environmental conservation and public health; and (c) the impact of those reactions on oil and natural gas production. Assessing emergent technology issues associated with wells nearing the end of productive life. Including: (a) location of orphaned and abandoned well sites; (b) well site remediation; (c) plugging materials; (d) plug placement; (e) the current regulatory environment; and (f) the identification of emergent technologies affecting end of life wells. New Energy Technologies ??Regulating Change, is the result of research performed for Tasks 2 and 3.

Amann, Rachel; Deweese, Ellis; Shipman, Deborah

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

451

TOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEMTOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEM ( TPS ) 1930( TPS ) 1930s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Leany #12;// ? ? ?? ?? #12;#12;TOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEMTOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEM. 80 : (Standard Work- CPG) 2 Toyota2. Toyota // waste value 3. (time, human effort

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

452

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

453

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

454

Coherent propagation of a single photon in a lossless medium: $0?$ pulse formation, slow photon, storage and retrieval in multiple temporal modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-photon coherent optics represents a fundamental importance for the investigation of quantum light-matter interactions. While most work has considered the interaction in the steady-state regime, here we demonstrate that a single-photon pulse shorter than any relaxation time in a medium propagates without energy loss and is consistently transformed into a zero-area pulse. A general analytical solution is found for photon passage through a cold ensemble of $\\Lambda$-type atoms confined inside a hollow core of a single-mode photonic-crystal fiber. We use the robust far off-resonant Raman scheme to control the pulse reshaping by an intense control laser beam and show that in the case of cw control field, for exact two-photon resonance, the outgoing photon displays an oscillating temporal distribution, which is the quantum counterpart of a classical field ringing, while for nonzero two-photon detuning a slow photon is produced. We demonstrate also that a train of readout control pulses coherently recalls the stored photon in many well-separated temporal modes, thus producing time-bin entangled single-photon states. Such states, which allow sharing quantum information among many users, are highly demanded for applications in long-distance quantum communication.

Shushan Petrosyan; Yuri Malakyan

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Design of product development systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of successful new products in less time and using fewer resources is key to the financial success of most consumer product companies. In this thesis we have studied the development of new products and how ...

Aguirre Granados, Adrian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

MTBE Production Economics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE Production MTBE Production Economics Tancred C. M. Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Production Costs 3. Relationship between price of MTBE and Reformulated Gasoline 4. Influence of Natural Gas Prices on the Gasoline Market 5. Regression Results 6. Data Sources 7. End Notes 1. Summary Last year the price of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) increased dramatically on two occasions (Figure 1) (see Data Sources at end of article.): 1. Between April and June 2000, the price (U.S. Gulf Coast waterborne market) of MTBE rose from $1.00 per gallon to over $1.60 per gallon. This represented an increase in the price premium for MTBE over the wholesale price of conventional gasoline from its normal (1995 though 2000 average) $0.26 per gallon to $0.60 per gallon. The MTBE

457

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Production The simplest and most common element, hydrogen is all around us, but always as a compound with other elements. To make it usable in fuel cells or otherwise provide energy, we must expend energy or modify another energy source to extract it from the fossil fuel, biomass, water, or other compound in which it is found. Nearly all hydrogen production in the United States today is by steam reformation of natural gas. This, however, releases carbon dioxide in the process and trades one relatively clean fuel for another, with associated energy loss, so it does little to meet national energy needs. Hydrogen can also be produced by electrolysis-passing an electrical current through water to break it into hydrogen and oxygen-but electrolysis is inefficient and is only as clean

458

PRODUCTION OF PURIFIED URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrometallurgical method for processing nuclear reactor fuel elements containing uranium and fission products and for reducing uranium compound; to metallic uranium is reported. If the material proccssed is essentially metallic uranium, it is dissolved in zinc, the sulution is cooled to crystallize UZn/sub 9/ , and the UZn/sub 9/ is distilled to obtain uranium free of fission products. If the material processed is a uranium compound, the sollvent is an alloy of zinc and magnesium and the remaining steps are the same.

Burris, L. Jr.; Knighton, J.B.; Feder, H.M.

1960-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

459

Gas production apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the production of gases, and more particularly to the production of tritium gas in a reliable long operating lifetime systems that employs solid lithium to overcome the heretofore known problems of material compatibility and corrosion, etc., with liquid metals. The solid lithium is irradiated by neutrons inside low activity means containing a positive (+) pressure gas stream for removing and separating the tritium from the solid lithium, and these means are contained in a low activity shell containing a thermal insulator and a neutron moderator.

Winsche, Warren E. (Bellport, NY); Miles, Francis T. (Bellport, NY); Powell, James R. (Wading River, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

emerging technologies for metals production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economics of Production of Primary Titanium by Electrolytic Winning [pp. 13-41] ... A Process for Continuous Titanium Production from Titanium Oxide [pp. 79-88

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Production analysis of Marcellus Shale.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to analyze the production potential of Marcellus shale using actual field data. By using real field production data for (more)

Belyadi, Hossein.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

SEDS: State Energy Production Estimates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity. ... Production. by state and for the United States; by energy source;

463

Cumulative Crude Production Additions (Annual)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This graph shows the cumulative growth of the Atlantic Basin light sweet crude oil production relative to the growth in crude oil production from the rest of the ...

464

Covered Product Categories (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Overview of the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Energy-Efficient Product Procurement Program and its designated product category list.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Energy and Biomedical / Primary Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 15, 2012 ... The distillation product by vacuum distillation process produced a high purity metal magnesium product, it can be deduced that reversion...

466

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Web and Web Services based tool that provides Subsets and Visualization of MODIS land products to facilitate land validation and field site characterization. S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook; B. E. Wilson. AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 14-18 2009 MODIS Land Product Subsets,S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook. November, 2009 MODIS Web Service, S.K. Santhana Vannan. ORNL DAAC UWG Meeting, May 2009 Subsetting Tools for MODIS Land Products: Time-series data for field sites, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Santhana Vannan, S. K. Holladay, and T. W. Beaty. Global Vegetation Workshop, Missoula MT, August 8-10, 2006 MODIS ASCII Subsets, R. B. Cook. May 2006 Subsets of Remote Sensing Products for AmeriFlux Sites: MODIS ASCII Subsets, AmeriFlux Annual Meeting, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Holladay, F. A. Heinsch, and C. B. Schaaf. October 5-7, 2004, Boulder, Colorado

467

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012 Production / Mining Method 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Underground (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Open Pit (estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching (thousand pounds U3O8) W W 2,681 4,259 W W W W W W Other1 (thousand pounds U3O8) W W W W W W W W W W Total Mine Production (thousand pounds U3O8) E2,200 2,452 3,045 4,692 4,541 3,879 4,145 4,237 4,114 4,335 Number of Operating Mines Underground 1 2 4 5 6 10 14 4 5 6 Open Pit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 In-Situ Leaching 2 3 4 5 5 6 4 4 5 5 Other Sources1 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

468

Programs on Product Spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study program states that are described as tuples, i.e., product state spaces. We show how to add program variables and assignment notation to simply typed lambda calculus in order to describe functions, relations and predicate transformers on such ...

Ralph Back; Joakim Wright von

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity the NAO. ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN NORWAY AND THE NAO The demand for heating oil in Norway

470

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc of sufficient strength to withstand handling, transfer and long term exposure. The final phase (4) was designed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

471

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Management & Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs), Tampa, Florida, Jan. 27-30, 2003. Department of Civil-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM concrete mixtures can be made with up to blends of 20% ponded-ash and 5% Class F fly ash. #12;Introduction

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

472

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coalCenter for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

473

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST by blending these selected conventional and clean coal ashes. Using these sixdifferent ash samples, eleven of 0 and60 percent by high-sulfurcoal ashes (Class F and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

474

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-lime fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 20%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans. #12;4 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely used source of energy ash. In 1992, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

475

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Class C fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 10 %) portland cement in the blend. Keywords; freezing and thawing durability; strength; sulfate resistance. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely amounts of coal combustion products (CCPs), which include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

476

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the coal ash derived from SOx control technology. Up to 80% of CCA was blended with ground portland cement: blended cement, clean coal ash, sulfate resistance, time of setting #12;3 Zichao Wu is Structural EngineerCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

477

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) in the range of 0 to 60Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

478

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Test results indicated that all the blends with coal ash had lower expansion than the control mixtureCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

479

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixtures were developed using blends of wood FA and Class C coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA improved performance of wood FA to a significant extentCenter for By-Products Utilization GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

480

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRACHLORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is descrlbed for the production of uranium tetrachloride by contacting uranlum values such as uranium hexafluoride, uranlum tetrafluoride, or uranium oxides with either aluminum chloride, boron chloride, or sodium alumlnum chloride under substantially anhydrous condltlons at such a temperature and pressure that the chlorldes are maintained in the molten form and until the uranium values are completely converted to uranlum tetrachloride.

Calkins, V.P.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finished products slow" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Selected Vendor Telecommunications Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;APPENDIX A A-2 Product: CellNet Developers: CellNet Data Systems Investors: AT&T Ventures Bank of Boston- held or other mobile receivers. CellNet's fixed wireless radio system consists of a two-way network, operation, and maintenance of the system, paying a fee of roughly $1.00 per meter per month for the basic

482

Inclusive neutral particle production  

SciTech Connect

Results of recent inclusive neutral particle production experiments are compared to existing experimental results. These experiments range from 15 to 2000 GeV/c in laboratory beam momentum and use $pi$$sup -$, $pi$$sup +$, p and anti p beams. (auth)

Kahn, S.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Electrolytic tritium production  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports fifty-three electrolytic cells of various configurations and electrode compositions examined for tritium production. Significant tritium was found in 11 cells at levels between 1.5 and 80 times the starting concentration after enrichment corrections are made.

Storms, E.; Talcott, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., Nuclear Materials Technology Div. and Material Science and Technology Div., MS C348, Los Alamos, NM (US))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Universal Product Design: Transforming User Activity Into Product Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many people have disabilities and would like to have all of the amenities typical of daily life. Universal product design is important in designing for the disabled and creating user-friendly products for all people. The goal of this thesis is to develop a universal product method by understanding how user activity closely resembles product function. The research results include a twenty product pair study in which a universal and typical product were compared. An activity diagram and functional model for each product in the product pair were the design tools used for this comparison. User activities were used to cluster product function changes. In addition, design changes such as functional, morphological and parametric were identified between the universal and typical product. The result was an action-function diagram showing the clusters and design changes for all of the twenty product pairs. An interactive GUI universal product design repository detailing the information from the action-function diagrams was created and used for eventual modification of typical products to make them universal. A universal product family was created using a user-centric universal design method developed because of the universal product design repository. Furthermore, user disability ratings from the ICF helped to expand the database and make creation of a universal product family more focused on levels of disability. The useful application of the research will be in developing a universal design method for product designers and engineers. This method will be broken down into a design structure matrix representation of functions from a universal product family of household kitchen appliances. In addition, an embodied concept for a product family consisting of existing accessible dispensers will be used to validate the universal design method developed from the twenty product study. Both case studies will serve as an example of how to extend universal design principles to a wide range of consumer product categories.

Kostovich, Vincent

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Table 1. U.S. Biodiesel Production Capacity and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Production Capacity and Production Biodiesel Production Capacity and Production (million gallons) Period 2011 January 2,114 35 February 2,104 40 March 2,081 60 April 2,101 71 May 2,064 77 June 2,069 81

486

Weekly Coal Production by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly Coal Production Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 14, 2013 | Release date: December 19, 2013 | Next release date: December 30, 2013 For the week ended December 14, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 3.1% higher than last week's estimate and 2.9% lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2012 Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.2 mmst Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 10.8 mmst U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 957.1 mmst, 1.9% lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2012 EIA revises its weekly estimates of state-level coal production using Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) quarterly coal production data.

487

Fe sub 3 Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Analysis of the frequency response of a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell exposed to radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation testing of photonic components is not new, however component level testing to date has not completely addressed quantities which are important to system behavior. One characteristic that is of particular importance for optical processing systems is the frequency response. In this report, we present the analysis of data from an experiment designed to provide a preliminary understanding of the effects of radiation on the frequency response of acousto-optic devices. The goal of the analysis is to describe possible physical mechanisms responsible for the radiation effects and to discuss the effects on signal processing functionality. The experiment discussed in this report was designed by Sandia National Laboratories and performed by Sandia and Phillips Laboratory personnel at White Sands Missile Range (WSMR). In the experiment, a TeO{sub 2} slow shear wave acousto-optic cell was exposed to radiation from the WSMR linear accelerator. The TeO{sub 2} cell was placed in an experimental configuration which allowed swept frequency diffracted power measurements to be taken during radiation exposure and recovery. A series of exposures was performed. Each exposure consisted of between 1 to 800, 1{mu}sec radiation pulses (yielding exposures of 2.25 kRad(Si) to 913 kRad(Si)), followed by recovery time. At low total and cumulative doses, the bandshape of the frequency response (i.e. diffracted power vs. frequency) remained almost identical during and after radiation. At the higher exposures, however, the amplitude and width of the frequency response changed as the radiation continued, but returned to the original shape slowly after the radiation stopped and recovery proceeded. It is interesting to note that the location of the Bragg degeneracy does not change significantly with radiation. In this report, we discuss these effects from the perspective of anisotropic Bragg diffraction and momentum mismatch, and we discuss the effect on the signal processing functionality.

Erteza, I.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Codes base on unambiguous products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose the notion of +-unambiguous product which is expanded from unambiguous product and the definitions of alternative product, alternative code, even alternative code on a pair (X, Y) of languages. Some basic properties of ... Keywords: +-unambiguous product, alt-code, ealt-code, generations of code, independency of conditions

Ho Ngoc Vinh; Vu Thanh Nam; Phan Trung Huy

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Advanced Product Quality Planning (APQP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...correctly will provide the best opportunity for sustainability once the work cells initiate production....

492

Synthesizing products for online catalogs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive product catalog is essential to the success of Product Search engines and shopping sites such as Yahoo! Shopping, Google Product Search, and Bing Shopping. Given the large number of products and the speed at which they are released to ...

Hoa Nguyen; Ariel Fuxman; Stelios Paparizos; Juliana Freire; Rakesh Agrawal

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

494

Product Efficiency Cases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and product-efficiency-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/exc-13-0004-matter-liebherr-canada-ltd EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd.

495

LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LENNOX LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS April 1, 2011 Mr. Daniel Cohen U.S. Department of Energy Assistant General Council for Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 RE: Regulatory Burden RFI Dear Mr. Cohen: Lennox Hearth Products (LHP) is hereby responding to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) request for information - published at 76 Fed. Reg. 6123 (February 3, 2011) - seeking comment and information to assist the DOE in reviewing its existing regulations to determine whether such regulations should be modified or repealed pursuant to Executive Order 13563 ("Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review," issued by President Obama on January 18, 2011). LHP is a leading manufacturer of indoor and outdoor fireplaces, fireplace inserts, free-standing stoves, gas log

496

Production of MHD fluid  

SciTech Connect

A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

Lacey, James J. (Library, PA); Kurtzrock, Roy C. (Bethel Park, PA); Bienstock, Daniel (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

497

Domestic Uranium Production Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012 Item 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 E2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Exploration and Development Surface Drilling (million feet) 1.1 0.7 1.3 3.0 4.9 4.6 2.5 1.0 0.7 W W 1.2 1.7 2.7 5.1 5.1 3.7 4.9 6.3 7.2 Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1 5.7 1.1 2.6 7.2 20.0 18.1 7.9 5.6 2.7 W W 10.6 18.1 40.1 67.5 81.9 35.4 44.6 53.6 66.6 Mine Production of Uranium (million pounds U3O8) 2.1 2.5 3.5 4.7 4.7 4.8 4.5 3.1 2.6 2.4 2.2 2.5 3.0 4.7 4.5 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.1 4.3 Uranium Concentrate Production (million pounds U3O8) 3.1 3.4 6.0 6.3 5.6 4.7 4.6 4.0 2.6 2.3 2.0 2.3 2.7 4.1 4.5 3.9 3.7 4.2 4.0 4.1

498

Joined ceramic product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a joined product is at least two ceramic parts, specifically bi-element carbide parts with a bond joint therebetween, wherein the bond joint has a metal silicon phase. The bi-element carbide refers to compounds of MC, M.sub.2 C, M.sub.4 C and combinations thereof, where M is a first element and C is carbon. The metal silicon phase may be a metal silicon carbide ternary phase, or a metal silicide.

Henager, Jr., Charles W [Kennewick, WA; Brimhall, John L [West Richland, WA

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

499

PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

1949-07-19T23:59:59.000Z