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Sample records for finger colin goranson

  1. Field Mapping At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin Goranson (2005) Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora...

  2. Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin Goranson (2005) Recent Drilling Activities At The Earth Power Resources Tuscarora...

  3. Colin Bishopp

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colin Bishopp is a Senior Advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy, where he focuses on energy finance policy and clean energy deployment.

  4. Core Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling...

  5. Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling...

  6. Core Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling...

  7. Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al.,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson,...

  8. Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run tier completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson,...

  9. Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson,...

  10. Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson,...

  11. Neutron Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson,...

  12. Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing in Geothermal Exploration Abstract No abstract prepared. Authors Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen and Gene Polik...

  13. Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing In Geothermal Exploration Abstract No abstract prepared. Authors Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen and Gene Polik...

  14. User:Colin.mccormick | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colin.mccormick Jump to: navigation, search Name Colin McCormick Edits 35 Colin McCormick Senior Advisor for R&D Office of the Under Secretary US Department of Energy Links Water...

  15. NREL: Energy Analysis - Colin McMillan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colin A. McMillan Photo of Colin A. McMillan. Colin A. McMillan is a member of the Washington D.C. Office in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Senior Analyst On staff since July 2013 Phone number: 202-488-2251 Email: colin.mcmillan@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Life cycle assessment Energy efficiency Econometrics Primary research interests Systems-level energy efficiency analysis Material and energy flows in economies Education and background training Ph.D. in natural resources, University of

  16. Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Authors Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson and David Blackwell Published GRC, 2005 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  17. Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock core analyses and mineral assemblage investigations References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake...

  18. Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    obtained from cuttings in this particular geologic setting. References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake...

  19. Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notes Two deeper wells encountered temps of 327 and 329 oF References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake...

  20. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger (Patent)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    controlled robotic or prosthetic finger Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger You are accessing a document from the...

  1. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  2. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger (Patent) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect controlled robotic or prosthetic finger Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint

  3. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Depiante, E.V.

    1997-11-18

    A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

  4. Finger wear detection for production line battery tester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Depiante, Eduardo V. (16 W. 505 Mockingbird La., Apt. 204, Hinsdale, IL 60521-6621)

    1997-01-01

    A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

  5. Stainless steel quadralatch finger test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1996-06-20

    The design of the quadralatch on the universal samplers was changed in response to flammable gas operating constraints. Additional redesign of the fingers was included to facilitate manufacturability. The new design was tested to assure satisfactory performance. It was shown that the fingers can hold a sampler in place with an upward force of at least 2200 N (500 pounds) and that the mechanical remote latch unit can release the quadralatch under this condition of maximum upward force.

  6. Los Alamos observatory fingers cosmic ray 'hot spots'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cosmic ray 'hot spots' Los Alamos observatory fingers cosmic ray 'hot spots' The research calls into question nearly a century of understanding about galactic magnetic fields near our solar system. November 24, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National

  7. Evaluation of Novel Design Strategies for Developing Zinc Finger Nucleases Tools for Treating Human Diseases

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bach, Christian; Sherman, William; Pallis, Jani; Patra, Prabir; Bajwa, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are associated with cell death and apoptosis by binding at countless undesired locations. This cytotoxicity is associated with the binding ability of engineered zinc finger domains to bind dissimilar DNA sequences with high affinity. In general, binding preferences of transcription factors are associated with significant degenerated diversity and complexity which convolutes the design and engineering of precise DNA binding domains. Evolutionary success of natural zinc finger proteins, however, evinces that nature created specific evolutionary traits and strategies, such as modularity and rank-specific recognition to cope with binding complexity that are critical for creating clinical viable toolsmore » to precisely modify the human genome. Our findings indicate preservation of general modularity and significant alteration of the rank-specific binding preferences of the three-finger binding domain of transcription factor SP1 when exchanging amino acids in the 2nd finger.« less

  8. Brookhaven Lab Captures E. coli’s Sticky Fingers on Film

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at Brookhaven use the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to take a look at how the urinary-tract-infection causing strain of E. coli extends its sticky fingers.

  9. STICKY FINGERS: How One Researcher is Improving the Science of Fingerprints

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy STICKY FINGERS: How One Researcher is Improving the Science of Fingerprints STICKY FINGERS: How One Researcher is Improving the Science of Fingerprints May 1, 2015 - 3:42pm Addthis Linda Lewis takes a materials science approach to forensics research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Linda Lewis takes a materials science approach to forensics research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge

  10. OUTFLOWS FROM EVOLVED STARS: THE RAPIDLY CHANGING FINGERS OF CRL 618

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, Bruce; Huarte-Espinosa, Martin; Frank, Adam; Gomez, Thomas; Alcolea, Javier; Corradi, Romano L. M.; Vinkovic, Dejan E-mail: martinHE@pas.rochester.edu E-mail: gomezt@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: rcorradi@iac.es

    2013-07-20

    Our ultimate goal is to probe the nature of the collimator of the outflows in the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618. CRL 618 is uniquely suited for this purpose owing to its multiple, bright, and carefully studied finger-shaped outflows east and west of its nucleus. We compare new Hubble Space Telescope images to images in the same filters observed as much as 11 yr ago to uncover large proper motions and surface brightness changes in its multiple finger-shaped outflows. The expansion age of the ensemble of fingers is close to 100 yr. We find strong brightness variations at the fingertips during the past decade. Deep IR images reveal a multiple ring-like structure of the surrounding medium into which the outflows propagate and interact. Tightly constrained three-dimensional hydrodynamic models link the properties of the fingers to their possible formation histories. We incorporate previously published complementary information to discern whether each of the fingers of CRL 618 are the results of steady, collimated outflows or a brief ejection event that launched a set of bullets about a century ago. Finally, we argue on various physical grounds that fingers of CRL 618 are likely to be the result of a spray of clumps ejected at the nucleus of CRL 618 since any mechanism that form a sustained set of unaligned jets is unprecedented.

  11. Deducing the Energetic Cost of Protein Folding in Zinc Finger Proteins Using Designed Metallopeptides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddi,A.; Guzman, T.; Breece, r.; Tierney, D.; Gibney, B.

    2007-01-01

    Zinc finger transcription factors represent the largest single class of metalloproteins in the human genome. Binding of Zn(II) to their canonical Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 sites results in metal-induced protein folding events required to achieve their proper structure for biological activity. The thermodynamic contribution of Zn(II) in each of these coordination spheres toward protein folding is poorly understood because of the coupled nature of the metal-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Using an unstructured peptide scaffold, GGG, we have employed fluorimetry, potentiometry, and calorimetry to determine the thermodynamics of Zn(II) binding to the Cys4, Cys3His1, and Cys2His2 ligand sets with minimal interference from protein folding effects. The data show that Zn(II) complexation is entropy driven and modulated by proton release. The formation constants for Zn(II)-GGG with a Cys4, Cys3His1, or Cys2His2 site are 5.6 x 1016, 1.5 x 1015, or 2.5 x 1013 M-1, respectively. Thus, the Zn(II)-Cys4, Zn(II)-Cys3His1, and Zn(II)-Cys2His2 interactions can provide up to 22.8, 20.7, and 18.3 kcal/mol, respectively, in driving force for protein stabilization, folding, and/or assembly at pH values above the ligand pKa values. While the contributions from the three coordination motifs differ by 4.5 kcal/mol in Zn(II) affinity at pH 9.0, they are equivalent at physiological pH, ?G = -16.8 kcal/mol or a Ka = 2.0 x 1012 M-1. Calorimetric data show that this is due to proton-based enthalpy-entropy compensation between the favorable entropic term from proton release and the unfavorable enthalpic term due to thiol deprotonation. Since protein folding effects have been minimized in the GGG scaffold, these peptides possess nearly the tightest Zn(II) affinities possible for their coordination motifs. The Zn(II) affinities in each coordination motif are compared between the GGG scaffold and natural zinc finger proteins to determine the free energy required to fold the latter. Several proteins have identical Zn(II) affinities to GGG. That is, little, if any, of their Zn(II) binding energy is required to fold the protein, whereas some have affinities weakened by up to 5.7 kcal/mol; i.e., the Zn(II) binding energy is being used to fold the protein.

  12. Fission Product Separation from Pyrochemical Electrolyte by Cold Finger Melt Crystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshua R. Versey

    2013-08-01

    This work contributes to the development of pyroprocessing technology as an economically viable means of separating used nuclear fuel from fission products and cladding materials. Electrolytic oxide reduction is used as a head-end step before electrorefining to reduce oxide fuel to metallic form. The electrolytic medium used in this technique is molten LiCl-Li2O. Groups I and II fission products, such as cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr), have been shown to partition from the fuel into the molten LiCl-Li2O. Various approaches of separating these fission products from the salt have been investigated by different research groups. One promising approach is based on a layer crystallization method studied at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Despite successful demonstration of this basic approach, there are questions that remain, especially concerning the development of economical and scalable operating parameters based on a comprehensive understanding of heat and mass transfer. This research explores these parameters through a series of experiments in which LiCl is purified, by concentrating CsCl in a liquid phase as purified LiCl is crystallized and removed via an argon-cooled cold finger.

  13. Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony L. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the users palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the users fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hands characteristics just into the systems mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interfaces controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

  14. Human KZNF Gene Catalog - A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Huntley, S; Baggott, D. M.; Hamilton, A. T.; Tran-Gyamfi, M.; Yang, S.; Kim, J.; Gordon, L.; Branscomb, E.; Stubbs, L.

    Kruppel-type zinc finger (ZNF) motifs are prevalent components of transcription factor proteins in all eukaryotes. KRAB-ZNF proteins, in which a potent repressor domain is attached to a tandem array of DNA-binding zinc-finger motifs, are specific to tetrapod vertebrates and represent the largest class of ZNF proteins in mammals. To define the full repertoire of human KRAB-ZNF proteins, we searched the genome sequence for key motifs and then constructed and manually curated gene models incorporating those sequences. The resulting gene catalog contains 423 KRAB-ZNF protein-coding loci, yielding alternative transcripts that altogether predict at least 742 structurally distinct proteins. Active rounds of segmental duplication, involving single genes or larger regions and including both tandem and distributed duplication events, have driven the expansion of this mammalian gene family. Comparisons between the human genes and ZNF loci mined from the draft mouse, dog, and chimpanzee genomes not only identified 103 KRAB-ZNF genes that are conserved in mammals but also highlighted a substantial level of lineage-specific change; at least 136 KRAB-ZNF coding genes are primate specific, including many recent duplicates. KRAB-ZNF genes are widely expressed and clustered genes are typically not coregulated, indicating that paralogs have evolved to fill roles in many different biological processes. To facilitate further study, we have developed a Web-based public resource with access to gene models, sequences, and other data, including visualization tools to provide genomic context and interaction with other public data sets. [This abstract was copied from: S Huntley, DM Baggott, AT Hamilton, M Tran-Gyamfi, S Yang, J Kim, L Gordon, E Branscomb, and L Stubbs. 2006. A comprehensive catalog of human KRAB-associated zinc finger genes: insights into the evolutionary history of a large family of transcriptional repressors, Genome Research 16(5):669 - 677] The website provides the ability to search the online catalog by genomic coordinates, name, locus type, and motifs, to utilize a graphical browser and to download data files.

  15. Blown Away: What Knot to Do When Sailing, by: Sir Randolph Bacon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Colin Adams) Professor Colin Adams, Thomas T. Read Professor of Mathematics Williams College Presentation: Office presentation icon Presentation Abstract: PDF icon Colin...

  16. Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    imaging methods are needed to measure and monitor subsurface reservoirs for hydrocarbon production or for carbon dioxide storage resulting from large-scale carbon...

  17. NCO-5 Technician Cuts Finger while Cutting Gasket Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trujillo, Stanley; Schreiber, Stephen Bruce; Mcneel, John Worth; Monsalve-Jones, Robert A.; Welsh, Mark; Ortega, Greg N.; Martinez, Xavier Baltazar; Padilla, Ruby A.

    2015-12-10

    As part of the ADPSM Safety Improvement Plan, the WSST has established a subcommittee for a Learning Team. The purpose of a Learning Team is to transfer and communicate the information into operational feedback and improvement. We want to pay attention to the small things that go wrong because they are often early warning signals and may provide insight into the health of the whole system.

  18. STICKY FINGERS: How One Researcher is Improving the Science of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Buchanan Through the Looking Glass: The Art and Science of Hand-Polishing Precision Optics Sally Dawson is an award-winning theoretical physicist seeking to better understand...

  19. Colorado Students Secure in Science Knowledge - News Feature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the National Science Bowl. Dennis Bolshakov, left, Arvind Chandramouli, Blake Salvador, Colin Tweedy, Mohini Tangri, and teacher Paula Petterson at the 2015 National...

  20. Search for: All records | DOE Patents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kelley, Aaron (2) Mitchinson, Colin (2) Bodie, Elizabeth A (1) England, George (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions ...

  1. Bio Sciences: Ryan Agh Haide Vela-Alvarez Chemistry: Morgan Kelley

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symposium Winners Bio Sciences: Ryan Agh Haide Vela-Alvarez Chemistry: Morgan Kelley Belinda Pacheco Computing: Nicholas Lewis Colin Redman and Gerald Collom Earth and Space...

  2. Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Hartill, Don ; Hartline Robert E. ; Haseroth, Helmut D. ; Hassanein, Ahmed ; Hoffman, Kara ; Holtkamp, Norbert ; Holzer, E. Barbara ; Johnson, Colin ; Johnson, Rolland P. ...

  3. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources - Presentation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Presentation Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Colin F. Williams and Marshall J. Reed and Arlene F. Anderson Conference Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir...

  4. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functional Nanostructured Materials led by David Prendergast with Colin Ophus and Alex Weber-Bargioni Imaging with Local Probes led by Paul Ashby with Peter Ercius and Adam...

  5. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    beneath the resurgent dome. References Christopher Farrar, Jacob DeAngelo, Colin Williams, Frederick Grubb, Shaul Hurwitz (2010) Temperature Data From Wells in Long Valley...

  6. Temperature Data From Wells in Long Valley Caldera, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract No abstract available. Authors Christopher Farrar, Jacob DeAngelo, Colin Williams, Frederick Grubb and Shaul Hurwitz Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2010 Report...

  7. MiniBooNE Pion Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contents: Pion Group Home Pion Group Members Pion References Colin's Cross Section Page MiniBooNE Internal Email M. Tzanov.

  8. Research Teams - Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Teams Research Teams Associates Greg Smith, Senior Research Chemist, SRI ... Colin Smith, Thermal Engineer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory Previously co-sponsored by ...

  9. Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    F 1,035.27 R References Colin F. Williams, Marshall J. Reed and Arlene F. Anderson. 2011. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources - Presentation. In:...

  10. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    518 F 977.67 R References Colin F. Williams, Marshall J. Reed and Arlene F. Anderson. 2011. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources - Presentation. In:...

  11. Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    464 F 923.67 R References Colin F. Williams, Marshall J. Reed and Arlene F. Anderson. 2011. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources - Presentation. In:...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Andy Ronald.Finger Lakes NGL Storage Providence...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of pipeline - 80 Bcf natural gas storage capacity (2) * NGL and Crude Oil - Eight ... expansion projects (2) Total storage ... results in higher prices for consumers * ...

  13. Single shot speckle and coherence analysis of the hard X-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Steinke, I. ; Zhu, D. ; Lemke, H. ; Cammarata, M. ; Fritz, D.M. ; Wochner, P. ; Castro-Colin, M. ; Hruszkewycz, S.O. ; Fuoss, P.H. ; Stephenson, G.B. ; Grubel, G. ; Robert, A. ; ,...

  14. Summer 2005 Cyclotron Institute REU Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Students: (1st Row L to R) Scot McGregor, Colin Young, Whitney Rockwell, Laniece Miller, Carson Fuls; (2nd Row L to R) Adil Bahalim, Jonathan Kalodimos; (3rd Row L to R)...

  15. Microsoft Word - Document11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a ssumed. Bio: Colin Adams is the Thomas T. Read Professor of Mathematics at Williams College. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin---Madison in 1983. He...

  16. Analysis of Neutral Current 0 Events at MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutral Current 0 Events at MiniBooNE Colin Anderson April 14, 2008 The Experiment Analysis Outline Experiment MiniBooNE Description NC 0 Overview Analysis Selection and...

  17. Neutral Current 10 Production at MiniBooNE - Sixth International...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Workshop on Neutrino-Nucleus Interactions in the Few-GeV Region Colin Anderson May 21, 2009 Outline The Measurement Isolating the NC 1&25; H Sample Cross Section...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... for x-ray diffraction on a synchrotron source,closequoteclosequote by Colin Nave, Ana Gonzalez, Graham Clark, Sean McSweeney, Stewart Cummings, and Michael Hart, Rev. Sci. ...

  19. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photons in Electromagnetic Interactions You wrote: The exchange of virtual photons in the elastic scattering of particles of charged particles explains the phenomenon of electrostatic repulsion of particles of the same charge. How does the exchange of virtual photons as per QED explain the electrostatic attraction of particles of opposite charge? - Colin Cumming Dear Colin, I know that it's hard to visualize, but it works the same way. When it comes to repulsion, you can think of two people

  20. Local employee honored for community involvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last month, the East Tennessee Economic Council (ETEC) recognized Colin Colverson, an Energy Department attorney in Oak Ridge, with the prestigious Postma Young Professional Medal. The selection committee chooses an annual recipient for the award that displays elite community service and leadership qualities.

  1. Boise State University Idaho | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    University Idaho Boise State University Idaho Team Roster: Anaysa Aguilar, Mechanical Engineering; Chris Davis, Mechanical Engineering; Dennis Twitty, Mechanical Engineering; Omar Alozaymi, Electrical Engineering; Joe Fercho, Electrical Engineering; Seth Townsend, Electrical Engineering; Carson Heagen, Business; Alex Hernandez, Business; Ashley Hulse, Business; Colin Lesch, Business; Joseph Skogen, Business Team Roster: Anaysa Aguilar, Mechanical Engineering; Chris Davis, Mechanical Engineering;

  2. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University Finger, Kenneth L. (Kenneth L. Finger) - Museum of Paleontology, University of California at Berkeley ...

  3. Cradle and pressure grippers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muniak, John E. (New York, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A gripper that is designed to incorporate the functions of gripping, supporting and pressure tongs into one device. The gripper has two opposing finger sections with interlocking fingers that incline and taper to form a wedge. The interlocking fingers are vertically off-set so that the opposing finger sections may close together allowing the inclined, tapered tips of the fingers to extend beyond the plane defined by the opposing finger section's engagement surface. The range of motion defined by the interlocking relationship of the finger sections allows the gripper to grab, lift and support objects of varying size and shape. The gripper has one stationary and one moveable finger section. Power is provided to the moveable finger section by an actuating device enabling the gripper to close around an object to be lifted. A lifting bail is attached to the gripper and is supported by a crane that provides vertical lift.

  4. National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program 2013 Peer Review National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification Colin F. Williams US Geological Survey Data Systems and Analysis (Resource Assessment) April 24, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research * Overall Summary - Major Project Goals * Develop new Geothermal Resource Classification standards * Expand Resource Assessment scope

  5. Bio Sciences: Ryan Agh Haide Vela-Alvarez Chemistry: Morgan Kelley

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symposium Winners Bio Sciences: Ryan Agh Haide Vela-Alvarez Chemistry: Morgan Kelley Belinda Pacheco Computing: Nicholas Lewis Colin Redman and Gerald Collom Earth and Space Sciences: Sean Dolan Lois Smith Engineering: Babatunde Adigun Lexey Sbriglia Health and Safety: Micaela Christensen Information Technology: Michael Salazar Mathematics: William Casper Material Sciences: Matthew Herman Sergio Pino-Gellardo, Matthew Kroonblawd Purnima Ghale, Georg Hahn, Vivek Sardeshmuckh and Jerry Shi

  6. SREL Reprint #3191

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Use of an Artificial Nesting Mound by Wood Turtles (Glyptemys insculpta): A Tool for Turtle Conservation Kurt A. Buhlmann1 and Colin P. Osborn2 1University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29802 2US Fish and Wildlife Service, Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, 241 Pleasant Plains Road, Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 Abstract: We constructed an artificial nesting mound for Glyptemys insculpta (Wood Turtle) in the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, NJ. The original nesting

  7. Pentagon clings to costly lifestyle (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pentagon clings to costly lifestyle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pentagon clings to costly lifestyle Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Colin Powell worked for more than half a year on a plan to save money by reducing duplication in the armed services. A few days before Powell released his report, Defense Secretary Les Aspin told the services to reduce the leftover Bush Defense budget by about $11 billion. Reporters outcried that President Clinton had ordered the budget slashed.

  8. Algorithms and tools for high-throughput geometry-based analysis of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    crystalline porous materials (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Algorithms and tools for high-throughput geometry-based analysis of crystalline porous materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Algorithms and tools for high-throughput geometry-based analysis of crystalline porous materials Authors: Willems, Thomas F ; Rycroft, Chris ; Kazi, Michael ; Meza, Juan Colin ; Haranczyk, Maciej Publication Date: 2012-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1065948 DOE Contract Number:

  9. Juan Meza | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Blandine Jerome Juan Meza Previous Next List Juan Meza Juan Meza Formerly: Senior Scientist; Department Head, High Performance Computing Research, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presently: Dean of the School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced Email: jcmeza [at] ucmerced.edu EFRC publications: Willems, Thomas F; Rycroft, Chris; Kazi, Michael; Meza, Juan Colin; and Haranczyk, Maciej Algorithms and tools for high-throughput geometry-based analysis of crystalline

  10. SMART Scale

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SMART Scale Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Colin Clark, CClark@ecoact.org ECOLOGY ACTION Project Summary Timeline:  Start date: October 1, 2013  Planned end date: September 30, 2016 Key Milestones :  June 2014: Research and develop list of measures needed to enhance Ecology !ction's DI 2.0 model to achieve an average of at least 20% energy savings  October 2014: Identification and Selection of Demonstration

  11. SMART Scale: Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SMART Scale Small Market Advanced Retrofit Transformation Program 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Colin Clark, CClark@ecoact.org ECOLOGY ACTION Project Summary Timeline:  Start date: October 1, 2013  Planned end date: September 30, 2016 Key Milestones :  June 2014: Research and develop list of measures needed to enhance Ecology !ction's DI 2.0 model to achieve an average of at least 20% energy savings  June 2015: Review of EM&V on completed projects showing an

  12. Colorado School Earns Return Trip to National Science Bowl - News Feature |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Colorado School Earns Return Trip to National Science Bowl March 8, 2016 The five student team members from the winning team hold a trophy and banner honoring their victory. Their coaches stand on on each side of the group. Ridgeview Classical Charter Team 1 (from left): Coach Paula Petterson, Blake Salvador, Alyssa Jhones, Colin Tweedy, Logan Howerter, Tyler Dunaisky, and Coach Dave Morse. Ridgeview Classical won the 2016 Colorado High School Science Bowl and will return to nationals

  13. Second AEO2014 Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    25, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL HOLTBERG TEAM LEADER ANALYSIS INTEGRATION TEAM JAMES TURNURE DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS FROM: BUILDINGS CONSUMPTION & EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS TEAM SUBJECT: Second AEO2014 Buildings Sector Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on 09-26-2013) Attendees: James Berry (EIA OES) Stephanie Burns (IMT) Gwendolyn Bredehoeft (EIA OEA) Colin McMillan (NREL) Bill McNary (EIA OES)

  14. NREL: Energy Analysis - Washington D.C. Office Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington D.C. Office The following SEAC staff are based in our Washington D.C. Office. They support a variety of programs and activities, and often are the liaison between the U.S. Department of Energy and staff based in Golden, Colorado. Team Lead: Robert Margolis Administrative Support: Catherine Burke (Golden) Austin Brown David J. Feldman Thomas Jenkin John (Jack) Mayernik Colin McMillan Kathleen Nawaz Monisha Shah Photo of Austin Brown. Austin Brown Senior Analyst (Strategic Planning)

  15. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program 2015 Peer Review National Geothermal Resource Assessment and Classification Colin F. Williams US Geological Survey Systems Analysis (Resource Assessment) Project Officer: Tim Reinhardt Total Project Funding: $2.89M May 11, 2015 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research * Overall Objectives * Develop new Geothermal Resource Classification standards * Expand

  16. Trends in stationary energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in stationary energy Colin McCormick Senior Advisor for R&D Office of the Under Secretary US Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2013 April 2013 2 Under Secretary of Energy * Oversee the applied energy programs * Efficiency & Renewables * Electric grid * Fossil energy * Nuclear energy * Indian energy * Support interactions with Office of Science, ARPA-E * Support cross-cutting topics in energy systems * Energy systems interaction * Water-energy nexus *

  17. Federal Finance Facilities Available for Energy Efficiency Upgrades and Clean Energy Deployment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 24, 2013 Clean Energy Finance: A Guide to Federal Financing Programs Available for Energy Efficiency Upgrades and Clean Energy Deployment 2 Agenda * Welcome - Molly Lunn, DOE * Overview and Invitation for Feedback - Colin Bishopp, DOE * USDA's Electric Loan Program - Jon Claffey, USDA * HUD's PowerSaver Home Improvement Loans Program - Michael Freedberg, HUD * SBA's 504 Loan Program - Patrick Kelley, SBA * Case Study: Leveraging Two Federal Finance Facilities in New York State - Jim

  18. State Energy Advisory Board March 2013 Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Meeting State Energy Advisory Board March 2013 Meeting The agenda, minutes, presentations, and other materials from this meeting of STEAB. PDF icon Meeting Agenda -- March 2013 PDF icon Meeting Minutes -- March 2013 PDF icon Energy Efficiency Overview PDF icon Energy Investment Partnerships - Colin Bishopp PDF icon NDRF - Steve Lindenberg PDF icon OWIP Overview - Anna Garcia PDF icon SEE Action Update - Johanna Zetterberg PDF icon SEP Nat Evaluation - Marty Schweitzer PDF icon Stakeholder

  19. Sandia Sled Track PNOV Press Release

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    current electronic detonator in a trainer device that resulted in a first- degree burn on a finger and second-degree burns on a thumb, finger and abdomen. NNSA cited LANS for...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... A Family of Zinc Finger Proteins Is Required forChromosome-specific Pairing and Synapsis ... Here, we show that afamily of four related C2H2 zinc-finger proteins plays a central role ...

  1. Direct Detector for Terahertz Radiation - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating...

  2. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photos placed in horizontal position with even amount of white space between photos and header To replace these boxes with images open the slide master Ar1 25.0 40.0 °C 30 35 FLIR Systems PV Reliability Operations Maintenance (PVROM) - Mitigating O&M Risks Through Fault and Failure Analysis Geoffrey T. Klise and Colin J. Hamman Sandia National Laboratories May 7, 2014 SAND2014-4275C Research Purpose - Improve PV System Reliability  Develop PV Reliability Operations Maintenance (PVROM)

  4. Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metal-organic frameworks | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Yuguang Ma, M. Colin McCarthy, Julian Sculley, Jiamei Yu, Hae-Kwon Jeong, Perla B. Balbuena, Hong-Cai Zhou, Coord. Chem. Rev., 255, 1791-1823 (2011) DOI: 10.1016/j.ccr.2011.02.012 Abstract: Reducing anthropogenic CO2 emission and lowering the concentration of

  5. EV Explorer: Giving Employers and Employees Better Information on the Benefits of PEVs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EXPLORER: GIVING EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES BETTER INFORMATION ON THE BENEFITS OF PEVS MICHAEL NICHOLAS GIL TAL DANIEL SCRIVANO COLIN CAMERON KALAI RAMEA PUT IN YOUR HOME AND WORK AND CALCULATE YOUR ENERGY SAVINGS ADD WORKPLACE CHARGING CUSTOMIZE YOUR PARAMETERS * Change number of commute days * Change energy prices * Change car in the "car manager" to any of 34,000 cars in fueleconomy.gov * Change your destination * Find it at http://gis.its.ucdavis.edu/evexplorer or search for "EV

  6. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics pore-scale simulations of unstable immiscible flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandara, Dunusinghe Mudiyanselage Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Oostrom, Martinus; Palmer, Bruce J.; Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong

    2013-12-01

    We have conducted a series of high-resolution numerical experiments using the Pair-Wise Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) multiphase flow model. First, we derived analytical expressions relating parameters in the PF-SPH model to the surface tension and static contact angle. Next, we used the model to study viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement of immiscible fluids in porous media for a wide range of capillary numbers and viscosity ratios. We demonstrated that the steady state saturation profiles and the boundaries of viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement regions compare favorably with micromodel laboratory experimental results. For displacing fluid with low viscosity, we observed that the displacement pattern changes from viscous fingering to stable displacement with increasing injection rate. When a high viscosity fluid is injected, transition behavior from capillary fingering to stable displacement occurred as the flow rate was increased. These observation also agree with the results of the micromodel laboratory experiments.

  7. The Sandia Hand Features

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Hand Features  Low Cost: using 3D high-resolution rapid prototyping technologies for low volumes, ensuring each component is amenable to injection molding for high volumes, and designing around components found in large consumer markets has enabled significant cost reductions  Dexterous: designed with four 3 Degree of Freedom (DOF) fingers to enable dexterous tasks such as finger gating while still maintaining form closure  Modular: a hand frame with identical finger modules that

  8. Laser cutting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Thomas J

    2015-03-03

    A workpiece cutting apparatus includes a laser source, a first suction system, and a first finger configured to guide a workpiece as it moves past the laser source. The first finger includes a first end provided adjacent a point where a laser from the laser source cuts the workpiece, and the first end of the first finger includes an aperture in fluid communication with the first suction system.

  9. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven...

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    answer) * Inexpensive: 50-200 fold reduction in required reagent volumes * Minimally-invasive: <20L whole blood input (finger puncture) * Simplerobust: Based on...

  11. The Magma Energy Exploratory Well | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authors John T. Finger and John C. Eichelberger Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Bulletin, 1990 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J. ; Cornell) August 2015 Recognition of distinct RNA motifs by the clustered CCCH zinc fingers of neuronal protein Unkempt Murn, Jernej ; Teplova, Marianna ; Zarnack, Kathi ; ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cell wall (1) chains (1) enzymes (1) fingers (1) genes (1) ligases (1) peptides (1) proteins (1) solutes (1) strains (1) transcription factors (1) trichoderma (1) zinc fungi,...

  14. Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Drilling Abstract No abstract prepared. Authors John Travis Finger and Eddie Ross Hoover Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

  15. Ergonomics Designs of Aluminum Beverage Cans and Bottles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Jing; Itoh, Ryouiti; Shinguryo, Takuro; Yamazaki, Koetsu; Nishiyama, Sadao

    2005-08-05

    This paper introduced the finite element analyses into the ergonomics designs to evaluate the human feelings numerically and objectively. Two design examples in developing aluminum beverage cans and bottles are presented. The first example describes a design of the tab of the can with better finger access. A simulation of finger pulling up the tab of the can has been performed and a pain in the finger has been evaluated by using the maximum value of the contact stress of a finger model. The finger access comparison of three kinds of tab ring shape designs showed that the finger access of the tab that may have a larger contact area with finger is better. The second example describes a design of rib-shape embossed bottles for hot vending. Analyses of tactile sensation of heat have been performed and the amount of heat transmitted from hot bottles to finger was used to present the hot touch feeling. Comparison results showed that the hot touch feeling of rib-shape embossed bottles is better than that of cylindrical bottles, and that the shape of the rib also influenced the hot touch feeling.

  16. Controlled zone microwave plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-10-20

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  17. Planar controlled zone microwave plasma system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxvlle, TN)

    2011-10-04

    An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

  18. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  19. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  20. A HEURISTIC PREDICTION OF THE COSMIC EVOLUTION OF THE CO-LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, D.; Heywood, I.; Kloeckner, H.-R.; Rawlings, S.

    2009-09-10

    We predict the emission line luminosity functions (LFs) of the first 10 rotational transitions of {sup 12}C{sup 16}O in galaxies at redshift z = 0 to z = 10. This prediction relies on a recently presented simulation of the molecular cold gas content in {approx}3 x 10{sup 7} evolving galaxies based on the Millennium Simulation. We combine this simulation with a model for the conversion between molecular mass and CO-line intensities, which incorporates the following mechanisms: (1) molecular gas is heated by the cosmic microwave background (CMB), starbursts (SBs), and active galactic nuclei (AGNs); (2) molecular clouds in dense or inclined galaxies can overlap; (3) compact gas can attain a smooth distribution in the densest part of disks; (4) CO luminosities scale with metallicity changes between galaxies; and (5) CO luminosities are always detected against the CMB. We analyze the relative importance of these effects and predict the cosmic evolution of the CO-LFs. The most notable conclusion is that the detection of regular galaxies (i.e., no AGN, no massive SB) at high z {approx}> 7 in CO emission will be dramatically hindered by the weak contrast against the CMB, in contradiction to earlier claims that CMB heating will ease the detection of high-redshift CO. The full simulation of extragalactic CO lines and the predicted CO-LFs at any redshift can be accessed online (http://s-cubed.physics.ox.ac.uk/, go to {sup S3}-SAX) and they should be useful for the modeling of CO-line surveys with future telescopes, such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array or the Square Kilometre Array.

  1. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bast, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Lennon, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Pastrnak, John W. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An attachment mechanism for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection.

  2. Internal pipe attachment mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

    1994-12-13

    An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    A reusable system is described for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod to a support member. A locking cap is secured to the fuel rod and a locking strip is fastened to the support member. The locking cap has two opposing fingers shaped to form a socket having a body portion. The locking strip has an extension shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion. The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip causing the extension to temporarily deflect open the fingers to engage the socket's body portion. For removal, the process is reversed.

  4. Vision for NREL Technology Has Entrepreneur Seeing Clearly -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Has Entrepreneur Seeing Clearly September 3, 2015 Photo shows a small piece of flexible film held between two fingers. Electrochromic windows-which use a jolt of electricity to go...

  5. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the ...

  6. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Goal would be a green field site The Originally ... vessel top dome With the rotating floor shield in place the ... The finger grab in use Magnetic Grabs Grab is ...

  7. The Magma Energy Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Article: The Magma Energy Program Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors T.Y. Chu, J.C. Dunn, John T. Finger, John B. Rundle and H.R. Westrich Published Journal Geothermal...

  8. The Petascale Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (6 OpenMP threads per NUMA node) OpenMP support (b) . . 5 5 a) Isosurfaces of CO 2 density in the brine, this image highlights the structure of the 3D fingers. b)...

  9. Chris Samoray | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chris Samoray - Communications Intern, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Chris Samoray is a Communications Intern at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Most Recent STICKY FINGERS: How One Researcher is Improving the Science of Fingerprints May 1

  10. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to capture those tracks for later analysis. How do you set up an apparatus to take pictures whenever tracks appear? At first, you might just try to be quick with your finger,...

  11. 12-16-04.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the pain. If the pain goes away, you may resume the motion carefully, with special care taken to keep your wrist straight. Gently exercise your fingers and wrists every hour....

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... a loss of contact inhibition is a critical event for cancer development and progression. ... loss of contact inhibition, a hallmark of cancer. less January 2014 Zinc-fingers and ...

  13. A SANDIA TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN I_ Aucll_t

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The sensor, jointly developed by Sandia and UNM, uses infrared light shown through a finger to measure blood sugar levels, pro- viding people with diabetes a safe and painless ...

  14. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  15. Evaluation of two-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure relations for unstable displacements in a pore network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehoff, Karl J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Changyong; Grate, Jay W.

    2012-10-29

    A series of displacement experiments was conducted using five wetting-nonwetting immiscible fluid pairs in a homogenous and uniform pore network. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or water as a wetting fluid, which was subsequently displaced by a nonwetting fluid (dodecane, hexadecane, or mineral oil) at different flow rates. The experiments were designed to allow determinations of nonwetting fluid relative permeabilities ( ), fluid saturations ( ), and capillary pressure heads ( ). In the displacements, nonwetting fluid saturations increased with increasing flow rates for all five fluid pairs, and viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement were observed. Viscous fingering occurred when PEG was displaced by either dodecane or hexadecane. For the water displacements, capillary fingers were observed at low capillary numbers. Due to unstable fingering phenomena, values for the PEG displacements were smaller than for the water displacements. A fitting exercise using the Brooks-Corey (1964) relationship showed that the fitted entry pressure heads are reasonably close to the computed entry pressure head. The fitted pore geometry factor, ?? values for the displacements are considerably lower than what is expected for displacements in homogeneous, highly uniform, porous systems, demonstrating the impact of unstable displacement on the apparent value of ?. It was shown that a continuum-based multiphase model could be used to predict the average behavior for wetting fluid drainage in a pore network as long as independently fitted - and - relations are used. The use of a coupled approach through the Brooks-Corey pore geometry factor underpredicts observed values.

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

  17. Insulation assembly for electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhoads, Frederick W.; Titmuss, David F.; Parish, Harold; Campbell, John D.

    2013-10-15

    An insulation assembly is provided that includes a generally annularly-shaped main body and at least two spaced-apart fingers extending radially inwards from the main body. The spaced-apart fingers define a gap between the fingers. A slot liner may be inserted within the gap. The main body may include a plurality of circumferentially distributed segments. Each one of the plurality of segments may be operatively connected to another of the plurality of segments to form the continuous main body. The slot liner may be formed as a single extruded piece defining a plurality of cavities. A plurality of conductors (extendable from the stator assembly) may be axially inserted within a respective one of the plurality of cavities. The insulation assembly electrically isolates the conductors in the electric motor from the stator stack and from other conductors.

  18. TYCHO SN 1572: A NAKED Ia SUPERNOVA REMNANT WITHOUT AN ASSOCIATED AMBIENT MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, W. W.; Leahy, D. A.

    2011-03-10

    The historical supernova remnant (SNR) Tycho SN 1572 originates from the explosion of a normal Type Ia supernova that is believed to have originated from a carbon-oxygen white dwarf in a binary system. We analyze the 21 cm continuum, H I, and {sup 12}CO-line data from the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey in the direction of SN 1572 and the surrounding region. We construct H I absorption spectra to SN 1572 and three nearby compact sources. We conclude that SN 1572 has no molecular cloud interaction, which argues against previous claims that a molecular cloud is interacting with the SNR. This new result does not support a recent claim that dust, newly detected by AKARI, originates from such an SNR-cloud interaction. We suggest that the SNR has a kinematic distance of 2.5-3.0 kpc based on a nonlinear rotational curve model. Very high energy {gamma}-ray emission from the remnant has been detected by the VERITAS telescope, so our result shows that its origin should not be an SNR-cloud interaction. Both radio and X-ray observations support that SN 1572 is an isolated Type Ia SNR.

  19. Removable feedwater sparger assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith.

  20. petascale_final2013.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coe cients for the 193 IZA zeolite structures. . . 4 4 Weak scaling studies of a Coarray shifter and two MPI particle shifter algorithms with no (a) and full (6 OpenMP threads per NUMA node) OpenMP support (b) . . 5 5 a) Isosurfaces of CO 2 density in the brine, this image highlights the structure of the 3D fingers. b) Block-structured adaptive mesh refinement in carbon sequestration calculation. Finest grids are concentrated near edges of the fingers, while coarse grids are used in the fluid,

  1. Removable feedwater sparger assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, R.C.

    1994-10-04

    A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

  2. Flexible interconnects for fuel cell stacks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lenz, David J.; Chung, Brandon W.; Pham, Ai Quoc

    2004-11-09

    An interconnect that facilitates electrical connection and mechanical support with minimal mechanical stress for fuel cell stacks. The interconnects are flexible and provide mechanically robust fuel cell stacks with higher stack performance at lower cost. The flexible interconnects replace the prior rigid rib interconnects with flexible "fingers" or contact pads which will accommodate the imperfect flatness of the ceramic fuel cells. Also, the mechanical stress of stacked fuel cells will be smaller due to the flexibility of the fingers. The interconnects can be one-sided or double-sided.

  3. Quantum chaos in the mixmaster universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, B.K.

    1989-04-15

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the vacuum Bianchi type-IX (mixmaster) cosmology yields a significant correlation between large universe volume and high anisotropy. An analog of the model's chaotic classical behavior is seen in the break up of the universe wave function at large volume into fingers in the corners of the minisuperspace anisotropy potential.

  4. Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) FY 1998 Progress Report Environment, Safety, and Health (ESH) Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry G. Hoffman; Kenneth Alvar; Thomas Buhl; Bruce Erdal; Philip Fresquez; Elizabeth Foltyn; Wayne Hansen; Bruce Reinert

    1999-06-01

    This progress report presents the results of 10 projects funded ($504K) in FY98 by the Technology Development, Evaluation, and Application (TDEA) Committee of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Nine projects are new for this year; two projects were completed in their third and final TDEA-funded year. As a result of their TDEA-funded projects, investigators have published 19 papers in professional journals, proceedings, or Los Alamos reports and presented their work at professional meetings. Supplemental funds and in-kind contributions, such as staff time, instrument use, and work space were also provided to the TDEA-funded projects by organizations external to ESH Division. Products generated from the projects funded in FY98 included a new extremity dosimeter that replaced the previously used finger-ring dosimeters, a light and easy-to-use detector to measure energy deposited by neutron interactions, and a device that will allow workers to determine the severity of a hazard.

  5. Radio frequency focused interdigital linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Donald A.; Starling, W. Joel

    2006-08-29

    An interdigital (Wideroe) linear accelerator employing drift tubes, and associated support stems that couple to both the longitudinal and support stem electromagnetic fields of the linac, creating rf quadrupole fields along the axis of the linac to provide transverse focusing for the particle beam. Each drift tube comprises two separate electrodes operating at different electrical potentials as determined by cavity rf fields. Each electrode supports two fingers, pointing towards the opposite end of the drift tube, forming a four-finger geometry that produces an rf quadrupole field distribution along its axis. The fundamental periodicity of the structure is equal to one half of the particle wavelength .beta..lamda., where .beta. is the particle velocity in units of the velocity of light and .lamda. is the free space wavelength of the rf. Particles are accelerated in the gaps between drift tubes. The particle beam is focused in regions inside the drift tubes.

  6. Passive tire pressure sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant (Los Lunas, NM); Williams, Robert Leslie (Albuquerque, NM); Waldschmidt, Robert Lee (Calgary, CA); Morgan, Catherine Hook (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2007-09-04

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

  7. Passive tire pressure sensor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent Bryant; Williams, Robert Leslie; Waldschmidt, Robert Lee; Morgan, Catherine Hook

    2006-08-29

    A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

  8. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, William T. (3927 Almon Dr., Martinez, GA 30907)

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

  9. Vacuum tool manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zollinger, W.T.

    1993-11-23

    Apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprises a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm. 6 figures.

  10. User interface for a tele-operated robotic hand system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Anthony L

    2015-03-24

    Disclosed here is a user interface for a robotic hand. The user interface anchors a user's palm in a relatively stationary position and determines various angles of interest necessary for a user's finger to achieve a specific fingertip location. The user interface additionally conducts a calibration procedure to determine the user's applicable physiological dimensions. The user interface uses the applicable physiological dimensions and the specific fingertip location, and treats the user's finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage in order to determine the angles of interest. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector which closely mimics the range of motion and proportions of a human hand. The user interface requires minimal contact with the operator and provides distinct advantages in terms of available dexterity, work space flexibility, and adaptability to different users.

  11. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  12. Radiation Levels in Real Time?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Levels in Real Time? There's an App for That! Gamma radiation levels in the southern Nevada area will soon be accessible around the world at the touch of a finger. Makers of the cell phone application EcoData: Radiation are expanding their global network of radiation monitoring stations to include up-to-date readings from the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) based out of southern Nevada. The CEMP was established in 1981 to monitor manmade and natural radiation levels surrounding

  13. Preliminary Differences Between CPOL and CRM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    differences between TWP-ICE data from the CPOL radar and the CRM: Should we point fingers at convective intensity, microphysics, or both? Adam Varble 1 , Ed Zipser 1 , and Ann Fridland 2 1 University of Utah 2 NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Outline * CRM vs. CPOL - Constant altitude radar reflectivity histograms * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example - Horizontal and vertical radar reflectivity cross sections * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example *

  14. NREL: Workforce Development and Education Programs - Becoming a Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Undergraduate Laboratory Intern Becoming a Science Undergraduate Laboratory Intern Photo of a male and female in lab coats and blue gloves holding a solar cell between their fingers. Sky Jackson, left, and Whitney Wenger compare solar cells. At NREL, the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program participants are selected from hundreds of applicants throughout the country. Before applying, applicants are encouraged to understand each aspect of the process. Eligibility

  15. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 24, 2008-A Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observatory fingers cosmic ray 'hot spots' November 24, 2008 Milagro Observatory unveils something never before seen from Earth LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 24, 2008-A Los Alamos National Laboratory cosmic-ray observatory has seen for the first time two distinct hot spots that appear to be bombarding Earth with an excess of cosmic rays. The research calls into question nearly a century of understanding about galactic magnetic fields near our solar system. Joining an international team of

  16. Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Security, LLC_VOL AD&D BHS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beneficiary (please see below) a death benefit if you die due to a covered accident while you are insured. It also pays you a benefit for certain accidental losses. Once a group policy is issued to your employer, a certificate of Insurance will be available to explain your coverage in detail. * Death benefits are paid in addition to any life Insurance benefits. * Voluntary Accidental Death & Dismemberment Insurance pays benefits for accidental loss of limbs, thumb and index finger, speech,

  17. Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Security, LLC_VOL AD&D BHS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beneficiary (please see below) a death benefit if you die due to a covered accident while you are insured. It also pays you a benefit for certain accidental losses. Once a group policy is issued to your employer, a certificate of Insurance will be available to explain your coverage in detail. x Death benefits are paid in addition to any life Insurance benefits. x Voluntary Accidental Death & Dismemberment Insurance pays benefits for accidental loss of limbs, thumb and index finger, speech,

  18. USER INTERFACE FOR A TELE-OPERATED ROBOTIC HAND SYSTEM

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2015-04-27

    A user interface for the teleoperation of a robotic hand. The user interface conducts a calibration procedure to determine a user’s applicable physiological dimensions and applies the physiological dimensions and a specific fingertip location to treat the user’s finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage, in order to determine angles of interest through reverse kinematics. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector...

  19. New Breathalyzer Offers Hope of Pain-Free Diabetes Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Researchers at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have teamed up with their Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) colleagues to develop a new hybrid nanostructure that could make it easier to monitor blood sugar. When used as a sensing tool in a breath analyzer, the new material could offer a way for millions of diabetics to avoid the pain and hassle of finger sticks.

  20. Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair June 23, 2011 - 4:15pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs I recently read about a study on fidgeting or as researchers refer to it-incidental physical activity. The study shows that the small collection of movements we often find inconsequential-like drumming your fingers, tapping your foot, or running after the

  1. Mr. Jeff Dolven President and Chief Executive Officer Skookum Contract Services

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2, 2015 Mr. Jeff Dolven President and Chief Executive Officer Skookum Contract Services P.O. Box 5359 Bremerton, Washington 98312 WEL-2015-03 Dear Mr. Dolven: The Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement conducted an investigation into the partial finger amputation sustained by a Skookum Contract Services (Skookum) worker on December 4, 2014, during transformer demolition at the Office of Secure Transportation's Vehicle Maintenance Facility (VMF) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Based on

  2. Self-cleaning feed distributing delivery device for glass melters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mensink, Daniel L. (155 Gatewood Dr., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01

    A self cleaning, plug resistant, adjustable parameter feed distributing and delivery apparatus for a glass melter comprising a housing with a passage therethrough for a glass slurry, a cold finger within the passage for creating a dispersion pattern of the slurry, a movable slotted tube for controlling the confluence of air propellant and slurry in the passage, and a plurality of ribs that extend through the slots in the slotted tube to urge the slurry forward if it becomes stuck or resists forward movement. Coolant passages in the housing and the cold finger maintain the slurry temperature below that of the melter plenum. The cold finger is axially movable to adjust the dispersion pattern to the desired consistency. Other design features of size can be applied for use in situations requiring different parameters of pattern, particle size, rate, and feed consistencies. The device utilizes air as both a propellant and a surface cleansing mechanism. Other fluids may be used as propellants where process compatibility requires.

  3. Direct detector for terahertz radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Shaner, Eric A. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2008-09-02

    A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

  4. Transitions from near-surface to interior redox upon lithiation in conversion electrode materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Kai; Xin, Huolin L.; Zhao, Kejie; Yu, Xiqian; Norlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Li, Jing; Jiang, Yi; Cadigan, Christopher A.; Richards, Ryan M.; Doeff, Marca M.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Stach, Eric A.; Li, Ju; Lin, Feng; Su, Dong

    2015-01-29

    Nanoparticle electrodes in lithium-ion batteries have both near-surface and interior contributions to their redox capacity, each with distinct rate capabilities. Using combined electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray methods and ab initio calculations, we have investigated the lithiation pathways that occur in NiO electrodes. We find that the near-surface electroactive (Ni??Ni?) sites saturated very quickly, and then encounter unexpected difficulty in propagating the phase transition into the electrode (referred to as a shrinking-core mode). However, the interior capacity for Ni??Ni? can be accessed efficiently following the nucleation of lithiation fingers which propagate into the sample bulk, but only after a certain incubation time. Our microstructural observations of the transition from a slow shrinking-core mode to a faster lithiation finger mode corroborate with synchrotron characterization of large-format batteries, and can be rationalized by stress effects on transport at high-rate discharge. The finite incubation time of the lithiation fingers sets the intrinsic limitation for the rate capability (and thus the power) of NiO for electrochemical energy storage devices. The present work unravels the link between the nanoscale reaction pathways and the C-rate-dependent capacity loss, and provides guidance for the further design of battery materials that favors high C-rate charging.

  5. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  6. Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P.; Simon, Jonathon N.; McConaghy, Charles F.

    2001-01-01

    A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

  7. VALIDATION OF HANFORD PERSONNEL AND EXTREMITY DOSIMETERS IN PLUTONIUM ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherpelz, Robert I.; Fix, John J.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2000-02-10

    A study was performed in the Plutonium Finishing Plant to assess the performance of Hanford personnel neutron dosimetry. The study was assessed whole body dosimetry and extremity dosimetry performance. For both parts of the study, the TEPC was used as the principle instrument for characterizing workplace neutron fields. In the whole body study, 12.7-cm-diameter TEPCs were used in ten different locations in the facility. TLD and TED personnel dosimeters were exposed on a water-filled phantom to enable a comparison of TEPC and dosimeter response. In the extremity study, 1.27-cm-diameter TEPCs were exposed inside the fingers of a gloveboxe glove. Extremity dosimeters were wrapped around the TEPCs. The glove was then exposed to six different cans of plutonium, simulating the exposure that a worker's fingers would receive in a glovebox. The comparison of TEPC-measured neutron dose equivalent to TLD-measured gamma dose equivalent provided neutron-to-gamma ratios that can be used to estimate the neutron dose equivalent received by a worker's finger based on the gamma readings of an extremity dosimeter. The study also utilized a Snoopy and detectors based on bubble technology for assessing neutron exposures, providing a comparison of the effectiveness of these instruments for workplace monitoring. The study concludes that the TLD component of the HCND performs adequately overall, with a positive bias of 30%, but exhibits excessive variability in individual results due to instabilities in the algorithm. The TED response was less variable but only 20% of the TEPC reference dose on average because of the low neutron energies involved. The neutron response of the HSD was more variable than the TLD component of the HCND and biased high by a factor of 8 overall due to its calibration to unmoderated 252Cf. The study recommends further work to correct instabilities in the HCND algorithm and to explore the potential shown by the bubble-based dosimeters.

  8. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ? 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  9. Pore-scale simulation of liquid CO2 displacement of water using a two-phase lattice Boltzmann model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Haihu; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.; Kang, Oinjun; Oostrom, Martinus

    2014-11-01

    A lattice Boltzmann color-fluid model, which was recently proposed by Liu et al. [H. Liu, A.J. Valocchi, and Q. Kang. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for immiscible two-phase flow simulations. Phys. Rev. E, 85:046309, 2012.] based on a concept of continuum surface force, is improved to simulate immiscible two-phase flows in porous media. The new improvements allow the model to account for different kinematic viscosities of both fluids and to model fluid-solid interactions. The capability and accuracy of this model is first validated by two benchmark tests: a layered two-phase flow with a viscosity ratio, and a dynamic capillary intrusion. This model is then used to simulate liquid CO2 (LCO2) displacing water in a dual-permeability pore network. The extent and behavior of LCO2 preferential flow (i.e., fingering) is found to depend on the capillary number (Ca), and three different displacement patterns observed in previous micromodel experiments are reproduced. The predicted variation of LCO2 saturation with Ca, as well as variation of specific interfacial length with LCO2 saturation, are both in good agreement with the experimental observations. To understand the effect of heterogeneity on pore-scale displacement, we also simulate LCO2 displacing water in a randomly heterogeneous pore network, which has the same size and porosity as the dual-permeability pore network. In comparison to the dual-permeability case, the transition from capillary fingering to viscous fingering occurs at a higher Ca, and LCO2 saturation is higher at low Ca but lower at high Ca. In either pore network, the LCO2-water specific interfacial length is found to obey a power-law dependence on LCO2 saturation.

  10. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1996-04-01

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of gas injection processes are reported. The research examines how the physical mechanisms at work during a gas injection project interact to determine process performance. In particular, the authors examine: the interactions of equilibrium phase behavior and two-phase flow that determine local displacement efficiency and minimum miscibility pressure, the combined effects of viscous fingering, gravity segregation and heterogeneity that control sweep efficiency in 2- and 3-dimensional porous media, the use of streamtube/streamline methods to create very efficient simulation technique for multiphase compositional displacements, the scaling of viscous, capillary and gravity forces for heterogeneous reservoirs, and the effects of the thin films and spreading behavior on three-phase flow. The following key results are documented: rigorous procedures for determination of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) or minimum miscibility enrichment (MME) for miscibility have been developed for multicomponent systems; the complex dependence of MMP`s for nitrogen/methane floods on oil and injection gas composition observed experimentally is explained for the first time; the presence of layer-like heterogeneities strongly influences the interplay of gravity segregation and viscous fingering, as viscous fingers adapt to preferential flow paths and low permeability layers restrict vertical flow; streamtube/streamline simulation techniques are demonstrated for a variety of injection processes in 2 and 3 dimensions; quantitative scaling estimates for the transitions from capillary-dominated to gravity-dominated to viscous-dominated flows are reported; experimental results are given that demonstrate that high pressure CO{sub 2} can be used to generate low IFT gravity drainage in fractured reservoirs if fractures are suitably connected; and the effect of wetting and spreading behavior on three-phase flow is described. 209 refs.

  11. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  12. SREL Reprint #3341

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Evaluating the effect of sample type on American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) analyte values in a point-of-care blood analyser Matthew T. Hamilton1,2, John W. Finger Jr1,3, Megan E. Winzeler1, and Tracey D. Tuberville1 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 3Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA Abstract: The

  13. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  14. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham (Oakland, CA); Miros, Robert H. J. (Fairfax, CA); Brown, Malcolm P. (San Francisco, CA); Stancel, Robert (Loss Altos Hills, CA)

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  15. Method for measuring lead concentrations in blood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nogar, Nicholas S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    Method for measuring lead concentrations in blood. The present invention includes the use of resonant laser ablation to analyze .ltoreq.1 .mu.L (or equivalent mass) samples of blood for lead content. A typical finger prick, for example, yields about 10 .mu.L. Solid samples may also readily be analyzed by resonant laser ablation. The sample is placed on a lead-free, electrically conducting substrate and irradiated with a single, focused laser beam which simultaneously vaporizes, atomizes, and resonantly ionizes an analyte of interest in a sample. The ions are then sorted, collected and detected using a mass spectrometer.

  16. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  17. 2012 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Featured Articles 2012 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Three images of actuators shown in a micrograph. 12.18.12From the Labs Flexing fingers for

  18. TiO{sub 2}/PANI And MWNT/PANI Composites Thin Films For Hydrogen Gas Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Subodh; Kumar, Sumit; Agrawal, Shweta; Saxena, Arpita; Choudhary, B. L.; Mathur, Shubhra; Singh, M.; Vijay, Y. K.

    2010-12-01

    The MWNT and TiO{sub 2} doped Polyaniline (PANI) composites were synthesized by In-situ chemical oxidative polymerization method at low temperature. The MWNT/PANI and TiO{sub 2}/PANI composite thin films were prepared using spin coating method onto finger type interdigited electrodes to develop the chemiresistor type gas sensor for hydrogen gas sensing application. It was observed that the MWNT and TiO{sub 2} doped PANI composite thin films show a higher response in comparision to neat PANI. The structural and morphological properties of these composite films were characterized by X-Ray differaction (XRD) pattern and sccaning electrone microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  19. Rotating head and piston engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomm, T.J.; Messick, N.C.

    1992-07-21

    This patent describes a rotary piston combustion engine. It comprises a housing means, an engine block housing a single toroidal bore, a piston carrier ring spaced outwardly along the entire perimeter of the toroidal bore with at least one finger extending inwardly for piston attachment, a power transfer cylinder, a power output shaft, an auxiliary shaft with driven gearing means meshing with the driving gearing means, a rotating head with windows for piston passage, a trapezoidal porting means in the engine block and in the rotating head, an exhaust port means.

  20. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulman, David Edward (Cincinnati, OH); Darkins, Jr., Toby George (Loveland, OH); Stumpf, James Anthony (Columbus, IN); Schroder, Mark S. (Greenville, SC); Lipinski, John Joseph (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  1. Interconnect assembly for an electronic assembly and assembly method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerbsch, Erich William

    2003-06-10

    An interconnect assembly and method for a semiconductor device, in which the interconnect assembly can be used in lieu of wirebond connections to form an electronic assembly. The interconnect assembly includes first and second interconnect members. The first interconnect member has a first surface with a first contact and a second surface with a second contact electrically connected to the first contact, while the second interconnect member has a flexible finger contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member. The first interconnect member is adapted to be aligned and registered with a semiconductor device having a contact on a first surface thereof, so that the first contact of the first interconnect member electrically contacts the contact of the semiconductor device. Consequently, the assembly method does not require any wirebonds, but instead merely entails aligning and registering the first interconnect member with the semiconductor device so that the contacts of the first interconnect member and the semiconductor device make electrically contact, and then contacting the second contact of the first interconnect member with the flexible finger of the second interconnect member.

  2. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1983-11-07

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solidified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  3. Blade platform seal for ceramic/metal rotor assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wertz, John L.

    1982-01-01

    A combination ceramic and metal turbine rotor for use in high temperature gas turbine engines includes a metal rotor disc having a rim with a plurality of circumferentially spaced blade root retention slots therein to receive a plurality of ceramic blades, each including side platform segments thereon and a dovetail configured root slidably received in one of the slots. Adjacent ones of the platform segments including edge portions thereon closely spaced when the blades are assembled to form expansion gaps in an annular flow surface for gas passage through the blades and wherein the assembly further includes a plurality of unitary seal members on the rotor connected to its rim and each including a plurality of spaced, axially extending, flexible fingers that underlie and conform to the edge portions of the platform segments and which are operative at turbine operating temperatures and speeds to distribute loading on the platform segments as the fingers are seated against the underside of the blade platforms to seal the gaps without undesirably stressing thin web ceramic sections of the platform.

  4. Transitions from near-surface to interior redox upon lithiation in conversion electrode materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Kai; Xin, Huolin L.; Zhao, Kejie; Yu, Xiqian; Norlund, Dennis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Li, Jing; Jiang, Yi; Cadigan, Christopher A.; Richards, Ryan M.; et al

    2015-01-29

    Nanoparticle electrodes in lithium-ion batteries have both near-surface and interior contributions to their redox capacity, each with distinct rate capabilities. Using combined electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray methods and ab initio calculations, we have investigated the lithiation pathways that occur in NiO electrodes. We find that the near-surface electroactive (Ni²⁺→Ni⁰) sites saturated very quickly, and then encounter unexpected difficulty in propagating the phase transition into the electrode (referred to as a “shrinking-core” mode). However, the interior capacity for Ni²⁺→Ni⁰ can be accessed efficiently following the nucleation of lithiation “fingers” which propagate into the sample bulk, but only after a certain incubationmore » time. Our microstructural observations of the transition from a slow shrinking-core mode to a faster lithiation finger mode corroborate with synchrotron characterization of large-format batteries, and can be rationalized by stress effects on transport at high-rate discharge. The finite incubation time of the lithiation fingers sets the intrinsic limitation for the rate capability (and thus the power) of NiO for electrochemical energy storage devices. The present work unravels the link between the nanoscale reaction pathways and the C-rate-dependent capacity loss, and provides guidance for the further design of battery materials that favors high C-rate charging.« less

  5. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  6. Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Albert R. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

  7. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodgers, M. Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Burg, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM); Jensen, Brian D. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Samuel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Barnes, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  8. Encephalolexianalyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Altschuler, Eric L.; Dowla, Farid U.

    1998-01-01

    The encephalolexianalyzer uses digital signal processing techniques on electroencephalograph (EEG) brain waves to determine whether or not someone is thinking about moving, e.g., tapping their fingers, or, alternatively, whether someone is actually moving, e.g., tapping their fingers, or at rest, i.e., not moving and not thinking of moving. The mu waves measured by a pair of electrodes placed over the motor cortex are signal processed to determine the power spectrum. At rest, the peak value of the power spectrum in the 8-13 Hz range is high, while when moving or thinking of moving, the peak value of the power spectrum in the 8-13 Hz range is low. This measured change in signal power spectrum is used to produce a control signal. The encephalolexianalyzer can be used to communicate either directly using Morse code, or via a cursor controlling a remote control; the encephalolexianalyzer can also be used to control other devices. The encephalolexianalyzer will be of great benefit to people with various handicaps and disabilities, and also has enormous commercial potential, as well as being an invaluable tool for studying the brain.

  9. Encephalolexianalyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Altschuler, E.L.; Dowla, F.U.

    1998-11-24

    The encephalolexianalyzer uses digital signal processing techniques on electroencephalograph (EEG) brain waves to determine whether or not someone is thinking about moving, e.g., tapping their fingers, or, alternatively, whether someone is actually moving, e.g., tapping their fingers, or at rest, i.e., not moving and not thinking of moving. The mu waves measured by a pair of electrodes placed over the motor cortex are signal processed to determine the power spectrum. At rest, the peak value of the power spectrum in the 8-13 Hz range is high, while when moving or thinking of moving, the peak value of the power spectrum in the 8-13 Hz range is low. This measured change in signal power spectrum is used to produce a control signal. The encephalolexianalyzer can be used to communicate either directly using Morse code, or via a cursor controlling a remote control; the encephalolexianalyzer can also be used to control other devices. The encephalolexianalyzer will be of great benefit to people with various handicaps and disabilities, and also has enormous commercial potential, as well as being an invaluable tool for studying the brain. 14 figs.

  10. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.

    1997-12-16

    A sensor is disclosed to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects. 16 figs.

  11. Self Aligned Cell: Scaling Up Manufacture of a Cost Effective Cell Architecture for Multicrystalline Silicon Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabor, A.; van Mierlo, F.

    2010-12-01

    Two areas of technology for fabrication of higher efficiency Si-wafer solar cells were addressed: (1) the formation of structured texturing that is an improvement over the industry-standard isotexture process for multicrystalline wafers. (2) the formation of fine line (<50 micron) metallization seed layers in a self-aligned manner where the fingers can be automatically and perfectly lined up to a selective emitter and where expensive silver screen printing paste can be mostly replaced by plating up the seed layers with silver or copper. The benefits are: a) Lower reflectivity , b) Decoupling the performance of the texture from the saw damage, thus allowing for better advances in sawing and a more robust wet process. 1366 Technologies developed 2 pilot machines for 1) deposition and patterning of low-cost resist layers to enable simultaneous Honeycomb front texturing and groove formation for multicrystalline Si wafers, and 2) fine-line dispensing of materials that are self aligned to the grooves.

  12. Thread gauge for tapered threads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, Albert L. (R.R. #2, Box 264, Pleasant Hill, MO 64080)

    1994-01-11

    The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads.

  13. Electro-mechanical heat switch for cryogenic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Marcel L. (Oakland, CA); Batteux, Jan D. (Hayward, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A heat switch includes two symmetric jaws. Each jaw is comprised of a link connected at a translatable joint to a flexible arm. Each arm rotates about a fixed pivot, and has an articulated end including a thermal contact pad connected to a heat sink. The links are joined together at a translatable main joint. To close the heat switch, a closing solenoid is actuated and forces the main joint to an over-center position. This movement rotates the arms about their pivots, respectively, forces each of them into a stressed configuration, and forces the thermal contact pads towards each other and into compressive contact with a cold finger. The closing solenoid is then deactivated. The heat switch remains closed due to a restoring force generated by the stressed configuration of each arm, until actuation of an opening solenoid returns the main joint to its starting open-switch position.

  14. RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR TYPE INSTABILITIES IN THE RECONNECTION EXHAUST JET AS A MECHANISM FOR SUPRA-ARCADE DOWNFLOWS IN THE SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, L.-J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Innes, D. E. E-mail: amitava@princeton.edu E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de

    2014-12-01

    Supra-arcade downflows (hereafter referred to as SADs) are low-emission, elongated, finger-like features observed in active region coronae above post-eruption flare arcades. Observations exhibit downward moving SADs intertwined with bright upward growing spikes. Whereas SADs are dark voids, spikes are brighter, denser structures. Although SADs have been observed for more than a decade, the mechanism of the formation of SADs remains an open issue. Using three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities develop in the downstream region of a reconnecting current sheet. The instabilities result in the formation of low-density coherent structures that resemble SADs, and high-density structures that appear to be spike-like. Comparison between the simulation results and observations suggests that Rayleigh-Taylor-type instabilities in the exhaust of reconnecting current sheets provide a plausible mechanism for observed SADs.

  15. Human body impedance for electromagnetic hazard analysis in the VLF to MF band

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanai, H.; Chatterjee, I.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1984-08-01

    A knowledge of the average electrical impedance of the human body is essential for the analysis of electromagnetic hazards in the VLF to MF band. The purpose of the measurements was to determine the average body impedance of several human subjects as a function of frequency. Measurements were carried out with the subjects standing barefoot on a ground plane and touching various metal electrodes with the hand or index finger. The measured impedance includes the electrode polarization and skin impedances, spread impedance near the electrode, body impedance, stray capacitance between the body surface and ground, and inductance due to the body and grounding strap. These components are separated and simplified equivalent circuits are presented for body impedance of humans exposed to free-space electromagnetic waves as well as in contact with large ungrounded metallic objects therein.

  16. Large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride cathode structure having predetermined emission profile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Gordon, Keith C. (Berkeley, CA); Kippenham, Dean O. (Castro Valley, CA); Purgalis, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Moussa, David (San Francisco, CA); Williams, Malcom D. (Danville, CA); Wilde, Stephen B. (Pleasant Hill, CA); West, Mark W. (Albany, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB.sub.6) cathode system (10) is disclosed. The system comprises a LaB.sub.6 cathode element (11) generally circular in shape about a central axis. The cathode element (11) has a head (21) with an upper substantially planar emission surface (23), and a lower downwardly and an intermediate body portion (26) which diminishes in cross-section from the head (21) towards the base (22) of the cathode element (11). A central rod (14) is connected to the base (22) of the cathode element (11) and extends along the central axis. Plural upstanding spring fingers (37) are urged against an outer peripheral contact surface (24) of the head end (21) to provide a mechanical and electrical connection to the cathode element (11).

  17. Large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride cathode structure having predetermined emission profile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gordon, K.C.; Kippenhan, D.O.; Purgalis, P.; Moussa, D.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.; West, M.W.

    1987-10-16

    A large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) cathode system is disclosed. The system comprises a LaB/sub 6/ cathode element generally circular in shape about a central axis. The cathode element has a head with an upper substantially planar emission surface, and a lower downwardly and an intermediate body portion which diminishes in cross-section from the head towards the base of the cathode element. A central rod is connected to the base of the cathode element and extends along the central axis. Plural upstanding spring fingers are urged against an outer peripheral contact surface of the head end to provide a mechanical and electrical connection to the cathode element. 7 figs

  18. A novel design for monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs) for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.S.; Duda, A.; Wanlass, M.W.

    1997-06-01

    The design for the fabrication of Monolithic Interconnected Modules (MIMs) for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion described in this paper utilizes a novel, interdigitated contacting scheme that increases the flexibility in the size of the component cells and hence the output current and voltage of the module. This flexibility is gained at the expense of only minimally increased grid obscuration. Because the design uses the grid fingers of the component cells as the interconnect structure, the area of the device used for this purpose becomes negligible. In this paper the authors report on the specifics of the design as well as issues related to the fabrication of the modules. Preliminary performance data for representative modules also are offered.

  19. Interactive display system having a digital micromirror imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Kaull, Lisa; Brewster, Calvin

    2006-04-11

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector cooperates with a digital imaging device, e.g. a digital micromirror imaging device, for projecting an image through the panel for display on the outlet face. The imaging device includes an array of mirrors tiltable between opposite display and divert positions. The display positions reflect an image light beam from the projector through the panel for display on the outlet face. The divert positions divert the image light beam away from the panel, and are additionally used for reflecting a probe light beam through the panel toward the outlet face. Covering a spot on the panel, e.g. with a finger, reflects the probe light beam back through the panel toward the inlet face for detection thereat and providing interactive capability.

  20. Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Gas Sensors: Modeling and Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2013-01-01

    We report finite element simulations of the effect of conductive sensing layers on the surface wave velocity of langasite substrates. The simulations include both the mechanical and electrical influences of the conducting sensing layer. We show that three-dimensional simulations are necessary because of the out-of-plane displacements of the commonly used (0, 138.5, 26.7) Euler angle. Measurements of the transducer input admittance in reflective delay-line devices yield a value for the electromechanical coupling coefficient that is in good agreement with the three-dimensional simulations on bare langasite substrate. The input admittance measurements also show evidence of excitation of an additional wave mode and excess loss due to the finger resistance. The results of these simulations and measurements will be useful in the design of surface acoustic wave gas sensors.

  1. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

  2. Thread gauge for tapered threads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, A.L.

    1994-01-11

    The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads. 13 figures.

  3. One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Brian; Ury, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

  4. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, Donald O. (Goleta, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    An optically transparent furnace (10) having a detection apparatus (29) with a pedestal (12) enclosed in an evacuated ampule (16) for growing a crystal (14) thereon. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater (20), a base heater (24) and a cold finger (26) such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material (18) to grow the crystal (14). A quartz halogen lamp (32) projects a collimated beam (30) onto the crystal (14) and a reflected beam (34) is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer (40) and the detected peak position (48) in the reflected energy spectrum (44) of the reflected beam (34) is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal (14).

  5. Membrane reactor for water detritiation: a parametric study on operating parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascarade, J.; Liger, K.; Troulay, M.; Perrais, C.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a parametric study done on a single stage finger-type packed-bed membrane reactor (PBMR) used for heavy water vapor de-deuteration. Parametric studies have been done on 3 operating parameters which are: the membrane temperature, the total feed flow rate and the feed composition through D{sub 2}O content variations. Thanks to mass spectrometer analysis of streams leaving the PBMR, speciation of deuterated species was achieved. Measurement of the amounts of each molecular component allowed the calculation of reaction quotient at the packed-bed outlet. While temperature variation mainly influences permeation efficiency, feed flow rate perturbation reveals dependence of conversion and permeation properties to contact time between catalyst and reacting mixture. The study shows that isotopic exchange reactions occurring on the catalyst particles surface are not thermodynamically balanced. Moreover, the variation of the heavy water content in the feed exhibits competition between permeation and conversion kinetics.

  6. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

  7. A strong candidate for the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miki, Y.; Swenson, J.; Yakumo, K.; Lewis, C.; Neuhausen, S.; Goldgar, D.; Shattuck-Eidens, D.; Harshman, K.; Tavtigian, S.; Liu, Q.

    1994-10-07

    A strong candidate for the 17q-linked BRCA1 gene, which influences susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer, has been identified by positional cloning methods. Probable predisposing mutations have been detected in five of eight kindreds presumed to segregate BRCA1 susceptibility alleles. The mutations include an 11-base pair deletion, a 1-base pair insertion, a stop codon, a missense substitution, and an inferred regulatory mutation. The BRCA1 gene is expressed in numerous tissues, including breast and ovary, and encodes a predicted protein of 1863 amino acids. This protein contains a zinc finger domain in its amino-terminal region, but is otherwise unrelated to previously described proteins. Identification of BRCA1 should facilitate early diagnosis of breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility in some individuals as well as a better understanding of breast cancer biology.

  8. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  9. Calculation of large scale relative permeabilities from stochastic properties of the permeability field and fluid properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenormand, R.; Thiele, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    The paper describes the method and presents preliminary results for the calculation of homogenized relative permeabilities using stochastic properties of the permeability field. In heterogeneous media, the spreading of an injected fluid is mainly sue to the permeability heterogeneity and viscosity fingering. At large scale, when the heterogeneous medium is replaced by a homogeneous one, we need to introduce a homogenized (or pseudo) relative permeability to obtain the same spreading. Generally, is derived by using fine-grid numerical simulations (Kyte and Berry). However, this operation is time consuming and cannot be performed for all the meshes of the reservoir. We propose an alternate method which uses the information given by the stochastic properties of the field without any numerical simulation. The method is based on recent developments on homogenized transport equations (the {open_quotes}MHD{close_quotes} equation, Lenormand SPE 30797). The MHD equation accounts for the three basic mechanisms of spreading of the injected fluid: (1) Dispersive spreading due to small scale randomness, characterized by a macrodispersion coefficient D. (2) Convective spreading due to large scale heterogeneities (layers) characterized by a heterogeneity factor H. (3) Viscous fingering characterized by an apparent viscosity ration M. In the paper, we first derive the parameters D and H as functions of variance and correlation length of the permeability field. The results are shown to be in good agreement with fine-grid simulations. The are then derived a function of D, H and M. The main result is that this approach lead to a time dependent . Finally, the calculated are compared to the values derived by history matching using fine-grid numerical simulations.

  10. Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): Sensitivity Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R L; Ramierz, A L; Daily, W D

    2001-02-28

    If geologic formations are used to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), monitoring the CO{sub 2} injection will be required to confirm the performance of the reservoir system, assess leaks and flow paths, and understand the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO{sub 2} and the geologic minerals and fluids. Electrical methods are well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are sensitive to the presence and nature of the formation fluids. High resolution tomographs of electrical properties are now possible using it 3D technique called electrical resistance tomography (ERT). Surveys are commonly conducted utilizing vertical arrays of point electrodes in a cross-well configuration. Recent field results obtained using steel well casings as electrodes are promising. When 3D ERT imaging can be performed using existing well casings as long electrodes, the need for additional drilling of observation wells is minimized. Using a model patterned after an oil field undergoing CO{sub 2} flood, forward and inverse simulations of ERT surveys have been run to test the sensitivity of the method to changes resulting from CO{sub 2} migration. Factors considered include resistivity contrast, anomaly proximity to electrodes, anomaly size and shape, measurement noise, and the electrode configuration used to perform the measurements. Field data suggest that CO{sub 2} migration changes the resistivity of a layer, producing an anomalous region. In our numerical study, the anomalous region s resistivity ranges from 0.2 to 10 times that of the initial value. Its geometry ranges from a thin, horizontal finger to a planar, horizontal mass having vertical protrusions simulating leakage of CO{sub 2} through caprock. Results of simulations run assuming that well casings are used as long electrodes or with arrays of point electrodes (simulating high resolution surveys) show useful information for even the narrowest simulated CO{sub 2} fingers.

  11. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of ?capillary fracturing? as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first singlephase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phase dia

  12. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 1 of 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of ?capillary fracturing? as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first single-phase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phase di

  13. A human factors approach towards the design of a new glovebox glove for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Jude M.

    2012-08-06

    Present day glovebox gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are underdeveloped and ergonomically inaccurate. This problem results in numerous sprain and strain injuries every year for employees who perform glovebox work. In addition to injuries, using the current glovebox glove design also contributes to breaches and contamination. The current glove used today at LANL has several problems: (1) The length of the fingers is incorrect, (2) the web spacing between the fingers is nonexistent, (3) the angles between each digit on the finger are incorrect, (4) the thumb is placed inaccurately, and (5) the length of the hand is incorrect. These problems present a need to correct the current glove design to decrease the risk of injuries, breaches, and contamination. Anthropometrics were researched to help find the best range of hand measurements to fix the current glove design. Anthropometrics is the measure of the human physical variation. Anthropometrics for this study were gathered from the American National Survey (ANSUR) data that was conducted by the U.S Army in 1988. The current glovebox glove uses anthropometrics from the 95th to 105th percentile range which is too large so the new gloves are going to implement data from a smaller range of percentile groups. The 105th percentile range represents measurements that exceed the human population but are needed to fit certain circumstance such as wearing several under gloves within the glovebox gloves. Anthropometrics used in this study include: 105th percentile measurements for joint circumference which was unchanged because the room for under gloves plus ease of hand insertion and extraction is needed, 80th percentile measurements for crotch length to allow workers to reach the web spacing in the glove, 20th percentile measurements for finger length to allow workers to reach the end of the glove, standard 10.5cm hand breadth to allow more room to accommodate under gloves, 45 degrees abduction angle for the thumb for better positioning, 45 degrees extension angle for the thumb for better positioning, and various angles for the other fingers to allow a more relaxed and natural fit. 3D modeling was used to implement the anthropometric data listed above onto an existing scanned solid model of a human hand. SolidWorks 2010 3-D modeling package was utilized to manipulate the hand model to represent the anthropometric data researched. The anthropometrics and modifications were reviewed by the University of New Mexico Department of Orthopedics hand surgeons. After all modifications and reviews were completed the model was printed out using stereolithography. The printed out model of the hand was used as a mold to create a prototype glovebox glove. The new mold was taken to Piercan USA to produce a 20mil Polyurethane/Hypalon glovebox glove. The Minnesota Dexterity test and Purdue Pegboard test were used to measure the dexterity of the prototype glovebox glove against a current 15 mil Hypalon LANL glovebox glove. Using the data from the tests a student t test was used to determine if there was a significant difference between the current hypalon glove results and the new prototype glove results. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly lower mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Minnesota Dexterity test. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly higher mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Purdue Pegboard test. A p value method was also performed to confirm the results of the student t test. A survey was also given to glovebox workers to determine if they preferred the new design. The best reaction from glovebox workers was the new thumb position, 73.2% of the sample population agreed with the new thumb position. Developing a new glovebox glove will improve the ergonomics of the hand for work performed, decrease exposure time, decreasing risk of breaching, increasing productivity, reducing injuries, and improving work performance. In the future the new glovebox

  14. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed {sup 252}Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the U.S. government and to universities for educational, research, and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of {sup 252}Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments, and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations.

  15. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366) FY2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; McCurdy, Greg; Campbell, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site (CAU 370) suggest that radionuclide-contaminated soils may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radionuclide-contaminated soils may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). In Area 11, several low-level airborne surveys of the Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites (CAU 366) show plumes of Americium 241 (Am-241) extending along ephemeral channels (Figure 1, marker numbers 5 and 6) below Corrective Action Site (CAS) 11-23-03 (marker number 3) and CAS 11 23-04 (marker number 4) (Colton, 1999). Plutonium Valley in Area 11 of the NNSS was selected for the study because of the aerial survey evidence suggesting downstream transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil. The aerial survey (Figure 1) shows a well defined finger of elevated radioactivity (marker number 5) extending to the southwest from the southernmost detonation site (marker number 4). This finger of contamination overlies a drainage channel mapped on the topographic base map used for presentation of the survey data suggesting surface runoff as a likely cause of the contaminated area. Additionally, instrumenting sites strongly suspected of conveying soil from areas of surface contamination offers the most efficient means to confirm that surface runoff may transport radioactive contamination as a result of ambient precipitation/runoff events. Closure plans being developed for the CAUs on the NNSS may include post-closure monitoring for possible release of radioactive contaminants. Determining the potential for transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils under ambient meteorological conditions will facilitate an appropriate closure design and post-closure monitoring program.

  16. Strain-guided mineralization in the bone–PDL–cementum complex of a rat periodontium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grandfield, Kathryn; Herber, Ralf -Peter; Chen, Ling; Djomehri, Sabra; Tam, Caleb; Lee, Ji -Hyun; Brown, Evan; Woolwine III, Wood R.; Curtis, Don; Ryder, Mark; Schuck, Jim; Webb, Samuel; Landis, William; Ho, Sunita P.

    2015-04-18

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mechanical strain by mapping physicochemical properties at periodontal ligament (PDL)–bone and PDL–cementum attachment sites and within the tissues per se. Design: Accentuated mechanical strain was induced by applying a unidirectional force of 0.06 N for 14 days on molars in a rat model. The associated changes in functional space between the tooth and bone, mineral forming and resorbing events at the PDL–bone and PDL–cementum attachment sites were identified by using micro-X-ray computed tomography (micro-XCT), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic histomorphometry, Raman microspectroscopy, and AFM-based nanoindentation technique. Results from these analytical techniques were correlated with histochemical strains specific to low and high molecular weight GAGs, including biglycan, and osteoclast distribution through tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Results: Unique chemical and mechanical qualities including heterogeneous bony fingers with hygroscopic Sharpey's fibers contributing to a higher organic (amide III — 1240 cm⁻¹) to inorganic (phosphate — 960 cm⁻¹) ratio, with lower average elastic modulus of 8 GPa versus 12 GPa in unadapted regions were identified. Furthermore, an increased presence of elemental Zn in cement lines and mineralizing fronts of PDL–bone was observed. Adapted regions containing bony fingers exhibited woven bone-like architecture and these regions rich in biglycan (BGN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) also contained high-molecular weight polysaccharides predominantly at the site of polarized bone growth. Conclusions: From a fundamental science perspective the shift in local properties due to strain amplification at the soft–hard tissue attachment sites is governed by semiautonomous cellular events at the PDL–bone and PDL–cementum sites. Over time, these strain-mediated events can alter the physicochemical properties of tissues per se, and consequently the overall biomechanics of the bone–PDL–tooth complex. From a clinical perspective, the shifts in magnitude and duration of forces on the periodontal ligament can prompt a shift in physiologic mineral apposition in cementum and alveolar bone albeit of an adapted quality owing to the rapid mechanical translation of the tooth.

  17. Automated Sorting of Transuranic Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2001-03-01

    The HANDSS-55 Transuranic Waste Sorting Module is designed to sort out items found in 55-gallon drums of waste as determined by an operator. Innovative imaging techniques coupled with fast linear motor-based motion systems and a flexible end-effector system allow the operator to remove items from the waste stream by a touch of the finger. When all desired items are removed from the waste stream, the remaining objects are automatically moved to a repackaging port for removal from the glovebox/cell. The Transuranic Waste Sorting Module consists of 1) a high accuracy XYZ Stereo Measurement and Imaging system, 2) a vibrating/tilting sorting table, 3) an XY Deployment System, 4) a ZR Deployment System, 5) several user-selectable end-effectors, 6) a waste bag opening system, 7) control and instrumentation, 8) a noncompliant waste load-out area, and 9) a Human/Machine Interface (HMI). The system is modular in design to accommodate database management tools, additional load-out ports, and other enhancements. Manually sorting the contents of a 55-gallon drum takes about one day per drum. The HANDSS-55 Waste Sorting Module is designed to significantly increase the throughput of this sorting process by automating those functions that are strenuous and tiresome for an operator to perform. The Waste Sorting Module uses the inherent ability of an operator to identify the items that need to be segregated from the waste stream and then, under computer control, picks that item out of the waste and deposits it in the appropriate location. The operator identifies the object by locating the visual image on a large color display and touches the image on the display with his finger. The computer then determines the location of the object, and performing a highspeed image analysis determines its size and orientation, so that a robotic gripper can be deployed to pick it up. Following operator verification by voice or function key, the object is deposited into a specified location.

  18. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flowmore » perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the armor joint.« less

  19. Strain-guided mineralization in the bone–PDL–cementum complex of a rat periodontium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grandfield, Kathryn; Herber, Ralf -Peter; Chen, Ling; Djomehri, Sabra; Tam, Caleb; Lee, Ji -Hyun; Brown, Evan; Woolwine III, Wood R.; Curtis, Don; Ryder, Mark; et al

    2015-04-18

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mechanical strain by mapping physicochemical properties at periodontal ligament (PDL)–bone and PDL–cementum attachment sites and within the tissues per se. Design: Accentuated mechanical strain was induced by applying a unidirectional force of 0.06 N for 14 days on molars in a rat model. The associated changes in functional space between the tooth and bone, mineral forming and resorbing events at the PDL–bone and PDL–cementum attachment sites were identified by using micro-X-ray computed tomography (micro-XCT), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic histomorphometry, Raman microspectroscopy, and AFM-based nanoindentation technique. Results frommore » these analytical techniques were correlated with histochemical strains specific to low and high molecular weight GAGs, including biglycan, and osteoclast distribution through tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Results: Unique chemical and mechanical qualities including heterogeneous bony fingers with hygroscopic Sharpey's fibers contributing to a higher organic (amide III — 1240 cm⁻¹) to inorganic (phosphate — 960 cm⁻¹) ratio, with lower average elastic modulus of 8 GPa versus 12 GPa in unadapted regions were identified. Furthermore, an increased presence of elemental Zn in cement lines and mineralizing fronts of PDL–bone was observed. Adapted regions containing bony fingers exhibited woven bone-like architecture and these regions rich in biglycan (BGN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) also contained high-molecular weight polysaccharides predominantly at the site of polarized bone growth. Conclusions: From a fundamental science perspective the shift in local properties due to strain amplification at the soft–hard tissue attachment sites is governed by semiautonomous cellular events at the PDL–bone and PDL–cementum sites. Over time, these strain-mediated events can alter the physicochemical properties of tissues per se, and consequently the overall biomechanics of the bone–PDL–tooth complex. From a clinical perspective, the shifts in magnitude and duration of forces on the periodontal ligament can prompt a shift in physiologic mineral apposition in cementum and alveolar bone albeit of an adapted quality owing to the rapid mechanical translation of the tooth.« less

  20. Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, Don F. (Albuquerque, NM); St. Clair, Jack A. (Albuquerque, NM); Togami, Henry K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1983-01-01

    A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

  1. Self-organized iron-oxide cementation geometry as an indicator of paleo-flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yifeng; Chan, Marjorie A.; Merino, Enrique

    2015-06-30

    Widespread iron oxide precipitation from groundwater in fine-grained red beds displays various patterns, including nodulation, banding and scallops and fingers. Hematite nodules have been reported also from the Meridiani Planum site on Mars and interpreted as evidence for the ancient presence of water on the red planet. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. A linear instability analysis of the reaction-transport equations suggests that a pattern transition from nodules to bands may result from a symmetry breaking of mineral dissolutionmore » and precipitation triggered by groundwater advection. Round nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands form in the presence of persistent water flows. Since water circulation is a prerequisite for a sustainable subsurface life, a Martian site with iron oxide precipitation bands, if one were found, may offer a better chance for detecting extraterrestrial biosignatures on Mars than would sites with nodules.« less

  2. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1998-12-15

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers is disclosed using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer`s position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates. 4 figs.

  3. Test-to-Failure of Crystalline Silicon Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Trudell, D.; Bosco, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2010-10-01

    Accelerated lifetime testing of five crystalline silicon module designs was carried out according to the Terrestrial Photovoltaic Module Accelerated Test-to-Failure Protocol. This protocol compares the reliability of various module constructions on a quantitative basis. The modules under test are subdivided into three accelerated lifetime testing paths: 85..deg..C/85% relative humidity with system bias, thermal cycling between ?40..deg..C and 85..deg..C, and a path that alternates between damp heat and thermal cycling. The most severe stressor is damp heat with system bias applied to simulate the voltages that modules experience when connected in an array. Positive 600 V applied to the active layer with respect to the grounded module frame accelerates corrosion of the silver grid fingers and degrades the silicon nitride antireflective coating on the cells. Dark I-V curve fitting indicates increased series resistance and saturation current around the maximum power point; however, an improvement in junction recombination characteristics is obtained. Shunt paths and cell-metallization interface failures are seen developing in the silicon cells as determined by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves in the case of negative 600 V bias applied to the active layer. Ability to withstand electrolytic corrosion, moisture ingress, and ion drift under system voltage bias are differentiated.

  4. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  5. Triggering collapse of the presolar dense cloud core and injecting short-lived radioisotopes with a shock wave. III. Rotating three-dimensional cloud cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-06-10

    A key test of the supernova triggering and injection hypothesis for the origin of the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes is to reproduce the inferred initial abundances of these isotopes. We present here the most detailed models to date of the shock wave triggering and injection process, where shock waves with varied properties strike fully three-dimensional, rotating, dense cloud cores. The models are calculated with the FLASH adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code. Three different outcomes can result: triggered collapse leading to fragmentation into a multiple protostar system; triggered collapse leading to a single protostar embedded in a protostellar disk; or failure to undergo dynamic collapse. Shock wave material is injected into the collapsing clouds through Rayleigh-Taylor fingers, resulting in initially inhomogeneous distributions in the protostars and protostellar disks. Cloud rotation about an axis aligned with the shock propagation direction does not increase the injection efficiency appreciably, as the shock parameters were chosen to be optimal for injection even in the absence of rotation. For a shock wave from a core-collapse supernova, the dilution factors for supernova material are in the range of ?10{sup 4} to ?3 10{sup 4}, in agreement with recent laboratory estimates of the required amount of dilution for {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al. We conclude that a type II supernova remains as a promising candidate for synthesizing the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes shortly before their injection into the presolar cloud core by the supernova's remnant shock wave.

  6. MEMS reliability in shock environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TANNER,DANELLE M.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; MASTERS,NATHAN

    2000-02-09

    In order to determine the susceptibility of the MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) devices to shock, tests were performed using haversine shock pulses with widths of 1 to 0.2 ms in the range from 500g to 40,000g. The authors chose a surface-micromachined microengine because it has all the components needed for evaluation: springs that flex, gears that are anchored, and clamps and spring stops to maintain alignment. The microengines, which were unpowered for the tests, performed quite well at most shock levels with a majority functioning after the impact. Debris from the die edges moved at levels greater than 4,000g causing shorts in the actuators and posing reliability concerns. The coupling agent used to prevent stiction in the MEMS release weakened the die-attach bond, which produced failures at 10,000g and above. At 20,000g the authors began to observe structural damage in some of the thin flexures and 2.5-micron diameter pin joints. The authors observed electrical failures caused by the movement of debris. Additionally, they observed a new failure mode where stationary comb fingers contact the ground plane resulting in electrical shorts. These new failure were observed in the control group indicating that they were not shock related.

  7. Structure of an aprataxin?DNA complex with insights into AOA1 neurodegenerative disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumbale, Percy; Appel, C. Denise; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Robertson, Patrick D.; Williams, Jessica S.; Krahn, Joe; Ahel, Ivan; Williams, R. Scott (NIEHS); (Manchester)

    2012-09-17

    DNA ligases finalize DNA replication and repair through DNA nick-sealing reactions that can abort to generate cytotoxic 5'-adenylation DNA damage. Aprataxin (Aptx) catalyzes direct reversal of 5'-adenylate adducts to protect genome integrity. Here the structure of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Aptx-DNA-AMP-Zn{sup 2+} complex reveals active site and DNA interaction clefts formed by fusing a histidine triad (HIT) nucleotide hydrolase with a DNA minor groove-binding C{sub 2}HE zinc finger (Znf). An Aptx helical 'wedge' interrogates the base stack for sensing DNA ends or DNA nicks. The HIT-Znf, the wedge and an '[F/Y]PK' pivot motif cooperate to distort terminal DNA base-pairing and direct 5'-adenylate into the active site pocket. Structural and mutational data support a wedge-pivot-cut HIT-Znf catalytic mechanism for 5'-adenylate adduct recognition and removal and suggest that mutations affecting protein folding, the active site pocket and the pivot motif underlie Aptx dysfunction in the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 (AOA1).

  8. Thermal conductor for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Joseph A.; Domroese, Michael K.; Lindeman, David D.; Radewald, Vern E.; Rouillard, Roger; Trice, Jennifer L.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal conductor for use with an electrochemical energy storage device is disclosed. The thermal conductor is attached to one or both of the anode and cathode contacts of an electrochemical cell. A resilient portion of the conductor varies in height or position to maintain contact between the conductor and an adjacent wall structure of a containment vessel in response to relative movement between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cell and conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cell and thermally conductive and electrically resistive material disposed between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may be fabricated to include a resilient portion having one of a substantially C-shaped, double C-shaped, Z-shaped, V-shaped, O-shaped, S-shaped, or finger-shaped cross-section. An elastomeric spring element may be configured so as to be captured by the resilient conductor for purposes of enhancing the functionality of the thermal conductor. The spring element may include a protrusion that provides electrical insulation between the spring conductor and a spring conductor of an adjacently disposed electrochemical cell in the presence of relative movement between the cells and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may also be fabricated from a sheet of electrically conductive material and affixed to the contacts of a number of electrochemical cells.

  9. NEW YOUNG STAR CANDIDATES IN CG4 AND Sa101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebull, L. M.; Laine, S.; Laher, R.; Legassie, M.; Hoette, V.; Kim, J. S.; Foster, M.; Mallory, C. R.; McCarron, K.; Sherry, W. H.

    2011-07-15

    The CG4 and Sa101 regions together cover a region of {approx}0.5 deg{sup 2} in the vicinity of a 'cometary globule' that is part of the Gum Nebula. There are seven previously identified young stars in this region; we have searched for new young stars using mid- and far-infrared data (3.6-70 {mu}m) from the Spitzer Space Telescope, combined with ground-based optical data and near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. We find infrared excesses in all six of the previously identified young stars in our maps and identify 16 more candidate young stars based on apparent infrared excesses. Most (73%) of the new young stars are Class II objects. There is a tighter grouping of young stars and young star candidates in the Sa101 region, in contrast to the CG4 region, where there are fewer young stars and young star candidates, and they are more dispersed. Few likely young objects are found in the 'fingers' of the dust being disturbed by the ionization front from the heart of the Gum Nebula.

  10. 150K - 200K miniature pulse tube cooler for micro satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassaing, Clément; Butterworth, James; Aigouy, Gérald; Daniel, Christophe; Crespin, Maurice; Duvivier, Eric

    2014-01-29

    Air Liquide is working with the CNES and Steel électronique in 2013 to design, manufacture and test a Miniature Pulse Tube Cooler (MPTC) to cool infrared detectors for micro-satellite missions. The cooler will be particularly adapted to the needs of the CNES MICROCARB mission to study atmospheric Carbon Dioxide which presents absorption lines in the thermal near infrared, at 1.6 μm and 2.0 μm. The required cooler temperature is from 150 to 200K with cooling power between 1 and 3 watts. The overall electrical power budget including electronics is less than 20W with a 288-300K rejection temperature. Particular attention is therefore paid to optimizing overall system efficiency. The active micro vibration reduction system and thermal control systems already developed for the Air Liquide Large Pulse Tube Cooler (LPTC) are currently being implemented into a new high efficiency electronic architecture. The presented work concerns the new cold finger and electronic design. The cooler uses the compressor already developed for the 80K Miniature Pulse Tube Cryocooler. This Pulse Tube Cooler addresses the requirements of space missions where extended continuous operating life time (>5 years), low mass and low micro vibration levels are critical.

  11. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  12. Self-organized iron-oxide cementation geometry as an indicator of paleo-flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yifeng; Chan, Marjorie A.; Merino, Enrique

    2015-06-30

    Widespread iron oxide precipitation from groundwater in fine-grained red beds displays various patterns, including nodulation, banding and scallops and fingers. Hematite nodules have been reported also from the Meridiani Planum site on Mars and interpreted as evidence for the ancient presence of water on the red planet. Here we show that such patterns can autonomously emerge from a previously unrecognized Ostwald ripening mechanism and they capture rich information regarding ancient chemical and hydrologic environments. A linear instability analysis of the reaction-transport equations suggests that a pattern transition from nodules to bands may result from a symmetry breaking of mineral dissolution and precipitation triggered by groundwater advection. Round nodules tend to develop under nearly stagnant hydrologic conditions, while repetitive bands form in the presence of persistent water flows. Since water circulation is a prerequisite for a sustainable subsurface life, a Martian site with iron oxide precipitation bands, if one were found, may offer a better chance for detecting extraterrestrial biosignatures on Mars than would sites with nodules.

  13. Management of Salt Waste from Electrochemical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael F. Simpson; Michael N. Patterson; Joon Lee; Yifeng Wang; Joshua Versey; Ammon Williams; Supathorn Phongikaroon; James Allensworth; Man-Sung Yim

    2013-10-01

    Electrochemical processing of used nuclear fuel involves operation of one or more cells containing molten salt electrolyte. Processing of the fuel results in contamination of the salt via accumulation of fission products and transuranic (TRU) actinides. Upon reaching contamination limits, the salt must be removed and either disposed or treated to remove the contaminants and recycled back to the process. During development of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II spent fuel treatment process, waste salt from the electrorefiner was to be stabilized in a ceramic waste form and disposed of in a high-level waste repository. With the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository, other options are now being considered. One approach that involves direct disposal of the salt in a geologic salt formation has been evaluated. While waste forms such as the ceramic provide near-term resistance to corrosion, they may not be necessary to ensure adequate performance of the repository. To improve the feasibility of direct disposal, recycling a substantial fraction of the useful salt back to the process equipment could minimize the volume of the waste. Experiments have been run in which a cold finger is used for this purpose to crystallize LiCl from LiCl/CsCl. If it is found to be unsuitable for transportation, the salt waste could also be immobilized in zeolite without conversion to the ceramic waste form.

  14. Management of salt waste from electrochemical processing of used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.F.; Patterson, M.N.; Lee, J.; Wang, Y.; Versey, J.; Phongikaroon, S.

    2013-07-01

    Electrochemical processing of used nuclear fuel involves operation of one or more cells containing molten salt electrolyte. Processing of the fuel results in contamination of the salt via accumulation of fission products and transuranic (TRU) actinides. Upon reaching contamination limits, the salt must be removed and either disposed or treated to remove the contaminants and recycled back to the process. During development of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II spent fuel treatment process, waste salt from the electro-refiner was to be stabilized in a ceramic waste form and disposed of in a high-level waste repository. With the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository, other options are now being considered. One approach that involves direct disposal of the salt in a geologic salt formation has been evaluated. While waste forms such as the ceramic provide near-term resistance to corrosion, they may not be necessary to ensure adequate performance of the repository. To improve the feasibility of direct disposal, recycling a substantial fraction of the useful salt back to the process equipment could minimize the volume of the waste. Experiments have been run in which a cold finger is used for this purpose to crystallize LiCl from LiCl/CsCl. If it is found to be unsuitable for transportation, the salt waste could also be immobilized in zeolite without conversion to the ceramic waste form. (authors)

  15. Flow and morphological conditions associated with the directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magirl, C.S.; Incropera, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    Using 27% aq. NH[sub 4]Cl solutions as transparent analog, shadowgraphy and dye injection were used to observe flow and morphology in unidirectional solidification (UDS) from below. Dendritic crystals that form at the cold surface reject lighter, solute-deficient fluid, and instability is shown by finger-type double-diffusive convection. As the mushy two-phase region grows, perturbations at the liquidus interface cause localized remelting and downward development of channels. Solsutal plumes emanate from the channels, and in time, double-diffusive convection layers also form in the melt. When the solution is chilled at the sides as well as at the bottom, conditions are influenced by detachment and settling of crystals from the sidewall and by plumes from slanted channels. When a slow, oscillatory rocking motion is imposed on UDS, the freckle-type segregates in the final cast is suppressed. Within the melt, plumes and double-diffusive convection are eliminated. Inertially induced convection mixes the melt and produces a dense slurry. Although channels are eliminated from the bottom mushy region, overall heat transfer and macrosegregation in the cavity are unaffected by the slow rocking. Numerical simulations qualitatively predict trends in the field variables and provide insights on interdendritic flows and macrosegregation (freckle-, A-type segregates), although its quantitative predictions are hampered by simplifying assumptions.

  16. Flow and morphological conditions associated with the directional solidification of aqueous ammonium chloride. Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magirl, C.S.; Incropera, F.P.

    1993-01-01

    Using 27% aq. NH{sub 4}Cl solutions as transparent analog, shadowgraphy and dye injection were used to observe flow and morphology in unidirectional solidification (UDS) from below. Dendritic crystals that form at the cold surface reject lighter, solute-deficient fluid, and instability is shown by finger-type double-diffusive convection. As the mushy two-phase region grows, perturbations at the liquidus interface cause localized remelting and downward development of channels. Solsutal plumes emanate from the channels, and in time, double-diffusive convection layers also form in the melt. When the solution is chilled at the sides as well as at the bottom, conditions are influenced by detachment and settling of crystals from the sidewall and by plumes from slanted channels. When a slow, oscillatory rocking motion is imposed on UDS, the freckle-type segregates in the final cast is suppressed. Within the melt, plumes and double-diffusive convection are eliminated. Inertially induced convection mixes the melt and produces a dense slurry. Although channels are eliminated from the bottom mushy region, overall heat transfer and macrosegregation in the cavity are unaffected by the slow rocking. Numerical simulations qualitatively predict trends in the field variables and provide insights on interdendritic flows and macrosegregation (freckle-, A-type segregates), although its quantitative predictions are hampered by simplifying assumptions.

  17. Blimp-1{delta}exon7: A naturally occurring Blimp-1 deletion mutant with auto-regulatory potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Doris; Nayak, Arnab; Schumann, Julia E.; Schimpl, Anneliese; Berberich, Ingolf Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2008-12-10

    Blimp-1 is a master regulator of terminal B cell differentiation and plays a pivotal role in various developmental processes. In addition to full length Blimp-1, a Blimp-1 mRNA lacking exon 7 (Blimp-1{delta}7) has been described to occur in murine B cells. The activity and function of the mutant mRNA-encoded protein (Blimp-1{delta}7), lacking three crucial zinc fingers necessary for DNA interaction, is completely unknown. Since isoforms of other prdm family proteins affect each other's functions, we wondered whether Blimp-1{delta}7 still plays a role in B cells, independent of direct DNA binding. In this study, we found that Blimp-1{delta}7 is preferentially expressed in naive CD19{sup +} B cells. A fraction of Blimp-1{delta}7 migrates to the nucleus, colocalizes with HDAC2 and is found at sites of repressed chromatin, although it does not bind to the Blimp-1 DNA consensus site. Unexpectedly, Blimp-1 and Blimp-1{delta}7 homodimerize as well as heterodimerize with each other. Ectopic expression of Blimp-1{delta}7 in WEHI 231 cells, a Blimp-1-negative murine lymphoma line, leads to cessation of proliferation and enhancement of apoptosis. Importantly, LPS-induced differentiation is suppressed in the presence of Blimp-1{delta}7. This is in agreement with our finding that Blimp-1{delta}7 interferes with endogenous Blimp-1 expression. Thus, our data suggest an auto-regulatory mechanism of Blimp-1 activation.

  18. Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) Furnace for Post-Irradiation Heating Tests of VHTR Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A Demkowicz; Paul Demkowicz; David V Laug

    2010-10-01

    Abstract Fuel irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination are currently in progress as part of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Fuels Development and Qualification Program. The PIE campaign will include extensive accident testing of irradiated very high temperature reactor fuel compacts to verify fission product retention characteristics at high temperatures. This work will be carried out at both the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, beginning with accident tests on irradiated fuel from the AGR-1 experiment in 2010. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested at INL to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, Eu, and I) and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

  19. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 C inlet temperature. We investigated flow perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area.

  20. Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    Particulate contamination removal from wafers using plasmas and mechanical agitation. The present invention includes the use of plasmas with mechanical agitation for removing particulate matter from the surface of a wafer. The apparatus hereof comprises a mechanical activator, at least one conducting contact pin for transferring the vibration from the activator to the wafer, clamp fingers that maintain the wafer's position, and means for generating a plasma in the vicinity of the surface of the wafer, all parts of the cleaning apparatus except the mechanical activator and part of the contact pin being contained inside the processing chamber. By exposing a wafer to a plasma and providing motion thereto in a direction perpendicular to its surface, the bonding between the particulate matter and the surface may be overcome. Once free of the wafer surface, the particulates become charged by electrons from the plasma and are drawn into the plasma by attractive forces which keep them from redepositing. The introduction of a flowing gas through the plasma sweeps the particulates away from the wafer and out of the plasma. The entire surface is cleaned during one cleaning step. The use of an rf plasma to accomplish the particulate removal was found to remove more than 90% of the particulates.

  1. Evaporite Caprock Integrity. An experimental study of reactive mineralogy and pore-scale heterogeneity during brine-CO2 exposure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Megan M.; Sholokhova, Yelena; Hao, Yue; Carroll, Susan A.

    2012-07-25

    Characterization and geochemical data are presented from a core-flooding experiment on a sample from the Three Fingers evaporite unit forming the lower extent of caprock at the Weyburn-Midale reservoir, Canada. This low-permeability sample was characterized in detail using X-ray computed microtomography before and after exposure to CO 2-acidified brine, allowing mineral phase and voidspace distributions to be quantified in three dimensions. Solution chemistry indicated that CO 2-acidified brine preferentially dissolved dolomite until saturation was attained, while anhydrite remained unreactive. Dolomite dissolution contributed to increases in bulk permeability through the formation of a localized channel, guided by microfractures as well asmore » porosity and reactive phase distributions aligned with depositional bedding. An indirect effect of carbonate mineral reactivity with CO 2-acidified solution is voidspace generation through physical transport of anhydrite freed from the rock matrix following dissolution of dolomite. The development of high permeability fast pathways in this experiment highlights the role of carbonate content and potential fracture orientations in evaporite caprock formations considered for both geologic carbon sequestration and CO 2-enhanced oil recovery operations.« less

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-handling-socket attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Smith, Bob G.

    1982-01-01

    A reusable system for removably attaching the upper end 10of a nuclear reactor duct tube to the lower end 30 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly handling socket. A transition ring 20, fixed to the duct tube's upper end 10, has an interior-threaded section 22 with a first locking hole segment 24. An adaptor ring 40, fixed to the handling socket's lower end 30 has an outside-threaded section 42 with a second locking hole segment 44. The inside 22 and outside 42 threaded sections match and can be joined so that the first 24 and second 44 locking hole segments can be aligned to form a locking hole. A locking ring 50, with a locking pin 52, slides over the adaptor ring 40 so that the locking pin 52 fits in the locking hole. A swage lock 60 or a cantilever finger lock 70 is formed from the locking cup collar 26 to fit in a matching groove 54 or 56 in the locking ring 50 to prevent the locking ring's locking pin 52 from backing out of the locking hole.

  3. Periostin differentially induces proliferation, contraction and apoptosis of primary Dupuytren's disease and adjacent palmar fascia cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vi, Linda; Feng, Lucy; Zhu, Rebecca D.; Wu, Yan; Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario ; Satish, Latha; Gan, Bing Siang; Lawson Health Research Institute, London, Ontario; Department of Surgery, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario ; O'Gorman, David B.

    2009-12-10

    Dupuytren's disease, (DD), is a fibroproliferative condition of the palmar fascia in the hand, typically resulting in permanent contracture of one or more fingers. This fibromatosis is similar to scarring and other fibroses in displaying excess collagen secretion and contractile myofibroblast differentiation. In this report we expand on previous data demonstrating that POSTN mRNA, which encodes the extra-cellular matrix protein periostin, is up-regulated in Dupuytren's disease cord tissue relative to phenotypically normal palmar fascia. We demonstrate that the protein product of POSTN, periostin, is abundant in Dupuytren's disease cord tissue while little or no periostin immunoreactivity is evident in patient-matched control tissues. The relevance of periostin up-regulation in DD was assessed in primary cultures of cells derived from diseased and phenotypically unaffected palmar fascia from the same patients. These cells were grown in type-1 collagen-enriched culture conditions with or without periostin addition to more closely replicate the in vivo environment. Periostin was found to differentially regulate the apoptosis, proliferation, {alpha} smooth muscle actin expression and stressed Fibroblast Populated Collagen Lattice contraction of these cell types. We hypothesize that periostin, secreted by disease cord myofibroblasts into the extra-cellular matrix, promotes the transition of resident fibroblasts in the palmar fascia toward a myofibroblast phenotype, thereby promoting disease progression.

  4. An asymmetric jet-launching model for the protoplanetary nebula CRL 618

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velzquez, Pablo F.; Raga, Alejandro C.; Toledo-Roy, Juan C.; Riera, Angels

    2014-10-20

    We propose an asymmetrical jet-ejection mechanism in order to model the mirror symmetry observed in the lobe distribution of some protoplanetary nebulae (pPNs), such as the pPN CRL 618. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of a precessing jet launched from an orbiting source were carried out, including an alternation in the ejections of the two outflow lobes, depending on which side of the precessing accretion disk is hit by the accretion column from a Roche lobe-filling binary companion. Both synthetic optical emission maps and position-velocity diagrams were obtained from the numerical results with the purpose of carrying out a direct comparison with observations. Depending on the observer's point of view, multipolar morphologies are obtained that exhibit a mirror symmetry at large distances from the central source. The obtained lobe sizes and their spatial distributions are in good agreement with the observed morphology of the pPN CRL 618. We also obtain that the kinematic ages of the fingers are similar to those obtained in the observations.

  5. Thermal energy storage apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, P.E.

    1980-04-22

    A thermal energy storage apparatus and method employs a container formed of soda lime glass and having a smooth, defectfree inner wall. The container is filled substantially with a material that can be supercooled to a temperature greater than 5* F., such as ethylene carbonate, benzophenone, phenyl sulfoxide, di-2-pyridyl ketone, phenyl ether, diphenylmethane, ethylene trithiocarbonate, diphenyl carbonate, diphenylamine, 2benzoylpyridine, 3-benzoylpyridine, 4-benzoylpyridine, 4methylbenzophenone, 4-bromobenzophenone, phenyl salicylate, diphenylcyclopropenone, benzyl sulfoxide, 4-methoxy-4prmethylbenzophenone, n-benzoylpiperidine, 3,3pr,4,4pr,5 pentamethoxybenzophenone, 4,4'-bis-(Dimethylamino)-benzophenone, diphenylboron bromide, benzalphthalide, benzophenone oxime, azobenzene. A nucleating means such as a seed crystal, a cold finger or pointed member is movable into the supercoolable material. A heating element heats the supercoolable material above the melting temperature to store heat. The material is then allowed to cool to a supercooled temperature below the melting temperature, but above the natural, spontaneous nucleating temperature. The liquid in each container is selectively initiated into nucleation to release the heat of fusion. The heat may be transferred directly or through a heat exchange unit within the material.

  6. Nucleic acids encoding human trithorax protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Glen A.; Djabali, Malek; Selleri, Licia; Parry, Pauline

    2001-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, there is provided an isolated peptide having the characteristics of human trithorax protein (as well as DNA encoding same, antisense DNA derived therefrom and antagonists therefor). The invention peptide is characterized by having a DNA binding domain comprising multiple zinc fingers and at least 40% amino acid identity with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein and at least 70% conserved sequence with respect to the DNA binding domain of Drosophila trithorax protein, and wherein said peptide is encoded by a gene located at chromosome 11 of the human genome at q23. Also provided are methods for the treatment of subject(s) suffering from immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer by administering to said subject a therapeutically effective amount of one of the above-described agents (i.e., peptide, antagonist therefor, DNA encoding said peptide or antisense DNA derived therefrom). Also provided is a method for the diagnosis, in a subject, of immunodeficiency, developmental abnormality, inherited disease, or cancer associated with disruption of chromosome 11 at q23.

  7. A high incidence of BRCA1 mutations in 20 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serova, O.; Montagna, M.; Sylla, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 breast-ovarian cancer families, the majority of which show positive evidence of linkage to chromosome 17q12, for germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 mutations cosegregating with breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility were identified in 16 families, including 1 family with a case of male breast cancer. Nine of these mutations have not been reported previously. The majority of mutations were found to generate a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated BRCA1 protein of 2%-88% of the expected normal length. Two mutations altered the RING finger domain. Sequencing of genomic DNA led to the identification of a mutation in the coding region of BRCA1 in 12 families, and cDNA analysis revealed an abnormal or missing BRCA1 transcript in 4 of the 8 remaining families. A total of eight mutations were associated with a reduced quantity of BRCA1 transcript. We were unable to detect BRCA1 mutations in 4 of the 20 families, but only 1 of these was clearly linked to BRCA1. It is expected that the majority of clear examples of the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome will be associated with germ-line mutations in the coding region of BRCA1. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Computational Intelligence Based Data Fusion Algorithm for Dynamic sEMG and Skeletal Muscle Force Modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandrasekhar Potluri,; Madhavi Anugolu; Marco P. Schoen; D. Subbaram Naidu

    2013-08-01

    In this work, an array of three surface Electrography (sEMG) sensors are used to acquired muscle extension and contraction signals for 18 healthy test subjects. The skeletal muscle force is estimated using the acquired sEMG signals and a Non-linear Wiener Hammerstein model, relating the two signals in a dynamic fashion. The model is obtained from using System Identification (SI) algorithm. The obtained force models for each sensor are fused using a proposed fuzzy logic concept with the intent to improve the force estimation accuracy and resilience to sensor failure or misalignment. For the fuzzy logic inference system, the sEMG entropy, the relative error, and the correlation of the force signals are considered for defining the membership functions. The proposed fusion algorithm yields an average of 92.49% correlation between the actual force and the overall estimated force output. In addition, the proposed fusionbased approach is implemented on a test platform. Experiments indicate an improvement in finger/hand force estimation.

  9. Observations of supra-arcade fans: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J.; Schmit, D.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y.-M.

    2014-11-20

    Supra-arcade fans are bright, irregular regions of emission that develop during eruptive flares above flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection sites which are extremely difficult to observe directly because of their low densities. It has been suggested that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low-density jet directed toward higher-density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low- and high-density fingers along the interface. Using Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131 images, we show details of SADs seen from three different orientations with respect to the flare arcade and current sheet, and highlight features that have been previously unexplained, such as the splitting of SADs at their heads, but are a natural consequence of instabilities above the arcade. Comparison with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations suggests that SADs are the result of secondary instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type in the exhaust of reconnection jets.

  10. Process for anodizing a robotic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, William T. (Weston, MA)

    2011-11-08

    A robotic device has a base and at least one finger having at least two links that are connected in series on rotary joints with at least two degrees of freedom. A brushless motor and an associated controller are located at each joint to produce a rotational movement of a link. Wires for electrical power and communication serially connect the controllers in a distributed control network. A network operating controller coordinates the operation of the network, including power distribution. At least one, but more typically two to five, wires interconnect all the controllers through one or more joints. Motor sensors and external world sensors monitor operating parameters of the robotic hand. The electrical signal output of the sensors can be input anywhere on the distributed control network. V-grooves on the robotic hand locate objects precisely and assist in gripping. The hand is sealed, immersible and has electrical connections through the rotary joints for anodizing in a single dunk without masking. In various forms, this intelligent, self-contained, dexterous hand, or combinations of such hands, can perform a wide variety of object gripping and manipulating tasks, as well as locomotion and combinations of locomotion and gripping.

  11. Intelligent, self-contained robotic hand

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krutik, Vitaliy; Doo, Burt; Townsend, William T.; Hauptman, Traveler; Crowell, Adam; Zenowich, Brian; Lawson, John

    2007-01-30

    A robotic device has a base and at least one finger having at least two links that are connected in series on rotary joints with at least two degrees of freedom. A brushless motor and an associated controller are located at each joint to produce a rotational movement of a link. Wires for electrical power and communication serially connect the controllers in a distributed control network. A network operating controller coordinates the operation of the network, including power distribution. At least one, but more typically two to five, wires interconnect all the controllers through one or more joints. Motor sensors and external world sensors monitor operating parameters of the robotic hand. The electrical signal output of the sensors can be input anywhere on the distributed control network. V-grooves on the robotic hand locate objects precisely and assist in gripping. The hand is sealed, immersible and has electrical connections through the rotary joints for anodizing in a single dunk without masking. In various forms, this intelligent, self-contained, dexterous hand, or combinations of such hands, can perform a wide variety of object gripping and manipulating tasks, as well as locomotion and combinations of locomotion and gripping.

  12. Case report: Profound neurobehavioral deficits in an oil field worker overcome by hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilburn, K.H. )

    1993-11-01

    A 24-year-old oil well tester was rendered semiconscious by hydrogen sulfide (H2S). He received oxygen and was hospitalized but released in 30 minutes. The next day, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and incontinence of urine and stool led to rehospitalization. These problems and leg shaking, dizziness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and nightmares prevented his return to work. A physical examination, chest x-ray, and pulmonary function tests were normal 39 months after the episode but vibration sense was diminished. Two choice visual reaction times were delayed. Balance was highly abnormal (5 to 6 cm/sec) with eyes closed. Blink reflex latency was slow (R-1 17.5 msec versus normal 14.3 msec). Numbers written on finger tips were not recognized. Verbal and visual recall were impaired but overlearned memory was intact. Cognitive functions measured by Culture Fair, block design, and digit symbol were impaired. Perceptual motor was slow. Scores for confusion, tension-anxiety, depression, and fatigue were elevated and vigor was reduced. Forty-nine months after exposure his reaction time, sway speed, and color vision had not improved. His recall and his cognitive, constructional, and psychomotor speeds had improved but remained abnormal. These deficits are most likely due to H2S. Similar testing of other survivors is recommended.

  13. Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    Gas miscible displacement enhanced oil recovery research is conducted by the US Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center to advance the application of miscible carbon dioxide flooding. This research is an integral part of a multidisciplinary effort to improve the technology for producing additional oil from US resources. This report summarizes the problems of the technology and the 1986 results of the ongoing research that was conducted to solve those problems. Poor reservoir volumetric sweep efficiency is the major problem associated with gas flooding and all miscible displacements. This problem results from the channeling and viscous fingering that occur due to the large differences between viscosity or density of the displacing and displaced fluids (i.e., carbon dioxide and oil, respectively). Simple modeling and core flooding studies indicate that, because of differences in fluid viscosities, breakthrough can occur after only 30% of the total pore volume (PV) of the rock has been injected with gas, while field tests have shown breakthrough occurring much earlier. The differences in fluid densities lead to gravity segregation. The lower density carbon dioxide tends to override the residual fluids in the reservoir. This process would be considerably more efficient if a larger area of the reservoir could be contacted by the gas. Current research has focused on the mobility control, computer simulation, and reservoir heterogeneity studies. Three mobility control methods have been investigated: (1) the use of polymers for direct thickening of high-density carbon dioxide, (2) mobile ''foam-like dispersions'' of carbon dioxide and an aqueous surfactant, and (3) in situ deposition of chemical precipitates. 22 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Turbulent mixing of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid at low-Mach number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M.; Picano, F.

    2014-05-15

    Supercritical fluids near the critical point are characterized by liquid-like densities and gas-like transport properties. These features are purposely exploited in different contexts ranging from natural products extraction/fractionation to aerospace propulsion. Large part of studies concerns this last context, focusing on the dynamics of supercritical fluids at high Mach number where compressibility and thermodynamics strictly interact. Despite the widespread use also at low Mach number, the turbulent mixing properties of slightly supercritical fluids have still not investigated in detail in this regime. This topic is addressed here by dealing with Direct Numerical Simulations of a coaxial jet of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid. Since acoustic effects are irrelevant in the low Mach number conditions found in many industrial applications, the numerical model is based on a suitable low-Mach number expansion of the governing equation. According to experimental observations, the weakly supercritical regime is characterized by the formation of finger-like structures the so-called ligaments in the shear layers separating the two streams. The mechanism of ligament formation at vanishing Mach number is extracted from the simulations and a detailed statistical characterization is provided. Ligaments always form whenever a high density contrast occurs, independently of real or perfect gas behaviors. The difference between real and perfect gas conditions is found in the ligament small-scale structure. More intense density gradients and thinner interfaces characterize the near critical fluid in comparison with the smoother behavior of the perfect gas. A phenomenological interpretation is here provided on the basis of the real gas thermodynamics properties.

  15. Effects of arsenic on modification of promyelocytic leukemia (PML): PML responds to low levels of arsenite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Seishiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Yayoi

    2013-12-15

    Inorganic arsenite (iAs{sup 3+}) is a two-edged sword. iAs{sup 3+} is a well-known human carcinogen; nevertheless, it has been used as a therapeutic drug for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), which is caused by a fusion protein comprising retinoic acid receptor-? and promyelocytic leukemia (PML). PML, a nuclear transcription factor, has a RING finger domain with densely positioned cysteine residues. To examine PML-modulated cellular responses to iAs{sup 3+}, CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells were each used to establish cell lines that expressed ectopic human PML. Overexpression of PML increased susceptibility to iAs{sup 3+} in CHO-K1 cells, but not in HEK293 cells. Exposure of PML-transfected cells to iAs{sup 3+} caused PML to change from a soluble form to less soluble forms, and this modification of PML was observable even with just 0.1 ?M iAs{sup 3+} (7.5 ppb). Western blot and immunofluorescent microscopic analyses revealed that the biochemical changes of PML were caused at least in part by conjugation with small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOylation). A luciferase reporter gene was used to investigate whether modification of PML was caused by oxidative stress or activation of antioxidant response element (ARE) in CHO-K1 cells. Modification of PML protein occurred faster than activation of the ARE in response to iAs{sup 3+}, suggesting that PML was not modified as a consequence of oxidative stress-induced ARE activation. - Highlights: PML was found in nuclear microspecles in response to arsenite. Arsenite triggers SUMOylation of PML. Arsenite modifies PML at as low as 0.1 ?M. Modification of PML is not caused by ARE activation.

  16. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  17. RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY STATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalmaso, M.; Gibbs, K.; Gregory, D.

    2011-05-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed prototype equipment to demonstrate remote surveying of Inner and Outer DOE Standard 3013 containers for fixed and transferable contamination in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 and 10 CFR 835 Appendix B. When fully developed the equipment will be part of a larger suite of equipment used to package material in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 at the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project slated for installation at the Savannah River Site. The prototype system consists of a small six-axis industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a force sensor, vacuum gripper and a three fingered pneumatic gripper. The work cell also contains two alpha survey instruments, swipes, swipe dispenser, and other ancillary equipment. An external controller interfaces with the robot controller, survey instruments and other ancillary equipment to control the overall process. SRNL is developing automated equipment for the Pit Disassembly and Conversion (PDC) Project that is slated for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment being developed is automated packaging equipment for packaging plutonium bearing materials in accordance with DOE-STD-3013-2004. The subject of this paper is the development of a prototype Radiological Survey Station (RSS). Other automated equipment being developed for the PDC includes the Bagless transfer System, Outer Can Welder, Gantry Robot System (GRS) and Leak Test Station. The purpose of the RSS is to perform a frisk and swipe of the DOE Standard 3013 Container (either inner can or outer can) to check for fixed and transferable contamination. This is required to verify that the contamination levels are within the limits specified in DOE-STD-3013-2004 and 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. The surface contamination limit for the 3013 Outer Can (OC) is 500 dpm/100 cm2 (total) and 20 dpm/100 cm2 (transferable). This paper will concentrate on the RSS developments for the 3013 OC but the system for the 3013 Inner Can (IC) is nearly identical.

  18. FUEL CONSERVATION BY THE APPLICATION OF SPILL PREVENTION AND FAILSAFE ENGINEERING (A GUIDELINE MANUAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodier,, J. L.; Siclari,, R. J.; Garrity,, P. A.

    1980-10-30

    From a series of nationwide plant surveys dedicated to spill prevention, containment and countermeasure evaluation, coupled with spill response action activities, a need was determined for a spill prevention guideline manual. From Federally accumulated statistics for oil and hazardous substance spills, the authors culled information on spills of hydrocarbon products. In 1978, a total of 1456 oil spills were reported compared to 1451 in 1979. The 1978 spills were more severe, however, since 7;289,163 gallons of oil were accident~y discharged. In 1979, the gallons spilled was reduced to 3,663,473. These figures are derived from reported spills; it is highly possible that an equal amount was spilled and not reported. Spills effectively contained within a plant property that do not enter a n~vigational waterway need not be reported. Needless to say, there is a tremendous annual loss of oil products due to accidental spillage during transportation, cargo transfer, bulk storage and processing. As an aid to plant engineers and managers, Fe~eral workers, fire marshalls and fire and casualty insurance inspectors, the documen~ is offered as a spill prevention guide. The'manual defines state-of-the-art spill prevention practices and automation techniques that can reduce spills caused by human error. Whenever practical, the cost of implementation is provided to aid equipment acquisition and installation budgeting. To emphasize the need for spill prevention activities, historic spills are briefly described after which remedial action is defined in an appropriate section of the manual. The section on plant security goes into considerable depth since to date no Federal agency or traqe association has provided industry with guidelines on this important phase of plant operation. The intent of the document is to provide finger-tip reference material that can be used by interested parties in a nationwide effort to reduce loss of oil from preventable spills.

  19. RECOVERY OF THE CANDIDATE PROTOPLANET HD 100546 b WITH GEMINI/NICI AND DETECTION OF ADDITIONAL (PLANET-INDUCED?) DISK STRUCTURE AT SMALL SEPARATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, Thayne; Kudo, Tomoyuki [NAOJ, Subaru Telescope, 650N' Aohoku Pl., Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Muto, Takayuki [Division of Liberal Arts, Kogashin University, 1-24-2, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinijuku-ku, Tokyo 163-8677 (Japan); Honda, Mitsuhiko [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka 259-1293 (Japan); Brandt, Timothy D. [Astrophysics Department, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Grady, Carol [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA96002 (United States); Fukagawa, Misato [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 7 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Janson, Markus [Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kuzuhara, Masayuki [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); McElwain, Michael W. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Follette, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Hashimoto, Jun [H. L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440W. Brooks St Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Henning, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kandori, Ryo; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Morino, Jun-ichi; Nishikawa, Jun [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kwon, Jungmi; Mede, Kyle, E-mail: currie@naoj.org [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-01

    We report the first independent, second epoch (re-)detection of a directly imaged protoplanet candidate. Using L' high-contrast imaging of HD 100546 taken with the Near-Infrared Coronagraph and Imager on Gemini South, we recover ''HD 100546 b'' with a position and brightness consistent with the original Very Large Telescope/NAos-COnica detection from Quanz etal., although data obtained after 2013 will be required to decisively demonstrate common proper motion. HD 100546 b may be spatially resolved, up to ?12-13 AU in diameter, and is embedded in a finger of thermal IR-bright, polarized emission extending inward to at least 0.''3. Standard hot-start models imply a mass of ?15 M{sub J} . However, if HD 100546 b is newly formed or made visible by a circumplanetary disk, both of which are plausible, its mass is significantly lower (e.g., 1-7 M{sub J} ). Additionally, we discover a thermal IR-bright disk feature, possibly a spiral density wave, at roughly the same angular separation as HD 100546 b but 90 away. Our interpretation of this feature as a spiral arm is not decisive, but modeling analyses using spiral density wave theory implies a wave launching point exterior to ?0.''45 embedded within the visible disk structure: plausibly evidence for a second, hitherto unseen, wide-separation planet. With one confirmed protoplanet candidate and evidence for one to two others, HD 100546 is an important evolutionary precursor to intermediate-mass stars with multiple super-Jovian planets at moderate/wide separations like HR 8799.

  20. Development and application of LEESA (Low Energy Electrostatic Sensitivity Apparatus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.S. ); Wood, R.L. )

    1990-01-01

    A precision Low Energy Electrostatic Sensitivity Apparatus (LEESA) was developed in the voltage range 0--3000 volts dc and was employed over a capacitance range of 25--50,000 pF on sensitive, very sensitive, and extremely sensitive pyrotechnic fuels and compositions. Zirconium powder, Zr/KClO{sub 4} pyrotechnic, titanium powder, Ti/KClO{sub 4} and TiH{sub x}/KClO{sub 4} pyrotechnics (x = 0.65, 1.65) and several other sensitive materials were evaluated. LEESA simulates casual human contact with potentially hazardous materials. In operation, a hand-held probe is applied to the sample to discharge the capacitance. As the probe approaches the sample, a spark jumps from the probe tip to the sample when the gap closes to the appropriate distance. This is analagous to a finger or a tool touching a sensitive material during which maneuver a spark jumps to the material. LEESA defines the probability of ignition over a voltage or energy range and is capable of thousands of trials on a test material in the span of a few hours. In addition to evaluating static sensitivity, the effect of electrode polarity, individual differences between operators, test method, humidity, sample size, particle size, capacitance, time constant RC, and voltage versus energy have been determined. The equipment is inexpensive and easy to build and use and is a low risk method because of the small quantities of sensitive material being tested at any one time. The accuracy and precision of the results surpasses that of methods currently in use. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  2. Photoelectronic characterization of heterointerfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumbach, Michael Todd

    2012-02-01

    In many devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, transistors, etc., the performance relies on the electronic structure at interfaces between materials within the device. The objective of this work was to perform robust characterization of hybrid (organic/inorganic) interfaces by tailoring the interfacial region for photoelectron spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were utilized to induce dipoles of various magnitudes at the interface. Additionally, SAMs of molecules with varying dipolar characteristics were mixed into spatially organized structures to systematically vary the apparent work function. Polymer thin films were characterized by depositing films of varying thicknesses on numerous substrates with and without interfacial modifications. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed to evaluate a buried interface between indium tin oxide (ITO), treated under various conditions, and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Conducting polymer films were found to be sufficiently conducting such that no significant charge redistribution in the polymer films was observed. Consequently, a further departure from uniform substrates was taken whereby electrically disconnected regions of the substrate presented ideally insulating interfacial contacts. In order to accomplish this novel strategy, interdigitated electrodes were used as the substrate. Conducting fingers of one half of the electrodes were electrically grounded while the other set of electrodes were electronically floating. This allowed for the evaluation of substrate charging on photoelectron spectra (SCOPES) in the presence of overlying semiconducting thin films. Such an experiment has never before been reported. This concept was developed out of the previous experiments on interfacial modification and thin film depositions and presents new opportunities for understanding chemical and electronic changes in a multitude of materials and interfaces.

  3. Third millenium ideal gas and condensed phase thermochemical database for combustion (with update from active thermochemical tables).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burcat, A.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry; Technion - Israel Inst. of Tech.

    2005-07-29

    The thermochemical database of species involved in combustion processes is and has been available for free use for over 25 years. It was first published in print in 1984, approximately 8 years after it was first assembled, and contained 215 species at the time. This is the 7th printed edition and most likely will be the last one in print in the present format, which involves substantial manual labor. The database currently contains more than 1300 species, specifically organic molecules and radicals, but also inorganic species connected to combustion and air pollution. Since 1991 this database is freely available on the internet, at the Technion-IIT ftp server, and it is continuously expanded and corrected. The database is mirrored daily at an official mirror site, and at random at about a dozen unofficial mirror and 'finger' sites. The present edition contains numerous corrections and many recalculations of data of provisory type by the G3//B3LYP method, a high-accuracy composite ab initio calculation. About 300 species are newly calculated and are not yet published elsewhere. In anticipation of the full coupling, which is under development, the database started incorporating the available (as yet unpublished) values from Active Thermochemical Tables. The electronic version now also contains an XML file of the main database to allow transfer to other formats and ease finding specific information of interest. The database is used by scientists, educators, engineers and students at all levels, dealing primarily with combustion and air pollution, jet engines, rocket propulsion, fireworks, but also by researchers involved in upper atmosphere kinetics, astrophysics, abrasion metallurgy, etc. This introductory article contains explanations of the database and the means to use it, its sources, ways of calculation, and assessments of the accuracy of data.

  4. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  5. Robust Accurate Non-Invasive Analyte Monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Mark R. (1603 Solano NE., Albuquerque, NM 87110)

    1998-11-03

    An improved method and apparatus for determining noninvasively and in vivo one or more unknown values of a known characteristic, particularly the concentration of an analyte in human tissue. The method includes: (1) irradiating the tissue with infrared energy (400 nm-2400 nm) having at least several wavelengths in a given range of wavelengths so that there is differential absorption of at least some of the wavelengths by the tissue as a function of the wavelengths and the known characteristic, the differential absorption causeing intensity variations of the wavelengths incident from the tissue; (2) providing a first path through the tissue; (3) optimizing the first path for a first sub-region of the range of wavelengths to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the first sub-region; (4) providing a second path through the tissue; and (5) optimizing the second path for a second sub-region of the range, to maximize the differential absorption by at least some of the wavelengths in the second sub-region. In the preferred embodiment a third path through the tissue is provided for, which path is optimized for a third sub-region of the range. With this arrangement, spectral variations which are the result of tissue differences (e.g., melanin and temperature) can be reduced. At least one of the paths represents a partial transmission path through the tissue. This partial transmission path may pass through the nail of a finger once and, preferably, twice. Also included are apparatus for: (1) reducing the arterial pulsations within the tissue; and (2) maximizing the blood content i the tissue.

  6. Phylogenetic and comparative gene expression analysis of barley (Hordeum vulgare)WRKY transcription factor family reveals putatively retained functions betweenmonocots and dicots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangelsen, Elke; Kilian, Joachim; Berendzen, Kenneth W.; Kolukisaoglu, Uner; Harter, Klaus; Jansson, Christer; Wanke, Dierk

    2008-02-01

    WRKY proteins belong to the WRKY-GCM1 superfamily of zinc finger transcription factors that have been subject to a large plant-specific diversification. For the cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare), three different WRKY proteins have been characterized so far, as regulators in sucrose signaling, in pathogen defense, and in response to cold and drought, respectively. However, their phylogenetic relationship remained unresolved. In this study, we used the available sequence information to identify a minimum number of 45 barley WRKY transcription factor (HvWRKY) genes. According to their structural features the HvWRKY factors were classified into the previously defined polyphyletic WRKY subgroups 1 to 3. Furthermore, we could assign putative orthologs of the HvWRKY proteins in Arabidopsis and rice. While in most cases clades of orthologous proteins were formed within each group or subgroup, other clades were composed of paralogous proteins for the grasses and Arabidopsis only, which is indicative of specific gene radiation events. To gain insight into their putative functions, we examined expression profiles of WRKY genes from publicly available microarray data resources and found group specific expression patterns. While putative orthologs of the HvWRKY transcription factors have been inferred from phylogenetic sequence analysis, we performed a comparative expression analysis of WRKY genes in Arabidopsis and barley. Indeed, highly correlative expression profiles were found between some of the putative orthologs. HvWRKY genes have not only undergone radiation in monocot or dicot species, but exhibit evolutionary traits specific to grasses. HvWRKY proteins exhibited not only sequence similarities between orthologs with Arabidopsis, but also relatedness in their expression patterns. This correlative expression is indicative for a putative conserved function of related WRKY proteins in mono- and dicot species.

  7. B{gt}1 T low mass magnetic field sweep assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cadieu, F.J.; Caldwell, C.; Griffin, J.; von Molnar, S.

    1997-04-01

    When making linear or nonlinear conductivity measurements it is often desirable to apply a high magnetic field locally to a sample. If the whole magnet assembly is integral to the sample probe, then, particularly when making low temperature measurements, a low total mass is desired. We have designed, modeled, and tested a variable magnetic field sweep unit suitable for use over a wide temperature range from cryogenic to {approx}200{degree}C which provides a sweepable uniform magnetic field over an air gap of 2 mm and spatial extent of 4 mm{times}4 mm. The unit consists of a magnet yoke structure with a mass of 18 g and a spur gear driven rotatable magnet to vary the gap field in a nearly sinusoidal manner as a function of the magnet rotation angle. In the present design, a 20 g SmCo magnet has been used which allows for low temperature operation to {approx}10 K, when attached to a cryogenic refrigerator cold finger. The shape of the magnetic yoke structure has been modeled and optimized using three-dimensional magnetic field software. The gap field uniformity can thus be modeled and tested experimentally. In a present working model the field for a 2 mm gap at room temperature B({theta})=1.05{center_dot}cos({theta})(T) where {theta} is the magnet rotation angle. The field sweep amplitude at 19 K only increased by 3{percent} over the 295 K value. With 0.25-mm-thick permunder pole tips, the field amplitude in a similar unit was increased to 1.20 T over a gap of 1.5 mm. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, C. A.; Dobson, P.F.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wang, J. S. Y.; Onstott, T.C.; Scherer, G.W.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ramakrishnan, T.S.; Stabinski, E.L.; Liang, K.; Verma, S.

    2010-10-01

    LUCI, the Laboratory for Underground CO{sub 2} Investigations, is an experimental facility being planned for the DUSEL underground laboratory in South Dakota, USA. It is designed to study vertical flow of CO{sub 2} in porous media over length scales representative of leakage scenarios in geologic carbon sequestration. The plan for LUCI is a set of three vertical column pressure vessels, each of which is {approx}500 m long and {approx}1 m in diameter. The vessels will be filled with brine and sand or sedimentary rock. Each vessel will have an inner column to simulate a well for deployment of down-hole logging tools. The experiments are configured to simulate CO{sub 2} leakage by releasing CO{sub 2} into the bottoms of the columns. The scale of the LUCI facility will permit measurements to study CO{sub 2} flow over pressure and temperature variations that span supercritical to subcritical gas conditions. It will enable observation or inference of a variety of relevant processes such as buoyancy-driven flow in porous media, Joule-Thomson cooling, thermal exchange, viscous fingering, residual trapping, and CO{sub 2} dissolution. Experiments are also planned for reactive flow of CO{sub 2} and acidified brines in caprock sediments and well cements, and for CO{sub 2}-enhanced methanogenesis in organic-rich shales. A comprehensive suite of geophysical logging instruments will be deployed to monitor experimental conditions as well as provide data to quantify vertical resolution of sensor technologies. The experimental observations from LUCI will generate fundamental new understanding of the processes governing CO{sub 2} trapping and vertical migration, and will provide valuable data to calibrate and validate large-scale model simulations.

  9. Advanced process control and novel test methods for PVD silicon and elastomeric silicone coatings utilized on ion implant disks, heatsinks and selected platens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, J.; Allen, B.; Wriggins, W.; Kuzbyt, R.; Sinclair, R.

    2012-11-06

    Coatings play multiple key roles in the proper functioning of mature and current ion implanters. Batch and serial implanters require strategic control of elemental and particulate contamination which often includes scrutiny of the silicon surface coatings encountering direct beam contact. Elastomeric Silicone Coatings must accommodate wafer loading and unloading as well as direct backside contact during implant plus must maintain rigid elemental and particulate specifications. The semiconductor industry has had a significant and continuous effort to obtain ultra-pure silicon coatings with sustained process performance and long life. Low particles and reduced elemental levels for silicon coatings are a major requirement for process engineers, OEM manufacturers, and second source suppliers. Relevant data will be presented. Some emphasis and detail will be placed on the structure and characteristics of a relatively new PVD Silicon Coating process that is very dense and homogeneous. Wear rate under typical ion beam test conditions will be discussed. The PVD Silicon Coating that will be presented here is used on disk shields, wafer handling fingers/fences, exclusion zones of heat sinks, beam dumps and other beamline components. Older, legacy implanters can now provide extended process capability using this new generation PVD silicon - even on implanter systems that were shipped long before the advent of silicon coating for contamination control. Low particles and reduced elemental levels are critical performance criteria for the silicone elastomers used on disk heatsinks and serial implanter platens. Novel evaluation techniques and custom engineered tools are used to investigate the surface interaction characteristics of multiple Elastomeric Silicone Coatings currently in use by the industry - specifically, friction and perpendicular stiction. These parameters are presented as methods to investigate the critical wafer load and unload function. Unique tools and test methods have been developed that deliver accurate and repeatable data, which will be described.

  10. Chemical Methods for Ugnu Viscous Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore Mohanty

    2012-03-31

    The North Slope of Alaska has large (about 20 billion barrels) deposits of viscous oil in Ugnu, West Sak and Shraeder Bluff reservoirs. These shallow reservoirs overlie existing productive reservoirs such as Kuparuk and Milne Point. The viscosity of the Ugnu reservoir on top of Milne Point varies from 200 cp to 10,000 cp and the depth is about 3300 ft. The same reservoir extends to the west on the top of the Kuparuk River Unit and onto the Beaufort Sea. The depth of the reservoir decreases and the viscosity increases towards the west. Currently, the operators are testing cold heavy oil production with sand (CHOPS) in Ugnu, but oil recovery is expected to be low (< 10%). Improved oil recovery techniques must be developed for these reservoirs. The proximity to the permafrost is an issue for thermal methods; thus nonthermal methods must be considered. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methods for the Ugnu reservoir on the top of Milne Point. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) formulation was developed for a viscous oil (330 cp) where as an alkaline-surfactant formulation was developed for a heavy oil (10,000 cp). These formulations were tested in one-dimensional and quarter five-spot Ugnu sand packs. Micromodel studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms of high viscosity ratio displacements. Laboratory displacements were modeled and transport parameters (such as relative permeability) were determined that can be used in reservoir simulations. Ugnu oil is suitable for chemical flooding because it is biodegraded and contains some organic acids. The acids react with injected alkali to produce soap. This soap helps in lowering interfacial tension between water and oil which in turn helps in the formation of macro and micro emulsions. A lower amount of synthetic surfactant is needed because of the presence of organic acids in the oil. Tertiary ASP flooding is very effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. This chemical formulation includes 1.5% of an alkali, 0.4% of a nonionic surfactant, and 0.48% of a polymer. The secondary waterflood in a 1D sand pack had a cumulative recovery of 0.61 PV in about 3 PV injection. The residual oil saturation to waterflood was 0.26. Injection of tertiary alkaline-surfactant-polymer slug followed by tapered polymer slugs could recover almost 100% of the remaining oil. The tertiary alkali-surfactant-polymer flood of the 330 cp oil is stable in three-dimensions; it was verified by a flood in a transparent 5-spot model. A secondary polymer flood is also effective for the 330 cp viscous oil in 1D sand pack. The secondary polymer flood recovered about 0.78 PV of oil in about 1 PV injection. The remaining oil saturation was 0.09. The pressure drops were reasonable (<2 psi/ft) and depended mainly on the viscosity of the polymer slug injected. For the heavy crude oil (of viscosity 10,000 cp), low viscosity (10-100 cp) oil-in-water emulsions can be obtained at salinity up to 20,000 ppm by using a hydrophilic surfactant along with an alkali at a high water-to-oil ratio of 9:1. Very dilute surfactant concentrations (~0.1 wt%) of the synthetic surfactant are required to generate the emulsions. It is much easier to flow the low viscosity emulsion than the original oil of viscosity 10,000 cp. Decreasing the WOR reverses the type of emulsion to water-in-oil type. For a low salinity of 0 ppm NaCl, the emulsion remained O/W even when the WOR was decreased. Hence a low salinity injection water is preferred if an oil-in-water emulsion is to be formed. Secondary waterflood of the 10,000 cp heavy oil followed by tertiary injection of alkaline-surfactants is very effective. Waterflood has early water breakthrough, but recovers a substantial amount of oil beyond breakthrough. Waterflood recovers 20-37% PV of the oil in 1D sand pack in about 3 PV injection. Tertiary alkali-surfactant injection increases the heavy oil recovery to 50-70% PV in 1D sand packs. As the salinity increased, the oil recovery due to alkaline surfactant flood increased, but water-in-oil emulsion was produced and pressure drop increased. With low salinity (deionized) water, the oil recovery was lower, but so was the pressure drop because only oil-in-water emulsion was produced. Secondary waterflood of the 10,000 cp heavy oil in 5-spot sand packs recovers 30-35% OOIP of the oil in about 2.5 PV injection. Tertiary injection of the alkaline-surfactant solution increases the cumulative oil recovery from 51 to 57% OOIP in 5-spot sand packs. As water displaces the heavy oil, it fingers through the oil with a fractal structure (fractal dimension = 1.6), as seen in the micromodel experiments. Alkaline-surfactant solution emulsifies the oil around the brine fingers and flows them to the production well. A fractional flow model incorporating the effect of viscous fingering was able to match the laboaratory experiments and can be used in reservoir simulators. The chemical techniques look promising in the laboratory and should be tested in the fields.

  11. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Teng

    2007-12-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to characterize the cell shape and tip undercooling and the experimental results are compared with the predictions of the model. From the investigation of cell/dendrite transition, a model is proposed, from which the condition for the onset of the transition can be obtained.

  12. Weighted simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levakhina, Y. M.; Mueller, J.; Buzug, T. M.; Duschka, R. L.; Vogt, F.; Barkhausen, J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: This paper introduces a nonlinear weighting scheme into the backprojection operation within the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). It is designed for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features in order to reduce limited angle artifacts. Methods: The algorithm estimates which projections potentially produce artifacts in a voxel. The contribution of those projections into the updating term is reduced. In order to identify those projections automatically, a four-dimensional backprojected space representation is used. Weighting coefficients are calculated based on a dissimilarity measure, evaluated in this space. For each combination of an angular view direction and a voxel position an individual weighting coefficient for the updating term is calculated. Results: The feasibility of the proposed approach is shown based on reconstructions of the following real three-dimensional tomosynthesis datasets: a mammography quality phantom, an apple with metal needles, a dried finger bone in water, and a human hand. Datasets have been acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis device and reconstructed using SART with and without suggested weighting. Out-of-focus artifacts are described using line profiles and measured using standard deviation (STD) in the plane and below the plane which contains artifact-causing features. Artifacts distribution in axial direction is measured using an artifact spread function (ASF). The volumes reconstructed with the weighting scheme demonstrate the reduction of out-of-focus artifacts, lower STD (meaning reduction of artifacts), and narrower ASF compared to nonweighted SART reconstruction. It is achieved successfully for different kinds of structures: point-like structures such as phantom features, long structures such as metal needles, and fine structures such as trabecular bone structures. Conclusions: Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to reduce typical tomosynthesis artifacts produced by high-attenuation features. The proposed algorithm assigns weighting coefficients automatically and no segmentation or tissue-classification steps are required. The algorithm can be included into various iterative reconstruction algorithms with an additive updating strategy. It can also be extended to computed tomography case with the complete set of angular data.

  13. Characterization and Alteration of Wettability States of Alaskan Reserviors to Improve Oil Recovery Efficiency (including the within-scope expansion based on Cyclic Water Injection - a pulsed waterflood for Enhanced Oil Recovery)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhijit Dandekar; Shirish Patil; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Numerous early reports on experimental works relating to the role of wettability in various aspects of oil recovery have been published. Early examples of laboratory waterfloods show oil recovery increasing with increasing water-wetness. This result is consistent with the intuitive notion that strong wetting preference of the rock for water and associated strong capillary-imbibition forces gives the most efficient oil displacement. This report examines the effect of wettability on waterflooding and gasflooding processes respectively. Waterflood oil recoveries were examined for the dual cases of uniform and non-uniform wetting conditions. Based on the results of the literature review on effect of wettability and oil recovery, coreflooding experiments were designed to examine the effect of changing water chemistry (salinity) on residual oil saturation. Numerous corefloods were conducted on reservoir rock material from representative formations on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The corefloods consisted of injecting water (reservoir water and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water) of different salinities in secondary as well as tertiary mode. Additionally, complete reservoir condition corefloods were also conducted using live oil. In all the tests, wettability indices, residual oil saturation, and oil recovery were measured. All results consistently lead to one conclusion; that is, a decrease in injection water salinity causes a reduction in residual oil saturation and a slight increase in water-wetness, both of which are comparable with literature observations. These observations have an intuitive appeal in that water easily imbibes into the core and displaces oil. Therefore, low-salinity waterfloods have the potential for improved oil recovery in the secondary recovery process, and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water is an attractive source of injection water or a source for diluting the high-salinity reservoir water. As part of the within-scope expansion of this project, cyclic water injection tests using high as well as low salinity were also conducted on several representative ANS core samples. These results indicate that less pore volume of water is required to recover the same amount of oil as compared with continuous water injection. Additionally, in cyclic water injection, oil is produced even during the idle time of water injection. It is understood that the injected brine front spreads/smears through the pores and displaces oil out uniformly rather than viscous fingering. The overall benefits of this project include increased oil production from existing Alaskan reservoirs. This conclusion is based on the performed experiments and results obtained on low-salinity water injection (including ANS lake water), vis-a-vis slightly altering the wetting conditions. Similarly, encouraging cyclic water-injection test results indicate that this method can help achieve residual oil saturation earlier than continuous water injection. If proved in field, this would be of great use, as more oil can be recovered through cyclic water injection for the same amount of water injected.

  14. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF/STB. The bubblepoint pressure for live oil samples varied between 1600 psi and 2100 psi. Wax precipitation is one of the most important phenomena in wax deposition and, hence, needs to be modeled. There are various models present in the literature. Won's model, which considers the wax phase as a non-ideal solution, and Pedersen's model, which considers the wax phase as an ideal solution, were compared. Comparison indicated that Pedersen's model gives better results, but the assumption of wax phase as an ideal solution is not realistic. Hence, Won's model was modified to consider different precipitation characteristics of the various constituents in the hydrocarbon fraction. The results obtained from the modified Won's model were compared with existing models, and it was found that predictions from the modified model are encouraging.

  15. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers. The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module, we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary parasitic reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, Development of a Rock Mechanical Module, we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species, we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes, We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

  16. Chemical Method to Improve CO{sub 2} Flooding Sweep Efficiency for Oil Recovery Using SPI-CO{sub 2} Gels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Lyle D.

    2009-04-14

    The problem in CO{sub 2} flooding lies with its higher mobility causing low conformance or sweep efficiency. This is an issue in oilfield applications where an injected fluid or gas used to mobilize and produce the oil in a marginal field has substantially higher mobility (function of viscosity and density and relative permeability) relative to the crude oil promoting fingering and early breakthrough. Conformance is particularly critical in CO{sub 2} oilfield floods where the end result is less oil recovered and substantially higher costs related to the CO{sub 2}. The SPI-CO{sub 2} (here after called SPI) gel system is a unique silicate based gel system that offers a technically effective solution to the conformance problem with CO{sub 2} floods. This SPI gel system remains a low viscosity fluid until an external initiator (CO{sub 2}) triggers gelation. This is a clear improvement over current technologies where the gels set up as a function of time, regardless of where it is placed in the reservoir. In those current systems, the internal initiator is included in the injected fluid for water shut off applications. In this new research effort, the CO{sub 2} is an external initiator contacted after SPI gel solution placement. This concept ensures in the proper water wet reservoir environment that the SPI gel sets up in the precise high permeability path followed by the CO{sub 2}, therefore improving sweep efficiency to a greater degree than conventional systems. In addition, the final SPI product in commercial quantities is expected to be low cost over the competing systems. This Phase I research effort provided proof of concept that SPI gels possess strength and may be formed in a sand pack reducing the permeability to brine and CO{sub 2} flow. This SPI technology is a natural extension of prior R & D and the Phase I effort that together show a high potential for success in a Phase II follow-on project. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a major by-product of hydrocarbon combustion for energy, chemical and fertilizer plants. For example, coal fired power plants emit large amounts of CO{sub 2} in order to produce electrical energy. Carbon dioxide sequestration is gaining attention as concerns mount over possible global climate change caused by rising emissions of greenhouse gases. Removing the CO{sub 2} from the energy generation process would make these plants more environmentally friendly. In addition, CO{sub 2} flooding is an attractive means to enhance oil and natural gas recovery. Capture and use of the CO{sub 2} from these plants for recycling into CO{sub 2} flooding of marginal reservoirs provides a dual use opportunity prior to final CO{sub 2} sequestration in the depleted reservoir. Under the right pressure, temperature and oil composition conditions, CO{sub 2} can act as a solvent, cleaning oil trapped in the microscopic pores of the reservoir rock. This miscible process greatly increases the recovery of crude oil from a reservoir compared to recovery normally seen by waterflooding. An Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) project that uses an industrial source of CO{sub 2} that otherwise would be vented to the atmosphere has the added environmental benefit of sequestering the greenhouse gas.

  17. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

    2007-03-31

    For two consecutive years, 2004 and 2005, the largest natural gas well (in terms of gas flow/day) drilled onshore USA targeted the Ordovician Trenton/Black River (T/BR) play in the Appalachian Basin of New York State (NYS). Yet, little data were available concerning the characteristics of the play, or how to recognize and track T/BR prospects across the region. Traditional exploration techniques for entry into a hot play were of limited use here, since existing deep well logs and public domain seismic were almost non-existent. To help mitigate this problem, this research project was conceived with two objectives: (1) to demonstrate that integrative traditional and innovative techniques could be used as a cost-effective reconnaissance exploration methodology in this, and other, areas where existing data in targeted fracture-play horizons are almost non-existent, and (2) determine critical characteristics of the T/BR fields. The research region between Seneca and Cayuga lakes (in the Finger Lakes of NYS) is on strike and east of the discovery fields, and the southern boundary of the field area is about 8 km north of more recently discovered T/BR fields. Phase I, completed in 2004, consisted of integrating detailed outcrop fracture analyses with detailed soil gas analyses, lineaments, stratigraphy, seismic reflection data, well log data, and aeromagnetics. In the Seneca Lake region, Landsat lineaments (EarthSat, 1997) were coincident with fracture intensification domains (FIDs) and minor faults observed in outcrop and inferred from stratigraphy. Soil gas anomalies corresponded to ENE-trending lineaments and FIDs. N- and ENE-trending lineaments were parallel to aeromagnetic anomalies, whereas E-trending lineaments crossed aeromagnetic trends. 2-D seismic reflection data confirmed that the E-trending lineaments and FIDs occur where shallow level Alleghanian salt-cored thrust-faulted anticlines occur. In contrast, the ENE-trending FIDs and lineaments occur where Iapetan rift faults have been episodically reactivated, and a few of these faults extend through the entire stratigraphic section. The ENE-trending faults and N-striking transfer zones controlled the development of the T/BR grabens. In both the Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake regions, we found more FIDs than Landsat lineaments, both in terms of individual FIDs and trends of FIDs. Our fused Landsat/ASTER image provided more lineaments, but the structural framework inferred from these lineaments is incomplete even for the fused image. Individual lineaments may not predict surface FIDs (within 500m). However, an individual lineament that has been groundtruthed by outcrop FIDs can be used as a proxy for the trend of intense fracturing. Aeromagnetics and seismic reflection data across the discovery fields west of Keuka Lake demonstrate that the fields terminate on the east against northerly-striking faults that extend from Precambrian basement to, in some cases, the surface; the fields terminate in the west at N- and NW-striking faults. Seismic and well log data show that the fields must be compartmentalized, since different parts of the same field show different histories of development. T/BR fields south of the research area also terminate (on the east) against northerly-trending lineaments which we suggest mark faults. Phase II, completed in 2006, consisted of collection and analysis of an oriented, horizontal core retrieved from one of the T/BR fields in a graben south of the field area. The field is located along ENE-trending EarthSat (1997) lineaments, similar to that hypothesized for the study area. The horizontal core shows much evidence for reactivation along the ENE-trending faults, with multiple events of vein development and both horizontal and vertical stylolite growth. Horizontal veins that post- and pre-date other vein sets indicate that at least two orogenic phases (separated by unloading) affected vein development. Many of the veins and releasing bend features (rhombochasms) are consistent with strike-slip motion (oblique) along ENE-striking faults as a result

  18. Development of a Low Input and sustainable Switchgrass Feedstock Production System Utilizing Beneficial Bacterial Endophytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, Chuansheng; Nowak, Jerzy; Seiler, John

    2014-10-24

    Switchgrass represents a promising feedstock crop for US energy sustainability. However, its broad utilization for bioenergy requires improvements of biomass yields and stress tolerance. In this DOE funded project, we have been working on harnessing beneficial bacterial endophytes to enhance switchgrass performance and to develop a low input feedstock production system for marginal lands that do not compete with the production of food crops. We have demonstrated that one of most promising plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN, is able to colonize roots and significantly promote growth of switchgrass cv. Alamo under in vitro, growth chamber, greenhouse, as well as field conditions. Furthermore, PsJN bacterization improved growth and development of switchgrass seedlings, significantly stimulated plant root and shoot growth, and tiller number in the field, and enhanced biomass accumulation on both poor (p<0.001) and rich (p<0.05) soils, with more effective stimulation of plant growth in low fertility soil. Plant physiology measurements showed that PsJN inoculated Alamo had consistently lower transpiration, lower stomatal conductance, and higher water use efficiency in greenhouse conditions. These physiological changes may significantly contribute to the recorded growth enhancement. PsJN inoculation rapidly results in an increase in photosynthetic rates which contributes to the advanced growth and development. Some evidence suggests that this initial growth advantage decreases with time when resources are not limited such as in greenhouse studies. Additionally, better drought resistance and drought hardening were observed in PsJN inoculated switchgrass. Using the DOE-funded switchgrass EST microarray, in a collaboration with the Genomics Core Facility at the Noble Foundation, we have determined gene expression profile changes in both responsive switchgrass cv. Alamo and non-responsive cv. Cave-in-Rock (CR) following PsJN bacterization. With the MapMan software to analyze microarray data, the number of up- and down-regulated probes was calculated. The number of up-regulated probes in Alamo was 26, 14, 14, and 12% at 0.5, 2, 4 and 8 days after inoculation (DAI) with PsJN, respectively while the corresponding number in CR was 24, 22, 21, and 19%, respectively. In both cultivars, the largest number of up-regulated probes occurred at 0.5 DAI. Noticeable differences throughout the timeframe between Alamo and CR were that the number was dramatically decreased to half (12%) in Alamo but remained high in CR (approximately 20%). The number of down regulated genes demonstrated different trends in Alamo and CR. Alamo had an increasing trend from 9% at 0.5 DAI to 11, 17, and 28% at 2, 4, and 8 DAI, respectively. However, CR had 13% at 0.5 and 2 DAI, and declined to 10% at 4 and 8 DAI. With the aid of MapMan and PageMan, we mapped the response of the ID probes to the observed major gene regulatory network and major biosynthetic pathway changes associated with the beneficial bacterial endophyte infection, colonization, and early growth promotion process. We found significant differences in gene expression patterns between responsive and non-responsive cultivars in many pathways, including redox state regulation, signaling, proteolysis, transcription factors, as well as hormone (SA and JA in particular)-associated pathways. Form microarray data, a total of 50 key genes have been verified using qPCR. Ten of these genes were chosen for further functional study via either overexpression and/or RNAi knockout technologies. These genes were calmodulin-related calcium sensor protein (CAM), glutathione S-transferase (GST), histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein (H-221), 3 different zinc finger proteins (ZF-371, ZF131 and ZF242), EF hand transcription factor (EF-622), peroxidase, cellulose synthase catalytic submit A2 (CESA2), and Aux/IAA family. A total of 8 overexpression and 5 RNAi transgenic plants have been regenerated, and their gene expression levels determined using qPCR. Consequently

  19. Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-11-30

    Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a hybrid energy storage and generation concept that has many potential benefits especially in a location with increasing percentages of intermittent wind energy generation. The objectives of the NYSEG Seneca CAES Project included: for Phase 1, development of a Front End Engineering Design for a 130MW to 210 MW utility-owned facility including capital costs; project financials based on the engineering design and forecasts of energy market revenues; design of the salt cavern to be used for air storage; draft environmental permit filings; and draft NYISO interconnection filing; for Phase 2, objectives included plant construction with a target in-service date of mid-2016; and for Phase 3, objectives included commercial demonstration, testing, and two-years of performance reporting. This Final Report is presented now at the end of Phase 1 because NYSEG has concluded that the economics of the project are not favorable for development in the current economic environment in New York State. The proposed site is located in NYSEG’s service territory in the Town of Reading, New York, at the southern end of Seneca Lake, in New York State’s Finger Lakes region. The landowner of the proposed site is Inergy, a company that owns the salt solution mining facility at this property. Inergy would have developed a new air storage cavern facility to be designed for NYSEG specifically for the Seneca CAES project. A large volume, natural gas storage facility owned and operated by Inergy is also located near this site and would have provided a source of high pressure pipeline quality natural gas for use in the CAES plant. The site has an electrical take-away capability of 210 MW via two NYSEG 115 kV circuits located approximately one half mile from the plant site. Cooling tower make-up water would have been supplied from Seneca Lake. NYSEG’s engineering consultant WorleyParsons Group thoroughly evaluated three CAES designs and concluded that any of the designs would perform acceptably. Their general scope of work included development of detailed project construction schedules, capital cost and cash flow estimates for both CAES cycles, and development of detailed operational data, including fuel and compression energy requirements, to support dispatch modeling for the CAES cycles. The Dispatch Modeling Consultant selected for this project was Customized Energy Solutions (CES). Their general scope of work included development of wholesale electric and gas market price forecasts and development of a dispatch model specific to CAES technologies. Parsons Brinkerhoff Energy Storage Services (PBESS) was retained to develop an air storage cavern and well system design for the CAES project. Their general scope of work included development of a cavern design, solution mining plan, and air production well design, cost, and schedule estimates for the project. Detailed Front End Engineering Design (FEED) during Phase 1 of the project determined that CAES plant capital equipment costs were much greater than the $125.6- million originally estimated by EPRI for the project. The initial air storage cavern Design Basis was increased from a single five million cubic foot capacity cavern to three, five million cubic foot caverns with associated air production wells and piping. The result of this change in storage cavern Design Basis increased project capital costs significantly. In addition, the development time required to complete the three cavern system was estimated at approximately six years. This meant that the CAES plant would initially go into service with only one third of the required storage capacity and would not achieve full capability until after approximately five years of commercial operation. The market price forecasting and dispatch modeling completed by CES indicated that the CAES technologies would operate at only 10 to 20% capacity factors and the resulting overall project economics were not favorable for further development. As a result of all of these factors, the Phase 1 FEED developed an installed CAES plant cost estimate of approximately $2,300/KW for the 210MW CAES 1A and 2 cycles. The capital cost for the 136 MW CAES 1 cycle was even higher due to the lower generating capacity of the cycle. Notably, the large equipment could have generated additional capacity (up to 270MW) which would have improved the cost per KW; however, the output was limited by the night time transmission system capability. The research herein, therefore, is particular to the site-specific factors that influenced the design and the current and forecasted generation mix and energy prices in Upstate New York and may not necessarily indicate that CAES plants cannot be economically constructed in other places in New York State or the world.