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1

Colin Bishopp  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Colin Bishopp is a Senior Advisor at the U.S. Department of Energy, where he focuses on energy finance policy and clean energy deployment.

2

Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Area (Goranson, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005)...

3

Core Holes At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs Area (Goranson, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Hot Sulphur Springs Area (Goranson, 2005)...

4

User:Colin.mccormick | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Colin McCormick Edits 35 Colin McCormick Senior Advisor for R&D Office of the Under Secretary US Department of Energy Links Water and energy studies...

5

COLIN: planning with continuous linear numeric change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe COLIN, a forward-chaining heuristic search planner, capable of reasoning with COntinuous LINear numeric change, in addition to the full temporal semantics of PDDL2.1. Through this work we make two advances to the state-of-the-art ...

Amanda Coles; Andrew Coles; Maria Fox; Derek Long

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Core Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal...

7

Core Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal...

8

Slim Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal...

9

Commentary on Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis, Richard McElreath, Michael Alvard, Abigail Barr, Jean Ensminger,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commentary on Joseph Henrich, Robert Boyd, Samuel Bowles, Colin Camerer, Ernst Fehr, Herbert Gintis and Cross-Cultural Normative Diversity Edouard Machery Department of History and Philosophy of Science@rci.rutgers.edu Stephen P. Stich Department of Philosophy & Center for Cognitive Science Rutgers University Davison Hall

Machery, Edouard

10

Abstract for Colin Morningstar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morningstar Carnegie Mellon University Towards the spectrum of QCD using a space-time lattice Progress in extracting excited-state baryon masses in lattice QCD using large sets of...

11

Cover story: Colin Clark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interview: Somerfield's security boss likes to keep infosecurity simple. He tells Eleanor Dallaway why he prefers to keep emails rather than block them, why Chip and PIN is a con and what is wrong with loyalty cards

Eleanor Dallaway

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Interview of Colin Renfrew  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society; joined no secret societies, except that David Frost and I with one or two friends, formed a dining club called the Cabal, which was by invitation only, and we had very elaborate dinners once a term in the Garden House Hotel 8:16:08 Frank Stubbings... of the energy of archaeologists had to go into establishing chronologies which were mainly solved by radiocarbon dating; that meant that archaeologists could now talk about something else as their primary interest; I am not a radiocarbon specialist but I did see...

Renfrew, Colin

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Modeling-Computer Simulations (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Modeling-Computer Simulations (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Various models/simulations used to analyze data obtained from slimhole drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Modeling-Computer_Simulations_(Combs,_Et_Al.,_1999)&oldid=387232" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

14

Static Temperature Survey At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Numerous temperature logs were taken with Sandia'splatinum-resistance-thermometer (PRT) tool which along with a Sandia logging truck remained on-site for the entire project. Static temperature logs (no flow in hole) were done with this tool before each series of productiotilnjection tests. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Steamboat_Springs_Area_(Combs,_Et_Al.,_1999)&oldid=511162"

15

Neutron Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Neutron Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Neutron Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

16

Injectivity Test At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Vale Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analysis of the two injection tests performed at the exploration slimhole site during May, 1995 yielded estimates for the permeability-thickness product (transmissivity) kh of 0.25 and 0.23 Da-fi, based on pressure fall off after injection (see Section IV-a). Using the pressure buildup for the second test, a transmissivity of 0.610 Da-ft was estimated. These estimates are approximately an order of magnitude smaller than the kh values estimated for the nearby A-Alt well which was tested in 1994. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

17

Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Vale Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In April-May 1995, Sandia drilled a cost-shared exploratory slimhole with Trans-Pacific Geothermal Corporation (TGC), which owns leases in the Vale KGIL4. In addition to possible discovery of a new geothermal resource, this situation offered an opportunity for direct cost comparison between an exploration sl.irnholedrilled with "hybrid" techniques on a diamond-coring rig and a previous exploration well, which was conventionally drilled but would be considered a slimhole in that technology. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

18

Slim Holes At International Geothermal Area, Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At International Geothermal Area, Japan (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Japan Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on personal relationships between Maxwell scientists and Japanese geothermal developers, production and injection data from 64 slim holes and 79 large-diameter wells (see table below) at four Japanese geothermal fields (Oguni, Sumikaw~ Takigarni, and Kirishirna) have been obtained. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And

19

Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Gamma Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

20

Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run tier completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Injectivity Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Part of the injection testing used downhole packers for isolating various zones and evaluating their permeability. By running the packers into the hole on N-rod ( 2.75"+K610 OD), the annulus was roughly the same cross-sectional area as the inside of the pipe. It was then possible to inject into either the zone above the packer or the one below, and compare the infectivity of those intervals. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration

22

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (27) Areas (8) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik Published: Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Acoustic Logs At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999)

23

Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes After circulating the mud out of the hole and replacing it with clear water, we attempted two injection tests; one into the open hole section (51 16'- 5360') below the HQ liner, and one into the annulus outside the uncemented part (2748' - -4800') of the liner. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration

24

Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Acoustic Logs At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Acoustic Logs Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes The acoustic borehole televiewer (BHTV) was run twice in the wellbore with limited success. There were several problems with the tool's fimctions, but images were successfully obtained over the interval from 2748' to 3635'. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration

25

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Abstract No abstract prepared. Authors Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen and Gene Polik Organization Sandia National Laboratories Published Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection, 1999 Report Number SAND99-1976 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Slimhole Handbook- Procedures and Recommendations for Slimhole Drilling and Testing in Geothermal Exploration Citation

26

Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

27

Finger Cooling During Cold Air Exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for predicting the onset of finger freezing. It is an extension of a tissue-cooling model originally developed to predict the onset of cheek freezing. The extension to the finger is presented as a more conservative ...

Peter Tikuisis

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Finger wear detection for production line battery tester  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change. 9 figs.

Depiante, E.V.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

29

Finger wear detection for production line battery tester  

SciTech Connect

A method for detecting wear in a battery tester probe. The method includes providing a battery tester unit having at least one tester finger, generating a tester signal using the tester fingers and battery tester unit with the signal characteristic of the electrochemical condition of the battery and the tester finger, applying wavelet transformation to the tester signal including computing a mother wavelet to produce finger wear indicator signals, analyzing the signals to create a finger wear index, comparing the wear index for the tester finger with the index for a new tester finger and generating a tester finger signal change signal to indicate achieving a threshold wear change.

Depiante, Eduardo V. (16 W. 505 Mockingbird La., Apt. 204, Hinsdale, IL 60521-6621)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long Fingers of Heat Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface volcanic-hotspots1.jpg Why it Matters: A key mission for the Office of Basic Energy Science is related to new methods and techniques for geosciences imaging from the atomic scale to the kilometer scale. Geophysical imaging methods are needed to measure and monitor subsurface reservoirs for hydrocarbon production or for carbon dioxide storage resulting from large-scale carbon sequestration schemes. Key Challenges: Development of new approaches for regional and global seismic tomography using high-accuracy numerical schemes that treat wave propagation through complex 3D models of earth structure directly with spectral element methods. Accomplishments: A new, cutting-edge method for global seismic imaging that

31

The Salt Finger Experiments of Jevons (1857) and Rayleigh (1880)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a century before Melvin Stern discovered salt fingers, W. Stanley Jevons performed the first salt finger experiment in an attempt to model cirrus clouds. Remarkably, he seemed to realize that a more rapid diffusion of heat relative to solute ...

Raymond W. Schmitt

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

FingerPad: private and subtle interaction using fingertips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present FingerPad, a nail-mounted device that turns the tip of the index finger into a touchpad, allowing private and subtle interaction while on the move. FingerPad enables touch input using magnetic tracking, by adding a Hall sensor grid on the ... Keywords: eyes-free interaction, finger-mounted device, instant-available, nail device, private input, subtle interaction

Liwei Chan, Rong-Hao Liang, Ming-Chang Tsai, Kai-Yin Cheng, Chao-Huai Su, Mike Y. Chen, Wen-Huang Cheng, Bing-Yu Chen

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Internal Wave Overturns Produced by Salt Fingers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salt finger fluxes obtained in small-domain direct numerical simulations (DNSs) are used to parameterize the fluxes in a larger domain that resolves internal gravity waves. For the case in which the molecular diffusivity ratio ? = KS/KT < 1 ...

Melvin E. Stern; Julian A. Simeonov

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Finger walking: motion editing with contact-based hand performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a system for generating full-body animations from the performance on a touch-sensitive tabletop of "finger walking", where two fingers are used to pantomime leg movements. A user study was conducted to explore how users can communicate full-body ...

Noah Lockwood; Karan Singh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Colin Messer, NM Energy Conservation and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The following report is based on the contributions of the individuals and organizations listed below. The Team members were chosen for their breadth of knowledge and industry or policy experience. The group was assembled with the goal of having a wide scope of interests including industry, academia and environmental analysis. The group also worked towards consensus viewpoints on the critical issues impacting the development of Biodiesel as an alternative fuel. This consensus model helped to achieve a balanced perspective on the challenges and potential solutions to further commercial development of this alternative transportation fuel. Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Team Members: Richard Nelson, Chair, Kansas State Univ.

Renewable Diesel; Conoco Phillips; Jeff Probst; Blue Sun Biodiesel; John Brenner; Natural Resources; Conservation Service

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC 2012 Cold Finger Separation [9]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fission Fission Product Separation by Cold Finger Crystal Growth Fission Product Separation by Cold Finger Crystal Growth Joshua R. Versey* and Supathorn Phongikaroon University of Idaho, Idaho Falls Center for Advanced Energy Studies *vers4197@vandals.uidaho.edu Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory Joshua R. Versey* and Supathorn Phongikaroon University of Idaho, Idaho Falls Center for Advanced Energy Studies *vers4197@vandals.uidaho.edu Michael F. Simpson Idaho National Laboratory 2012 IPRC Fontana, Wisconsin 2012 IPRC Fontana, Wisconsin Outline * Background * Motivation & Goals * Cold Finger Theory * Cold Finger Design * Experimental Program * Results & Discussion * Summary & Future Work 2 Background Advanced Pyrochemical Technology Concept 3 Background 4 Advanced Pyrochemical Technology Concept Background 5 Oxide Reduction Process Cathode

37

Microsoft PowerPoint - IPRC 2012 Cold Finger Separation [9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* LiCl * LiCl-CsCl (5 wt% CsCl) * Melted salt at 685C * Positioned cold finger at the molten salt top surface * Experiments began once salt temperature reached 660C ( 3C)...

38

Viscous Fingering and Gravity Segregation through Porous Media: Experimental Findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During downward vertical flow of a viscous solution, the viscous fingering (VF) phenomenon affects miscible displacement of solutes through a soil profile. On the other hand, during horizontal flow, when the liquid residing in a horizontal bed of ...

Farhat Abbas; Derek A. Rose

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fingering to fracturing transition in a transient gel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture processes are ubiquitous in soft materials, even in complex fluids, subjected to stresses. To investigate these processes in a simple geometry, we use a model self-assembled transient gel and study the instability patterns obtained in a radial Hele-Shaw cell when a low viscosity oil pushes the more viscous transient gel. Thanks to an analysis of the morphology of the patterns, we find a discontinuous transition between the standard Saffman-Taylor fingering instability and a fracturing instability as the oil injection rate increases. Our data suggest that the flow properties of the gel ahead of the finger tip controls the transition towards fracturing. By analyzing the displacement field of the gel in the vicinity of the fingers and cracks, we show that in the fingering regime, the oil gently pushes the gel, whereas in the fracturing regime, the crack tears apart the gel, resulting in a strong drop of the gel velocity ahead of the crack tip as compared to the tip velocity. We find a unique behavior for the whole displacement field of a gel around a crack, which is drastically different from that around a finger, and reveals the solid-like behavior of the gel at short time. Our experiments and analysis provide quantitative yet simple tools to unambiguously discriminate a finger from a crack in a visco-elastic material.

Guillaume Foyart; Laurence Ramos; Serge Mora; Christian Ligoure

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

40

Design and analysis of fingernail sensors for measurement of fingertip touch fouce and finger posture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new type of wearable sensor for detecting fingertip touch force and finger posture is presented. Unlike traditional electronic gloves, in which sensors are embedded along the finger and on the fingerpads, this new device ...

Mascaro, Stephen A. (Stephen Austin)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mixing in a Moderately Sheared Salt-Fingering Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixing due to sheared salt fingers is studied by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a double-diffusively unstable shear layer. The focus is on the “moderate shear” case, where shear is strong enough to produce Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) ...

W. D. Smyth; S. Kimura

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Stable pinching by a pair of robot fingers with soft tips under the effect of gravity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyses lumped-parameter dynamics of a pair of robot fingers with soft and deformable tips pinching a rigid object under the effect of a gravity force. The dynamics of the system in which area contacts between the finger-tips and the surfaces ... Keywords: Gravity, Lumped-parameter dynamics, Robot fingers, Soft tips, Stable pinching

Suguru Arimoto; Zoe Doulgeri; Pham Thuc Anh Nguyen; John Fasoulas

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Principles of superposition for controlling pinch motions by means of robot fingers with soft tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the dynamics and control of pinch motions generated by a pair of two multi-degrees-of-freedom robot fingers with soft and deformable tips pinching a rigid object. It is shown firstly that passivity analysis leads to an effective design ... Keywords: Pinch motion, Robot finger, Soft finger, Stable grasping, Superposition principle

S. Arimoto; K. Tahara; M. Yamaguchi; P. T. A. Nguyen; M.-Y. Han

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A novel three-finger IPMC gripper for microscale applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart materials have been widely used for control actuation. A robotic hand can be equipped with artificial tendons and sensors for the operation of its various joints mimicking human-hand motions. The motors in the robotic hand could be replaced with novel electroactive-polymer (EAP) actuators. In the three-finger gripper proposed in this paper, each finger can be actuated individually so that dexterous handling is possible, allowing precise manipulation. In this dissertation, a microscale position-control system using a novel EAP is presented. A third-order model was developed based on the system identification of the EAP actuator with an AutoRegresive Moving Average with eXogenous input (ARMAX) method using a chirp signal input from 0.01 Hz to 1 Hz limited to 7 �± V. With the developed plant model, a digital PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controller was designed with an integrator anti-windup scheme. Test results on macro (0.8-mm) and micro (50-�¼m) step responses of the EAP actuator are provided in this dissertation and its position tracking capability is demonstrated. The overshoot decreased from 79.7% to 37.1%, and the control effort decreased by 16.3%. The settling time decreased from 1.79 s to 1.61 s. The controller with the anti-windup scheme effectively reduced the degradation in the system performance due to actuator saturation. EAP microgrippers based on the control scheme presented in this paper will have significant applications including picking-and-placing micro-sized objects or as medical instruments. To develop model-based control laws, we introduced an approximated linear model that represents the electromechanical behavior of the gripper fingers. Several chirp voltage signal inputs were applied to excite the IPMC (ionic polymer metal composite) fingers in the interesting frequency range of [0.01 Hz, 5 Hz] for 40 s at a sampling frequency of 250 Hz. The approximated linear Box-Jenkins (BJ) model was well matched with the model obtained using a stochastic power-spectral method. With feedback control, the large overshoot, rise time, and settling time associated with the inherent material properties were reduced. The motions of the IPMC fingers in the microgripper were coordinated to pick, move, and release a macro- or micro-part. The precise manipulation of this three-finger gripper was successfully demonstrated with experimental closed-loop responses.

Yun, Kwan Soo

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Giving the Caller the Finger: Collaborative Responsibility for Cellphone Interruptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a system in which a cell phone decides whether to ring by accepting votes from the others in a conversation with the called party. When a call comes in, the phone first determines who is in the conversation by using a decentralized network of autonomous body-worn sensor nodes. It then vibrates all participants' wireless finger rings. Although the alerted people do not know if it is their own cellphones that are about to interrupt, each of them has the possibility to veto the call anonymously by touching his/her finger ring. If no one vetoes, the phone rings. A user study showed significantly more vetoes during a collaborative group-focused setting than during a less group oriented setting. Our system is a component of a larger research project in context-aware computer-mediated call control.

Stefan Marti; Chris Schmandt

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Density fingering in spatially modulated Hele-Shaw cells  

SciTech Connect

Density fingering of the chlorite-tetrathionate reaction has been studied experimentally in a periodically heterogeneous Hele-Shaw cell where the heterogeneity is introduced in the form of spatial modulation of gap width along the front. Depending on the spatial wavelength, gap width, and chemical composition, three types of cellular structures have been observed. The initial evolution is characterized by dispersion curves, while the long time behavior is described by the change in the autocorrelation function of the front profile and in the mixing length of the patterns.

Toth, Tamara; Horvath, Dezso; Toth, Agota [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 105, Szeged, H-6701 (Hungary)

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

47

Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Walter R. Benoit, Colin Goranson, Steven Wesnousky, David Blackwell (2004) Overview Of The Lake City, California Geothermal System Retrieved from

48

A discontinuous Galerkin method for gravity-driven viscous fingering instabilities in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach to the simulation of gravity-driven viscous fingering instabilities in porous media flow. These instabilities play a very important role during carbon sequestration processes in brine aquifers. Our approach is based on a nonlinear ... Keywords: Discontinuous Galerkin method, Gravity-driven flows, Porous media flows, Viscous fingering

G. Scovazzi; A. Gerstenberger; S. S. Collis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Design and analysis of artifact-resistive finger photoplethysmographic sensors for vital sign monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A miniaturized, telemetric, photoplethysmograph sensor for long-term, continuous monitoring is presented in this thesis. The sensor, called a "ring sensor," is attached to a finger base for monitoring beat-to-beat pulsation, ...

Rhee, Sokwoo

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Turbulence in a Sheared, Salt-Fingering-Favorable Environment: Anisotropy and Effective Diffusivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a shear layer with salt-fingering-favorable stratification have been performed for different Richardson numbers Ri and density ratios R?. In the absence of shear (Ri = ?), the primary instability is square ...

Satoshi Kimura; William Smyth; Eric Kunze

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Observations of Small-Scale Mixing Processes in the Seasonal Thermocline. Part I: Salt Fingering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Towed conductivity microstructure measurements are examined for evidence of salt fingering in the seasonal thermocline of the Sargasso Sea. Patches of limited-amplitude, narrow-bandwidth signals occur in particular fluid layers about 1 m thick ...

G. O. Marmorino

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Climatological Conditions of Lake-Effect Precipitation Events Associated with the New York State Finger Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatological analysis was conducted of the environmental and atmospheric conditions that occurred during 125 identified lake-effect (LE) precipitation events in the New York State Finger Lakes region for the 11 winters (October–March) from ...

Neil Laird; Ryan Sobash; Natasha Hodas

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A multi finger electromagnetic actuator apparatus for biomechanical studies on the hand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this thesis was on the design and construction of a multi-finger haptic device powered by electromechanical voice-coil actuators. Five actuators were designed and constructed and a position and force feedback ...

Dobson, Kathleen L. (Kathleen Lynn), 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Modal and Temporal Logics for Processes Colin Stirling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. to develop and optimize a sparkignited CNG Powered Refuse Truck Photo Credit: Cummings Westport, Inc. 11.9 liter CNG engine suitable for refuse and other vocational Class 8 applications. The engine conventional CNG engine to a more efficient and higher performance engine, and integrate it into a refuse

Stirling, Colin

55

Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Histone H3 lysine4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

Wang, Gang G.; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L.; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David; (MSKCC); (Scripps); (Rockefeller)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

The efficacy of electrolyzed water for cleaning and sanitizing rubber picker fingers soiled with chicken fat and Salmonella Typhimurium.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rubber picker fingers used to remove feathers from broiler carcasses have been considered potential cross-contamination sites during poultry processing. The effects of alkaline electrolyzed (EO)… (more)

Burkeen, Vedas K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

An overview of instability and fingering during immiscible fluid flow in porous and fractured media  

SciTech Connect

Wetting front instability is an important phenomenon affecting fluid flow and contaminant transport in unsaturated soils and rocks. It causes the development of fingers which travel faster than would a uniform front and thus bypass much of the medium. Water saturation and solute concentration in such fingers tend to be higher than in the surrounding medium. During infiltration, fingering may cause unexpectedly rapid arrival of water and solute at the water-table. This notwithstanding, most models of subsurface flow and transport ignore instability and fingering. In this report, we survey the literature to assess the extent to which this may or may not be justified. Our overview covers experiments, theoretical studies, and computer simulations of instability and fingering during immiscible two-phase flow and transport, with emphasis on infiltration into soils and fractured rocks. Our description of instability in an ideal fracture (Hele-Shaw cell) includes an extension of existing theory to fractures and interfaces having arbitrary orientations in space. Our discussion of instability in porous media includes a slight but important correction of existing theory for the case of an inclined interface. We conclude by outlining some potential directions for future research. Among these, we single out the effect of soil and rock heterogeneities on instability and preferential flow as meriting special attention in the context of nuclear waste storage in unsaturated media.

Chen, G.; Neuman, S.P. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources; Taniguchi, M. [Nara Univ. of Education (Japan). Dept. of Earth Sciences

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Brookhaven Lab Captures E. coli's Sticky Fingers on Film | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Lab Captures E. coli's Sticky Fingers on Film Brookhaven Lab Captures E. coli's Sticky Fingers on Film Brookhaven Lab Captures E. coli's Sticky Fingers on Film June 7, 2011 - 2:33pm Addthis The bacterial protein transport channel in its resting closed state (green) and the activated open state (blue). The channel is sealed by a plug structure that is shown in red. Note the change of the channel shape from oval to near circular and displacement of the plug when open. Some parts of the protein molecule are omitted for simplicity. | Courtesy of: Brookhaven National Laboratory The bacterial protein transport channel in its resting closed state (green) and the activated open state (blue). The channel is sealed by a plug structure that is shown in red. Note the change of the channel shape from oval to near circular and displacement of the plug when open. Some parts of

59

Twenty-Seventh Symposium (International) on Combustion/The Combustion Institute, 1998/pp. 28152820 FINGERING INSTABILITY IN SOLID FUEL COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2815 Twenty-Seventh Symposium (International) on Combustion/The Combustion Institute, 1998/pp. 2815­2820 FINGERING INSTABILITY IN SOLID FUEL COMBUSTION: THE CHARACTERISTIC SCALES OF THE DEVELOPED STATE ORY ZIK, Israel We present new results on the fingering instability in solid fuel combustion. The instability

Moses, Elisha

60

arXiv:cond-mat/9707333v131Jul1997 Fingering Instability in Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:cond-mat/9707333v131Jul1997 Fingering Instability in Combustion O. Zik(1) , Z. Olami(2) and E quantitatively verify a model based on diffusion limited transport. Harnessing combustion is a basic element conflagrations is often determined by fundamental issues regarding the stability of combustion fronts. Although

Moses, Elisha

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61

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Finger-tapping Task Separates Motor from Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in a Finger- tapping Task Separates Motor from Timing Mechanisms,3 , and Elisha Moses1 Abstract & We study the interplay between motor programs and their timing in the brain by using precise pulses of transcranial mag- netic stimulation (TMS) applied to the primary motor cortex

Moses, Elisha

62

Important role of force/velocity characteristics in sensory-motor coordination for control design of object manipulation by a multi-fingered robot hand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is in duplicate to present computer simulation results of concurrent grasp and object manipulation by a pair of three degrees of freedom (3-dof) robot fingers with rigid hemispherical finger-ends that induce rolling contacts ... Keywords: Force-velocity characteristics, Gain tuning, Robot fingers, Rolling contact, Sensory feedback, Stable grasp

J.-H. Bae; S. Arimoto

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Core holes enabled injection and flow testing up to 70 gpm. References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Lake_City_Hot_Springs_Area_(Benoit_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=386872" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

64

Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell Published: GRC, 2005 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Core Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Static Temperature Survey At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Lake City Hot Springs Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Hole_Drilling_And_Testing_At_The_Lake_City,_California_Geothermal_Field&oldid=389996

65

Core Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Holes At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three core holes drilled between 2002 and 2005. Depths: 1,728; 3,435; 4,727 ft. Two deeper wells encountered temps of 327 and 329 oF and permable fractures in sedimentary and volcanic rocks; enabled injection and flow testing up to 70 gpm. Quartz fluid inclusions give temps of 264 and 316 oF. Core drillling allowed an understanding of geology and geothermal system that could never have been obtained from cuttings in this particular geologic setting. References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field

66

Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering for supercritical CO2 - water displacement in a homogeneous pore network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing resident brine from the pore space by supercritical CO2 (scCO2). The displacement process is considered unstable due to the unfavorable viscosity ratio (logM = -5.21), respectively. Crossover from capillary to viscous fingering was observed for logCa = -5.91~-5.21, resulting in a large decrease in scCO2 saturation. The discontinuous-rate experimental results confirmed the decrease in nonwetting fluid saturation during crossover from capillary to viscous fingering predicted by numerical simulations by Lenormand et al. (1988).1 Capillary fingering was the only mechanism that dominates all injection rates in the continuous-rate experiment, and resulted in monotonic increase in scCO2 saturation.

Wang, Ying; Zhang, Changyong; Wei, Ning; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Li, Xiaochun; Bonneville, Alain HR

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

An engineered split M.HhaI-zinc finger fusion lacks the intended methyltransferase specificity  

SciTech Connect

The ability to site-specifically methylate DNA in vivo would have wide applicability to the study of basic biomedical problems as well as enable studies on the potential of site-specific DNA methylation as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of diseases. Natural DNA methyltransferases lack the specificity required for these applications. Nomura and Barbas [W. Nomura, C.F. Barbas 3rd, In vivo site-specific DNA methylation with a designed sequence-enabled DNA methylase, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129 (2007) 8676-8677] have reported that an engineered DNA methyltransferase comprised of fragments of M.HhaI methyltransferase and zinc finger proteins has very high specificity for the chosen target site. Our analysis of this engineered enzyme shows that the fusion protein methylates target and non-target sites with similar efficiency.

Meister, Glenna E. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Ostermeier, Marc [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)], E-mail: oster@jhu.edu

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Accretion from debris disks onto white dwarfs : Fingering (thermohaline) instability and derived accretion rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations of a large number of DA and DB white dwarfs show evidence of debris disks, which are the remnants of old planetary systems. The infrared excess detected with \\emph{Spitzer} and the lines of heavy elements observed in their atmospheres with high-resolution spectroscopy converge on the idea that planetary material accretes onto these stars. Accretion rates have been derived by several authors with the assumption of a steady state between accretion and gravitational settling. The results are unrealistically different for DA and DB white dwarfs. When heavy matter is accreted onto stars, it induces an inverse $\\mu$-gradient that leads to fingering (thermohaline) convection. The aim of this letter is to study the impact of this specific process on the derived accretion rates in white dwarfs and on the difference between DA and DB. We solve the diffusion equation for the accreted heavy elements with a time-dependent method. The models we use have been obtained both with the IRAP code, which compu...

Deal, M; Vauclair, G; Vauclair, S; Wachlin, F C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Allosteric Activation of E2-RING Finger-Mediated Ubiquitylation by a Structurally Defined Specific E2-Binding Region of gp78  

SciTech Connect

The activity of RING finger ubiquitin ligases (E3) is dependent on their ability to facilitate transfer of ubiquitin from ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2) to substrates. The G2BR domain within the E3 gp78 binds selectively and with high affinity to the E2 Ube2g2. Through structural and functional analyses, we determine that this occurs on a region of Ube2g2 distinct from binding sites for ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) and RING fingers. Binding to the G2BR results in conformational changes in Ube2g2 that affect ubiquitin loading. The Ube2g2:G2BR interaction also causes an 50-fold increase in affinity between the E2 and RING finger. This results in markedly increased ubiquitylation by Ube2g2 and the gp78 RING finger. The significance of this G2BR effect is underscored by enhanced ubiquitylation observed when Ube2g2 is paired with other RING finger E3s. These findings uncover a mechanism whereby allosteric effects on an E2 enhance E2-RING finger interactions and, consequently, ubiquitylation.

Das, Ranabir; Mariano, Jennifer; Tsai, Yien Che; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Kostova, Zlatka; Li, Jess; Tarasov, Sergey G.; McFeeters, Robert L.; Altieri, Amanda S.; Ji, Xinhua; Byrd, R. Andrew; Weissman, Allan M.; (NCI)

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Submitted to Colin Cheyne, ed., Festschrift for Alan Musgrave A METHODOLOGICAL CRITIQUE OF THE SEMANTIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

handles narrative explanations. Consider, for example, a so-called Rube Goldberg machine. Here; for example, one early step is an case of oxidative decarboxylation. But unlike the Rube Goldberg machine

Koertge, Noretta

71

ExpandplusCrystal Structures of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Zinc Fingers Bound to DNA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has two homologous zinc finger domains, Zn1 and Zn2, that bind to a variety of DNA structures to stimulate poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis activity and to mediate PARP-1 interaction with chromatin. The structural basis for interaction with DNA is unknown, which limits our understanding of PARP-1 regulation and involvement in DNA repair and transcription. Here, we have determined crystal structures for the individual Zn1 and Zn2 domains in complex with a DNA double strand break, providing the first views of PARP-1 zinc fingers bound to DNA. The Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA structures establish a novel, bipartite mode of sequence-independent DNA interaction that engages a continuous region of the phosphodiester backbone and the hydrophobic faces of exposed nucleotide bases. Biochemical and cell biological analysis indicate that the Zn1 and Zn2 domains perform distinct functions. The Zn2 domain exhibits high binding affinity to DNA compared with the Zn1 domain. However, the Zn1 domain is essential for DNA-dependent PARP-1 activity in vitro and in vivo, whereas the Zn2 domain is not strictly required. Structural differences between the Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA complexes, combined with mutational and structural analysis, indicate that a specialized region of the Zn1 domain is re-configured through the hydrophobic interaction with exposed nucleotide bases to initiate PARP-1 activation.

M Langelier; J Planck; S Roy; J Pascal

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Genome-wide in silico screen for CCCH-type zinc finger proteins of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania major  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

finger domains (ZnF_C2H2, Zf-RanBP, ZnF_HIT), a cytidine deaminase domain, a helicase domain, a DNAJ domain, an exonuclease domain, a HECT domain and a U-box. The vast majority of CCCH proteins are unique to Kine- toplastida, or even to a subgroup... finger domains (ZnF_C2H2, Zf-RanBP, ZnF_HIT), a cytidine deaminase domain, a helicase domain, a DNAJ domain, an exonuclease domain, a HECT domain and a U-box. The vast majority of CCCH proteins are unique to Kine- toplastida, or even to a subgroup...

Kramer, Susanne; Kimblin, Nicola C; Carrington, Mark

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modeling, Design and Construction of Articulated Hand for Use in Prosthetics, with Adaptive Control in Neural Networks Based on Mathematical Model for Finger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Articulated hand model was designed and built by CAD-CAM software, analyzed by finite element in the structure; the hand was made for a 3D printer in a first time, the construction of each finger suggested a mathematical model that describes the Inertia ... Keywords: Prosthetics, Adaptive Control by Neural Networks, Myoelectric Signal, Mathematical Model of 3G

Emilio Soto; Oscar Baez; Sergio Sosa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the user’s palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the user’s fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hand’s characteristics just into the system’s mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interface’s controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

Anthony L. Crawford

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

Rajakumara, Eerappa; Wang, Zhentian; Ma, Honghui; Hu, Lulu; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan; Guo, Rui; Wu, Feizhen; Li, Haitao; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Shi, Yang (MSKCC); (Constellation); (Fudan); (Tsinghua)

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

76

PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

E Rajakumara; Z Wang; H Ma; L Hu; H Chen; Y Lin; R Guo; F Wu; H Li; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Influence of Viscous and Capillary Forces on Immiscible Fluid Displacement: Pore-Scale Experimental Study in a Water-Wet Micromodel Demonstrating Viscous and Capillary Fingering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unstable immiscible fluid displacement in porous media affects geological carbon sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, and groundwater contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids. Characterization of immiscible displacement processes at the pore-scale is important to better understand macroscopic processes at the continuum-scale. A series of displacement experiments was conducted to investigate the impacts of viscous and capillary forces on displacement stability and fluid saturation distributions in a homogeneous water-wet pore network micromodel with precisely-microfabricated pore structures. Displacements were studied using seven wetting-nonwetting fluid pairs with viscosity ratios M (viscosity of the advancing nonwetting fluid divided by the viscosity of the displaced wetting fluid) ranging four orders of magnitude from logM = -1.95 to 1.88. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG200) or water as a wetting fluid, which was then displaced by a nonwetting alkane fluid under different flow rates. Capillary numbers (Ca) ranged over four orders of magnitude for the reported experiments, from logCa = -5.88 to -1.02. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize displacement and measure nonwetting fluid saturation distributions. These experiments extend the classical work by Lenormand et al. by using water-wet micromodels, high-precision fabrication, and enhanced image analysis of the saturation distributions. In the micromodel experiments initially saturated with PEG200, a viscous wetting fluid, unstable displacement occurred by viscous fingering over the whole range of imposed capillary numbers. For the experiments initially saturated with water, unstable displacement occurred by capillary fingering at low capillary numbers. When the viscous forces were increased by increasing the injection rate, crossover into stable displacement was observed for the fluid pairs with M > 0. For unstable displacement experiments applying the same capillary number for the various fluid pairs, nonwetting fluid saturations were higher when capillary fingering was the dominant fingering process compared to viscous fingering. Our saturation distributions are consistent with other published experimental work and confirm the numerical results obtained by Lenormand et al.

Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Import demand for Brazilian ethanol: a cross-country analysis Barbara Farinelli, Colin A Carter, C.-Y. Cynthia Lin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact. "The EU sets its biofuel target without checking the impact on people and the environment," said to the drawing board. Let's be clear, biofuels are not a panacea ­ even if the EU is able to reach the 10% targetEuropean biofuel plans could spell disaster - environmentalresearchweb A community website from IOP

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

79

Traffic Generation of IEC 61850 Sampled Values Jakub W. Konka, Colin M. Arthur, Francisco J. Garcia and Robert C. Atkinson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, data integration and data distribution between the various devices and components that use this complex proposed. A Smart Grid can be defined as a unified, fully interoperable, communications-enabled electrical and Robert C. Atkinson Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering University of Strathclyde Glasgow G1 1

Atkinson, Robert C

80

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Interview: Collin Broholm Johns Hopkins' Colin Broholm recently joined ORNL's Neutron Sciences Directorate as a joint faculty appointment. Johns Hopkins' Colin Broholm recently...

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81

SEPTEMBER 201224 B OR DE R L A N D S N E WS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Article by COLIN SHACKELFORD, FORREST SMITH, AND BONNIE J. WARNOCK A NATIVE PLANT RESTORATION REVOLUTION

82

Finteraction Finger Interaction with Mobile Phone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, sensors, and organic light emitting diode display [8]. Gummi[9] is a prototype based on this concept

Reiterer, Harald

83

Multi-fingered grasping and manipulation in virtual environments using an isometric finger device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the task. 4.2 Task 2: Fill the Jar In the second task theuser has to ?ll an empty jar with water (Figure 5, top). Thethen pour the water into the jar. The glass is grasped by

Kurillo, Gregorij; Mihelj, Matjaz; Bajd, Tadej; Munih, Marko

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Directory Challenge '97 Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... EMA Coordinators Paul Moniz and Tracy Campos WEMA Regional Coordinators Colin Robbins, NEXOR (for EEMA) Terry Brain, BHP Information ...

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

85

Robust Digital Valve for Prosthetic Finger, Robotics, Microsurgery  

2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Technology •Small hydraulic system for high strength, very small control of robotic systems

86

Los Alamos observatory fingers cosmic ray 'hot spots'  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

magnetic fields near our solar system. November 24, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as...

87

Modelling the evolution of the influenza virus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jones Colin Russell Nicola Lewis (& AHT) Dan Horton (& VLA) Ana Mosterin Eugene Skepner Yan Wong (& Leeds) Margaret Mackinnon (& KEMRI) David Wales (Chemistry) Chris Whittleston (Chemistry) Birgit Strodel (Chemistry...

Burke, David

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

88

"ProductCode","ProductName","ProductVersion" ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... UNK","Colin","English","Utility" 705,"Drive log","Shareware ... Utility" 728,"Random Password Generator Pro","9.0 ... 910,"Windows CE Direct X Platform ...

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Wellness Wirekeeping your finger on the pulse Volume 1 | Issue 4 | July 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Spoon into dessert dishes. Garnish each with 2 banana slices just before serving. Blissful Banana Mousse

Bass, Hank W.

90

Using Zinc Finger Nucleases for Targeted Genome Modification in the Zebrafish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

yeast ortholog of BLM RecQ helicase. Genes Dev. 19, 339–350.M, Proytcheva M. (1999) The DNA helicase activity of BLM isinteraction of p53 and BLM DNA helicase in apoptosis. J Biol

McCammon, Jasmine Mali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Discrimination and Identification of Finger Joint-Angle Position Using Active Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Contract No. N61339-93-C-0083 from the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, in part by Grant than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise, to republish prior specific permission and/or a fee. Permissions may be requested from Publications Dept., ACM, Inc

Tan, Hong Z.

92

Engineering Scalable Combinational Logic in Escherichia coli Using Zinc Finger Proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

symbols and their truth tables (input/output definitions)Definition” column shows the truth table for each gate. Thisand 3 NOR gates. B) The truth table for the circuit in A

Holtz, William Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A research platform using active local cooling directed at minimizing the blood flow in human fingers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Patients undergoing chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer often suffer from deterioration of extremities, such as neuropathy and onycholysis, a condition which leads to the partial detachment of the nail from the nail bed. To prevent these deterioration, ... Keywords: PID control, Peltier cooling, local cooling, prevention of onycholysis

Jan Steckel; Frank Goethijn; Guido De Bruyne; Vincent Nulens; Daniel Lacko; Samuel Bey; Stijn Verwulgen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Personalized input: improving ten-finger touchscreen typing through automatic adaptation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although typing on touchscreens is slower than typing on physical keyboards, touchscreens offer a critical potential advantage: they are software-based, and, as such, the keyboard layout and classification models used to interpret key presses can dynamically ... Keywords: adaptive interfaces, personalization, touchscreen text input

Leah Findlater; Jacob Wobbrock

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Design and Control of an Anthropomorphic Robotic Finger with Multi-point Tactile Sensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to develop the prototype of a tactile sensing platform for anthropomorphic manipulation research. We investigate this problem through the fabrication and simple control of a planar 2-DOF robotic ...

Banks, Jessica

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Springer Briefs in Energy Analysis A new series of books edited by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(UAB)) Peak Oil: Science, History, and the Post-Peak World (Colin J Oil Industry: History and Trends to 2030 (Lianyong Feng, China University-book. Titles in development and further information on reverse While oil spills, mine

Hall, Charles A.S.

97

Revue de presse ANGLAIS Semaine du 01 au 07 mars 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or the oyster rule wave power? (By Colin Barras) : There's no shortage of designs to convert wave energy plant called 'qat' is using more and more fresh water, which, as a result, is becoming scarce. Giant

Rennes, Université de

98

Unobtrusive physiological monitoring in an airplane seat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To spot these finger movements, the finger stripes for both index fingers are equipped with 3-axis accelerometers (see. Fig. 2). The detection of artifacts evoked ...

99

Cooperativity and Specificity of Cys2His2 Zinc Finger Protein-DNA Interactions: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the galaxy 42 · Understanding the atomic nucleus 44 · BaBar takes a bow with charm 46 Advancing technology

Seok, Chaok

100

Integrative analysis of the zinc finger transcription factor Lame duck in the Drosophila myogenic gene regulatory network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contemporary high-throughput technologies permit the rapid identification of transcription factor (TF) target genes on a genome-wide scale, yet the functional significance of TFs requires knowledge of target gene expression ...

Busser, Brian W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Getting practical with interactive tabletop displays: designing for dense data, "fat fingers," diverse interactions, and face-to-face collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tabletop displays with touch-based input provide many powerful affordances for directly manipulating and collaborating around information visualizations. However, these devices also introduce several challenges for interaction designers, including discrepancies ... Keywords: i-Loupe, iPodLoupe, information visualization, interaction lenses, resolution discrepancy

Stephen Voida; Matthew Tobiasz; Julie Stromer; Petra Isenberg; Sheelagh Carpendale

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Final Report text revl.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 February 2003 Measurement of Vibration Transfer from Surface to Beam Tunnel Hal Amick, Tao Xu, Nat Wongprasert Colin Gordon & Associates 883 Sneath Lane, Suite 150 San Bruno CA 94066 USA Abstract: On 7 August 2002, a vibration measurement program was carried out at SLAC, the purpose of which was to document the vibration attenuation characteristics of the soil at that site. The measurements were carried out by Dr. Tao Xu and Dr. Nat Wongprasert of Colin Gordon & Associates. This report presents data from that study in a somewhat summarized form.. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Stanford University Measurement of Vibration Transfer from Surface to Beam Tunnel 7 August 2002

103

Relaxing B Sharing Restrictions within CSP B Arnaud Lanoix1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relaxing B Sharing Restrictions within CSP B Arnaud Lanoix1 , Olga Kouchnarenko2 , Samuel Colin3 of state sharing in CSP B specifications: B machines controlled by various CSP parts are supposed without creating inconsistencies in CSP B specifications. To achieve this, we present an approach where

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

104

Using CSP||B Components: Application to a Platoon of Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using CSP||B Components: Application to a Platoon of Vehicles Samuel Colin1, Arnaud Lanoix1, Olga- tionalities and services. It is specified using the combination, named CSP B, of two well-known formal methods: formal methods, CSP||B, compositional modelling, specification, ver- ification, case study 1 Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

105

Relaxing B Sharing Restrictions within CSP B Arnaud Lanoix1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relaxing B Sharing Restrictions within CSP B Arnaud Lanoix1 , Olga Kouchnarenko2 , Samuel Colin3.poirriez@univ-valenciennes.fr Abstract. This paper addresses the issue of state sharing in CSP B specifications: B machines controlled by various CSP parts are supposed not to refer to, share or modify the same state space. However, some kinds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

106

Towards Validating a Platoon of Cristal Vehicles using CSP B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards Validating a Platoon of Cristal Vehicles using CSP B Samuel Colin1, Arnaud Lanoix1, Olga of Cristal vehicles is developed using the combination, named CSP B, of two well-known formal methods properties in a compositional way. We make use of previous theoretical results on CSP B to validate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

107

Newsletter 33, December 2012 Animal Demography Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ago by Colin Williams with MT01. A new route, WK07, in the Little Karoo precinct is replacing WK02 = WS, Abdim's = AS, Yellow-billed = YS, African Openbill = OBS, Marabou = MS Korhaans: Blue = UK, Karoo and 32­38 km. Paddy Campbell, Ross Zietsman and Cliff Hopkins had an amazing count on EP08 with 41 Karoo

de Villiers, Marienne

108

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Park, CA 94025 2. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program Washington, DC e-mail: colin of energy resources, including geothermal energy. Stakeholders at all levels of government, within in the 1970s during a time of rapid development and new interest in geothermal energy. That many

Stanford University

109

Future development of the PLATO observatory for Antarctic science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during the summertime with solar panels. One of the 10-foot shipping containers houses the power system is five months after the last possible human contact with the experiments, and when solar powerFuture development of the PLATO observatory for Antarctic science Michael C. B. Ashley*a, Colin S

Ashley, Michael C. B.

110

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts ROBERT S MACKAY COLIN ROURKE We propose that a gamma ray burst is a kinematic Gamma ray bursts are intense flashes of electromagnetic radiation of cosmic origin lasting from ten accepted mechanism. We propose that a gamma ray burst is simply a kinematic effect, namely the effect

Rourke, Colin

111

Ligand chemistry of titania precursor affects transient photovoltaic behavior in inverted organic solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transient photovoltaic behavior in inverted organic solar cells Jong Bok Kim,1,a) Seokhoon Ahn,2,b) Seok JuLigand chemistry of titania precursor affects transient photovoltaic behavior in inverted organic solar cells Jong Bok Kim, Seokhoon Ahn, Seok Ju Kang, Colin Nuckolls, and Yueh-Lin Loo Citation: Appl

112

A Desalination Battery Mauro Pasta,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Desalination Battery Mauro Pasta, Colin D. Wessells, Yi Cui,,§ and Fabio La Mantia, although its high energy consumption, and thus high cost, call for new, efficient technology. Here, we demonstrate the novel concept of a "desalination battery", which operates by performing cycles in reverse

Cui, Yi

113

Dying for NF-jB? Control of cell death by transcriptional regulation of the apoptotic machinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ezra Burstein and Colin S DuckettĂ? The transcription factor nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) is a pleiotropic signals and cellular stress. Several hundred cellular genes have been shown to be regulated by NF-kB showed that loss or suppression of NF-kB results in an enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis. In the ensuing

Burstein, Ezra

114

Kimmerle, Kunzer; Mathematics for Engineers II (Math203) http://math.guc.edu.eg To be handed in in the respective first tutorial in the week 01. May 06. May.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- CP1 Efthymiou, Aristeidis Dean of Research - College of Science and Engineering Webber, Bonnie Deputy Page 1 of 6 #12;Duty Type Duty Scope Name Deputy Head - Computing Renals, Steve - Personnel Stirling Shillcock, Richard Smaill, Alan Stenning, Keith Stevens, Perdita Stirling, Colin Thompson, Henry Renals

Kuenzer, Matthias

115

Gripping device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a gripping device having at least two fingers: one movable finger and at least one stationary finger. The fingers are attached to a support by a collar, the movable finger being pivotally attached. The support carries an air cylinder with a shaft to actuate the movable finger. The movable finger has a wide portion with a slot. On the distal end of the air cylinder's shaft is a travelerthat rides int he slot and, as it does, causes the movable finger to pivot toward and away from the two stationary fingers.

Hapstack, M.

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Gamma Log Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted: natural gamma and neutron porosity logs indicate gross rock type References Galbraith, R. M. (1 May 1978) Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Goranson, C.; Schroeder, R. (1 June 1978) Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gamma_Log_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=510780"

117

Acoustic Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Acoustic Logs At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Acoustic Logs Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Acoustic logs indicate fractured rock and potentially permeable zones. References Galbraith, R. M. (1 May 1978) Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Goranson, C.; Schroeder, R. (1 June 1978) Static downhole characteristics of well CGEH-1 at Coso Hot Springs, China Lake, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Acoustic_Logs_At_Coso_Geothermal_Area_(1977)&oldid=510216"

118

SpaceE#cient Finger Search on DegreeBalanced Search Trees # Guy E. Blelloch Bruce M. Maggs Shan Leung Maverick Woo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department 3 State RPS Policies and Purchase Mandates: 21 States and D.C. WI: 10% by 2015 NV: 20% by 2015 TX Objectives · Background: State RPS policies have become major drivers of renewable energy additions, but the adoption of new state RPS policies hinges on expected costs and benefits · Objective: We review previous

Maggs, Bruce M.

119

Space-Efficient Finger Search on Degree-Balanced Search Trees Guy E. Blelloch Bruce M. Maggs Shan Leung Maverick Woo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RPS mandates have been shown to increase in-state market penetration for renewable technologies to mean any projects that are smaller than utility-scale. #12;5 Figure 1: Number of State RPS Policies of a public benefits fund and renewable portfolio standards (RPS). By mandating a minimum amount of energy

Blelloch, Guy E.

120

Vestibular papillomatosis as a normal vulvar anatomical condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiple finger-like projections with rounded tips andMultiple finger-like projections with rounded tips andlesions as small, smooth projections of the vulvar mucosa

Diaz Gonzales, Jose Manuel; Martinez Luna, Eduwiges; Pena Romero, Adriana; Molina Hernandez, Alma; Dominguez Cherit, Judith

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Engineering --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Callen, James D. (James D. Callen) - Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Carter, Troy (Troy Carter) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles Cassak, Paul (Paul Cassak) - Department of Physics, West Virginia University Choueiri, Edgar (Edgar Choueiri) - Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University Cohen, David (David Cohen) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore College Colin, Thierry (Thierry Colin) - Institut de Mathematiques de Bordeaux, Université Bordeaux Coster, David (David Coster) - Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S

122

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fission and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kaiser, David (David Kaiser) - Program in Science, Technology, and Society & Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Kastens, Kim Anne (Kim Anne Kastens) - Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory & Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University Kelly, Kevin (Kevin Kelly) - Department of Philosophy, Carnegie Mellon University Keniston, Kenneth (Kenneth Keniston) - Program in Science, Technology, and Society, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Klahr, David (David Klahr) - Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University Klein, Colin (Colin Klein) - Philosophy Department, University of Illinois at Chicago Klein, David (David Klein) - Department of Mathematics, California

123

Energy Department Releases New Clean Energy Finance Guide | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases New Clean Energy Finance Guide Releases New Clean Energy Finance Guide Energy Department Releases New Clean Energy Finance Guide August 28, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Photo from the Energy Department archive. Photo from the Energy Department archive. Colin Bishopp Colin Bishopp Senior Advisor, U.S. Department of Energy Learn more Download the Energy Department's new guide to federal financing programs for clean energy and renewable energy projects. Increasing the efficiency of our buildings and accelerating the deployment of renewable energy technologies will strengthen local economies and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This is why President Obama's Climate Action Plan calls for federal agencies to work closely with states and municipalities to reduce barriers to investment in energy efficiency and

124

SlapsegII FAQ's  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fingers for a subject. Is the performance to be measured by the percentage of successful segmentations? Does NIST intend ...

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

125

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electromagnetic Calorimeter Institution Board Electromagnetic Calorimeter Institution Board Ren-yuan Zhu, Chair Caltech Renyuan Zhu zhu@hep.caltech.edu Cornell Ritchie Paterson ritchie@lepp.cornell.edu Fermilab Jeffrey Berryhill berryhil@fnal.gov Florida State Yuri Gershtein gerstein@hep.fsu.edu Kansas State Yurii Maravin maravin@fnal.gov Minnesota Roger Rusack rusack@mnhep.hep.umn.edu Northeastern Steve Reucroft reucroft@neu.edu Notre Dame Colin Jessop jessop@slac.stanford.edu Princeton Pierre Piroue piroue@princeton.edu Virginia Brad Cox cox@uvahep.phys.virginia.edu U.S. CMS is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of

126

Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams & Deangelo, Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin F. Williams, Jacob DeAngelo (2008) Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geographic_Information_System_At_U.S._West_Region_(Williams_%26_Deangelo,_2008)&oldid=390068" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

127

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Williams & Deangelo, Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At U.S. West Region (Williams & Deangelo, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Colin F. Williams, Jacob DeAngelo (2008) Mapping Geothermal Potential In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Data_Acquisition-Manipulation_At_U.S._West_Region_(Williams_%26_Deangelo,_2008)&oldid=387276" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers

128

Microsoft Word - EMSSABChairs conferencecall July 29.FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 29, 2010 July 29, 2010 Participants Chairs /Representatives: Site Support Staff: Hanford Susan Leckband, Shelley Cimon Idaho Nevada Walter Wegst NNM Ralph Phelps Oak Ridge Ron Murphree Kevin Westervelt Ceri Chapple Kelly Snyder, Denise Rupp Lee Bishop, Menice Santistevan Pat Halsey, Spencer Gross, Pete Osborne Paducah Ralph Young Suzanne Clinton Portsmouth Richard Snyder Julie Galloway Savannah River Manuel Bettencourt Gerri Flemming, Erica Williams DOE-HQ Representatives: EM-42 Melissa Nielson, Cate Brennan, Michelle Hudson EM-3.1 Colin Jones EM-5 Shari Davenport EM-43 Doug Tonkay EM-60 Connie Flohr LM Tony Carter Opening Remarks Ms. Melissa Nielson, Director, Office of Public and Intergovernmental Accountability, called the

129

The Sandia Hand Features  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Hand Sandia Hand Features ď‚· Low Cost: using 3D high-resolution rapid prototyping technologies for low volumes, ensuring each component is amenable to injection molding for high volumes, and designing around components found in large consumer markets has enabled significant cost reductions ď‚· Dexterous: designed with four 3 Degree of Freedom (DOF) fingers to enable dexterous tasks such as finger gating while still maintaining form closure ď‚· Modular: a hand frame with identical finger modules that attach through magnetic attachment with electrical power and communications achieved through spring contacts. Power to each finger socket is actively controlled, permitting hot swapping of finger modules. Benefits

130

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

Miller, David H. (Redondo Beach, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Each Substance Unique Density Each Substance Unique Density Name: Colin Status: educator Grade: 6-8 Location: CO Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Is it true that the density of each substance is unique? (That is my understanding.) So when my students ask, will a substance with a density of 1g/cc float or sink in water, I should tell them that this is a highly unlikely situation because pure, distilled water is the only known substance with that density? Replies: Hi Colin, No, the density of a substance is not a unique property of the substance. Density is not enough to uniquely identify a solid or liquid. It certainly is one of several physical properties that one likes to measure in order to be sure that a substance is what one supposes it to be. Consider carbon. In its graphitic form a sample of carbon will have a density of about 2.2. In the form of diamond, carbon's density is about 3.5. This simple example shows that the manner in which the element is formed results in a phase with a very different density. More generally, one can form various minerals with various densities and there is no guarantee that one of those will not have a density of 1. The same is true with liquids - thousands of new compounds are synthesized every year, and I am willing to bet any money that some of them have a density of 1 g/cc.

132

Learning in Stomatopod Crustaceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are most often made with the armored heel of this terminalthe sharp "finger" and armored heel on that of the smasher.

Cronin, Thomas W.; Caldwell, Roy L.; Marshall, Justin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

An Introduction to Basic Laboratory Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hood chemical safety codes cover slip dialysis tubing dissection scope* eye goggles eye wash station filter paper finger bowl fire extinguisher flask glass marker gloves graduated...

134

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canadian bacon, egg and cheese Texas toast - Breakfast: sausage gravy omelet - Tuna melt - Smart cuisine: finger-lickin' baked chicken - Mom's meatloaf - Spicy buffalo...

135

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cafe Thursday, Aug. 30 - Breakfast: sausage gravy omelet - Green pork chili - Surfside tuna melt - Mom's meat loaf - Smart cuisine: finger-lickin' oven-fried chicken - Crispy...

136

Painful junctura tendinum of the hand extensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A string-like junctura tendinum was palpable between the ring and little fingers ( Fig.1). Upon flexion-extension of the meta- carpophalangeal (MP) joint of the ...

137

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Anti-Vibration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vibration Gloves Anti-Vibration Gloves Description Color Finish USes FNAL Stock Number Pigskin leather palm and fingers Low-profile closure with woven elastic cuff Neoprene knuckle...

138

Date | 1Refrigeration and Air Conditioning EMA Education and Training Date | 2Refrigeration and Air Conditioning EMA Education and Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Date | 1Refrigeration and Air Conditioning EMA Education and Training #12;Date | 2Refrigeration Flow Coil Design etc. Finger Print Relationship Every evaporator is unique Unstable Region * = examples

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

139

Molecular restrictions for human eye irritation by chemical vapors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and reactive airborne chemicals. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 1998;WL. Chemesthesis: The Common Chemical Sense. In: Finger TE,MH. Quantification of chemical vapors in chemosensory

Cometto-Muniz, J. Enrique; Cain, William S.; Abraham, Michael H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Operating Instructions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The system operation is center around 3 areas of the equipment 1) Deposition chamber 2) Vaporizer 3) Chiller/cold finger ...

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2012 Annual Progress Report -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing R&D Manufacturing R&D Printable Version 2012 Annual Progress Report VI. Manufacturing R&D This section of the 2012 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program focuses on manufacturing R&D. Manufacturing R&D Sub-Program Overview, Nancy Garland, U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly Manufacturing R&D, Michael Ulsh, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Manufacturing of Low-Cost, Durable Membrane Electrode Assemblies Engineered for Rapid Conditioning, Colin Busby, W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. Adaptive Process Controls and Ultrasonics for High-Temperature PEM MEA Manufacture, Dan Walczyk, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Non-Contact Sensor Evaluation for Bipolar Plate Manufacturing Process Control and Smart Assembly of Fuel Cell Stacks, Eric Stanfield,

142

Manufacturing of Low-Cost, Durable Membrane Electrode Assemblies Engineered for Rapid Conditioning - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program F. Colin Busby W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc (Gore) Gore Electrochemical Technologies Team 201 Airport Road Elkton, MD 21921 Phone: (410) 392-3200 Email: CBusby@WLGore.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FСЗ6-08G018052 Subcontractors: * UTC Power, South Windsor, CT * University of Delaware, Newark, DE (UD) * University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (UTK) Project Start Date: October 1, 2008 Project End Date: June 30, 2014

143

Trends in stationary energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trends in stationary energy Trends in stationary energy Colin McCormick Senior Advisor for R&D Office of the Under Secretary US Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2013 April 2013 2 Under Secretary of Energy * Oversee the applied energy programs * Efficiency & Renewables * Electric grid * Fossil energy * Nuclear energy * Indian energy * Support interactions with Office of Science, ARPA-E * Support cross-cutting topics in energy systems * Energy systems interaction * Water-energy nexus * Bulk energy storage * Energy finance * International Lab engagement * Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR) 3 2013: Already a busy year for energy 4 Some notable trends in stationary energy The water-energy nexus The rise of natural gas Global trends New models for the grid

144

NCEM National Center for Electron Microscopy: Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Scientific Technical / Admin. Postdoctoral and Visitors Uli Dahmen, Head Jane Cavlina / Administrator Abhay Gautam Christian Kisielowski John Turner Helmut Poppa Andrew Minor ChengYu Song Frances Allen Andreas Schmid Marissa Libbee Tamara Radetic Peter Ercius Karen Bustillo Haimei Zheng Jim Ciston Alpha N'Diaye Colin Ophus Gong Chen Burak Ozdol Velimir Radmilovic Sara Kiani Hua Guo Christian Liebscher Josh Kacher Chris Nelson Xiuguang Jin Qian Yu Mary Scott Search the LBNL directory services page for other LBNL staff. Scientific Staff Uli Dahmen udahmen@lbl.gov (510) 486-4627 Ulrich Dahmen is Director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy. His current research interests include embedded nanostructures and interfaces in materials. Embedded nanostructures. Size- and shape-dependence of structural phase

145

Microsoft Word - EMSSABChairs.conferencecall.May19.FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 19, 2010 May 19, 2010 Participants Chairs/Representatives: Idaho Willie Preacher, Ceri Chapple Nevada Harold Sullivan, Kelly Snyder, Denise Rupp NNM Ralph Phelps, Lee Bishop, Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge Ron Murphree, Kevin Westervelt, Pete Osborne Paducah Judy Clayton, Ralph Young, Buz Smith, Eric Roberts Portsmouth Dick Snyder, Julie Galloway Richland/Hanford Susan Leckband, Lori Gamache Savannah River Manuel Bettencourt, Gerri Flemming DOE representatives: EM-3.1 John Mocknick, Colin Jones EM-42 Melissa Nielson, Cate Brennan, Michelle Hudson EM-62 Mark Janaskie Opening Remarks Ms. Cate Brennan, the Designated Federal Officer for the Environmental Management Site- Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), called the meeting to order. EM Budget and Strategic Planning Follow-Up

146

09123-14 - Final Report, B - 08-30-13  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA RPSEA Final Report Document Number 09123.14.Final Robert Zubrin, Mark Berggren, James Siebarth, Colin Apke, Boris Nizamov, Thomas Henshaw Pioneer Astronautics http://www.pioneerastro.com/ Reid Grigg, Chongwei Xiao, Ephraim Schofield Petroleum Recovery Research Center New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology http://baervan.nmt.edu/ Green Oil TM : CO 2 - Enhanced Oil Recovery For America's Small Oil Producers Contract Number 09123-14 August 9, 2013 Robert Zubrin, Principal Investigator President, Pioneer Astronautics 11111 W. 8 th Avenue, Lakewood, CO 80215 303-980-0890 Page 1 This report was prepared by Pioneer Astronautics as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of

147

Project Name/Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RCA CM-3 Risk Management RCA CM-3 Risk Management Projects/Programs - RMPs, Tools, and SMEs Project Name/Description (see note below) DOE Program DOE RMP Contractor RMP Combined RMP Tools Database/Risk Analysis SMEs Federal/M&O/Consultant Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Project EE X Research Support Facility Project EE X National Synchrotron Light Source II Project SC X 12 GeV Upgrade Project (TJL) SC X Physical Sciences Facility Project (PNNL) SC X P6, Pertmaster, Excel Mike Shay, Jason Gatelum ITER SC X (internation al pgm) P6, Pertmaster, Risk Checklist, Risk Assessor Handbook John Tapia, Colin Williams, Allen Bishop SING & SING II (SNS, OR) SC X Excel, Analytic Hierarchy, P6 Barbara Thibadeau Modernization of Lab Fac. (ORNL)

148

Office of Fossil Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Semi-annual Progress Report Reporting Period: November, 2008-April, 2009 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston May, 2009 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Oil & Natural Gas Technology

149

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al., Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Area (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Shaul Hurwitz, Christopher D. Farrar, Colin F. Williams (2010) The Thermal Regime In The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, California- Inferences From Precision Temperature Logs In Deep Wells Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Static_Temperature_Survey_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Hurwitz,_Et_Al.,_2010)&oldid=511152"

150

National Energy Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Policy May 2001 Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound Energy for America's Future Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group "America must have an energy policy that plans for the future, but meets the needs of today. I believe we can develop our natural resources and protect our environment." - President George W. Bush For Sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S Government Printing Office Internet: bookstore.gpo.gov Phone: (202) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2250 Mail: Stop SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-0001 ISBN 0-16-050814-2 Members of the National Energy Policy Development Group DICK CHENEY The Vice President COLIN L. POWELL The Secretary of State PAUL O'NEILL The Secretary of the Treasury

151

CNMS_UEC_19_Sep_2011_Smith.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Annual Meeting of the CNMS User Executive Committee September 1 9, 2 011 a t 1 2:15P, ORNL Bldg 8600, Room C--152 UEC Members Attending: Mark Dadmun (Chair), Martyn McLachlan, Nina Balke, David Bucknall, Vivek Prabhu, Colin Wolden, Marco Nardelli, Michael Hickner, Tony Hmelo CNMS r epresentatives: Peter Cummings, Laura Edwards, Tony Haynes, Sean Smith Meeting C onvened 1 2:15P CNMS Update Provided by Sean Smith (slides attached) Discussion P oints * It was noticed that the total number of user publications for the current year through 9/9/11 appear to be down. Haynes explained that this is an artifact of the data collection cycle and that the year was not complete. * The number of active user projects appears to be leveling off at ~250 per year. CNMS

152

Microsoft Word - EMSSABChairs conferencecall Jan27.FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 27, 2011 January 27, 2011 Participants Board Chairs/Representatives Site Support Staff Hanford Susan Leckband Idaho R.D. Maynard, Willie Preacher Nevada Walt Wegst, Kathleen Bienenstein Kelly Snyder, Denise Rupp Northern New Mexico Ralph Phelps, Robert Gallegos Lee Bishop, Menice Santistevan Oak Ridge Ron Murphree, Kevin Westervelt David Adler, Spencer Gross, Pete Osborne Paducah Buz Smith, Eric Roberts Portsmouth Dick Snyder, Larry Parker Rick Greene, Julie Galloway Savannah River Don Bridges Erica Williams DOE-HQ Representatives: EM-5 Shari Davenport EM-60 Joann Luczak EM-41 Tish O'Conor EM-42 Catherine Brennan, Michelle Hudson, Allison Clark EM-43 Arnie Edelman, Dave Mathes EM-3.1 Colin Jones Opening Remarks Ms. Catherine Brennan, Designated Federal Officer for the Environmental Management Site-

153

News Item  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foundry User Alveo Energy Receives $4M from ARPA-E Foundry User Alveo Energy Receives $4M from ARPA-E Alveo Energy-a Bay Area start-up company and Molecular Foundry user-has been awarded $4 million by ARPA-E for their project, "Open Framework Electrode Batteries for Cost-Effective Energy Storage." This venture seeks to develop a new class of batteries based on the pigment Prussian Blue to provide efficient, cost-effective support of renewable energy sources. "This ARPA-E award is an enormous opportunity for Alveo." says Colin Wessells, CEO and lead researcher for Alveo Energy. "It will allow us to rapidly push our battery technology from the final stages of lab R&D through initial pilot-scale production. " The new batteries use a family of electrode materials based on a common and

154

Office of Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Fossil Energy Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate End of Phase 2 Topical Report Reporting Period: June, 2007-June, 2008 Submitted by: Rice University and University of Houston George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Houston June, 2008 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu University of Houston Department of Chemical Engineering 4800 Calhoun Street Houston, TX 77204-4004 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory

155

Microsoft Word - NT42960R17.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate Final Report Reporting Period: July, 2006 -December, 2011 Submitted by: Rice University, University of Texas, and Oklahoma State University George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Texas Priyank Jaiswal, Oklahoma State University May, 2012 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 John Terneus, Program Officer Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy

156

DUCRETE Shielding: A Cost Effective Alternative Radiation Shield  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Submitted to Spectrum 2000, Sept 24-28, 2000, Chattanooga, TN Summary Submitted to Spectrum 2000, Sept 24-28, 2000, Chattanooga, TN DUCRETE: A Cost Effective Radiation Shielding Material W. J. Quapp, Starmet CMI W. H. Miller, University of Missouri-Columbia James Taylor, Starmet CMI Colin Hundley, Starmet CMI Nancy Levoy, Starmet Corporation 1. INTRODUCTION A consequence of uranium enrichment in the US has been the accumulation of nearly 740,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) tails. 1 While this material was once considered a feed stock for the United States Breeder Reactor Program, it is no longer needed. Alternative uses of depleted uranium are few. Some have been used for medical isotope transport casks, some for industrial radioactive source shields, some for military anti-tank

157

Trends in stationary energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in stationary energy Trends in stationary energy Colin McCormick Senior Advisor for R&D Office of the Under Secretary US Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2013 April 2013 2 Under Secretary of Energy * Oversee the applied energy programs * Efficiency & Renewables * Electric grid * Fossil energy * Nuclear energy * Indian energy * Support interactions with Office of Science, ARPA-E * Support cross-cutting topics in energy systems * Energy systems interaction * Water-energy nexus * Bulk energy storage * Energy finance * International Lab engagement * Quadrennial Technology Review (QTR) 3 2013: Already a busy year for energy 4 Some notable trends in stationary energy The water-energy nexus The rise of natural gas Global trends New models for the grid

158

Oil & Natural Gas Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May -October, 2009 May -October, 2009 Submitted by: Rice University, University of Texas, and Oklahoma State University George J. Hirasaki and Walter Chapman, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Gerald R. Dickens, Colin A. Zelt, and Brandon E. Dugan, Earth Science Kishore K. Mohanty, University of Texas Priyank Jaiswal, Oklahoma State University November, 2009 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42960 John Terneus, Program Officer Rice University - MS 362 6100 Main St. Houston, TX 77251-1892 Phone: 713-348-5416; FAX: 713-348-5478; Email: gjh@rice.edu Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy 2 Table of Contents Disclaimer .......................................................................................................... 3

159

Definition: Brophy Occurrence Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Brophy Occurrence Models Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Brophy Occurrence Models Paul Brophy has classified geothermal areas based on a variety of properties such as tectonic setting, controlling structures, and fluid properties.[2] References ↑ Colin F. Williams,Marshall J. Reed,Arlene F. Anderson. 2011. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. In: Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; 2011/02/02; Stanford, California. Stanford, California: Stanford University; p. ↑ [1] Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Brophy_Occurrence_Models&oldid=699053"

160

Enhancing Mobile Browsing and Although the web browser has become a standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interest to mobile users for several reasons, including fat finger issues for input and mobile navigation, limited display for web page rendering, and difficulties in continuing to read while switching activities to run, such as checking weather, emails or schedule, the fat finger problem is still an issue on small

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ergonomics Designs of Aluminum Beverage Cans and Bottles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduced the finite element analyses into the ergonomics designs to evaluate the human feelings numerically and objectively. Two design examples in developing aluminum beverage cans and bottles are presented. The first example describes a design of the tab of the can with better finger access. A simulation of finger pulling up the tab of the can has been performed and a pain in the finger has been evaluated by using the maximum value of the contact stress of a finger model. The finger access comparison of three kinds of tab ring shape designs showed that the finger access of the tab that may have a larger contact area with finger is better. The second example describes a design of rib-shape embossed bottles for hot vending. Analyses of tactile sensation of heat have been performed and the amount of heat transmitted from hot bottles to finger was used to present the hot touch feeling. Comparison results showed that the hot touch feeling of rib-shape embossed bottles is better than that of cylindrical bottles, and that the shape of the rib also influenced the hot touch feeling.

Han Jing; Itoh, Ryouiti; Shinguryo, Takuro [Technical Development Department, Aluminum Company, Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, 1500 Suganuma, Oyama-Cho, Sunto-Gun, Shizuoka, 410-1392 (Japan); Yamazaki, Koetsu [Division of Innovative Technology and Science, Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, 2-40-20 Kodatsuno, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-8667 (Japan); Nishiyama, Sadao [Aluminum Company, Mitsubishi Materials Corporation, 19F Otemachi First Square West, 1-5-1, Ohtemachi, Chiyoda-Ku. Tokyo, 100-8117 (Japan)

2005-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

162

Comparing free-hand Menu Techniques for Distant Displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparing free-hand Menu Techniques for Distant Displays Linear-, Marking- and Finger-Counting Menu's the Idea? Free-hand menu selection on distant displays l Free-hand: no Instrumentation, no touch l Distant-Counting Exploration " " Eyes-free " " Direct Selection " Hierarchy Size * * 5^2 #12;24 How would people express Finger

Bailly, Gilles

163

Planar controlled zone microwave plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxvlle, TN)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

164

Controlled zone microwave plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for initiating a process gas plasma. A conductive plate having a plurality of conductive fingers is positioned in a microwave applicator. An arc forms between the conductive fingers to initiate the formation of a plasma. A transport mechanism may convey process materials through the plasma. A spray port may be provided to expel processed materials.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

165

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

Ryan, M.J.

1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

166

Steam trap monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Gene Frequency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gene Frequency Gene Frequency Name: donna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If six fingers is a dominant human trait why do we have only five? Replies: This is simple. There are just not many genes in the human population for six fingers. Steve Sample Look in any high school biology book for what is known as Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These two scientists (separately) said that gene frequencies do not change much unless something in the environment selects them over other genes. In other words, unless 6 fingers somehow becomes an advantage, and five-fingered people have less of an advantage, the frequency of six fingered people in the population will not necessarily increase. This is the same reason that recessive traits don't disappear from the population. Also, six fingers is not considered attractive and they may not get as many mates. Also, more people are born with six fingers than you might imagine but just have them amputated shortly after birth.

168

Internal pipe attachment mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

169

Pattern formation by injection of air in a non-Brownian suspension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the injection of air in a granular suspension. We use a linear Hele-Saw cell filled with a suspension which is displaced by air, leading to a Saffman-Taylor (fingering) instability. For the suspension, we use an iso-dense mixture where the fluid and the particles have the same density. The volume fraction of particles can thus be adjusted over a wide range. We discuss the question of an effective rheology inside the cell as well as the pattern formation as a function of the granular compacity. We finally report results on the finger width for stable fingers and the thresholds for their destabilization.

C. Chevalier; A. Lindner; E. Clement

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

The acoustics of the bawu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bawu employs a metal free?reed mounted in a bamboo resonating pipe with several finger holes. It is closely related in principle of operation to other Asian free?reed instruments

Casey A. Fetzer; Nicole L. Brucker; Eric D. Shackelford; James P. Cottingham

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Baroclinic Interleaving Instability: A Second-Moment Closure Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interleaving motions on a wide, baroclinic front are modeled using a second-moment closure to represent unresolved fluxes by turbulence and salt fingering. A linear perturbation analysis reveals two broad classes of unstable modes. First are scale-...

W. D. Smyth; H. Burchard; L. Umlauf

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No abstract prepared. Author John Travis Finger + , Eddie Ross Hoover + Document type Book + Has queryThis property is a special property in this wiki. Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role...

173

Low-cost selective deposition of wax onto textured solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The active regions of a solar cell must be inoculated with wax, while leaving the metal fingers and bus bars bare, in preparation for the electroplating step of a new solar panel manufacturing process. Different methods ...

Páez, Daýan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NTU nephelometric turbidity unit OD outside diameter pCiL picocuries per liter PMIT Production Multi-Finger Imaging Tool Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA U.S....

175

HCI gesture tracking using wearable passive tags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis. a wearable system is developed to track hand gestures with passive RFID sensor tags. This system was composed of an ultra-high frequency reader and small, passive, finger-worn tags powered by scavenged RFID ...

Bainbridge, Rachel M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Extending the Virtual Trackball Metaphor to Rear Touch Input Deutsche Telekom Laboratories, TU Berlin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 3D model inspection. The hardware capabilities of mobile devices for rendering 3D content-based touch interaction. This problem has been named the "fat finger problem" [1]. Sev- eral solutions have

177

PalmSpace: Continuous Around-Device Gestures vs. Multitouch for 3D Rotation Tasks on Mobile Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current graphics hardware for mobile devices now allows for rendering sophisticated 3D scenes on mobile on touchscreens caused by the fat finger problem, i.e. occlusion and accu- racy [17], but 3D content itself

178

SNOUT: One-Handed use of Capacitive Touch Devices Adam Zarek, Daniel Wigdor, Karan Singh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- rameters and speech-to-text for text entry. An evaluation of SNOUT shows it to effectively render handheld and accuracy issues that make it similar to but distinctly different from fat-finger problem [28]. Second

Toronto, University of

179

Back-of-Device Authentication on Smartphones Alexander De Luca1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- dential input is moved out of the "normal" view of possible observers, rendering attacks much more difficult. Back-of-device interaction has been proposed to address the so-called "fat finger" problem [24

180

Miniature Fluid Control Valve - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Summary: Technology Description A very small control valve that is used to control flow into and out of a finger prosthesis. The valve makes use of a spring loaded poppet

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fermilab | Take Five for Goal Zero | Gloves | Nitrile Gloves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nitrile Gloves Nitrile Gloves Description Color Finish Chemical Compatibility FNAL Stock Number 5.5 mil thick fingers 5.1 mil at palm 10 long 100% nitrile (non-latex) Powder...

182

The Banana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A banana fits the human hand and mouth as neatly as if it had been made to order Merely zip the skin down and bite -- no messy fingers, no squirting juice, and no seeds to spit...

183

Equilibration of Two-Dimensional Double-Diffusive Intrusions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the equilibration of lateral intrusions in a doubly diffusive fluid with uniform unbounded basic-state gradients in temperature and salinity. These are density compensated in the horizontal direction and finger favorable in ...

Julian Simeonov; Melvin E. Stern

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

General Category  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

travels (or conducts) from the stove top directly into your fingers. Another means of heat transfer is through convection, in which heat is transferred through air flow. If you...

185

Solar cell interconnection and packaging using tape carrier  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an array of photovoltaic cells. It comprises: photovolatic cells having a ratio of mass to surface area of less than 60 milligrams/square centimeter; a dielectric tape having a carrier surface for supporting the photovoltaic cells; interconnect means including an electrical circuit for electrically interconnecting the photovoltaic cells, the interconnect means supported by the dielectric tape on the carrier surface, the electrical circuit including contact fingers; and means defining primary openings in the dielectric tape, a primary opening being associated with a contact finger and positioned such that the contact finger can be directed from below the carrier surface in the direction of the photovoltaic cells and electrically connected to a photovoltaic cell, a portion of both sides of the contact finger being substantially free of the dielectric tape. This patent also describes the array of the above claim, wherein the photovoltaic cells are tandem cells including an upper subcell and a lower subcell.

Kim, N.P.; Stanbery, B.J.

1991-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

186

68 HARPER'S MAGAZINE / JANUARY 2013 he fork is worth considering. It's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

placing of dirty fingers in the communal meat bowl-- and he encouraged it when he returned to England eats his peas with a knife, and that says it all. Steven Shapin teaches history of science at Harvard

Shapin, Steven

187

Influence of gas compression on flame acceleration in the early stage of burning in tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanism of finger flame acceleration at the early stage of burning in tubes has been observed experimentally by Clanet and Searby [Combust. Flame 105: 225 (1996)] for slow propane-air flames, and elucidated analytically and computationally by Bychkov et al. [Combust. Flame 150: 263 (2007)] in the limit of an incompressible flow. We analytically, experimentally and computationally study herein the finger flame acceleration for fast burning flames, when the gas compressibility assumes an important role. Specifically, we have developed a theory through small Mach number expansion up to the first-order terms, demonstrating that gas compression reduces the acceleration rate and thereby moderates the finger flame acceleration noticeably. We have also conducted experiments for hydrogen-oxygen mixtures with considerable initial values of the Mach number, showing finger flame acceleration with the acceleration rate much smaller than those obtained previously for hydrocarbon flames. Furthermore, we have performed...

Valiev, Damir; Kuznetsov, Mikhail; Eriksson, Lars-Erik; Law, Chung K; Bychkov, Vitaly

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Aircraft Observations of a Coastally Trapped Wind Reversal off the California Coast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summertime marine atmospheric boundary layer off the California coast is normally characterized by northerly winds associated with the Pacific high. This pattern is occasionally disturbed by episodes of southerly winds and a finger of fog or ...

Thomas R. Parish; David A. Rahn; David Leon

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

J. Fluid Mech. (2002), vol. 466, pp. 285304. c 2002 Cambridge University Press DOI: 10.1017/S0022112002001258 Printed in the United Kingdom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

critical distance above the finger, below which the stream is cylindrical. Closer inspection reveals; Clarke 1968, 1969; Kaye & Vale 1969; Petrie 1979; Adachi 1987; Gonz´alez-Mendizabal, Olivera

Bush, John W.M.

190

The design of a hybrid DC motor/SMA actuated robotic hand based on physiological and anatomical synergies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new approach to the design and control of multi-fingered hands using hybrid DC motor-Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) array actuators is presented in this thesis. The fundamental design concept is based on the principle of motor ...

Rosmarin, Josiah Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are an apparatus and a method for determining concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Category:OpenEI Community Members | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Community Members OpenEI Community Members Jump to: navigation, search The following are Open Energy Information User/Contributors: Pages in category "OpenEI Community Members" The following 63 pages are in this category, out of 63 total. A User:Aaronbeach User:Abergfel User:Ajohnson7 User:An8thg User:Andrruban User:Arondobos User:Avanega B User:Bbush C User:Calpak User:Cjauzenne User:Clarknd User:Colin.mccormick User:Cwebber D User:Dbgrantham User:Dbowers User:Dbrodt User:Dflower User:Dmulcahy User:DWC Bot E User:Elainethale User:Enaname E cont. User:Enitz User:Enitz/Boot Camp User:Enviroenergy2005 User:Ewilson G User:Graham7781 User:GregZiebold H User:Harris User:Heatpumpsupply J User:J.M.Pearce User:JAABot User:Jackie Lyndon User:Jayhuggins User:Jimrothstein User:Joebloggs User:Jorn.Aabakken User:Justinrickard

194

prstab.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18 18 V. Daniel Elvira, 2 Deborah Errede, 19 Adrian Fabich, 3 William M. Fawley, 16 Richard C. Fernow, 8 Massimo Ferrario, 12 David A. Finley, 2 Nathaniel J. Fisch, 20 Yasuo Fukui, 15 Miguel A. Furman, 16 Tony A. Gabriel, 21 Raphael Galea, 14 Juan C. Gallardo, 8 Roland Garoby, 3 Alper A. Garren, 15 Stephen H. Geer, 2 Simone Gilardoni, 3 Andreas J. Van Ginneken, 2 Ilya F. Ginzburg, 22 Romulus Godang, 13 Maury Goodman, 23 Michael R. Gosz, 1 Michael A. Green, 16 Peter Gruber, 3 John F. Gunion, 24 Ramesh Gupta, 8 John R Haines, 21 Klaus Hanke, 3 Gail G. Hanson, 25 Tao Han, 4 Michael Haney, 19 Don Hartill, 26 Robert E. Hartline, 27 Helmut D. Haseroth, 3 Ahmed Hassanein, 23 Kara Hoffman, 28 Norbert Holtkamp, 21 E. Barbara Holzer, 3 Colin Johnson, 3 Rolland P. Johnson, 27 Carol Johnstone, 2 Klaus Jungmann, 29 Stephen A. Kahn, 8 Daniel M. Kaplan, 1 Eberhard K. Keil, 2 Eun-San Kim, 30 Kwang-Je Kim, 28 Bruce J. King, 31 Harold

195

Reclaiming the Ungentlemanly Arts: The Global Origins of SOE and OSS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sir Colin McV. Gubbins, former director of Britain's Special Operations Executive (SOE), explained in 1966 to a Danish audience that it is much easier to pronounce a new organization than to actually create it. This dissertation examines the processes whereby SOE was created, including how its doctrine was formulated and subsequently disseminated, both to its own agents and to its American counterpart, the Office of Strategic Services (OSS). Traditional narratives, which imply that SOE had no precedents, fail to appreciate that Gubbins and his colleagues consciously looked to past and contemporary examples for inspiration. This dissertation follows Gubbins's career, examining his experience of unconventional warfare in the Allied Intervention in Russia, in Ireland during the Irish Revolution, and in India. To personal experience was added the experience of colleagues and the knowledge he gained by study of several other historical and contemporary conflicts. Pragmatically synthesizing this information, Gubbins authored two brief guides in 1939: the Art of Guerilla Warfare and the Partisan Leader's Handbook. In 1940 Gubbins joined the new SOE and was given charge of both operations and training, allowing his ideas to shape SOE's agents and form their thinking. Even before the entry of the United States into the Second World War, OSS turned to Britain for training in intelligence and sabotage. SOE played a substantial role in this process, propagating Gubbins's ideas even further. Although the Americans drew upon their own sources of inspiration as well, SOE and Gubbins's doctrines were significant, arguably central, to American thinking.

Linderman, Aaron

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Liquid CO2 Displacement of Water in a Dual-Permeability Pore Network Micromodel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeability contrasts exist in multilayer geological formations under consideration for carbon sequestration. To improve our understanding of heterogeneous pore-scale displacements, liquid CO2 (LCO2) - water displacement was evaluated in a pore network micromodel with two distinct permeability zones. Due to the low viscosity ratio (logM = -1.1), unstable displacement occurred at all injection rates over two orders of magnitude. LCO2 displaced water only in the high permeability zone at low injection rates with the mechanism shifting from capillary fingering to viscous fingering with increasing flow rate. At high injection rates, LCO2 displaced water in the low permeability zone with capillary fingering as the dominant mechanism. LCO2 saturation (SLCO2) as a function of injection rate was quantified using fluorescent microscopy. In all experiments, more than 50% of LCO2 resided in the active flowpaths, and this fraction increased as displacement transitioned from capillary to viscous fingering. A continuum-scale two-phase flow model with independently determined fluid and hydraulic parameters was used to predict SLCO2 in the dual-permeability field. Agreement with the micromodel experiments was obtained for low injection rates. However, the numerical model does not account for the unstable viscous fingering processes observed experimentally at higher rates and hence overestimated SLCO2.

Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Grate, Jay W.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Warner, Marvin G.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluation of two-phase relative permeability and capillary pressure relations for unstable displacements in a pore network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of displacement experiments was conducted using five wetting-nonwetting immiscible fluid pairs in a homogenous and uniform pore network. The micromodel was initially saturated with either polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG) or water as a wetting fluid, which was subsequently displaced by a nonwetting fluid (dodecane, hexadecane, or mineral oil) at different flow rates. The experiments were designed to allow determinations of nonwetting fluid relative permeabilities ( ), fluid saturations ( ), and capillary pressure heads ( ). In the displacements, nonwetting fluid saturations increased with increasing flow rates for all five fluid pairs, and viscous fingering, capillary fingering, and stable displacement were observed. Viscous fingering occurred when PEG was displaced by either dodecane or hexadecane. For the water displacements, capillary fingers were observed at low capillary numbers. Due to unstable fingering phenomena, values for the PEG displacements were smaller than for the water displacements. A fitting exercise using the Brooks-Corey (1964) relationship showed that the fitted entry pressure heads are reasonably close to the computed entry pressure head. The fitted pore geometry factor, ?? values for the displacements are considerably lower than what is expected for displacements in homogeneous, highly uniform, porous systems, demonstrating the impact of unstable displacement on the apparent value of ?. It was shown that a continuum-based multiphase model could be used to predict the average behavior for wetting fluid drainage in a pore network as long as independently fitted - and - relations are used. The use of a coupled approach through the Brooks-Corey pore geometry factor underpredicts observed values.

Dehoff, Karl J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Changyong; Grate, Jay W.

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Dynamics of gravity driven three-dimensional thin films on hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterned substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate numerically the dynamics of unstable gravity driven three-dimensional thin liquid films on hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterned substrates of longitudinal stripes and checkerboard arrangements. The thin film can be guided preferentially on hydrophilic longitudinal stripes, while fingers develop on adjacent hydrophobic stripes if their width is large enough. On checkerboard patterns, the film fingering occurs on hydrophobic domains, while lateral spreading is favoured on hydrophilic domains, providing a mechanism to tune the growth rate of the film. By means of kinematical arguments, we quantitatively predict the growth rate of the contact line on checkerboard arrangements, providing a first step towards potential techniques that control thin film growth in experimental setups.

Rodrigo Ledesma-Aguilar; Aurora Hernandez-Machado; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Removable feedwater sparger assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

Challberg, R.C.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Claviers GAG: claviers logiciels optimisés pour la saisie de texte au stylet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The character layout on the keyboards of our computers dates from more than one century and had been designed for reasons which are no longer standing. This layout is all the more annoying when the text input is doing with one finger (or via a stylus) ... Keywords: characters layout, optimisation, soft keyboard

Mathieu Raynal

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Wind MIDI Controller Extraordinary Playability and Versatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WX5 Wind MIDI Controller Extraordinary Playability and Versatility The Yamaha WX5 Wind MIDI Controller takes wind MIDI control to new levels of performance and playability. With precise, responsive wind and lip sensors, a choice of single-reed or recorder type mouthpieces, and a range of fingering

Yang, Junfeng

203

TeslaTouch: electrovibration for touch surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new technology for enhancing touch interfaces with tactile feedback. The proposed technology is based on the electrovibration principle, does not use any moving parts and provides a wide range of tactile feedback sensations to fingers moving ... Keywords: multitouch, tactile feedback, touch screens

Olivier Bau; Ivan Poupyrev; Ali Israr; Chris Harrison

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NANO-SCALE VISUALIZATION OF LIQUID INTERFACES DURING COALESCENCE AND RAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO-SCALE VISUALIZATION OF LIQUID INTERFACES DURING COALESCENCE AND RAPTURE Experiments by Jacob viscosity and interfacial tension) and experimental conditions (shear rate or approach velocity), and nano such as fingering and cavitation, both occurring at the nano- or submicron-scales. The two figures below ­ the first

Akhmedov, Azer

205

ShadowGuides: visualizations for in-situ learning of multi-touch and whole-hand gestures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present ShadowGuides, a system for in-situ learning of multi-touch and whole-hand gestures on interactive surfaces. ShadowGuides provides on-demand assistance to the user by combining visualizations of the user's current hand posture as interpreted ... Keywords: displacement, gesture learning, marking menus, multi-finger

Dustin Freeman; Hrvoje Benko; Meredith Ringel Morris; Daniel Wigdor

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Stability of two-dimensional blind grasping under the gravity effect and rolling constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims to show a sensory-motor coordination control scheme that realizes stable pinching of rigid objects with parallel or nonparallel flat surfaces movable in 2-dimensional vertical plane by a pair of robot fingers with hemispherical ends. ... Keywords: Bernstein's DOF problem, Blind grasping, Force/torque balance, Multifingered hand, Sensory-motor coordination

S. Arimoto; M. Yoshida; J.-h. Bae

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Volume 2, Chapter 12: Eliminating Defects and Knowing the Reasons Behind Defects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

down to the surface.] One should gradually sand (or rasp) the bridge down, checking the results it tight. The defects of the nut and yin­t'o; that is, striking noises, shadow sounds, striking fingers fasteners should not be too tight or too loose. If too tight, then tuning the strings will be difficult

Binkley, Jim

208

F A C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T A N D O P E R A T I O N S C E N T E R Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15401 Plumbing June 9, 2011 Revision 0 SAND 2011-3946P This document has been reviewed by a Derivative they are free of dirt and grit, and are well lubricated. 3 Run-up all nuts finger tight. 4 Develop the required. The joints must be made perfectly tight by the use of Teflon tape or approved Teflon thread sealing

209

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use Point Model: a user has repeatedly acquired the shown crosshairs using finger postures ranging from 90 than capacitive sensing. INTRODUCTION Acquiring a small target on a touch screen is error prone. We can

Baudisch, Patrick

210

IN UTERO ELECTROPORATION A. Preparation of micropipettes for DNA injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not to damage either the placenta or the blood vessels connecting with the uterus. 9. Hold the fiberoptic light with the index and middle finger, and place the uterus between the fiberoptic light cable and thumb. Squeeze) Equipment Warm plate Fiberoptic light (Leica) Micro-manipulator (KD scientific) Pulse generator (BTX 830

Oliver, Douglas L.

211

Feature Extraction Based on Maximum Nearest Subspace Margin Criterion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the classification rule of sparse representation-based classification (SRC) and linear regression classification (LRC), we propose the maximum nearest subspace margin criterion for feature extraction. The proposed method can be seen as a preprocessing ... Keywords: Dimensionality reduction, Face recognition, Feature extraction, Finger knuckle print recognition, Linear regression classification

Yi Chen; Zhenzhen Li; Zhong Jin

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Lawn Maintenance Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most homeowners do not consider lawn maintenance to be dangerous. However lawn mowers, trimmers, edgers and other power equipment can cause minor to severe burns and lacerations, broken and dislocated bones, eye injuries and loss of fingers, toes and legs. You can avoid accidents like these by following the safety guidelines in this publication.

Smith, David

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

On selecting Gabor features for biometric authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a Gabor feature selection technique that allows us to develop a fast and robust Gabor-feature based biometric system. Existing Gabor based methods use a huge number of Gabor features to represent the patterns. Our experiments on different ... Keywords: Gabor features, automated identification, biometrics, ear authentication, equal error rate, feature selection, finger authentication

Loris Nanni; Alessandra Lumini

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

An Integrated View on Plasma Power Exhaust and In-vessel Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kinetic energy and electromagnetic waves. In addition control power will be injected in the plasma core generated during these transition phases. In addition, instabilities of plasma will produce off with limited regions (EHF elements) in which the value can reach 5 MW/m2. Manufacturing of the 9-finger module

215

Bow wave and spray dynamics by a wedge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flows around a wedge-shaped bow are simulated with the aim of investigating the wave breaking mechanism and small scale features of ship bow waves. This fluid dynamics video shows the plunging wave breaking process around the wedge including the thin water sheet formation, overturning sheet with surface disturbance, fingering and breaking up into spray, plunging and splashing, and air entrainment.

Wang, Zhaoyuan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Exploring the impulsion and vibration effects of tactile patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the impulsion and vibration properties of different tactile patterns. These properties describe the unique states of the pins for example raised or lowered. The tactile feedback is provided by Braille pins on a finger and is in the ... Keywords: braille cell, impulsion, selection, tactile feedback, tactile patterns, vibration

Muhammad Tahir; Gilles Bailly; Eric Lecolinet

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pseudo three-dimensional vision-based nail-fold morphological and hemodynamic analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a Pseudo three-dimensional Vision-based Nail-fold Morphological and Hemodynamic Analysis (PTVNMHA) is proposed to automatically extract morphological/hemodynamic features from a microscopic nail-fold image sequence, reconstruct the corresponding ... Keywords: Blood flow rate, Blood flow velocity, Finger nail-fold morphological/hemodynamic analysis, Microcirculation, Pseudo three-dimensional capillary reconstruction

Lun-Chien Lo; Ker-Cheng Lin; Yuan-Nian Hsu; Tsung-Po Chen; John Y. Chiang; Yung-Fu Chen; Yin-Tso Liu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Los Alamos National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 1-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laboratory and the associated residential and commercial areas of Los Alamos and White Rock are located on the Pajarito Plateau, which consists of a series of finger-like mesas separated by deep east-to- west-oriented canyons cut by streams. Mesa tops range in elevation from approximately 7,800 ft on the flanks

219

A Study Of Semiconductor Quantum Dots In The Application To Terahertz Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laboratory and the associated residential and commercial areas of Los Alamos and White Rock are located on the Pajarito Plateau, which consists of a series of finger-like mesas separated by deep east-to- west-oriented canyons cut by streams. Mesa tops range in elevation from approximately 7,800 ft on the flanks

Sheldon, Nathan D.

220

Peer-To-Peer Unstructured Anycasting Using Correlated Swarms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compared to search without caching. The rest of the paper is organized as follows. In Section 2The terms community can be entered in the querying peer's primary finger table. The second search strategy employs for the success of any social-networking based application is the efficiency of search. In this paper, we propose

Konstantopoulos, Takis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

OmniTouch: wearable multitouch interaction everywhere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OmniTouch is a wearable depth-sensing and projection system that enables interactive multitouch applications on everyday surfaces. Beyond the shoulder-worn system, there is no instrumentation of the user or environment. Foremost, the system allows the ... Keywords: appropriated surfaces, finger tracking, object classification, on-body computing, on-demand interfaces

Chris Harrison; Hrvoje Benko; Andrew D. Wilson

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Distant Freehand Pointing and Clicking on Very Large, High Resolution Displays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distant Freehand Pointing and Clicking on Very Large, High Resolution Displays Daniel Vogel, Ravin" selection with finger or thumb. ABSTRACT We explore the design space of freehand pointing and clicking interfaces. Although alternatives like gesture-based interfaces have been explored, the self-revealing nature

Toronto, University of

223

Rock Harbor UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passage Conglomerate Bay Five Finger Bay Lane Cove Stockly Bay Lake Ojibway Siskiwit River Creek Little River Washington Moskey M cCargoe Cove Robinson Bay Amygdaloid Channel Pickerel Cove Chippewa Harbor Crystal Cove Belle Isle Canoe Rocks Caribou Island Saginaw Point Tookers Island The Palisades Raspberry

224

TUIC: enabling tangible interaction on capacitive multi-touch displays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present TUIC, a technology that enables tangible interaction on capacitive multi-touch devices, such as iPad, iPhone, and 3M's multi-touch displays, without requiring any hardware modifications. TUIC simulates finger touches on capacitive displays ... Keywords: 2d marker, frequency tag, interactive surface, multi-touch, physical interaction, tags, tangible, tui

Neng-Hao Yu; Li-Wei Chan; Seng Yong Lau; Sung-Sheng Tsai; I-Chun Hsiao; Dian-Je Tsai; Fang-I Hsiao; Lung-Pan Cheng; Mike Chen; Polly Huang; Yi-Ping Hung

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

A Study on IF Signal Fading in the Fiber-Optic Millimeter Wave System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not to damage either the placenta or the blood vessels connecting with the uterus. 9. Hold the fiberoptic light with the index and middle finger, and place the uterus between the fiberoptic light cable and thumb. Squeeze) Equipment Warm plate Fiberoptic light (Leica) Micro-manipulator (KD scientific) Pulse generator (BTX 830

Choi, Woo-Young

226

High-resolution x-ray guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography of joint tissues in hand osteoarthritis: Morphological and functional assessments  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of multimodality functional imaging techniques to identify the quantitative optical findings that can be used to distinguish between osteoarthritic and normal finger joints. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, the distal interphalangeal finger joints from 40 female subjects including 22 patients and 18 healthy controls were examined clinically and scanned by a hybrid imaging system. This system integrated x-ray tomosynthetic setup with a diffuse optical imaging system. Optical absorption and scattering images were recovered based on a regularization-based hybrid reconstruction algorithm. A receiver operating characteristic curve was used to calculate the statistical significance of specific optical features obtained from osteoarthritic and healthy joints groups. Results: The three-dimensional optical and x-ray images captured made it possible to quantify optical properties and joint space width of finger joints. Based on the recovered optical absorption and scattering parameters, the authors observed statistically significant differences between healthy and osteoarthritis finger joints. Conclusions: The statistical results revealed that sensitivity and specificity values up to 92% and 100%, respectively, can be achieved when optical properties of joint tissues were used as classifiers. This suggests that these optical imaging parameters are possible indicators for diagnosing osteoarthritis and monitoring its progression.

Yuan Zhen; Zhang Qizhi; Sobel, Eric S.; Jiang Huabei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Division of Rheumatology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Student Handbook Baylor College of Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Section 1 Introduction 1 1 Introduction Dextrous Manipulation means handling objects skillfully, pneumatic pistons, etc.) to achieve the desired finger targets and to correct for modeling errors. How can to behave locally in a prescribed way (e.g. remote center of compliance, stiffness control). High­level task

Lichtarge, Olivier

228

Doses to the hand during the administration of radiolabeled antibodies containing Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure of the hands of medical personnel administering radiolabeled antibodies (RABs) was evaluated on the basis of (a) observing and photo-documenting administration techniques, and (b) experimental data on doses to thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) on fingers of phantom hands holding syringes, and on syringes, with radionuclides in the syringes in each case. Actual exposure data for I-131 and Lu-177 were obtained in field studies. Variations in handling and administration techniques were identified. Dose rates measured using TLDs on the surface of loaded syringes were adjusted for differences in electronic stopping power, absorption coefficients, and attenuation between dosimeters and tissue to estimate dose-to-skin averaged over 1 cm{sup 2} at 7 mg cm{sup {minus}2} depth for Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177. Dose rate coefficients to the skin, if in contact with the syringe wall, were 89, 1.9, 3.8, and 0.41 {micro}Sv s{sup {minus}1} per 37 MBq (1 mCi) for Y-90, Tc-99m, I-131, and Lu-177, respectively. For dose reduction, when using Y-90 the importance was clearly indicated of (a) avoiding direct contact with syringes containing RABs, if practical, and (b) using a beta-particle shield on the syringe. In using a syringe for injection, doses can best be approximated for the geometry studied by (a) wearing a finger dosimeter on the middle finger, toward the outside of the hand, on the hand operating the plunger, and (b) wearing finger dosimeters on the inner (palm) side of the finger on the hand that supports the syringe for energetic beta-particle emitters, such as Y-90 and Re-188.

Barber, D.E. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Public Health; Carsten, A.L.; Kaurin, D.G.L.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields M. Ferer, (mferer@wvu.edu) Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315, Grant S. Bromhal, (bromhal@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; and Duane H. Smith, (dsmith@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 & Department of Physics, West Virginia University. Underground injection of gas is a common practice in the oil and gas industry. Injection into deep, brine-saturated formations is a commercially proven method of sequestering CO 2 . However, it has long been known that displacement of a connate fluid by a less viscous fluid produces unstable displacement fronts with significant fingering. This fingering allows only a

230

Temperature effects on oil-water relative permeabilities for unconsolidated sands  

SciTech Connect

This study presents an experimental investigation of temperature effects on relative permeabilities of oil- water systems in unconsolidated sands. The fluids used in this study were refined mineral oil and distilled water. A rate sensitivity study was done on residual oil saturation and oil and water relative permeabilities. The temperature sensitivity study of relative permeabilities was conducted in 2 parts. The first was to investigate changes in residual oil saturation with temperature where the cores were 100% saturated with oil at the start of the waterflood. The second part continued the floods for a longer time until the water-cut was virtually 100%. Under these conditions, little change in residual oil saturation was observed with temperature. A study on viscous instabilities also was performed. This verified the existence of viscous fingers during waterflooding. It also was observed that tubing volume after the core could cause fingering, resulting in lower apparent breakthrough oil recoveries.

Sufi, A.H.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2013 April 30, 2013 Injury/Illness Cases - April 2013 * Index finger strain * The Guest Faculty reported discomfort in finger associated with use of computer mouse. * Neck strain * The Electrician experience a muscle spasm in the neck while lying in an awkward position to access a junction box in the interstitial space between the roof of a cleanroom and the building space ceiling. * Thumb, elbow and hip strain * The Administrative Assistant experienced pain and discomfort of the thumb, elbow, and hip while working at computer workstation. 2 Environment / Health / Safety / Security DIVISION Ergonomic Injury/Illness Cases - April 2013 * Contusion of knee, elbow and wrist * The Administrative Assistant tripped on a step between two levels of the observation deck on the roof of Building 90.

232

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 30, 2013 November 30, 2013 Environment / Health / Safety DIVISION Injury/Illness Cases - November 2013 * Contusion on hand * While entering the lower level of Building 47, the Computer Systems Engineer tripped over a one inch rise of the floor slab at the doorway and fell striking the left hand against the ground. * Lower leg fracture * The Research Associate's ankle rolled to the side after slipping on small gravel while walking across the patio between Buildings 74 and 84. This resulted in a fracture of the lower leg. Slip Trip Fall 2 Environment / Health / Safety DIVISION Injury/Illness Cases - November 2013 * Laceration on finger * The Electronics Engineering Technologist lacerated the middle finger while using a utility knife to cut cable sheathing.

233

DOE Solar Decathlon: Cornell University: Living the Good (Solar) Life  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cornell University's Solar Decathlon 2007 house viewed from the southeast in its permanent location near New York's Finger Lakes. Cornell University's Solar Decathlon 2007 house viewed from the southeast in its permanent location near New York's Finger Lakes. Enlarge image Light Canopy's owners made additions to the house that honored the decathletes' original vision. (Courtesy of Mike Koplinka-Loehr) Who: Cornell University What: Light Canopy Where: Lansing, NY 14882 Map This House Public tours: Open for the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association's Green Buildings Open House Tours each fall Solar Decathlon 2007 Cornell University: Living the Good (Solar) Life The Cornell University team auctioned off its solar-powered house, Light Canopy, to a private buyer after competing in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2007. The Koplinka-Loehr family now resides in the house at its permanent location on the southeastern shore of New York's Cayuga Lake.

234

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 30, 2013 June 30, 2013 Injury/Illness Cases - June 2013 2 Environment / Health / Safety / Security DIVISION * Neck Strain * The Administrative Assistant III experienced the onset of neck discomfort associated with work at computer. * Elbow Strain, Bilateral * The Principal Contracts Officer experienced onset of pain in both elbows associated with work at computer. * Bilateral Hand and Finger Pain * The Senior Custodian reported the onset of pain in the hands (bilaterally) associated with the performance of job tasks. Ergonomic Cases Injury/Illness Cases - June 2013 3 Environment / Health / Safety / Security DIVISION * Multiple Upper Extremity Strain * The Administrative Assistant III experienced the onset of pain in the forearms, hands, and fingers associated with work at computer.

235

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 These slides are updated on a monthly basis, as soon as data are reasonably final for the preceding month. Hours worked are estimated monthly and updated with final and actual values quarterly. While every effort is made to present accurate and final data, data may change in subsequent months, as additional information becomes available and as later developments change the recordability of some cases. Refer questions about these charts to rwfisher@lbl.gov 2 Narrative of October 2010 Injury/Illness Cases * Guest Student Assistant - Finger contusion - While plumbing additional signal cables in a NIM bin rack the left middle finger struck the blade of one of the cooling fans. * Materials Project Scientist/Engineer - Allergic response - Employee experienced a sudden onset of allergy

236

Passive tire pressure sensor and method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A surface acoustic wave device includes a micro-machined pressure transducer for monitoring tire pressure. The device is configured having a micro-machined cavity that is sealed with a flexible conductive membrane. When an external tire pressure equivalent to the cavity pressure is detected, the membrane makes contact with ridges on the backside of the surface acoustic wave device. The ridges are electrically connected to conductive fingers of the device. When the detected pressure is correct, selected fingers on the device will be grounded producing patterned acoustic reflections to an impulse RF signal. When the external tire pressure is less than the cavity reference pressure, a reduced reflected signal to the receiver results. The sensor may further be constructed so as to identify itself by a unique reflected identification pulse series.

Pfeifer, Kent Bryant (Los Lunas, NM); Williams, Robert Leslie (Albuquerque, NM); Waldschmidt, Robert Lee (Calgary, CA); Morgan, Catherine Hook (Ann Arbor, MI)

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

Locking support for nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A locking device for supporting and locking a nuclear fuel assembly within a cylindrical bore formed by a support plate, the locking device including a support and locking sleeve having upwardly extending fingers forming wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annular tapered surface on the fuel assembly and the support plate bore as well as downwardly extending fingers having wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annularly tapered surface on the support plate bore and the fuel assembly whereby the sleeve tends to support and lock the fuel assembly in place within the bore by its own weight while facilitating removal and/or replacement of the fuel assembly.

Ledin, Eric (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Cable shield connecting device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

Silva, Frank A. (Basking Ridge, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Vacuum tool manipulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus for manipulating a vacuum hose in a reactor vessel comprising a housing with two opposing openings, an arm carried by the housing and deployable from a stowed position essentially completely within the housing to an extended position where the arm extends through the two openings in a generally horizontal position. The arm preferably has a two-fingered gripping device for gripping the vacuum hose but may carry a different end effector such as a grinding wheel. The fingers are opened and closed by one air cylinder. A second air cylinder extends the device. A third air cylinder within the housing pivotally pulls the opposing end of the arm into the housing via a pivoting member pivotally connected between the third air cylinder shaft and the arm.

Zollinger, W.T.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Biometric cryptosystem based on discretized fingerprint texture descriptors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on a biometric cryptosystem implementation and evaluation based on a number of fingerprint texture descriptors. The texture descriptors, namely, the Gabor filter-based FingerCode, a local binary pattern (LBP), and a local direction ... Keywords: BCH, BPA, Biometric discretization, DROBA, ECC, EER, Error-correcting code, FAR, FCS, FRR, Fingerprint texture descriptors, Fuzzy commitment scheme, GAR, LBP, LCM, LDP, LDPC, LDerivP, Local binary pattern, MPA, PEG, ROI, SPA

Yadigar Imamverdiyev; Andrew Beng Jin Teoh; Jaihie Kim

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Interview with John Walker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-organisms, called Cephalosporins which became commercially extremely important and Abraham became immensely wealthy from that and gave a great proportion of his wealth back to Oxford University and Lincoln College, where he was a Fellow; at the time... and was very happy; Hal Dixon and Dan Brown; Aaron Klug and zinc fingers; the Walker motif 12:38:16 Peter Mitchell and his concepts of chemiosmosis dominated the biogenetics field; had been difficult to get established even after his 1978 Nobel Prize; Mitchell...

Walker, John E

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

243

A novel hybrid ultrafast shape descriptor method for use in virtual screening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dis- covery. Curr Pharm Des 2001, 7:567-597. 10. Gasteiger J: Handbook of Chemoinformatics Weinheim: Wiley; 2003. 11. Elsevier MDL: 2440 Camino Ramon, Suite 300, San Ramon, CA 94583 . 12. Daylight Chemical Information Systems Inc.: Daylight... not use a predefined dictionary, but incorporate patterns, often made up of atom types, augmented atoms and atom paths. The Daylight finger- Such descriptors have been reported by Hert et al. [13,14] and Bender et al. [15] to perform well in the domain...

Cannon, Edward O; Nigsch, Florian; Mitchell, John B O

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

244

An infant with double trisomy (48,XXX,+18)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report on an infant with double trisomy 48,XXX,+18. She presented with manifestation of trisomy 18: prominent occiput, microphthalmia, small mouth, micrognathia, malformed ears, congenital heart defect, overlapping fingers, talipes equinovarus, and rockerbottom feet. An extra palmar crease was present only on the right hand. This patient was alive at 12 months. The clinical manifestations are compared with those of 10 previously reported cases. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Jaruratanasirikul, S.; Jinorose, U. [Prince of Songkla Univ. (Thailand)

1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Synchronous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Multiple Digits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cancers of the perionychium are relatively rare occurrences and are often related to chronic inflammation associated with trauma, infection, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or other carcinogens. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor reported of the nail bed. Synchronous squamous cell carcinomas of the perionychium have been rarely reported. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with synchronous squamous cell carcinomas involving both hands and multiple digits. Treatment modalities include chemotherapeutics, Mohs surgery, and amputation. Early diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the nail bed provides the greatest chance to preserve maximal function of the hand. Onychomycosis may be the presenting symptom of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma and may also be a predisposing factor in patients with occupational risk factors. Suspicion of this disease process can help the clinician establish the diagnosis via biopsy and provide optimal care for these patients. Cancers of the perionychium are relatively rare occurrences and are often related to chronic inflammation associated with trauma, infection, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or other carcinogens. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common tumor reported of the nail bed. Synchronous squamous cell carcinomas of the perionychium have been rarely reported. We present a case of a 46-year-old woman with synchronous squamous cell carcinomas involving both hands and multiple digits. CASE REPORT A 46-year-old white female was referred from the dermatology clinic with a biopsy-proven squamous cell carcinoma of the left ring finger perionychium. Physical examination demonstrated erythematous scaly lesions with the absence of a nail plate at the left thumb, index Authors have no financial disclaimers or conflicts to disclose. 70 ABNER ET AT finger, and ring finger as well as the right long finger, without associated lymphadenopathy (Fig 1). She described chronic onychomycosis of the nails attributed to her job as a dishwasher.

Morton L. Kasdan; Bradon J. Wilhelmi; Mda A B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The epidemiology of low vision and blindness associated with trichiasis in southern Sudan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 3Christian Mission Aid, Nairobi, Kenya, Africa, 4Family Health International, Nairobi, Kenya, Africa, 5Lighthouse For Christ Eye Centre, Mombasa, Kenya, Africa, 6Ministry of Health, Government of Southern Sudan, Juba, Sudan, Africa and 7The Carter... was done in persons with VA < 3/60 by counting fingers, hand movement and light perception as appropriate. All participants then underwent basic eye examination. Using a torch and a ×2.5 magnifying binoc- ular loupe, each eye was examined first for in...

Ngondi, Jeremiah; Reacher, Mark; Matthews, Fiona E; Ole-Sempele, Francis; Onsarigo, Alice; Matende, Ibrahim; Baba, Samson; Brayne, Carol; Emerson, Paul M

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Digital instability of a confined elastic meniscus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin soft elastic layers serving as joints between relatively rigid bodies may function as sealants, thermal, electrical, or mechanical insulators, bearings, or adhesives. When such a joint is stressed, even though perfect adhesion is maintained, the exposed free meniscus in the thin elastic layer becomes unstable, leading to the formation of spatially periodic digits of air that invade the elastic layer, reminiscent of viscous fingering in a thin fluid layer. How- ever, the elastic instability is reversible and rate-independent, dis- appearing when the joint is unstressed. We use theory, experiments, and numerical simulations to show that the transition to the digital state is sudden (first-order), the wavelength and amplitude of the fingers are proportional to the thickness of the elastic layer, and the required separation to trigger the instability is inversely proportional to the in-plane dimension of the layer. Our study reveals the energetic origin of this instability and has implications for the strength of polymeric adhesives; it also suggests a method for patterning thin films reversibly with any arrangement of localized fingers in a digital elastic memory, which we confirm experimentally.

John S. Biggins; Baudouin Saintyves; Zhiyan Wei; Elisabeth Bouchaud; L. Mahadevan

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

Monte Carlo Assessments of Absorbed Doses to the Hands of Radiopharmaceutical Workers Due to Photon Emitters  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the characterization of radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine technicians resulting from the handling of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation monitoring using ring dosimeters indicates that finger dosimeters that are used to show compliance with applicable regulations may overestimate or underestimate radiation doses to the skin depending on the nature of the particular procedure and the radionuclide being handled. To better understand the parameters governing the absorbed dose distributions, a detailed model of the hands was created and used in Monte Carlo simulations of selected nuclear medicine procedures. Simulations of realistic configurations typical for workers handling radiopharmaceuticals were performedfor a range of energies of the source photons. The lack of charged-particle equilibrium necessitated full photon-electron coupled transport calculations. The results show that the dose to different regions of the fingers can differ substantially from dosimeter readings when dosimeters are located at the base of the finger. We tried to identify consistent patterns that relate the actual dose to the dosimeter readings. These patterns depend on the specific work conditions and can be used to better assess the absorbed dose to different regions of the exposed skin.

Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Karagiannis, Harriet [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro electro mechanical sensor that uses capacitive readout electronics. The sensor involves a micromachined low frequency rocking accelerometer with capacitive pickoff fabricated by deep reactive ion etching. The accelerometer includes a central silicon proof mass, is suspended by a thin polysilicon tether, and has a moving electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) located at each end the proof mass. During movement (acceleration), the tethered mass moves relative to the surrounding packaging, for example, and this defection is measured capacitively by a plate capacitor or interdigitated finger capacitor, having the cooperating fixed electrode (capacitor plate or interdigitated fingers) positioned on the packaging, for example. The micromachined rocking accelerometer has a low frequency (<500 Hz), high sensitivity (.mu.G), with minimal power usage. The capacitors are connected to a power supply (battery) and to sensor interface electronics, which may include an analog to digital (A/D) converter, logic, RF communication link, antenna, etc. The sensor (accelerometer) may be, for example, packaged along with the interface electronics and a communication system in a 2".times.2".times.2" cube. The proof mass may be asymmetric or symmetric. Additional actuating capacitive plates may be used for feedback control which gives a greater dynamic range.

Lee, Abraham P. (Arlington, VA); Simon, Jonathon N. (San Leandro, CA); McConaghy, Charles F. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hydrogen Storage in metal-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been known for over thirty years that potassium-intercalated graphites can readily adsorb and desorb hydrogen at {approx}1 wt% at 77 K. These levels are much higher than can be attained in pure graphite, owing to a larger thermodynamic enthalpy of adsorption. This increased enthalpy may allow hydrogen sorption at higher temperatures. Potassium has other beneficial effects that enable the design of a new material: (a) Increased adsorption enthalpy in potassium-intercalated graphite compared to pure graphite reduces the pressure and increases the temperature required for a given fractional coverage of hydrogen adsorption. We expect the same effects in potassium-intercalated SWNTs. (b) As an intercalant, potassium separates c-axis planes in graphite. Potassium also separates the individual tubes of SWNTs ropes producing swelling and increased surface area. Increased surface area provides more adsorption sites, giving a proportionately higher capacity. The temperature of adsorption depends on the enthalpy of adsorption. The characteristic temperature is roughly the adsorption enthalpy divided by Boltzmann's constant, k{sub B}. For the high hydrogen storage capacity of SWNTs to be achieved at room temperature, it is necessary to increase the enthalpy of adsorption. Our goal for this project was to use metal modifications to the carbon surface of SWNTs in order to address both enhanced adsorption and surface area. For instance, the enthalpy of sorption of hydrogen on KC8 is 450 meV/H{sub 2}, whereas it is 38 meV/H{sub 2} for unmodified SWNTs. By adsorption thermodynamics we expect approximately that the same performance of SWNTs at 77 K will be achieved at a temperature of [450/38] 77 K = 900 K. This is a high temperature, so we expect that adsorption on nearly all the available sites for hydrogen will occur at room temperature under a much lower pressure. This pressure can be estimated conveniently, since the chemical potential of hydrogen is approximately proportional to the logarithm of the pressure. Using 300 K for room temperature, the 100 bar pressure requirement is reduced to exp(-900/300) 100 bar = 5 bar at room temperature. This is in the pressure range used for prior experimental work such as that of Colin and Herold in the late 1960's and early 1970's.

Dr. Ahn

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Manufacturing Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Manufacturing SHARE Manufacturing 200401490 Production of Materials with Superior Properties Utilizing High Magnetic Field (Related ID # 200501531, 200701867, 200802085, 200902312, 201002455, 201102675) 200701900 Robust Digital Valve for Prosthetic Finger, Microsurgery, Robotics (Related ID # 200701983, 200802088) 200701972 Manufacturing Biodiesel from Triglycerides (Related ID # 200702012, 200802186) 200701983 Meso-scale Fluidic Digital Valve 200802083 A Hydraulic Flow Control Device by Means of a Digital Poppet Valve 200802088 Miniature shape memory alloy fluid control valve 200902224 Glass Drawing for Wire Arrays 200902231 Nano/Micro Vacuum Triodes Using Glass Fiber Drawing Methods 200902291 Method of Machining Carbon and Graphite foams 200902309 Multi-Winding Homopolar Electric Machine Offers

253

Effect of gate-driven spin resonance on the conductance of a one-dimensional quantum wire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider quasiballistic electron transmission in a one-dimensional quantum wire subject to both time-independent and periodic potentials of a finger gate that results in a coordinate- and time-dependent Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling. A spin-dependent conductance is calculated as a function of external constant magnetic field, the electric field frequency, and the potential strength. The results demonstrate the effect of the gate-driven electric dipole spin resonance in a transport phenomenon such as spin-flip electron transmission.

Almas F. Sadreev; E. Ya. Sherman

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Revue d’Etudes Tibétaines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

That is, the words for the various offerings, padyaµ, pu?pe etc. should be substituted for arghaµ in turn. The Earth Ritual 11 line 4 With (this mantra) three times, offer the gtor ma and seal (it) with subduing (the earth). "You, Goddess, were mastered... ?†ha Buddhafield. With the Svabhĺva (Emptiness) mantra (see above: 6), the Vajra Master meditates on the five fingers of his right hand as a five-spoked rdo rje and after waving his hand in the air, he touches the earth, ritually establishing the earth in its pure...

Achard, Jean-Luc

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

STRUCTURE FOR SUB-ASSEMBLIES OF ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sub-assemblies for electronic systems, particularly a unit which is self- contained and which may be adapted for quick application to and detachment from a chassis or panel, are discussed. The disclosed structure serves the dual purpose of a cover or enclosure for a subassembly comprising a base plate and also acts as a clamp for retaining the base plate in position on a chassis. The clamping action is provided by flexible fingers projecting from the side walls of the cover and extending through grooves in the base plate to engage with the opposite side of the chassis.

Bell, P.R.; Harris, C.C.

1959-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Photovoltaic panel clamp  

SciTech Connect

A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

Mittan, Margaret Birmingham (Oakland, CA); Miros, Robert H. J. (Fairfax, CA); Brown, Malcolm P. (San Francisco, CA); Stancel, Robert (Loss Altos Hills, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

Photovoltaic panel clamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

Thermoelectric battery, protected against shocks and accelerations  

SciTech Connect

In a thermoelectric battery the heat source is suspended on the end of a thermoelectric unit, the other end of which is attached via a heat conducting mass to the casing. A resilient mounting permits resilient rocking of the thermoelectric unit to reduce stress on the unit in the event of shock or acceleration applied to the casing and spring fingers not normally in contact with the heat source or the thermoelectric unit are positioned to arrest the heat source if the assembly rocks more than a predetermined amount.

Brown, M.H.; Myatt, J.

1979-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

Computer-assisted tomography for the observation of oil displacement in porous media  

SciTech Connect

Computer-assisted tomography (CAT) is used to obtain cross-sectional images of Berea sandstone cores during oil displacement experiments. Local oil saturation averaged over an area of about 0.03X0.03 in. (0.8X0.8 mm) square is computed as a function of spatial position and time. A series of CAT scan images displaying the time evolution of the fluid distribution at one cross section are shown to illustrate the formation of viscous fingers.

Wang, S.Y.; Ayral, S.; Gryte, C.C.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

Bulman, David Edward (Cincinnati, OH); Darkins, Jr., Toby George (Loveland, OH); Stumpf, James Anthony (Columbus, IN); Schroder, Mark S. (Greenville, SC); Lipinski, John Joseph (Simpsonville, SC)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County --  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Title Breast Cancer and Personal Environmental Risk Factors in Marin County -- Pilot Study Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2003 Authors Erdmann, Christine A., Georgianna Farren, Kimberly Baltzell, Terri Chew, Cynthia Clarkson, Ruth Fleshman, Colin Leary, Mary Mizroch, Fern Orenstein, Marion L. Russell, Virginia Souders-Mason, and Margaret Wrensch Abstract The purpose of the Personal Environmental Risk Factor Study (PERFS) pilot project was to develop methodologies and a questionnaire for a future population-based case-control study to investigate the role of selected environmental exposures in breast cancer development. Identification of etiologically relevant exposures during a period of potential vulnerability proximate to disease onset offers the possibility of clinical disease prevention even when disease initiation may have already occurred many years earlier. Certain personal environmental agents or combinations of agents may influence disease promotion. Therefore, this pilot study focused on exposures that occurred during the ten-year period prior to diagnosis for cases and the last ten years for controls, rather than more historic exposures. For this pilot study, we used a community-based research approach. In our collaborative efforts, community members participated with academic researchers in all phases of the research, including research question identification, study design, development of research tools, development of the human subjects protocol, and report writing. Community member inclusion was based upon the concept that community participation could improve the relevance of scientific studies and ultimate success of the research by encouraging an ongoing dialogue between community members and academic representatives. Early activities of this project focused on the collection of input from the community regarding the possible role of environmental factors in the incidence of breast cancer in Marin County. The intent was to inform the scientists of community concerns, enhance the research team's understanding of the community being studied, and provide interested community members with a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of traditional research methods through active participation in the research process. This pilot study identified specific testable hypotheses through review of the literature and consultation with relevant experts and the affected community. Initially, the study was to focus on modifiable personal environmental exposures that are associated with breast tumor promotion and higher socioeconomic status (SES). However, little information was available in the scientific literature regarding the putative mechanism by which some of the suspected environmental factors may act (i.e., initiator vs. promoter). Likewise, little is known about the distribution of personal environmental risk factors by socioeconomic status. Therefore, tumor promotion involvement and association with SES were not very useful as selection criteria, and selection of topics was based primarily on published scientific findings of human studies and community input. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Boards at the University of California at San Francisco (Committee on Human Research) and at the University of California at Berkeley (Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects)

262

Growth saturation of unstable thin films on transverse-striped hydrophilic-hydrophobic micropatterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we demonstrate the growth saturation of an unstable thin liquid film on micropatterned hydrophilic-hydrophobic substrates. We consider different transverse-striped micropatterns, characterized by the total fraction of hydrophilic coverage and the width of the hydrophilic stripes. We compare the growth of the film on the micropatterns to the steady states observed on homogeneous substrates, which correspond to a saturated sawtooth and growing finger configurations for hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, respectively. The proposed micropatterns trigger an alternating fingering-spreading dynamics of the film, which leads to a complete suppression of the contact line growth above a critical fraction of hydrophilic stripes. Furthermore, we find that increasing the width of the hydrophilic stripes slows down the advancing front, giving smaller critical fractions the wider the hydrophilic stripes are. Using analytical approximations, we quantitatively predict the growth rate of the contact line as a function of the covering fraction, and predict the threshold fraction for saturation as a function of the stripe width.

Rodrigo Ledesma-Aguilar; Aurora Hernandez-Machado; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spontaneous Generation Revisited Spontaneous Generation Revisited Name: Jake Status: other Grade: other Location: ID Country: USA Date: Spring 2012 Question: I'm curious can genes be altered and changed during our life and passed on to future generations? I ask this because I've witnessed an instance that I found most interesting... it was a father, who before he ever conceived his child lost his pinkie on his left hand, and years later he has a child and crazy as it is the child on its left hand was born with an extra finger an extra pinkie.. it has had me contemplating whether this machination has any validity in genes altering during our life perhaps because of our life choices or environmental factors ect ect. Replies: The example you describe is pure coincidence -- not genetic. The environment does impact our genes, and those genes can be passed on to our children. However, the changed gene has to be in the gamete (sperm or egg) -- these cells alone contain the genetic material that is passed along. A change to a finger (that has not also occurred in the gamete) would not be passed on.

264

Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N N NOTICE OTICE In the first instance, an employee was using a floor- mounted abrasive cut-off wheel saw to remove bolts extending past a plate's surface when the wheel shat- tered. The employee's right thumb was impacted, break- ing the thumbnail, splitting open the skin, and shattering the thumb's end bone. Use of a hand-held, angle-head cutting wheel tool, or making a jig to hold the plate in place would have prevented this injury. In the second case, an employee was using a pneu- matic crimping tool. The open end of the tool's jaws was not guarded. The injury occurred when the tip of the employee's right-hand little finger was in the wrong place at the wrong time and the tool's jaws shut on the finger- tip. This resulted in the fingernail being cut through, an open cut on the bottom of the fingertip, and a chipped end bone. The injury would have been avoided had the open jaws been guarded. Unfortunately,

265

Maintaining body temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintaining body temperature Maintaining body temperature Name: Jeff Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What keeps the human body at a constant temperature of 98.6? Replies: Maintaining body temperature is very complex. It also takes a lot of energy. About 80% of the energy from the food you eat goes to maintaining body temperature. Basically, the chemical reactions of metabolism of stored food, especially fats, generate heat as a by product. This heat warms the body. The brain reads temperature and controls to some extent the rate of this metabolism. There are also many other mechanisms triggered by the brain to keep the core of your body warm, even if the periphery (skin) is cold. Blood vessels to the fingers and toes constrict, so that the cold air doesn't cool the blood too much, so that cooled blood doesn't cool down the heart and brain when it returns. In severe cases, your body will sacrifice a finger or a toe to keep you from dying of cold core temperature (frostbite: it saves your life!). Also the brain can order a lot of muscles to contract rapidly. This generates a lot of heat quickly, a response called shivering. There's much more to this exciting field of research.

266

Structural basis of error-prone replication and stalling at a thymine base by human DNA polymerase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human DNA polymerase iota (pol iota) is a unique member of Y-family polymerases, which preferentially misincorporates nucleotides opposite thymines (T) and halts replication at T bases. The structural basis of the high error rates remains elusive. We present three crystal structures of pol complexed with DNA containing a thymine base, paired with correct or incorrect incoming nucleotides. A narrowed active site supports a pyrimidine to pyrimidine mismatch and excludes Watson-Crick base pairing by pol. The template thymine remains in an anti conformation irrespective of incoming nucleotides. Incoming ddATP adopts a syn conformation with reduced base stacking, whereas incorrect dGTP and dTTP maintain anti conformations with normal base stacking. Further stabilization of dGTP by H-bonding with Gln59 of the finger domain explains the preferential T to G mismatch. A template 'U-turn' is stabilized by pol and the methyl group of the thymine template, revealing the structural basis of T stalling. Our structural and domain-swapping experiments indicate that the finger domain is responsible for pol's high error rates on pyrimidines and determines the incorporation specificity.

Kirouac, Kevin N.; Ling, Hong; (UWO)

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses  

SciTech Connect

Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng (NIBS-China); (Zhejiang)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Blade platform seal for ceramic/metal rotor assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combination ceramic and metal turbine rotor for use in high temperature gas turbine engines includes a metal rotor disc having a rim with a plurality of circumferentially spaced blade root retention slots therein to receive a plurality of ceramic blades, each including side platform segments thereon and a dovetail configured root slidably received in one of the slots. Adjacent ones of the platform segments including edge portions thereon closely spaced when the blades are assembled to form expansion gaps in an annular flow surface for gas passage through the blades and wherein the assembly further includes a plurality of unitary seal members on the rotor connected to its rim and each including a plurality of spaced, axially extending, flexible fingers that underlie and conform to the edge portions of the platform segments and which are operative at turbine operating temperatures and speeds to distribute loading on the platform segments as the fingers are seated against the underside of the blade platforms to seal the gaps without undesirably stressing thin web ceramic sections of the platform.

Wertz, John L. (Indianapolis, IN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

HCI Gesture Tracking Using Wearable Passive Tags  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a wearable system is developed to track hand gestures with passive RFID sensor tags. This system was composed of an ultra-high frequency reader and small, passive, finger-worn tags powered by scavenged RFID energy equipped with a variety of sensors that could be used to detect gestures. The primary physical goals of the system were to be comfortable and wearable without interfering with other everyday activities. The computational goals of the system were to track particular hand movements, which could be used to control a wearable computer or aid in interaction with ubiquitous and other wearable devices. As a user is walking through their environments, we aim to avoid the need for pulling out an interface with keyboard, keypad, or touch screen, and also avoid bulky hand-held interfaces, allowing the user to specify input with their fingers without taking their eyes and attention off their immediate focus. This thesis first introduces our hardware, then gives some

Rachel M. Bainbridge; Joseph A. Paradiso

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Compact electrostatic comb actuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

Rodgers, M. Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Burg, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM); Jensen, Brian D. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Samuel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Barnes, Stephen M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Dose Reconstruction Using Computational Modeling of Handling a Particular Arsenic-73/Arsenic-74 Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A special work evolution was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with a particular 73As/74As source but the worker’s extremity dosimeter did not appear to provide appropriate dosimetric information for the tasks performed. This prompted a reconstruction of the dose to the worker’s hands. The computer code MCNP was chosen to model the tasks that the worker performed to evaluate the potential nonuniform hand dose distribution. A model was constructed similar to the worker’s hands to represent the performed handling tasks. The model included the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and the palm. The dose was calculated at the 7 mg cm-2 skin depth. To comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 835, the 100 cm2 area that received the highest dose must be calculated. It could be determined if the dose received by the worker exceeded any regulatory limit. The computer code VARSKIN was also used to provide results to compare with those from MCNP where applicable. The results from the MCNP calculations showed that the dose to the worker’s hands did not exceed the regulatory limit of 0.5 Sv (50 rem). The equivalent nonuniform dose was 0.126 Sv (12.6 rem) to the right hand and 0.082 Sv (8.2 rem) to the left hand.

Stallard, Alisha M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Method and apparatus for making superconductive magnet coils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A curved, shell-type magnet coil, adapted to be used in a superconducting magnet, is wound by providing a mandrel having a tubular cylindrical mid-portion terminating at both ends in tapered end portions formed with longitudinal slots having flexible fingers therebetween. An elongated electrical conductor is wound around an elongated oval-shaped pole island engaged with the outside of the cylindrical mid-portion, to form a multiplicity of oval-shaped turns engaged with a 180-degree segment of the mandrel. The coil turns have longitudinal portions with curved portions therebetween, engaging the tapered end portions of the mandrel. Upon completion of the winding, tapered expansion members are fully inserted into the tapered end portions, to displace the flexible fingers outwardly into a cylindrical form and to displace the curved portions of the turns into a shape conforming to such cylindrical form while also exerting increased tension upon the turns to minimize draping of the turns and to enhance the mechanical integrity of the coil. A half cylinder clamp may then be employed to clamp the coil, whereupon the coil may be solidified by the use of an epoxy adhesive.

Borden, A.R.

1983-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Learning grasp strategies with partial shape information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of grasping novel objects in cluttered environments. If a full 3-d model of the scene were available, one could use the model to estimate the stability and robustness of different grasps (formalized as form/force-closure, etc); in practice, however, a robot facing a novel object will usually be able to perceive only the front (visible) faces of the object. In this paper, we propose an approach to grasping that estimates the stability of different grasps, given only noisy estimates of the shape of visible portions of an object, such as that obtained from a depth sensor. By combining this with a kinematic description of a robot arm and hand, our algorithm is able to compute a specific positioning of the robot’s fingers so as to grasp an object. We test our algorithm on two robots (with very different arms/manipulators, including one with a multi-fingered hand). We report results on the task of grasping objects of significantly different shapes and appearances than ones in the training set, both in highly cluttered and in uncluttered environments. We also apply our algorithm to the problem of unloading items from a dishwasher.

Ashutosh Saxena; Lawson L. S. Wong; Andrew Y. Ng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Polymer floods: A case study of nonlinear wave analysis and of instability control in tertiary oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Polymer flooding in oil reservoir simulation is considered in two space dimensions. The wave structures associated with such a process give rise to interesting phenomena in the nonlinear regime which have direct bearing on the efficiency of oil recovery. These waves influence and can prevent surface instabilities of the fingering mode. In this paper we resolve these waves by a front tracking method. We consider the fingering problem and the issue of oil recovery for the polymer flood. The details of these two phenomena depend on the separation between the waves and upon the viscosity contrast between the oil, water and polymer. We identify a nonlinear transfer of instability between adjacent waves and a nonlinear enhancement of recovery due to successive waves. The conclusions produced by this work are also pertinent to tracer flooding. One interesting conclusion applies to polymer injection followed by pure water injection. In this case the instability is transferred to the polymer-water interface, and the pure water region can break through the polymer to achieve direct contact with the oil. The polymer is left in narrow ribbons parallel to the main flow field and is by-passed by pure water. The effect of narrow regions of by-passed polymer can be simulated by the front tracking method and is not equivalent to numerical or physical diffusion, which would distribute the polymer more uniformly and retard the breakthrough of water through the polymer layer. 45 refs., 15 figs.

Daripa, P.; Glimm, J.; Lindquist, B.; McBryan, O.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Polymer floods: A case study of nonlinear wave analysis and of instability control in tertiary oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymer flooding in oil reservoir simulation is considered in two space dimensions. The wave structures associated with such a process give rise to interesting phenomena in the nonlinear regime which have direct bearing on the efficiency of oil recovery. These waves influence and can prevent surface instabilities of the fingering mode. In this paper the authors resolve these waves by a front tracking method. They consider the fingering problem and the issue of oil recovery for the polymer flood. The details of these two phenomena depend on the separation between the waves and upon the viscosity contrast between the oil, water and polymer. They identify a nonlinear transfer of instability between adjacent waves and a nonlinear enhancement of recovery due to successive waves. The conclusions produced by this work are also pertinent to tracer flooding. One interesting conclusion applies to polymer injection followed by pure water injection. In this case the instability is transferred to the polymer-water interface, and the pure water region can break through the polymer to achieve direct contact with the oil. The polymer is left in narrow ribbons parallel to the main flow field and is by-passed by pure water. The effect of narrow regions of by-passed polymer can be simulated by the front tracking method and is not equivalent to numerical or physical diffusion, which would distribute the polymer more uniformly and retard the breakthrough of water through the polymer layer.

Daripa, P.; Glimm, J.; Lindquist, B.; McBryan, O.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Widget  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Widget Widget Download the widget so you can have key features from DOE R&D Accomplishments right at your finger tips! Use the widget to search, to check out what's new, to receive the RSS feed, and to access the Blog. Get the DOE R&D Accomplishments widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! Not seeing a widget? (More info) Search: provides the capability to search the DOE R&D Accomplishments Database which contains specially-selected documents, including historically significant, legacy, and landmark documents from DOE and its predecessors New4U: contains introductory material about recently-added content, with link(s) to the content, about science research and researchers (including Nobel Laureates) associated with DOE and/or predecessors

277

Slide 1  

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September 30, 2013 September 30, 2013 Environment / Health / Safety DIVISION Please Note: The data presentation in this current FY13 summary does not reflect the recently announced restructuring of the Lab's research and directorate organizations. These changes will be reflected in subsequent editions of this report. Injury/Illness Cases - September 30, 2013 * Hand, wrist and forearm strain * The Guest Postdoctoral Fellow reported ongoing discomfort of the finger on one hand that may be associated with one or more activities including computer keyboard use, pipetting, and outdoor recreational activities. Ergonomic Cases 2 Environment / Health / Safety DIVISION * Small droplet of buffer solution in eye * The Biologist Project Scientist / Engineer reported a small drop of solution in

278

11Fermi 2/19/99  

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Hawking Ponders Infinity Hawking Ponders Infinity ÒCAN YOU HEAR ME?Ó A substantial baritone, round and full; the accent borderline Scottish or Welsh, but schooled well short of a full brogue. A hint of wry in the tone, promising a barb or two before the nightÕs work was done. The voice immediately owned every expanse of the Arie Crown Theater at McCormick Place, ChicagoÕs gargantuan convention center by the lake. But who owned the voice? A motorized wheelchair rested at center stage, life support apparatus stacked behind the wheels, its inhabitant almost too still for reality. His head leaned unmoving against his right shoulder, his skeletal body angled in the chair like an oddly-bent wire coathanger. In front of him was a small custom computer console, where a minute twitch of his finger

279

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

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Beets and Bacteria Beets and Bacteria Name: Arlene Status: other Grade: 6-8 Location: IL Country: USA Date: Fall 2011 Question: I found an experiment at the pbs.org/teachers website that evaluates different handwashing techniques by swabbing palms, nails, and in between fingers after different types of handwashing. These swabs are then "plated" on canned beets placed inside of a petri dish. Does this sound like a realistic and safe experiment for middle school students? NEWTON BBS does not recommend growing/culturing bacteria without the supervision of a microbiologist, and a properly equipped microbiology laboratory. Safety is our main concern! Growing dangerous bacteria species unknowingly is a real possibility and serious illness may occur without proper handling techniques. Furthermore, without proper bacterial disposal procedures such as an autoclave can guarantee, there is a danger to anyone who comes in contact after disposal.

280

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 These slides are updated on a monthly basis, as soon as data are reasonably final for the preceding month. Hours worked are estimated monthly and updated with final and actual values quarterly. While every effort is made to present accurate and final data, data may change in subsequent months, as additional information becomes available and as later developments change the recordability of some cases. Refer questions about these charts to rwfisher@lbl.gov 2 Narrative of October 2009 Recordable Injury Cases * Chemist Post Doc Fellow - Laceration of finger - EE was disconnecting tubing from a condenser. The condenser broke from the forces applied and EE sustained small laceration. * Custodian - Knee strain - EE was pivoting to reach for a waste container and

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281

Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for Worker Safety and Health Violations October 8, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for violations of DOE's worker safety and health regulations with a proposed civil penalty of $70,000. The violations are associated with an October 6, 2009, hand injury event that occurred while a Parsons worker was performing crane lubrication on a moving cable at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at DOE's Savannah River Site, resulting in the loss of three fingers.

282

The Froghopper or Spittlebug  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Froghopper or Spittlebug Froghopper or Spittlebug Nature Bulletin No. 348-A June 7, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George w. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FROGHOPPER OR SPITTLEBUG With the coming of summer, mysterious blobs of snow-white froth begin to appear on weeds, grasses, garden crops and other vegetation. Later, hundreds of these foam blossoms dot the meadows and hillsides. Each resembles a dab of soap suds or beaten egg white and feel slippery between one's fingers. ' Examined closely, a small flat greenish seed-like creature, with six slender legs and a broad head having a pointed beak beneath, is found inside. Named Froghopper because of his squatty froggy appearance, he is also called the Spittlebug because his home looks like a fleck of saliva. In folklore these little masses of froth are described as "frog spit", "snake spit", "cuckoo spit", or the birthplace of horseflies.

283

Frostbite Theater - Static Electricity Experiments - Opposites Attract and  

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Behind the Scenes Behind the Scenes Previous Video (Behind the Scenes) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Thunder and Lightning) Thunder and Lightning Opposites Attract and Likes Repel An electroscope can be used to show that opposite electric charges attract and like electric charges repel. [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: I'm sure you all know that opposite charges attract and like charges repel, but have you ever seen it? If not, we can show you with these things! Steve: These devices are called electroscopes. They're made from a little clippy thing and two pieces of plastic. If Joanna and I take our fingers and scrape them against the plastic

284

Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair June 23, 2011 - 4:15pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs I recently read about a study on fidgeting or as researchers refer to it-incidental physical activity. The study shows that the small collection of movements we often find inconsequential-like drumming your fingers, tapping your foot, or running after the bus-have significant health and cardiovascular benefits. The more I thought about it the more I realized that many everyday activities that contribute to overall fitness turn out to be quite energy-efficient and environmentally friendly as well. Take my commute for instance-every weekday I cram my way into a crowded

285

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duct leakage was a key factor in moisture Duct leakage was a key factor in moisture damage in manufactured homes in humid climates. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 2. House-as-a-System Solutions 2.1 New Homes with Whole-House Packages Moisture and Ventilation Solutions in Hot, Humid Climates: Florida Manufactured Housing Research by Building America diagnosed the causes and prescribed a cure that dramatically reduced moisture problems in manufactured housing in Florida. In the late 1990s, Building America researchers at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) worked with manufactured home builders to diagnose moisture problems in homes in Florida. Moisture issues were so severe that in some homes researchers could push their fingers through the saturated drywall. Using a

286

Fossil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 29, 2013 July 29, 2013 Excerpts of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz's Remarks at National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown On Monday, July 29, 2013, Secretary Moniz will visit the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in Morgantown, W. Va. July 8, 2013 New Breathalyzer Offers Hope of Pain-Free Diabetes Monitoring Researchers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have teamed up with their Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) colleagues to develop a new hybrid nanostructure that could make it easier to monitor blood sugar. When used as a sensing tool in a breath analyzer, the new material could offer a way for millions of diabetics to avoid the pain and hassle of finger sticks. June 27, 2013 Improving Our Environment One Roof at a Time

287

Williams, Ronald L From: Breed, William  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breed, William Breed, William Sent: Thursday, February 15,2001 4:14 PM To: Anderson, Margot Cc: Terry, Tracy Subject: RE: national energy strategy Okay by me; let us know what effort is needed and appropriate. Bill -Original Message- From: Anderson, Margot Sent Thursday, February 15, 2001 4:13 PM To: Breed, William Cc Terry, Tracy Subject: RE: national energy strategy BB - Thanks for volunteering HS for the macro section and Fred for micro. John fingered Tracy for both. Tracy is working AS WE WRITE on the macro part - we got EIA's input and she is reviewing and adding her two cents. I am going to let TT make the call. If she has time for Hilary to review and add (by the end of the day), fine, otherwise, given the short timeframe, Hilary can get in on the next round. Margot --

288

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 These slides are updated on a monthly basis, as soon as data are reasonably final for the preceding month. Hours worked are estimated monthly and updated with final and actual values quarterly. While every effort is made to present accurate and final data, data may change in subsequent months, as additional information becomes available and as later developments change the recordability of some cases. Refer questions about these charts to rwfisher@lbl.gov 2 Narrative of February 2011 Injury/Illness Cases * Electrical Engineer - Ankle strain - While walking to office after arriving at work in the morning, the employee's knee buckled causing the ankle to roll. * Postdoctoral Fellow - Clean needle puncture of finger - While manipulating a needle attached to a building

289

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 8, 2013 August 8, 2013 One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives Stent Balanced on the tip of a finger, it doesn't look like much - a bit of screen door, perhaps, or a badly mangled paper clip - but this little piece of metal is making big news in the medical community, and big changes in the lives of patients with coronary- and peripheral-artery disease. What it is, is a stent - specifically a stent made of a unique platinum-chromium alloy developed by researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and Boston Scientific. Stents are tiny mesh tubes that doctors carefully insert into narrowed or weakened arteries to keep the blood flowing. For decades, 316L stainless steel was the alloy of choice as newly designed stents were made thinner

290

Preliminary Differences Between CPOL and CRM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

differences between TWP-ICE data differences between TWP-ICE data from the CPOL radar and the CRM: Should we point fingers at convective intensity, microphysics, or both? Adam Varble 1 , Ed Zipser 1 , and Ann Fridland 2 1 University of Utah 2 NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Outline * CRM vs. CPOL - Constant altitude radar reflectivity histograms * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example - Horizontal and vertical radar reflectivity cross sections * Active Period Examples * Suppressed Period Example * Preliminary Conclusions Histograms (Active) Cross-Sections - Active (Baseline) 6 Hours Later... Cross-Sections - Active (Sensitivity) 6 Hours Later... Stratiform Differences Histograms (Suppressed) Cross-Sections - Suppressed Preliminary Conclusions * Active Period - Both CRM runs produce too much convective area

291

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 These slides are updated on a monthly basis, as soon as data are reasonably final for the preceding month. Hours worked are estimated monthly and updated with final and actual values quarterly. While every effort is made to present accurate and final data, data may change in subsequent months, as additional information becomes available and as later developments change the recordability of some cases. Refer questions about these charts to rwfisher@lbl.gov 2 Narrative of April 2010 Recordable Injury Cases * Computer Systems Engineer - Finger strain - Associated with mouse use at computer workstation. (A case from 2009 that became recordable in April of 2010) 3 Narrative of April 2010 First Aid Cases * Administrative Assistant - Wrist strain - Loading and unloading boxes of conference

292

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: No abstract prepared. Author(s): John Travis Finger, Eddie Ross Hoover Published: Publisher Unknown, Date Unknown Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Annex_7_-_The_Iea%27S_Role_In_Advanced_Geothermal_Drilling&oldid=389771" Category: Reference Materials What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

293

One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives August 8, 2013 - 10:57am Addthis One Thing Leads to Another: How NETL Research Saves Lives Learn More The coronary stent was developed as part of NETL's Technology Transfer program. NETL's technology portfolio contains a broad range of innovations that have resulted from research in areas such as carbon capture and sequestration, mercury capture, fuel cells, sensors and controls, computational modeling, and materials science, among many others. NETL Technology Transfer program Balanced on the tip of a finger, it doesn't look like much - a bit of screen door, perhaps, or a badly mangled paper clip - but this little piece of metal is making big news in the medical community, and big changes

294

 

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MINUTES of the MINUTES of the Nu-Factory Physics Study Group Meeting Friday, Sept. 17, 1999 Present: Debbie Harris, Eric Hawker, Stephen Parke, Rajendran Raja, Bob Bernstein,Heidi Schellman, Steve Geer, Panagiotis Spentzouris 1. Charge Those present are being asked by the Fermilab Directorate to participate in a study of the physics capabilities of a neutrino factory. Heidi Schellman and Steve Geer have been fingered as co-coordinators for the study. A draft of the charge is appended below. Although the charge for the group is not yet final, we are encouraged to get cracking. We are expected to include others who are interested in the study ... and indeed would like to be as inclusive as possible. 2. Meetings We have only 6 months to complete the study. Therefore it is urgent to get started with regular

295

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

296

Argonne CNM Highlight: New Gas Sensor Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Gas Sensor Based on Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes A new gas sensor based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes Hybrid sensor fabrication process: (top) SEM image of a few MWCNTs spanning across two neighboring Au fingers of the interdigitated electrode; (bottom) HRTEM image of a MWCNT uniformly coated with SnO nanocrystals. Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials staff in the Nanofabrication & Devices Group together with collaborative users from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee have fabricated a miniaturized gas sensor using hybrid nanostructures consisting of SnO2 nanocrystals supported on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In contrast to the high-temperature operation required for SnO2 nanocrystals alone, and to the insensitivity towards H2

297

Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Handbook of Best Practices for Geothermal Drilling Abstract This Handbook is a description of the complex process that comprises drilling a geothermal well. The focus of the detailed Chapters covering various aspects of the process (casing design, cementing, logging and instrumentation, etc) is on techniques and hardware that have proven successful in geothermal reservoirs around the world. The Handbook will eventually be linked to the Geothermal Implementing Agreement (GIA) web site, with the hope and expectation that it can be continually updated as new methods are demonstrated or proven. Authors John Finger and Doug Blankenship

298

Building Science Solutions Â… Faster and Better  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Webinar questions should be directed to: basc@pnnl.gov 2 | Building America eere.energy.gov Building Science Solutions - Faster and Better Sam Rashkin Michael Baechler Linda Connell Building America Solution Center October 11, 2012 3 | Building America eere.energy.gov Building America Solution Center Overview 4 | Building America eere.energy.gov World Class Research... ... at Your Finger Tips 5 | Building America eere.energy.gov Is: Easy Access to World-Class Research: * Guidance for Applying Targeted Energy Measures * Tool for Users to Prepare Customized Project Content * Source for Proven Performance * Link to Full References Is Not: * Design Tool for Customized Energy Packages What the DOE Building America Solution Center 'Is' & 'Is Not'

299

No Slide Title  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DoE Quarterly Review DoE Quarterly Review 08/13/08 Machine and Alternator Inspections 2 Status * Disassembly of C-Mod is complete - Inspection of feltmetal proceeding * Documenting condition of all 1920 feltmetal pads * Some feltmetal has been removed and finger joints have been prepared for soldering of new feltmetal * Induction heating procedures have been reviewed and the first soldering tests completed successfully - Inspection of coils, coaxes, heaters, cooling lines, etc, proceeding * Alternator Inspection began on 08/04/08 - Drive motor removed - Coupling between flywheel and alternator disengaged, alignment checked and recorded, and surfaces inspected and in good condition - Removal of rotor will begin this week 3 Machine Inspection * All feltmetal was replaced in 1998, a few pads

300

Aldo Leopold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aldo Leopold Aldo Leopold Nature Bulletin No. 701 January 19, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor ALDO LEOPOLD: 1886 -- 1948 This nature bulletin would not have been written--in fact, our conservation department and its comprehensive program of outdoor education might not exist -- except for a famous essay published in 1938 by a great philosopher, conservationist and professor of wildlife management at the University of Wisconsin: Aldo Leopold. He had a remarkable capability, bordering on clairvoyance, of looking into the future. He penetrated into the meat of a problem, analyzed it, and unerringly put his finger upon the solution. And he had a unique knack of putting ideas into a few terse arresting words and phrases.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2012 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 News Featured Articles 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony News Archives Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Featured Articles 2012 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Three images of actuators shown in a micrograph. 12.18.12FROM THE LABS Flexing fingers for micro-robotics: External link Berkeley Lab scientists create a powerful, microscale actuator. Read More » A map of intensities merged using the CrystFEL software. 12.17.12Article Lights in the Darkness . . . and Hope from the Labs Research at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provides new insights into two terrible diseases. Read More » 2013 National Science Bowl 12.12.12Article

302

Animal Hands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hands Hands Nature Bulletin No. 611 October 1, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist ANIMAL HANDS Muddy footprints shaped like babies' hands can be seen on almost every trash barrel in our forest preserve picnic areas. These are made by raccoons which come at night to eat discarded sandwiches, chicken bones and other food scraps. The hind feet as well as the front feet of the coon are built like hands and that its front foot, especially in mud or soft snow, leaves a print of the palm with four spread fingers and a thumb. The track of the hind foot is longer with a definite heal. The coon feels for fish, crawfish, frogs and snails along the water's edge, scrubbing each thoroughly before eating. Full of curiosity and mischief, a pet coon quickly learns to unlatch doors, play with small objects and pick people's pockets.

303

Energy News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 Department of Energy Cites Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for Worker Safety and Health Violations WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. for violations of DOE's worker safety and health regulations with a proposed civil penalty of $70,000. The violations are associated with an October 6, 2009, hand injury event that occurred while a Parsons worker was performing crane lubrication on a moving cable at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at DOE's Savannah River Site, resulting in the loss of three fingers. October 8, 2010 Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions for Worker Safety and Health Violations

304

Microsoft Word - NT42951PrelimDesCkean.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

07 07 Project No. NT42951 Electronic File Name: NT42951PD.pdf Topical Report Preliminary Design of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling Principal Authors: Al T. Champness Anthony J. Worthen John T. Finger Report Issued: February 1, 2007 DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42951 Submitted By: Drill Cool Systems, Inc. 627 Williams St. Bakersfield, CA 93305 i Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

305

Experimental and Computational Studies of Fluid Flow Phenomena in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine and Oil Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA IN CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE AND OIL FIELDS Chuang Ji ( chuang.ji@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Goodarz Ahmadi ( ahmadi@clarkson.edu ) BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Duane H. Smith ( duane.smith@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 2 INTRODUCTION Sequestration of CO 2 by injection into deep geological formations is a method to reduce CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, when CO 2 is injected underground, it forms fingers extending into the rock pores saturated with brine or petroleum. This flow

306

EV Charging Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charging Infrastructure Charging Infrastructure JOHN DAVIS: Virtually anywhere in the U.S. you can bring light to a room with the flick of a finger. We take it for granted, but creating the national electric grid to make that possible took decades to accomplish. Now, in just a few years, we've seen the birth of a new infrastructure that allows electric vehicles to quickly recharge their batteries at home, work, or wherever they may roam. But this rapid growth has come with a few growing pains. Starting with less than 500 in 2009, there are now over 19,000 public-access charging outlets available to electric vehicles owners at commuter lots, parking garages, airports, retail areas and thousands of

307

Cytokines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cytokines Cytokines Name: kathryn Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is a cytokine? Replies: Cytokines are chemicals released by cells that allow them to communicate with each other. Cyto means cell and kin- means kinesis or movement. These types of chemicals are released by one type of cell to call other cells to another area of the body. For instance, when there is an infection in your finger, the first cells on the scene will secrete chemicals that signal other white blood cells to come to their aid. They also are sensed in the hypothalamus and cause the body's thermostat to be reset to cause a fever which is another reaction natural reaction to microbes in the body. There are many different kinds of cytokines and more are being discovered all the time. There is a very active branch of biological research today that deals with cell to cell signaling

308

Student Safety 2011 [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Safety Student Safety Orientation Safety & Health Services Division June 2011 Safety Matters at BNL "Safety: We maintain a safe workplace and we plan our work and perform it safely. We take responsibility for take responsibility for the safety of ourselves, coworkers and guests." Safety Makes Science Possible! Be Safety Conscious Check for postings before entering areas Have a questioning attitude about things you do not understand. Be aware and cognizant of your surroundings. Watch out for one another-sometimes a second Watch out for one another-sometimes a second eye can avoid injury to a co-worker. Date of Incident Department Incident Description Incident Type 07/30/10 Office of Educational Programs A visiting student's finger was lacerated by a beaker in a lab.

309

Visualizing Type Ia Supernova Explosions at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supernova Explosions Supernova Explosions Visualizing Type Ia Supernova Explosions Childs1a-Supernovasm.png Deep inside a dying star in a galaxy far, far away, a carbon fusion flame ignites. Ignition may happen in the middle or displaced slightly to one side, but this simulation explores the consequences of central ignition. In a localized hot spot, represented here by a deformed sphere with an average radius of 100 km, carbon is assumed to have already fused to iron, producing hot ash (~10 billion K) with a density about 20% less than its surroundings. As the burning progresses, this hot buoyant ash rises up and interacts with cold fuel. Rayleigh-Taylor fingers give rise to shear and turbulence, which interacts with the flame, causing it to move faster. In about 2 seconds, the energy released blows the entire white dwarf star up,

310

Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair June 23, 2011 - 4:15pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs I recently read about a study on fidgeting or as researchers refer to it-incidental physical activity. The study shows that the small collection of movements we often find inconsequential-like drumming your fingers, tapping your foot, or running after the bus-have significant health and cardiovascular benefits. The more I thought about it the more I realized that many everyday activities that contribute to overall fitness turn out to be quite energy-efficient and environmentally friendly as well. Take my commute for instance-every weekday I cram my way into a crowded

311

New Breathalyzer Offers Hope of Pain-Free Diabetes Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2013 8, 2013 New Breathalyzer Offers Hope of Pain-Free Diabetes Monitoring Diabetes Carbon nanotube armchair povray Researchers at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have teamed up with their Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) colleagues to develop a new hybrid nanostructure that could make it easier to monitor blood sugar. When used as a sensing tool in a breath analyzer, the new material could offer a way for millions of diabetics to avoid the pain and hassle of finger sticks. How will it work? By detecting acetone. Everyone produces a certain level of acetone through normal, daily metabolic processes. But diabetics produce it in larger amounts and also exhale it at a higher rate than non-diabetics, which is what produces the "fruity" aroma present when

312

Open Problems in Universal Induction & Intelligence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specialized intelligent systems can be found everywhere: finger print, handwriting, speech, and face recognition, spam filtering, chess and other game programs, robots, et al. This decade the first presumably complete mathematical theory of artificial intelligence based on universal induction-prediction-decision-action has been proposed. This information-theoretic approach solidifies the foundations of inductive inference and artificial intelligence. Getting the foundations right usually marks a significant progress and maturing of a field. The theory provides a gold standard and guidance for researchers working on intelligent algorithms. The roots of universal induction have been laid exactly half-a-century ago and the roots of universal intelligence exactly one decade ago. So it is timely to take stock of what has been achieved and what remains to be done. Since there are already good recent surveys, I describe the state-of-the-art only in passing and refer the reader to the literature. This article concent...

Hutter, Marcus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Non-linear Evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in a Radiation Supported Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-linear regime of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a radiation supported atmosphere, consisting of two uniform fluids with different densities, is studied numerically. We perform simulations using our recently developed numerical algorithm for multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics based on a variable Eddington tensor as implemented in Athena, focusing on the regime where scattering opacity greatly exceeds absorption opacity. We find that the radiation field can reduce the growth and mixing rate of RTI, but this reduction is only significant when radiation pressure significantly exceeds gas pressure. Small scale structures are also suppressed in this case. In the non-linear regime, dense fingers sink faster than rarefied bubbles can rise, leading to asymmetric structures about the interface. By comparing the calculations that use a variable Eddington tensor (VET) versus the Eddington approximation, we demonstrate that anisotropy in the radiation field can affect the non-linear development of RTI...

Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electro-mechanical heat switch for cryogenic applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat switch includes two symmetric jaws. Each jaw is comprised of a link connected at a translatable joint to a flexible arm. Each arm rotates about a fixed pivot, and has an articulated end including a thermal contact pad connected to a heat sink. The links are joined together at a translatable main joint. To close the heat switch, a closing solenoid is actuated and forces the main joint to an over-center position. This movement rotates the arms about their pivots, respectively, forces each of them into a stressed configuration, and forces the thermal contact pads towards each other and into compressive contact with a cold finger. The closing solenoid is then deactivated. The heat switch remains closed due to a restoring force generated by the stressed configuration of each arm, until actuation of an opening solenoid returns the main joint to its starting open-switch position.

van den Berg, Marcel L. (Oakland, CA); Batteux, Jan D. (Hayward, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Impedance Calculations for the NSLS-II Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impedance of two vacuum chamber components, Bellows and BPM, is considered in some detail. In order to avoid generation of Higher-Order Modes (HOM's) in the NSLS-II bellows, we designed a new low-impedance RF shielding consisting of 6 wide and 2 narrow metal plates without opening slots between them. The short-range wakepotential has been optimized taking into account vertical offset of RF fingers from their nominal position. The results were compared with data of bellows designed at other laboratories. Narrow-band impedance of the BPM Button has been studied. TE-modes in the BPM button were suppressed by a factor of 8 by modification of existing housings. Two new types of housings are shown. The total impedance of the NSLS-II storage ring is discussed in terms of the loss factor and the vertical kick factor for a 3mm-Gaussian bunch.

Blednykh,A.; Ferreira, M.; Krinsky, S.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

Advanced Light Source instrumentation overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accelerator instrumentation played a vital role in commissioning the ALS injector accelerator. It helped us to see whether electron dynamics agreed with our theoretical predictions and important beam parameters met the design specifications. It helped us to see where beam losses occurred and why. In this paper we will start with a brief description of the ALS accelerator complex and the expected performance of it. Then we will describe each diagnostics instrument by its construction, operational principle, requirements, and our experiences with it. We will describe the wall current monitor, the scintillator, the Faraday cup, the beam collimator, the beam position monitor, the direct-current current transformer (DCCT), the traveling wave electrodes the Sabersky finger, and other special instruments. Finally, we will go into some detail on how we measured the beam emittances, the closed orbit, and the betatron tunes.

Kim, C.H.; Hinkson, J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Conductivity Relationship for Steady-state Unsaturated Flow Processes under Optimal Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Optimality principles have been used for investigating physical processes in different areas. This work attempts to apply an optimal principle (that water flow resistance is minimized on global scale) to steady-state unsaturated flow processes. Based on the calculus of variations, we show that under optimal conditions, hydraulic conductivity for steady-state unsaturated flow is proportional to a power function of the magnitude of water flux. This relationship is consistent with an intuitive expectation that for an optimal water flow system, locations where relatively large water fluxes occur should correspond to relatively small resistance (or large conductance). Similar results were also obtained for hydraulic structures in river basins and tree leaves, as reported in other studies. Consistence of this theoretical result with observed fingering-flow behavior in unsaturated soils and an existing model is also demonstrated.

Liu, H. H.

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thread gauge for tapered threads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads. 13 figures.

Brewster, A.L.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

Semiclassical approximation to supersymmetric quantum gravity  

SciTech Connect

We develop a semiclassical approximation scheme for the constraint equations of supersymmetric canonical quantum gravity. This is achieved by a Born-Oppenheimer type of expansion, in analogy to the case of the usual Wheeler-DeWitt equation. The formalism is only consistent if the states at each order depend on the gravitino field. We recover at consecutive orders the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the functional Schroedinger equation, and quantum gravitational correction terms to this Schroedinger equation. In particular, the following consequences are found: (i) the Hamilton-Jacobi equation and therefore the background spacetime must involve the gravitino, (ii) a (many-fingered) local time parameter has to be present on super Riem {sigma} (the space of all possible tetrad and gravitino fields) (iii) quantum supersymmetric gravitational corrections affect the evolution of the very early Universe. The physical meaning of these equations and results, in particular, the similarities to and differences from the pure bosonic case, are discussed.

Kiefer, Claus; Lueck, Tobias; Moniz, Paulo [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany); Astronomy Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary College, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

A laboratory work: A teaching robot arm for mechanics and electronic circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanics and electronic systems can be applied to the physical models to understand the physical phenomena for students in laboratory. In this paper we have developed a robot arm for a laboratory experiment, where students learn how to design a human arm and fingers with basic knowledge of the mechanics and electronics. This experiment culminates in an exhibition tie together aspects of a surprisingly wide range of disciplines and represents an alternative vision of how robot arm design can be used to teach both physics and electric/electronic engineering. A new tool is described that combines the mechanical arrangement with an electronic control circuit and it is shown that this can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics laboratory to teach the law of mechanics and basic electronic devices for both teacher and students.

Sise, O

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A laboratory work: A teaching robot arm for mechanics and electronic circuits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanics and electronic systems can be applied to the physical models to understand the physical phenomena for students in laboratory. In this paper we have developed a robot arm for a laboratory experiment, where students learn how to design a human arm and fingers with basic knowledge of the mechanics and electronics. This experiment culminates in an exhibition tie together aspects of a surprisingly wide range of disciplines and represents an alternative vision of how robot arm design can be used to teach both physics and electric/electronic engineering. A new tool is described that combines the mechanical arrangement with an electronic control circuit and it is shown that this can be readily used as an instructional tool in the physics laboratory to teach the law of mechanics and basic electronic devices for both teacher and students.

Omer Sise

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

322

MEMS reliability in a vibration environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MicroElectricalMechanical Systems (MEMS) were subjected to a vibration environment that had a peak acceleration of 120g and spanned frequencies from 20 to 2000 Hz. The device chosen for this test was a surface-micromachined microengine because it possesses many elements (springs, gears, rubbing surfaces) that may be susceptible to vibration. The microengines were unpowered during the test. The authors observed 2 vibration-related failures and 3 electrical failures out of 22 microengines tested. Surprisingly, the electrical failures also arose in four microengines in the control group indicating that they were not vibration related. Failure analysis revealed that the electrical failures were due to shorting of stationary comb fingers to the ground plane.

TANNER,DANELLE M.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; STAKE,JOHN R.; SMITH,NORMAN F.

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

323

Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of Hemextin A: A Unique Anticoagulant Protein from Hemachatus haemachatus Venom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hemextin A was isolated and purified from African Ringhals cobra (Hemachatus haemachatus). It is a three-finger toxin that specifically inhibits blood coagulation factor VIIa and clot formation and that also interacts with hemextin B to form a unique anticoagulant complex. Hemextin A was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method by equilibration against 0.2 M ammonium acetate, 0.1 M sodium acetate trihydrate pH 4.6 and 30% PEG 4000 as the precipitating agent. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 49.27, b = 49.51, c = 57.87 {angstrom} and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. They diffracted to 1.5 {angstrom} resolution at beamline X25 at BNL.

Banerjee,Y.; Kumar, S.; Jobichen, C.; Kini, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thread gauge for tapered threads  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads.

Brewster, Albert L. (R.R. #2, Box 264, Pleasant Hill, MO 64080)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

326

Pns dynamo: Theory and observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We briefly review the turbulent mean-field dynamo action in protoneutron stars that are subject to convective and neutron finger instabilities during the early evolutionary phase. By solving the mean-field induction equation with the simplest model of $\\alpha$-quenching we estimate the strength of the generated magnetic field. If the initial period of the protoneutron star is short, then the generated large-scale field is very strong ($> 3 \\times 10^{13}$G) and exceeds the small-scale field at the neutron star surface, while if the rotation is moderate, then the pulsars are formed with more or less standard dipole fields ($< 3 \\times 10^{13}$G) but with surface small-scale magnetic fields stronger than the dipole field. If rotation is very slow, then the mean-field dynamo does not operate, and the neutron star has no global field.

Bonanno, Alfio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Journal of Medical Case Reports BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Although not as common as the other melanomas, amelanotic melanoma often evades diagnosis by masquerading as other pathology. A high index of suspicion is therefore required for early and appropriate intervention. We present a patient who was diagnosed and managed as having paronychia of the middle finger while in actual fact he had a subungual amelanotic melanoma. By the time of his referral to the orthopaedic team it had progressed to an advanced stage. Our case underlies the importance of early recognition and referral of this rare but malignant lesion by primary care physicians. Background With malignant melanoma early diagnosis is vital. Amelanotic malignant melanoma often presents in unusual ways, often evading early diagnosis, resulting in a poorer prognosis. Differential diagnosis can include paronychia, pyogenic granuloma, glomus tumor, and subungual

Ezekiel Oburu; Alberto Gregori

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Speech information retrieval: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Audio is an information-rich component of multimedia. Information can be extracted from audio in a number of different ways, and thus there are several established audio signal analysis research fields. These fields include speech recognition, speaker recognition, audio segmentation and classification, and audio finger-printing. The information that can be extracted from tools and methods developed in these fields can greatly enhance multimedia systems. In this paper, we present the current state of research in each of the major audio analysis fields. The goal is to introduce enough back-ground for someone new in the field to quickly gain high-level understanding and to provide direction for further study.

Hafen, Ryan P.; Henry, Michael J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Self Aligned Cell: Scaling Up Manufacture of a Cost Effective Cell Architecture for Multicrystalline Silicon Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two areas of technology for fabrication of higher efficiency Si-wafer solar cells were addressed: (1) the formation of structured texturing that is an improvement over the industry-standard isotexture process for multicrystalline wafers. (2) the formation of fine line (<50 micron) metallization seed layers in a self-aligned manner where the fingers can be automatically and perfectly lined up to a selective emitter and where expensive silver screen printing paste can be mostly replaced by plating up the seed layers with silver or copper. The benefits are: a) Lower reflectivity , b) Decoupling the performance of the texture from the saw damage, thus allowing for better advances in sawing and a more robust wet process. 1366 Technologies developed 2 pilot machines for 1) deposition and patterning of low-cost resist layers to enable simultaneous Honeycomb front texturing and groove formation for multicrystalline Si wafers, and 2) fine-line dispensing of materials that are self aligned to the grooves.

Gabor, A.; van Mierlo, F.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

Turner, Brian (Myersville, MD); Ury, Michael (Bethesda, MD)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride cathode structure having predetermined emission profile  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large area directly heated lanthanum hexaboride (LaB/sub 6/) cathode system is disclosed. The system comprises a LaB/sub 6/ cathode element generally circular in shape about a central axis. The cathode element has a head with an upper substantially planar emission surface, and a lower downwardly and an intermediate body portion which diminishes in cross-section from the head towards the base of the cathode element. A central rod is connected to the base of the cathode element and extends along the central axis. Plural upstanding spring fingers are urged against an outer peripheral contact surface of the head end to provide a mechanical and electrical connection to the cathode element. 7 figs

Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gordon, K.C.; Kippenhan, D.O.; Purgalis, P.; Moussa, D.; Williams, M.D.; Wilde, S.B.; West, M.W.

1987-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

332

Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming (Michigan-Med); (HHMI)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

Glass, R.S.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

335

Structural and Functional Elucidation of the Mechanism Promoting Error-prone Synthesis by Human DNA Polymerase [kappa] Opposite the 7,8-Dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine Adduct  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human polymerase kappa (hPol {kappa}) is one of four eukaryotic Y-class DNA polymerases and may be an important element in the cellular response to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzo[a]pyrene, which can lead to reactive oxygenated metabolite-mediated oxidative stress. Here, we present a detailed analysis of the activity and specificity of hPol {kappa} bypass opposite the major oxidative adduct 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2{prime}-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG). Unlike its archaeal homolog Dpo4, hPol {kappa} bypasses this lesion in an error-prone fashion by inserting mainly dATP. Analysis of transient-state kinetics shows diminished 'bursts' for dATP:8-oxoG and dCTP:8-oxoG incorporation, indicative of non-productive complex formation, but dATP:8-oxoG insertion events that do occur are 2-fold more efficient than dCTP:G insertion events. Crystal structures of ternary hPol {kappa} complexes with adducted template-primer DNA reveal non-productive (dGTP and dATP) alignments of incoming nucleotide and 8-oxoG. Structural limitations placed upon the hPol {kappa} by interactions between the N-clasp and finger domains combined with stabilization of the syn-oriented template 8-oxoG through the side chain of Met-135 both appear to contribute to error-prone bypass. Mutating Leu-508 in the little finger domain of hPol {kappa} to lysine modulates the insertion opposite 8-oxoG toward more accurate bypass, similar to previous findings with Dpo4. Our structural and activity data provide insight into important mechanistic aspects of error-prone bypass of 8-oxoG by hPol {kappa} compared with accurate and efficient bypass of the lesion by Dpo4 and polymerase {eta}.

Irimia, Adriana; Eoff, Robert L.; Guengerich, F.Peter; Egli, Martin; (Vanderbilt)

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Scale-up of miscible flood processes  

SciTech Connect

Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of “capillary fracturing” as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first single-phase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phas

Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments  

SciTech Connect

In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate saturations. Large volumes (of order one pore volume) of gaseous and aqueous phases must be transported into the gas hydrate stability zone. The driver for this transport is the pressure sink induced by a reduction in occupied pore volume that accompanies the formation of hydrate from gas and water. Pore-scale imbibition models and bed-scale multiphase flow models indicate that the rate-limiting step in converting gas to hydrate is the supply of water to the hydrate stability zone. Moreover, the water supply rate is controlled by capillarity-driven flux for conditions typical of the Alaska North Slope. A meter-scale laboratory experiment confirms that significant volumes of fluid phases move into the hydrate stability zone and that capillarity is essential for the water flux. The model shows that without capillarity-driven flux, large saturations of hydrate cannot form. The observations of thick zones of large saturation at Mallik and Mt Elbert thus suggest that the primary control on these systems is the rate of transport of gaseous and aqueous phases, driven by the pressure sink at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. A key finding of our project is the elucidation of “capillary fracturing” as a dominant gas transport mechanism in low-permeability media. We initially investigate this phenomenon by means of grain-scale simulations in which we extended a discrete element mechanics code (PFC, by Itasca) to incorporate the dynamics of first singlephase and then multiphase flow. A reductionist model on a square lattice allows us to determine some of the fundamental dependencies of the mode of gas invasion (capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and fracturing) on the parameters of the system. We then show that the morphology of the gas-invaded region exerts a fundamental control on the fabric of methane hydrate formation, and on the overpressures caused by methane hydrate dissociation. We demonstrate the existence of the different invasion regimes by means of controlled laboratory experiments in a radial cell. We collapse the behavior in the form of a phase

Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

A human factors approach towards the design of a new glovebox glove for Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Present day glovebox gloves at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are underdeveloped and ergonomically inaccurate. This problem results in numerous sprain and strain injuries every year for employees who perform glovebox work. In addition to injuries, using the current glovebox glove design also contributes to breaches and contamination. The current glove used today at LANL has several problems: (1) The length of the fingers is incorrect, (2) the web spacing between the fingers is nonexistent, (3) the angles between each digit on the finger are incorrect, (4) the thumb is placed inaccurately, and (5) the length of the hand is incorrect. These problems present a need to correct the current glove design to decrease the risk of injuries, breaches, and contamination. Anthropometrics were researched to help find the best range of hand measurements to fix the current glove design. Anthropometrics is the measure of the human physical variation. Anthropometrics for this study were gathered from the American National Survey (ANSUR) data that was conducted by the U.S Army in 1988. The current glovebox glove uses anthropometrics from the 95th to 105th percentile range which is too large so the new gloves are going to implement data from a smaller range of percentile groups. The 105th percentile range represents measurements that exceed the human population but are needed to fit certain circumstance such as wearing several under gloves within the glovebox gloves. Anthropometrics used in this study include: 105th percentile measurements for joint circumference which was unchanged because the room for under gloves plus ease of hand insertion and extraction is needed, 80th percentile measurements for crotch length to allow workers to reach the web spacing in the glove, 20th percentile measurements for finger length to allow workers to reach the end of the glove, standard 10.5cm hand breadth to allow more room to accommodate under gloves, 45 degrees abduction angle for the thumb for better positioning, 45 degrees extension angle for the thumb for better positioning, and various angles for the other fingers to allow a more relaxed and natural fit. 3D modeling was used to implement the anthropometric data listed above onto an existing scanned solid model of a human hand. SolidWorks 2010 3-D modeling package was utilized to manipulate the hand model to represent the anthropometric data researched. The anthropometrics and modifications were reviewed by the University of New Mexico Department of Orthopedics hand surgeons. After all modifications and reviews were completed the model was printed out using stereolithography. The printed out model of the hand was used as a mold to create a prototype glovebox glove. The new mold was taken to Piercan USA to produce a 20mil Polyurethane/Hypalon glovebox glove. The Minnesota Dexterity test and Purdue Pegboard test were used to measure the dexterity of the prototype glovebox glove against a current 15 mil Hypalon LANL glovebox glove. Using the data from the tests a student t test was used to determine if there was a significant difference between the current hypalon glove results and the new prototype glove results. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly lower mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Minnesota Dexterity test. With a 95% confidence level the prototype showed to have a significantly higher mean difference from the current hypalon glovebox glove with the Purdue Pegboard test. A p value method was also performed to confirm the results of the student t test. A survey was also given to glovebox workers to determine if they preferred the new design. The best reaction from glovebox workers was the new thumb position, 73.2% of the sample population agreed with the new thumb position. Developing a new glovebox glove will improve the ergonomics of the hand for work performed, decrease exposure time, decreasing risk of breaching, increasing productivity, reducing injuries, and improving work performance. In the future the new glovebox

Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers  

SciTech Connect

Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability. Preliminary simulation results show good agreement between classical instability solutions and numerical predictions of finger growth and spacing obtained using different gas/liquid viscosity ratios, relative permeability and capillary pressure models. Further studies are recommended to validate these results over a broader range of conditions.

Garcia, Julio Enrique

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

HIGH EFFICIENCY BIFACIAL BACK SURFACE FIELD SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first high efficiency p÷-n-n + bifacial solar cells are presented. Efficiencies of 15.7 % and 13.6 % were measured under front and back air mass one illumination respectively at 28 °C. At 7 air mass one illumination and 28 °C the front efficiency increases to 16.5%. A pilot production of 200 cells was made following a fabrication process as simple as that for conventional back surface field cells. Mean efficiencies of 13.4 % and 10.7 % were obtained under front and back illumination respectively. The production yield is higher than 80%. The advantages that bifacial cells present in some applications, compared with conventional cells, have been pointed out for static [1] and quasi-static [2] concentrating systems, for luminescent concentrators [3] and also for flat panels. A transistor-like structure (n+-p-n +) has already been developed as a bifacial cell [4]. We have also suggested [5] and theoretically analysed [6] the use of a back surface field (BSF) structure (n+-p-p ÷ or p+-n-n +) as a bifacial cell. The purpose here is to demonstrate the feasibility of high efficiency bifacial BSF solar cells. p+-n-n ÷ bifacial cells with a 5 cm 2 area were made on float-zone silicon wafers. The resistivity of the n-type base region was 10 ~2 cm and the thickness was 260 pm. The p ÷ and n + regions were formed by open-tube diffusions using BBr3 and POC13 sources, the resulting sheet resistance being 45- 60 ~2/[:] for the p ÷ layer and 20- 30 ~2/[:] for the n ÷ layer. A TiOx antireflection (AR) coating was spun onto both sides of the cell; Ti-Pd-Ag grids were sputtered and lift-off defined also on both faces. The metallization pattern was designed for the cells to operate inside static compound parabolic mirrors with a concentration factor of 5 and a non-uniform distribution of light intensity on the cell surface. The optimum grid has ten fingers per centimetre (each finger is 50- 70 pm wide) and produces a coverage factor in the illuminated area of about 5.5%.

A. Cuevas; A. Luque; J. Eguren; J. Del Alamo

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Domain analysis for estrogen receptor/Sp1-mediated transactivation and detection of estrogen receptor/Sp1 protein interactions in living cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estrogen Receptor ? (ER?)/Sp1 activation of GC-rich gene promoters in breast cancer cells is dependent, in part, on the activation function 1 (AF1) of ER?. This study investigates contributions of the DNA binding domain (C) and AF2 (DEF) regions of ER? on activation of ER?/Sp1. 17Beta-estradiol (E2) and the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 182,780 induced reporter gene activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells cotransfected with human or mouse ER? (hER? or MOR), but not ER? and GC-rich constructs containing three tandem Sp1 binding sites (pSp13) or other E2-responsive GC-rich promoters. Estrogen and antiestrogen activation of hER?/Sp1 was dependent on overlapping and different regions of the C, D, E, and F domains of ER?. Antiestrogen-induced activation of hER?/Sp1 was lost using hER? mutants deleted in zinc finger 1 (amino acids (aa) 185-205), zinc finger 2 (aa 218-245), and the hinge/helix 1 (aa 265-330) domains. In contrast with antiestrogens, E2-dependent activation of hER?/Sp1 required the C-terminal F domain (aa 579-595), which contains a ?-strand structural motif. Moreover, in peptide competition experiments overexpression of NR-box peptides inhibits E2-induced luciferase activity of pERE3, which contains three tandem repeats of consensus ERE sites, whereas E2-induced hER?/Sp1 action was not inhibited by NR-box peptide expression. In contrast, overexpression of a C-terminal (aa 575-595) F domain peptide specifically blocked E2-dependent activation of hER?/Sp1, but not on activation of pERE3, suggesting that F domain interactions with nuclear cofactors are specifically required for ER?/Sp1 action. Furthermore, direct physical interactions between hER? and Sp1 protein in vivo have been investigated by using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) microscopy and image analysis. Consistent with results from transient transfection assay, E2, 4OHT, and ICI enhanced hER?/Sp1 interactions in living cells and these interactions were also confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation. In addition, endogenous hER?/Sp1 action was evaluated by using si RNA for Sp1 and a significant decrease in ligand-induced hER?/Sp1 action was observed after decreased Sp1 expression.

Kim, KyoungHyun

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366) FY2012  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events. Field measurements at the T-4 Atmospheric Test Site (CAU 370) suggest that radionuclide-contaminated soils may have migrated along a shallow ephemeral drainage that traverses the site (NNSA/NSO, 2009). (It is not entirely clear how contaminated soils got into their present location at the T-4 Site, but flow to the channel has been redirected and the contamination does not appear to be migrating at present.) Aerial surveys in selected portions of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) also suggest that radionuclide-contaminated soils may be migrating along ephemeral channels in Areas 3, 8, 11, 18, and 25 (Colton, 1999). In Area 11, several low-level airborne surveys of the Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites (CAU 366) show plumes of Americium 241 (Am-241) extending along ephemeral channels (Figure 1, marker numbers 5 and 6) below Corrective Action Site (CAS) 11-23-03 (marker number 3) and CAS 11 23-04 (marker number 4) (Colton, 1999). Plutonium Valley in Area 11 of the NNSS was selected for the study because of the aerial survey evidence suggesting downstream transport of radionuclide-contaminated soil. The aerial survey (Figure 1) shows a well defined finger of elevated radioactivity (marker number 5) extending to the southwest from the southernmost detonation site (marker number 4). This finger of contamination overlies a drainage channel mapped on the topographic base map used for presentation of the survey data suggesting surface runoff as a likely cause of the contaminated area. Additionally, instrumenting sites strongly suspected of conveying soil from areas of surface contamination offers the most efficient means to confirm that surface runoff may transport radioactive contamination as a result of ambient precipitation/runoff events. Closure plans being developed for the CAUs on the NNSS may include post-closure monitoring for possible release of radioactive contaminants. Determining the potential for transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils under ambient meteorological conditions will facilitate an appropriate closure design and post-closure monitoring program.

Julianne J Miller, Steve A. Mizell, George Nikolich, Greg McCurdy, and Scott Campbell

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Automated Sorting of Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect

The HANDSS-55 Transuranic Waste Sorting Module is designed to sort out items found in 55-gallon drums of waste as determined by an operator. Innovative imaging techniques coupled with fast linear motor-based motion systems and a flexible end-effector system allow the operator to remove items from the waste stream by a touch of the finger. When all desired items are removed from the waste stream, the remaining objects are automatically moved to a repackaging port for removal from the glovebox/cell. The Transuranic Waste Sorting Module consists of 1) a high accuracy XYZ Stereo Measurement and Imaging system, 2) a vibrating/tilting sorting table, 3) an XY Deployment System, 4) a ZR Deployment System, 5) several user-selectable end-effectors, 6) a waste bag opening system, 7) control and instrumentation, 8) a noncompliant waste load-out area, and 9) a Human/Machine Interface (HMI). The system is modular in design to accommodate database management tools, additional load-out ports, and other enhancements. Manually sorting the contents of a 55-gallon drum takes about one day per drum. The HANDSS-55 Waste Sorting Module is designed to significantly increase the throughput of this sorting process by automating those functions that are strenuous and tiresome for an operator to perform. The Waste Sorting Module uses the inherent ability of an operator to identify the items that need to be segregated from the waste stream and then, under computer control, picks that item out of the waste and deposits it in the appropriate location. The operator identifies the object by locating the visual image on a large color display and touches the image on the display with his finger. The computer then determines the location of the object, and performing a highspeed image analysis determines its size and orientation, so that a robotic gripper can be deployed to pick it up. Following operator verification by voice or function key, the object is deposited into a specified location.

Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Moths and Butterflies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moths and Butterflies Moths and Butterflies Nature Bulletin No. 192-A May 15, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MOTHS AND BUTTERFLIES Moths and butterflies include some of the largest and some of the most beautiful insects, as well as some quite small and many of the most harmful. There are approximately 80, 000 species -- more in the tropical regions than elsewhere -- and far more moths than butterflies. Of about 10,000 that occur in America north of Mexico, only about 600 are butterflies, including a few that range north of the Arctic Circle. In the next two bulletins we shall endeavor to make you acquainted with some of our most common or spectacular kinds. Moths and butterflies have four scaly wings. If you handle them, what appears to be dust comes off on your fingers. These dust particles are minute scales, each a flattened hollow bristle with fine ridges on the upper side. It is the pigments in these scales, which on many butterflies and moths cover each wing like overlapping shingles on a roof, that produce the colors and markings. Metallic iridescent colors are due to the reflection or refraction of light by the tiny ridges. In some cases, generally the males, certain scales are outlets for scent glands producing an odor which, when perceptible to humans, has a musky or flower-like fragrance.

347

Buckeyes and Horse Chestnuts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buckeyes and Horse Chestnuts Buckeyes and Horse Chestnuts Nature Bulletin No. 266-A April 22, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BUCKEYES AND HORSE CHESTNUTS Most children know Longfellow's poem which begins: "Under the spreading chestnut tree the village smithy stands"; but few people know that, actually, the tree which inspired it was a horse chestnut. The native buckeyes and their imported relatives, the horse chestnuts, are much different from the true chestnut but among them are some of our finest street and shade trees. They belong to a family which includes kinds that are large, some that are medium-sized or small, and some that are only shrubs. They are notable for their dense foliage of large toothed leaves, their upstanding showy "candles" of flowers in spring, and their peculiar fruit or nuts. The flowers are white, yellow, red or varicolored, according to the species. The leaves, growing upon thick branchlets which have no fine twigs, have from 3 to 9 large leaflets set upon the end of a long stem like the spread fingers of a human hand .

348

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Skin Sensitivity and the Cold Name: Richard Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A student in my anatomy and physiology class asked me, "When it's very cold outside in the winter, why does your skin hurt MORE than usual when you bang your finger or someone slaps you on the arm?" Replies: Wow! This is one outstanding question. Mammals respond to cold weather with the hypothalamus releasing thyrotropin releasing factor. This production increases with the severity of the cold weather and the length of the exposure to cold over a long period of time (at least three to four weeks). The thyroid responds by slowly increasing in size and releases thyroxine at higher quantities. Thyroxine increases the sensitivity of the entire nervous system. As a matter of fact, as you probably know, it increases the metabolism wholesale! within the body. This gets complicated so I'm keeping it simple. So, the bottom line is thyroxine. It just heightens our sensitivity not only to cold but our entire nervous system is enhanced.

349

The Environment of Galaxies at Low Redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare environmental effects in two analogous samples of galaxies, one from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the other from a semi-analytic model (SAM) based on the Millennium Simulation (MS), to test to what extent current SAMs of galaxy formation are reproducing environmental effects. We estimate the large-scale environment of each galaxy using a Bayesian density estimator based on distances to all ten nearest neighbors and compare broad-band photometric properties of the two samples as a function of environment. The feedbacks implemented in the semi-analytic model produce a qualitatively correct galaxy population with similar environmental dependence as that seen in SDSS galaxies. In detail, however, the colors of MS galaxies exhibit an exaggerated dependence on environment: the field contains too many blue galaxies while clusters contain too many red galaxies, compared to the SDSS sample. We also find that the MS contains a population of highly clustered, relatively faint red galaxies with velocity dispersions comparable to their Hubble flow. Such high-density galaxies, if they exist, would be overlooked in any low-redshift survey since their membership to a cluster cannot be determined due to the "Fingers of God" effect.

Nicolas B. Cowan; Zeljko Ivezic

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer MitoNEET is a Uniquely Folded Outer Mitochondrial Membrane Protein Stabilized by Diabetes Drugs The rise in obesity in the United States parallels a dramatic increase in obesity-associated diseases, most notably type-2 diabetes. This disease is predicted to reach epidemic proportions in the next several decades (Zimmet et al 2001, Urek et al 2007). Thus, understanding the biochemical processes underlying type-2 diabetes and identifying new targets for therapeutic intervention are critical for national and world health. A drug of choice to treat type-II diabetes is pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) derivative originally thought to exert its effect through activation of the nuclear transcription factor PPARg. Recently, a novel protein target for pioglitazone was discovered and was called mitoNEET (Colca et al 2004). This protein is anchored to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) (Wiley et al 2007). Contrary to predictions that this was a zinc-finger transcription factor we discovered that mitoNEET is a novel 2Fe-2S protein.

351

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Regeneration of Lost Parts in Animals Nature Bulletin No. 751 April 11, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist REGENERATION OF LOST PARTS IN ANIMALS For ages, mankind has been fascinated with the idea that lost parts of animals can be regrown. According to Greek legend, one of the twelve "labors" of Hercules was the destruction of the Hydra, a gigantic monster with nine serpents' heads. Finding that as soon as one head was cut off two new ones grew in its place, at last he burned out their roots with firebrands. All animals have the power of regeneration to a greater or lesser degree. In man and higher animals it is quite limited. We see it most often in the healing of wounds and the mending of bones. A lost fingernail can be replaced but not a lost finger. Lower animals have a much greater ability to replace parts. For instance, the little half-inch flatworm, Planaria, that lives under rocks in clean creeks can be cut into as many as 32 pieces and each fragment is able to rebuild a miniature flatworm complete with head, tail, eyes, mouth and internal organs.

352

Decimal System and Double Digits  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decimal System and Double Digits Decimal System and Double Digits Name: Ken Status: other Grade: other Country: Canada Date: April 2011 Question: If the origin of the decimal system reflects counting on ten fingers and if zero came into use after the decimal system had been established why did we not create a single symbol for our tenth digit rather than use the double digit 10? If T were to represent the tenth number this would have created a counting system where the number series 1,2...9,T is followed by the same series having a 1 to the left then followed by the same series having a 2 to the left, etc. The T would be the last number in a series of ten single digits rather than be the first number in a series of double digits. The symbol zero would be used only between negative one and positive one because it represents the existence of nothing and, therefore, would have no other function.

353

Structure of an aprataxin?DNA complex with insights into AOA1 neurodegenerative disease  

SciTech Connect

DNA ligases finalize DNA replication and repair through DNA nick-sealing reactions that can abort to generate cytotoxic 5'-adenylation DNA damage. Aprataxin (Aptx) catalyzes direct reversal of 5'-adenylate adducts to protect genome integrity. Here the structure of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe Aptx-DNA-AMP-Zn{sup 2+} complex reveals active site and DNA interaction clefts formed by fusing a histidine triad (HIT) nucleotide hydrolase with a DNA minor groove-binding C{sub 2}HE zinc finger (Znf). An Aptx helical 'wedge' interrogates the base stack for sensing DNA ends or DNA nicks. The HIT-Znf, the wedge and an '[F/Y]PK' pivot motif cooperate to distort terminal DNA base-pairing and direct 5'-adenylate into the active site pocket. Structural and mutational data support a wedge-pivot-cut HIT-Znf catalytic mechanism for 5'-adenylate adduct recognition and removal and suggest that mutations affecting protein folding, the active site pocket and the pivot motif underlie Aptx dysfunction in the neurodegenerative disorder ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1 (AOA1).

Tumbale, Percy; Appel, C. Denise; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Robertson, Patrick D.; Williams, Jessica S.; Krahn, Joe; Ahel, Ivan; Williams, R. Scott (NIEHS); (Manchester)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

Test-to-Failure of Crystalline Silicon Modules: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accelerated lifetime testing of five crystalline silicon module designs was carried out according to the Terrestrial Photovoltaic Module Accelerated Test-to-Failure Protocol. This protocol compares the reliability of various module constructions on a quantitative basis. The modules under test are subdivided into three accelerated lifetime testing paths: 85..deg..C/85% relative humidity with system bias, thermal cycling between ?40..deg..C and 85..deg..C, and a path that alternates between damp heat and thermal cycling. The most severe stressor is damp heat with system bias applied to simulate the voltages that modules experience when connected in an array. Positive 600 V applied to the active layer with respect to the grounded module frame accelerates corrosion of the silver grid fingers and degrades the silicon nitride antireflective coating on the cells. Dark I-V curve fitting indicates increased series resistance and saturation current around the maximum power point; however, an improvement in junction recombination characteristics is obtained. Shunt paths and cell-metallization interface failures are seen developing in the silicon cells as determined by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves in the case of negative 600 V bias applied to the active layer. Ability to withstand electrolytic corrosion, moisture ingress, and ion drift under system voltage bias are differentiated.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Trudell, D.; Bosco, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S. R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A New two-dimensional Second Order Non-oscillatory Central Scheme Applied to multiphase flows in heterogeneous porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare the Kurganov-Tadmor (KT) two-dimensional second order semi-discrete central scheme in dimension by dimension formulation with a new two-dimensional approach introduced here and applied in numerical simulations for two-phase, two-dimensional flows in heterogeneous formations. This semi-discrete central scheme is based on the ideas of Rusanov's method using a more precise information about the local speeds of wave propagation computed at each Riemann Problem in two-space dimensions. We find the KT dimension by dimension has a much simpler mathematical description than the genuinely two-dimensional one with a little more numerical diffusion, particularly in the presence of viscous fingers. Unfortunately, as one can see, the KT with the dimension by dimension approach might produce incorrect boundary behavior in a typical geometry used in the study of porous media flows: the quarter of a five spot. This problem has been corrected by the authors with the new semi-discrete scheme proposed here. We conclu...

Furtado, F; Ribeiro, S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Management of Salt Waste from Electrochemical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Electrochemical processing of used nuclear fuel involves operation of one or more cells containing molten salt electrolyte. Processing of the fuel results in contamination of the salt via accumulation of fission products and transuranic (TRU) actinides. Upon reaching contamination limits, the salt must be removed and either disposed or treated to remove the contaminants and recycled back to the process. During development of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II spent fuel treatment process, waste salt from the electrorefiner was to be stabilized in a ceramic waste form and disposed of in a high-level waste repository. With the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository, other options are now being considered. One approach that involves direct disposal of the salt in a geologic salt formation has been evaluated. While waste forms such as the ceramic provide near-term resistance to corrosion, they may not be necessary to ensure adequate performance of the repository. To improve the feasibility of direct disposal, recycling a substantial fraction of the useful salt back to the process equipment could minimize the volume of the waste. Experiments have been run in which a cold finger is used for this purpose to crystallize LiCl from LiCl/CsCl. If it is found to be unsuitable for transportation, the salt waste could also be immobilized in zeolite without conversion to the ceramic waste form.

Michael F. Simpson; Michael N. Patterson; Joon Lee; Yifeng Wang; Joshua Versey; Ammon Williams; Supathorn Phongikaroon; James Allensworth; Man-Sung Yim

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

A BAC-based physical map of the Drosophila buzzatii genome  

SciTech Connect

Large-insert genomic libraries facilitate cloning of large genomic regions, allow the construction of clone-based physical maps and provide useful resources for sequencing entire genomes. Drosophilabuzzatii is a representative species of the repleta group in the Drosophila subgenus, which is being widely used as a model in studies of genome evolution, ecological adaptation and speciation. We constructed a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) genomic library of D. buzzatii using the shuttle vector pTARBAC2.1. The library comprises 18,353 clones with an average insert size of 152 kb and a {approx}18X expected representation of the D. buzzatii euchromatic genome. We screened the entire library with six euchromatic gene probes and estimated the actual genome representation to be {approx}23X. In addition, we fingerprinted by restriction digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis a sample of 9,555 clones, and assembled them using Finger Printed Contigs (FPC) software and manual editing into 345 contigs (mean of 26 clones per contig) and 670singletons. Finally, we anchored 181 large contigs (containing 7,788clones) to the D. buzzatii salivary gland polytene chromosomes by in situ hybridization of 427 representative clones. The BAC library and a database with all the information regarding the high coverage BAC-based physical map described in this paper are available to the research community.

Gonzalez, Josefa; Nefedov, Michael; Bosdet, Ian; Casals, Ferran; Calvete, Oriol; Delprat, Alejandra; Shin, Heesun; Chiu, Readman; Mathewson, Carrie; Wye, Natasja; Hoskins, Roger A.; Schein, JacquelineE.; de Jong, Pieter; Ruiz, Alfredo

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

358

Intra-Arterial Calcium Gluconate Treatment After Hydrofluoric Acid Burn of the Hand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrofluoric acid (HF) is a colorless corrosive acid used in different industrial branches. Exposure to HF typically results from spills, and most often the hand or fingers are involved. Tissue damage through cutaneous HF exposure occurs through corrosive burns due to the free hydrogen ions and through skin penetration of the fluoride ions, causing a depletion of calcium in the deep tissue layers, ultimately leading to cell death and tissue necrosis. Treatment of HF burns consists of thoroughly flushing the exposed area with water and applying calcium gluconate gel to the skin. If topical treatment does not suffice, subcutaneous injections, as well as intravascular-both intravenous and intra-arterial-calcium gluconate therapy, have been advocated. We report for the first time a case of HF burn of the hand and digits associated with vasospasm. Pain and vasospasm were successfully treated by repeated intra-arterial calcium gluconate injection. We conclude that intra-arterial calcium gluconate injection is a successful and well-tolerated therapy for HF burn associated with Raynaud's syndrome. Intra-arterial injection allows for well-controlled delivery of therapy as well as assessment of the vascular status.

Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Jaeger, U. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Sagoschen, I. [Klinikum der Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Poison Control Center, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II (Germany); Lamberti, C. [Universitaet Bonn, Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik I (Germany); Wilhelm, K. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Universitaet Bonn (Germany)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermal conductor for high-energy electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal conductor for use with an electrochemical energy storage device is disclosed. The thermal conductor is attached to one or both of the anode and cathode contacts of an electrochemical cell. A resilient portion of the conductor varies in height or position to maintain contact between the conductor and an adjacent wall structure of a containment vessel in response to relative movement between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cell and conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cell and thermally conductive and electrically resistive material disposed between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may be fabricated to include a resilient portion having one of a substantially C-shaped, double C-shaped, Z-shaped, V-shaped, O-shaped, S-shaped, or finger-shaped cross-section. An elastomeric spring element may be configured so as to be captured by the resilient conductor for purposes of enhancing the functionality of the thermal conductor. The spring element may include a protrusion that provides electrical insulation between the spring conductor and a spring conductor of an adjacently disposed electrochemical cell in the presence of relative movement between the cells and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may also be fabricated from a sheet of electrically conductive material and affixed to the contacts of a number of electrochemical cells.

Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Intracellular distribution of a speech/language disorder associated FOXP2 mutant  

SciTech Connect

Although a mutation (R553H) in the forkhead box (FOX)P2 gene is associated with speech/language disorder, little is known about the function of FOXP2 or its relevance to this disorder. In the present study, we identify the forkhead nuclear localization domains that contribute to the cellular distribution of FOXP2. Nuclear localization of FOXP2 depended on two distally separated nuclear localization signals in the forkhead domain. A truncated version of FOXP2 lacking the leu-zip, Zn{sup 2+} finger, and forkhead domains that was observed in another patient with speech abnormalities demonstrated an aggregated cytoplasmic localization. Furthermore, FOXP2 (R553H) mainly exhibited a cytoplasmic localization despite retaining interactions with nuclear transport proteins (importin {alpha} and {beta}). Interestingly, wild type FOXP2 promoted the transport of FOXP2 (R553H) into the nucleus. Mutant and wild type FOXP2 heterodimers in the nucleus or FOXP2 R553H in the cytoplasm may underlie the pathogenesis of the autosomal dominant speech/language disorder.

Mizutani, Akifumi [Divisions of Development and Differentiation, Department of Human Inherited Metabolic Disease, National Institute of Neuroscience, Ogawahigashi-machi 4-1-1, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502 (Japan); Department of Pediatrics, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji 3311-1, Shimotsukeshi, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Ayumi [Divisions of Development and Differentiation, Department of Human Inherited Metabolic Disease, National Institute of Neuroscience, Ogawahigashi-machi 4-1-1, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502 (Japan); Momoi, Mariko Y. [Department of Pediatrics, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji 3311-1, Shimotsukeshi, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan)]. E-mail: mymomoi@jichi.ac.jp; Fujita, Eriko [Divisions of Development and Differentiation, Department of Human Inherited Metabolic Disease, National Institute of Neuroscience, Ogawahigashi-machi 4-1-1, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502 (Japan); Tanabe, Yuko [Divisions of Development and Differentiation, Department of Human Inherited Metabolic Disease, National Institute of Neuroscience, Ogawahigashi-machi 4-1-1, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502 (Japan); Momoi, Takashi [Divisions of Development and Differentiation, Department of Human Inherited Metabolic Disease, National Institute of Neuroscience, Ogawahigashi-machi 4-1-1, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8502 (Japan)

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) furnace system for high temperature performance testing of VHTR fuel  

SciTech Connect

The AGR-1 irradiation of TRISO-coated particle fuel specimens was recently completed and represents the most successful such irradiation in US history, reaching peak burnups of greater than 19% FIMA with zero failures out of 300,000 particles. An extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) campaign will be conducted on the AGR-1 fuel in order to characterize the irradiated fuel properties, assess the in-pile fuel performance in terms of coating integrity and fission metals release, and determine the fission product retention behavior during high temperature safety testing. A new furnace system has been designed, built, and tested to perform high temperature accident tests. The Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system is designed to heat fuel specimens at temperatures up to 2000 degrees C in helium while monitoring the release of volatile fission metals (e.g. Cs, Ag, Sr, and Eu), iodine, and fission gases (Kr, Xe). Fission gases released from the fuel to the sweep gas are monitored in real time using dual cryogenic traps fitted with high purity germanium detectors. Condensable fission products are collected on a plate attached to a water-cooled cold finger that can be exchanged periodically without interrupting the test. Analysis of fission products on the condensation plates involves dry gamma counting followed by chemical analysis of selected isotopes. This paper will describe design and operational details of the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator furnace system and the associated fission gas monitoring system, as well as preliminary system calibration results.

Paul A. Demkowicz; David V. Laug; Dawn M. Scates; Edward L. Reber; Lyle G. Roybal; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Robert N. Morris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is disclosed which is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

Ritter, D.F.; St. Clair, J.A.; Togami, H.K.

1981-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Continuous chain bit with downhole cycling capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous chain bit for hard rock drilling is capable of downhole cycling. A drill head assembly moves axially relative to a support body while the chain on the head assembly is held in position so that the bodily movement of the chain cycles the chain to present new composite links for drilling. A pair of spring fingers on opposite sides of the chain hold the chain against movement. The chain is held in tension by a spring-biased tensioning bar. A head at the working end of the chain supports the working links. The chain is centered by a reversing pawl and piston actuated by the pressure of the drilling mud. Detent pins lock the head assembly with respect to the support body and are also operated by the drilling mud pressure. A restricted nozzle with a divergent outlet sprays drilling mud into the cavity to remove debris. Indication of the centered position of the chain is provided by noting a low pressure reading indicating proper alignment of drilling mud slots on the links with the corresponding feed branches.

Ritter, Don F. (Albuquerque, NM); St. Clair, Jack A. (Albuquerque, NM); Togami, Henry K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Sketch Recognition on Mobile Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sketch recognition allows computers to understand and model hand drawn sketches and diagrams. Traditionally sketch recognition systems required a pen based PC interface, but powerful mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can provide a new platform for sketch recognition systems. We describe a new sketch recognition library, Strontium (SrL) that combines several existing sketch recognition libraries modified to run on both personal computers and on the Android platform. We analyzed the recognition speed and accuracy implications of performing low-level shape recognition on smartphones with touch screens. We found that there is a large gap in recognition speed on mobile devices between recognizing simple shapes and more complex ones, suggesting that mobile sketch interface designers limit the complexity of their sketch domains. We also found that a low sampling rate on mobile devices can affect recognition accuracy of complex and curved shapes. Despite this, we found no evidence to suggest that using a finger as an input implement leads to a decrease in simple shape recognition accuracy. These results show that the same geometric shape recognizers developed for pen applications can be used in mobile applications, provided that developers keep shape domains simple and ensure that input sampling rate is kept as high as possible.

Lucchese, George 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Day-to-day oversight of National Laboratory MC&A programs  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) orders require that its Los Alamos Area Office (LAAO) oversee the day-to-day activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Making that oversight unobtrusive is important to keep it from creating additional burdens of reports and programs for the LANL. LAAO accomplishes day-to-day oversight of Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) at the LANL as an onsite observer of LANL`S in-house monitoring activities. Working guidelines established for the LAAO observer prevent us from hindering LANL`s program. A subset of MC&A activities that spans a wide range of MC&A programs with great sensitivity to functionality was selected for monitoring. Thus, timely ``finger on the pulse`` monitoring occurs without smothering the laboratory. LAAO and LANL Management negotiated implementation and observer guidance for the monitoring process. LAAO will apply the method used to other topical areas of the Safeguards and Security arena in the future.

Sedlacek, W.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Flynn, A.B. [USDOE Los Alamos Area Office, NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order l allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a 'finger' or of a 'hockey puck' in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

Jaouadi, A. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Gaaloul, N. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Welfengarten 1, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Pruvost, L. [CNRS, Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC), F-91405 Orsay (France); Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Telmini, M. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Charron, E. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 (France)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Absorbed dose measurements during routine equine radiographic procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was performed in order to determine absorbed doses from scattered radiation to personnel during routine equine radiographic procedures and to determine if the protective apparel adequately reduced exposure from scattered radiation. Absorbed doses were measured for one month at the Texas A&M University Veterinary Teaching Hospital using Li:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). All personnel present in the x-ray examination room during eqine radiography were monitored using TLDs placed at: (1) the finger level; (2) the waist level; (3) the eye level; and (4) the forearm level. Absorbed doses ranged from 0.693 ligy to 31.3 tigy per study. The greatest doses were associated with the individual handling the cassette holder, although the individual making the exposures received similar doses due to improper techniques. The individual holding the horse's halter consistently received the lowest dose. Although all doses observed were within acceptable limits for occupational workers, results demonstrated the need for protective apparel to effectively reduce exposures.

Salinas, Leticia Lamar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chemical decontamination of BWR fuel and core materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous EPRI project decontaminated two discharged BWR fuel assemblies using the AP-LOMI and AP-CAN-DECON processes at Commonwealth Edison's Quad-Cities Nuclear Power Site. The two decontaminated assemblies and a third control assembly were shipped to the B W Hot Cell Facility in Lynchburg, Virginia. The three assemblies were partially disassembled in the hot cells and several rods extracted for nondestructive oxide measurement and visual examination. Various components were removed from the two decontaminated fuel assemblies for destructive examination to search for possible deleterious effects of chemical cleaning. The AP-LOMI process removed essentially all of the crud which normally covers a BWR bundle and channel. The AP-CAN-DECON process removed most of the crud, but left a thin layer on the rods and components in the central region of the bundle between the top and bottom spacer grids. Neither decontamination process appeared to damage the Zircaloy-2 fuel and water rods, or the Zircaloy-4 channels and spacers. An adherent zirconium oxide layer still covered all of the Zircaloy surfaces which were examined. The increase in hydrogen content of the channels and fuel rods was low. The AP-LOMI process did not appear to damage the Inconel X-750 fuel rod expansion springs, spacer lantern springs or channel finger spring. A thin, adherent oxide layer was found on all components.

Beauregard, R.J. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Formation flow channel blocking  

SciTech Connect

A method is claimed for selectively blocking high permeability flow channels in an underground hydrocarbon material bearing formation having flow channels of high permeability and having flow channels of lesser permeability. The method includes the following steps: introducing a blocking material fluid comprising a blocking material in a carrier into the flow channels through an injection well in communication with the formation; introducing a buffer fluid into the formation through the injection well for the buffer fluid to displace the blocking material fluid away from the injection well; allowing the blocking material to settle in the channels to resist displacement by fluid flowing through the channels; introducing a quantity of an activating fluid into the channels through the injection well at a sufficient rate for the activating fluid to displace the buffer fluid and finger into the high permeability channels to reach the blocking material in the high permeability channels without reaching the blocking material in the low permeability channels, the activating fluid being adapted to activate the blocking material which it reaches to cause blocking of the high permeability channels.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

OmniTouch: wearable multitouch interaction everywhere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. OmniTouch is a wearable depth-sensing and projection system that allows everyday surfaces- including a wearer’s own body- to be appropriated for graphical multitouch interaction. OmniTouch is a wearable depth-sensing and projection system that enables interactive multitouch applications on everyday surfaces. Beyond the shoulder-worn system, there is no instrumentation of the user or environment. Foremost, the system allows the wearer to use their hands, arms and legs as graphical, interactive surfaces. Users can also transiently appropriate surfaces from the environment to expand the interactive area (e.g., books, walls, tables). On such surfaces- without any calibration- OmniTouch provides capabilities similar to that of a mouse or touchscreen: X and Y location in 2D interfaces and whether fingers are “clicked” or hovering, enabling a wide variety of interactions. Reliable operation on the hands, for example, requires buttons to be 2.3cm in diameter. Thus, it is now conceivable that anything one can do on today’s mobile devices, they could do in the palm of their hand. ACM Classification: H.5.2 [Information interfaces and

Chris Harrison; Hrvoje Benko; Andrew D. Wilson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: An evaluation of the continuum approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the continuum approach is relatively simple and straightforward to implement, it has been commonly used in modeling flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. However, the usefulness of this approach can be questioned in terms of its adequacy for representing fingering flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock. The continuum approach thus needs to be evaluated carefully by comparing simulation results with field observations directly related to unsaturated flow and transport processes. This paper reports on such an evaluation, based on a combination of model calibration and prediction, using data from an infiltration test carried out in a densely fractured rock within the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Comparisons between experimental and modeling results show that the continuum approach may be able to capture important features of flow and transport processes observed from the test. The modeling results also show that matrix diffusion may have a significant effect on the overall transport behavior in unsaturated fractured rocks, which can be used to estimate effective fracture-matrix interface areas based on tracer transport data. While more theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies are needed to provide a conclusive evaluation, this study suggests that the continuum approach is useful for modeling flow and transport in unsaturated, densely fractured rock.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Haukwa, Charles B.; Ahlers, C. Fredrik; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Flint, Alan L.; Guertal, William B.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal REVIEW ARTICLE Role of radiosynovectomy in the treatment of rheumatoid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiosynovectomy is a novel method of treatment for several acute and chronic inflammatory joint disorders. A small amount of a beta-emitting radionuclide is injected into the affected joint delivering a radiation dose of 70 to 100 Gy to the synovia. The proliferative tissue is destroyed, secretion of fluid and accumulation of inflammation causing cellular compounds stops and the joint surfaces become fibrosed, providing long term symptom relief. The radionuclides are injected in colloidal form so that they remain in the synovium and are not transported by lymphatic vessels causing radiation exposure to other organs. Complete reduction of knee joint swelling has been seen in above 40 % and pain relief in 88 % of patients. Wrist, elbow, shoulder, ankle and hip joints showed significant improvement in 50-60 % and restoration of normal function and long term pain relief has been achieved in about 70 % of small finger joints. In hemophilic arthropathies complete cessation of bleeding in about 60 % and improved mobility in 75 % of patients has

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Interplay between Np95 and Eme1 in the DNA damage response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mus81 (methyl methansulfonate UV sensitive clone 81) and Eme1 (essential meiotic endonuclease 1, also known as MMS4) form a heterodimeric endonuclease that is critical for genomic stability and the response to DNA crosslink damage and replication blockade. However, relatively little is known as to how this endonuclease is regulated following DNA damage. Here, we report mammalian Eme1 interacts with Np95, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in chromatin modification, replication-linked epigenetic maintenance and the DNA damage response. Np95 and Eme1 co-localize on nuclear chromatin following exposure of cells to camptothecin, an agent that promotes the collapse of replication forks. The observed co localization following DNA damage was found to be dependent on an intact RING finger, the structural motif that encodes the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Np95. Taken together, these findings link Mus81-Eme1 with the replication-associated chromatin modifier functions of Np95 in the cellular response to DNA damage.

Mistry, Helena; Gibson, Lianne; Yun, J.W.; Sarras, Haya; Tamblyn, Laura [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada); McPherson, John Peter [Department of Pharmacology, University of Toronto, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8 (Canada)], E-mail: peter.mcpherson@utoronto.ca

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Recognition of a Mononucleosomal Histone Modification Pattern by BPTF via Multivalent Interactions  

SciTech Connect

Little is known about how combinations of histone marks are interpreted at the level of nucleosomes. The second PHD finger of human BPTF is known to specifically recognize histone H3 when methylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me2/3). Here, we examine how additional heterotypic modifications influence BPTF binding. Using peptide surrogates, three acetyllysine ligands are indentified for a PHD-adjacent bromodomain in BPTF via systematic screening and biophysical characterization. Although the bromodomain displays limited discrimination among the three possible acetyllysines at the peptide level, marked selectivity is observed for only one of these sites, H4K16ac, in combination with H3K4me3 at the mononucleosome level. In support, these two histone marks constitute a unique trans-histone modification pattern that unambiguously resides within a single nucleosomal unit in human cells, and this module colocalizes with these marks in the genome. Together, our data call attention to nucleosomal patterning of covalent marks in dictating critical chromatin associations.

A Ruthenburg; H Li; T Milne; S Dewell; R McGinty; M Yuen; B Ueberheide; Y Dou; T Muir; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Recognition of a Mononucleosomal Histone Modification Pattern by BPTF via Multivalent Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Little is known about how combinations of histone marks are interpreted at the level of nucleosomes. The second PHD finger of human BPTF is known to specifically recognize histone H3 when methylated on lysine 4 (H3K4me2/3). Here, we examine how additional heterotypic modifications influence BPTF binding. Using peptide surrogates, three acetyllysine ligands are indentified for a PHD-adjacent bromodomain in BPTF via systematic screening and biophysical characterization. Although the bromodomain displays limited discrimination among the three possible acetyllysines at the peptide level, marked selectivity is observed for only one of these sites, H4K16ac, in combination with H3K4me3 at the mononucleosome level. In support, these two histone marks constitute a unique trans-histone modification pattern that unambiguously resides within a single nucleosomal unit in human cells, and this module colocalizes with these marks in the genome. Together, our data call attention to nucleosomal patterning of covalent marks in dictating critical chromatin associations.

Ruthenburg, Alexander J.; Li, Haitao; Milne, Thomas A.; Dewell, Scott; McGinty, Robert K.; Yuen, Melanie; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Dou, Yali; Muir, Tom W.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David (MSKCC); (Rockefeller); (Michigan-Med)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

377

Calculation of extremity neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors are calculated for three types of finger and wrist extremity phantoms: (1) the polymethyl methacrylate models specified by the U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program for Personnel Dosimetry Systems (DOELAP); (2) the tissue-and-bone phantoms suggested by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; and (3) the Radiology Support Devices (RSD) Inc. RS-122T an-n/shoulder phantom. Extremity factors are determined at shallow surface and bone levels for bare, D20moderated and polyethylene moderated 112Cf. The DOELAP free-field calibration geometry and a realistic glovebox scenario are simulated using a Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code. Calculated DOELAP and RSD extremity fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors for the free-field calibration geometry are 1 to 9 percent lower than the calculated whole-body conversion factor. The tissue-and-bone phantoms exhibit conversion factors 1 to 10 percent greater than the whole-body factor. Glovebox fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors range from 12 percent less than to 128 percent greater than calculated free-field whole-body conversion factors. A preliminary evaluation of the application of the calculated fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors to Los Alamos National Laboratory extremity dosimeter correction factors is performed.

Wood-Zika, Annmarie Ruth

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of bellows and gate valves with a comb-type rf shield for high-current accelerators: Four-year beam test at KEK B-Factory  

SciTech Connect

Since a comb-type rf shield was proposed in 2003 as a rf shield for future high-intensity accelerators, various types of bellow chambers and gate valves with this rf shield have been installed in the KEK B-Factory rings in series and tested with beams. Through beam tests to check the performance, a structural simplification has been tried in parallel. The temperatures of the bellow corrugations decreased by a factor of 3-6 compared to those with a conventional finger-type rf shield in most cases. The temperatures of the body of the gate valves also decreased by a factor of 2-5. These results demonstrated the availability of the comb-type rf shield. Although a discharge was observed in one simplified model, the latest model has shown no problem up to a stored beam current of 1.8 A (1.3 mA/bunch, 6 mm bunch length). Experiences with the comb-type rf shield in these four-year beam tests are reviewed here.

Suetsugu, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Shibata, Kyo; Shirai, Mitsuru; Bondar, Aleksander E.; Kuzminykh, Victor S.; Gorbovsky, Aleksander I.; Sonderegger, Kurt; Morii, Minoru; Kawada, Kakuyu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); VAT Vakuumventile AG, Haag CH-9469 (Switzerland); VAT SKK Vacuum Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-0023 (Japan)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Calorimetric method of ac loss measurement in a rotating magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for calorimetric ac-loss measurements of high-T{sub c} superconductors (HTS) at 80 K. It is based on a technique used at 4.2 K for conventional superconducting wires that allows an easy loss measurement in parallel or perpendicular external field orientation. This paper focuses on ac loss measurement setup and calibration in a rotating magnetic field. This experimental setup is to demonstrate measuring loss using a temperature rise method under the influence of a rotating magnetic field. The slight temperature increase of the sample in an ac-field is used as a measure of losses. The aim is to simulate the loss in rotating machines using HTS. This is a unique technique to measure total ac loss in HTS at power frequencies. The sample is mounted on to a cold finger extended from a liquid nitrogen heat exchanger (HEX). The thermal insulation between the HEX and sample is provided by a material of low thermal conductivity, and low eddy current heating sample holder in vacuum vessel. A temperature sensor and noninductive heater have been incorporated in the sample holder allowing a rapid sample change. The main part of the data is obtained in the calorimetric measurement is used for calibration. The focus is on the accuracy and calibrations required to predict the actual ac losses in HTS. This setup has the advantage of being able to measure the total ac loss under the influence of a continuous moving field as experienced by any rotating machines.

Ghoshal, P. K. [Oxford Instruments NanoScience, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX13 5QX (United Kingdom); Coombs, T. A.; Campbell, A. M. [Department of Engineering, Electrical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Growth of Bi doped cadmium zinc telluride single crystals by Bridgman oscillation method and its structural, optical, and electrical analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The II-VI compound semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is very useful for room temperature radiation detection applications. In the present research, we have successfully grown Bi doped CZT single crystals with two different zinc concentrations (8 and 14 at. %) by the Bridgman oscillation method, in which one experiment has been carried out with a platinum (Pt) tube as the ampoule support. Pt also acts as a cold finger and reduces the growth velocity and enhances crystalline perfection. The grown single crystals have been studied with different analysis methods. The stoichiometry was confirmed by energy dispersive by x-ray and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy analyses and it was found there is no incorporation of impurities in the grown crystal. The presence of Cd and Te vacancies was determined by cathodoluminescence studies. Electrical properties were assessed by I-V analysis and indicated higher resistive value (8.53x10{sup 8} {Omega} cm) for the crystal grown with higher zinc concentration (with Cd excess) compare to the other (3.71x10{sup 5} {Omega} cm).

Carcelen, V.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, J.; Dieguez, E. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Facultad de Ciencias, Univ. Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco (Spain); Hidalgo, P. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "finger colin goranson" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Exploratory research and development project for soil sampling probe investigation  

SciTech Connect

The report investigates a number of design concepts for a soil sampling probe. The design concepts are shown as a series of figures drawn to scale. The probe would be attached to the lower end of a 2-inch diameter drill casing that is inserted into the ground with a steady downward force. It is intended to be used at soil depths of 0-50 feet. Small soil samples will be gathered through the use of a pneumatic jet or a remotely operated mechanical finger. The soil sample will then be transported pneumatically from the tip of the probe to the surface via a sample line in the center of the drill casing. This is achieved by entraining the soil samples in a stream of clean dry nitrogen. At the surface, the soil sample will be filtered from the carrier gas. The report also considers designs that use a carrier capsule. The soil would be remotely placed in a transport capsule at the tip of the probe and pneumatic pressure would be used to force the capsule up the sample line to the surface for retrieval. The soil sampling is to be done without removing the drill casing or using any of the typical coring tools. The sampling system is specifically aimed at soil that may be contaminated with radioactive or toxic materials. The system is suitable for remote operation with a minimum impact and generation of waste. The concepts may also be useful for remote sampling for other applications. 8 figs.

Thurston, G.C.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print Highest-Resolution Ribosome Structure Print The last step in converting the genetic information stored in DNA into the major functional parts of cells is protein biosynthesis. Protein synthesis occurs on the ribosome, a cellular factory found in all forms of life. In contrast to most cellular machines, the ribosome contains a functional core of RNA that is enhanced by ribosomal proteins and accessory factors. Two structures of the intact ribosome from the common bacterium Escherichia coli, determined by a Berkeley-Berlin collaboration to a resolution of 3.5 Ă…, the highest yet achieved, provide many new insights into how the ribosome factory works. Ribosomes Ready for Extreme Close-Up In 1999, the first structure of the intact ribosome-a very large, asymmetric protein that is difficult to crystallize-was solved by x-ray crystallography at the ALS (see "Solving the Ribosome Puzzle"). Since then, scientists have developed quite an extensive photo gallery of ribosomes from various organisms and in various configurations. More importantly, they have sharpened the focus significantly, going from a resolution of 7.8 Ă… in 1999, to 5.5 Ă… in 2001 (see "Zooming in on Ribosomes"), to an amazing 3.5 Ă… in this latest work. What was initially seen as fuzzy "fingers" of electron density can now be resolved into individual nucleotides in the RNA strands. Serendipitously, the crystals used in this particular study contained two versions of the ribosome, each one in a different "pose," allowing the researchers to compare the positions of the various parts and deduce how they work. With these sharper images, scientists are now better able to interpret previous data, test models, and develop new theories, both practical (how do antibiotics that target the ribosome work?) and theoretical (how much has the ribosome evolved from bacteria to human?). Stay tuned.

383

Molecular dissection of prethymic progenitor entry into the T lymphocyte developmental pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Notch signaling activates T lineage differentiation from hemopoietic progenitors, but relatively few regulators that initiate this program have been identified, e.g., GATA3 and T cell factor-I (TCF-1) (gene name Tcli). To identify additional regulators of T cell specification, a cDNA libnlrY from mouse Pro-T cells was screened for genes that are specifically up-regulated in intrathymic T cell precursors as compared with myeloid progenitors. Over 90 genes of interest were identified, and 35 of 44 tested were confirmed to be more highly expressed in T lineage precursors relative to precursors of B and/or myeloid lineage. To a remarkable extent, however, expression of these T lineage-enriched genes, including zinc finger transcription factor, helicase, and signaling adaptor genes, was also shared by stem cells (Lin{sup -}Sca-1{sup +}Kit{sup +}CD27{sup -}) and multipotent progenitors (Lin{sup -}Sca-l{sup +}Kit{sup +}CD27{sup +}), although down-regulated in other lineages. Thus, a major fraction of these early T lineage genes are a regulatory legacy from stem cells. The few genes sharply up-regulated between multipotent progenitors and Pro-T cell stages included those encoding transcription factors Bclllb, TCF-I (Tcli), and HEBalt, Notch target Deltexl, Deltex3L, Fkbp5, Eval, and Tmem13l. Like GATA3 and Deltexl, Bclllb, Fkbp5, and Eval were dependent on Notch/Delta signaling for induction in fetal liver precursors, but only BcIlI band HEBalt were up-regulated between the first two stages of intrathymic T cell development (double negative I and double negative 2) corresponding to T lineage specification. Bclllb was uniquely T lineage restricted and induced by NotchlDelta signaling specifically upon entry into the T lineage differentiation pathway.

Fung, Elizabeth-sharon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

A complex de novo translocation of chromosomes 4, 6 and 21 in a child with dysmorphic features and unusual hematological findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 5 1/2-year-old white male was referred to our institution for evaluation of easy bruising confined to lower extremities since infancy. His family history is not significant with healthy parents and six normal siblings. Physical examination revealed weight and height both in 50th and 75th percentile, respectively. Major findings included macrocephaly with prominent forehead, hypertelorism with inner and outer canthus distances both above 97th percentile, epicanthus folds, normal ears with prominent upper pinnae, thin, sharp nose with pointed tip, neck with pterygium coli appearance and shortened clavicles, short thumbs with hyperconvex nails that curved around tip of fingers, abnormally bowed elbows and knee joints, prominent abdomen with omphalocele and flat feet with hypoplastic nails. He has a speech articulation problem which may be due to high arched palate. Hematological evaluation revealed PT/PTT values in normal range with prolonged bleeding time > 15 minutes. Because of abnormal elbow and knee joints, Mitromycin C Stress test was performed to rule out Fanconi`s anemia (FA). The chromosome breakage frequency was found to be within the normal range for both the patient and the control. Thus, the diagnosis of FA was ruled out. However, cytogenetic analysis revealed a three-way complex translocation between chromosomes 4, 6 and 21 with an apparent balanced carrier male karyotype: 46,XY,t(4;6;21)(4qter{r_arrow}4p16::21q21{r_arrow} 21qter;6qter{r_arrow}6p21.1::4p16{r_arrow}4pter;21pter{r_arrow} 21q21::6p21.1{r_arrow}6pter). Both parents have normal chromosomes.

Muneer, R.S.; Hopcus, D.J.; Sarale, C. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

CONFINED POPULATION III ENRICHMENT AND THE PROSPECTS FOR PROMPT SECOND-GENERATION STAR FORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that nucleosynthetic output of the first Population III supernovae was a catalyst defining the character of subsequent stellar generations. Most of the work on the earliest enrichment was carried out assuming that the first stars were extremely massive and that the associated supernovae were unusually energetic, enough to completely unbind the baryons in the host cosmic minihalo and disperse the synthesized metals into the intergalactic medium. Recent work, however, suggests that the first stars may in fact have been somewhat less massive, with a characteristic mass scale of a few tens of solar masses. We present a cosmological simulation following the transport of the metals synthesized in a Population III supernova assuming that it had an energy of 10{sup 51} erg, compatible with standard Type II supernovae. A young supernova remnant is inserted in the first star's relic H II region in the free expansion phase and is followed for 40 Myr employing adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian tracer particle techniques. The supernova remnant remains partially trapped within the minihalo, and the thin snowplow shell develops pronounced instability and fingering. Roughly half of the ejecta turn around and fall back toward the center of the halo, with 1% of the ejecta reaching the center in {approx}30 kyr and 10% in {approx}10 Myr. The average metallicity of the combined returning ejecta and the pristine filaments feeding into the halo center from the cosmic web is {approx}0.001-0.01 Z{sub Sun }, but the two remain unmixed until accreting onto the central hydrostatic core that is unresolved at the end of the simulation. We conclude that if Population III stars had less extreme masses, they promptly enriched the host minihalos with metals and triggered Population II star formation.

Ritter, Jeremy S.; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Milosavljevic, Milos; Bromm, Volker [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gnat, Orly [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Photoelectronic characterization of heterointerfaces.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many devices such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, transistors, etc., the performance relies on the electronic structure at interfaces between materials within the device. The objective of this work was to perform robust characterization of hybrid (organic/inorganic) interfaces by tailoring the interfacial region for photoelectron spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were utilized to induce dipoles of various magnitudes at the interface. Additionally, SAMs of molecules with varying dipolar characteristics were mixed into spatially organized structures to systematically vary the apparent work function. Polymer thin films were characterized by depositing films of varying thicknesses on numerous substrates with and without interfacial modifications. Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) was performed to evaluate a buried interface between indium tin oxide (ITO), treated under various conditions, and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). Conducting polymer films were found to be sufficiently conducting such that no significant charge redistribution in the polymer films was observed. Consequently, a further departure from uniform substrates was taken whereby electrically disconnected regions of the substrate presented ideally insulating interfacial contacts. In order to accomplish this novel strategy, interdigitated electrodes were used as the substrate. Conducting fingers of one half of the electrodes were electrically grounded while the other set of electrodes were electronically floating. This allowed for the evaluation of substrate charging on photoelectron spectra (SCOPES) in the presence of overlying semiconducting thin films. Such an experiment has never before been reported. This concept was developed out of the previous experiments on interfacial modification and thin film depositions and presents new opportunities for understanding chemical and electronic changes in a multitude of materials and interfaces.

Brumbach, Michael Todd

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Third millenium ideal gas and condensed phase thermochemical database for combustion (with update from active thermochemical tables).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermochemical database of species involved in combustion processes is and has been available for free use for over 25 years. It was first published in print in 1984, approximately 8 years after it was first assembled, and contained 215 species at the time. This is the 7th printed edition and most likely will be the last one in print in the present format, which involves substantial manual labor. The database currently contains more than 1300 species, specifically organic molecules and radicals, but also inorganic species connected to combustion and air pollution. Since 1991 this database is freely available on the internet, at the Technion-IIT ftp server, and it is continuously expanded and corrected. The database is mirrored daily at an official mirror site, and at random at about a dozen unofficial mirror and 'finger' sites. The present edition contains numerous corrections and many recalculations of data of provisory type by the G3//B3LYP method, a high-accuracy composite ab initio calculation. About 300 species are newly calculated and are not yet published elsewhere. In anticipation of the full coupling, which is under development, the database started incorporating the available (as yet unpublished) values from Active Thermochemical Tables. The electronic version now also contains an XML file of the main database to allow transfer to other formats and ease finding specific information of interest. The database is used by scientists, educators, engineers and students at all levels, dealing primarily with combustion and air pollution, jet engines, rocket propulsion, fireworks, but also by researchers involved in upper atmosphere kinetics, astrophysics, abrasion metallurgy, etc. This introductory article contains explanations of the database and the means to use it, its sources, ways of calculation, and assessments of the accuracy of data.

Burcat, A.; Ruscic, B.; Chemistry; Technion - Israel Inst. of Tech.

2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Use of streamtube to model multiphase flow is demonstrated to be a fast and accurate approach for displacements that are dominated by reservoir heterogeneity. The streamtube technique is particularly powerful for multiphase compositional displacements because it represents the effects of phase behavior with a one-dimensional flow and represents the effects of heterogeneity through the locations of streamtubes. A new approach for fast calculations of critical tie-lines directly from criticality conditions is reported. A global triangular structure solution for four-component flow systems, whose tie-lies meet at the edge of a quaternary phase diagram or lie in planes is presented. Also demonstrated is the extension of this solution to multicomponent systems under the same assumptions. The interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces on final residual oil saturation is examined experimentally and theoretically. The analysis of vertical equilibrium conditions for three-phase gravity drainage shows that almost all oil can be recovered from the top part of a reservoir. The prediction of spreading and stability of thin film is performed to investigate three-phase gravity drainage mechanisms. Finally, experimental results from gravity drainage of crude oil in the presence of CO{sub 2} suggest that gravity drainage could be an efficient oil recovery process for vertically fractured reservoirs.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Retention behavior of dilute polymers in oil sands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adequate mobility control between fluid banks is a pertinent factor in the successful application of secondary and tertiary oil recovery processes. Favorable mobilities can be obtained by increasing the viscosity or reducing the permeability to the displacing fluid phase. Polyacrylamide and oio-polymers have proved to be useful for these purposes. These polymers increase the water viscosity substantially at low concentrations. The resulting reduced mobility of the displacing phase suppresses the fingering phenomenon and improves piston-like displacement. However, the structural complexity of these polymers coupled with the complexity of the flow channels in the porous medium cause part of these polymers to be retained in the reservoir as the displacing fluid from advances, thereby causing a reduction in the concentration of the polymer solution and consequently a loss of mobility control. In addition to the mechanical filtering, adsorption on the grain surfaces reduce the polymer concentration in the displacing fluid. Behavior of polyacrylamide polymers has been studied extensively. Susceptibility of these polymers to salinity, pH, shear, temperature, etc., is well documented. Mechanical entrapment, retention, degradation and adsorption behavior on porous media, including fired Berea sandstone, bead packs and Ottawa sand have been reported. The present study investigates the adsorption and trapping of polymers in flow experiments through unconsolidated oil field sands. Effects of particle size and mineral content have been studied. Effect of a surfactant slug on polymer-rock interaction is also reported. Corroborative studies have been conducted to study the pressure behavior and high tertiary oil recovery in surfactant dilute-polymer systems.

Kikani, J.; Somerton, W.H.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY STATION DEVELOPMENT FOR THE PIT DISASSEMBLY AND CONVERSION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed prototype equipment to demonstrate remote surveying of Inner and Outer DOE Standard 3013 containers for fixed and transferable contamination in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 and 10 CFR 835 Appendix B. When fully developed the equipment will be part of a larger suite of equipment used to package material in accordance with DOE Standard 3013 at the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project slated for installation at the Savannah River Site. The prototype system consists of a small six-axis industrial robot with an end effector consisting of a force sensor, vacuum gripper and a three fingered pneumatic gripper. The work cell also contains two alpha survey instruments, swipes, swipe dispenser, and other ancillary equipment. An external controller interfaces with the robot controller, survey instruments and other ancillary equipment to control the overall process. SRNL is developing automated equipment for the Pit Disassembly and Conversion (PDC) Project that is slated for the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment being developed is automated packaging equipment for packaging plutonium bearing materials in accordance with DOE-STD-3013-2004. The subject of this paper is the development of a prototype Radiological Survey Station (RSS). Other automated equipment being developed for the PDC includes the Bagless transfer System, Outer Can Welder, Gantry Robot System (GRS) and Leak Test Station. The purpose of the RSS is to perform a frisk and swipe of the DOE Standard 3013 Container (either inner can or outer can) to check for fixed and transferable contamination. This is required to verify that the contamination levels are within the limits specified in DOE-STD-3013-2004 and 10 CFR 835, Appendix D. The surface contamination limit for the 3013 Outer Can (OC) is 500 dpm/100 cm2 (total) and 20 dpm/100 cm2 (transferable). This paper will concentrate on the RSS developments for the 3013 OC but the system for the 3013 Inner Can (IC) is nearly identical.

Dalmaso, M.; Gibbs, K.; Gregory, D.

2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Some surprises in the transport of miscible fluids in the presence of a second immiscible phase  

SciTech Connect

Displacements were conducted in Berea cores to gain insight into the mechanism of tertiary oil displacement and propagation by a micellar slug. Contrary to expectation, the first oil mobilized by micellar fluid was among the first oil (instead of the last oil) to be produced, giving the appearance of either viscous fingering or of unusually large dispersion. To eliminate the possibility of unfavorable mobility ratios caused by oil/water/surfactant interaction, we conducted several runs in which an injected hydrocarbon displaced another hydrocarbon, initially at residual saturation. In other experiments, water (the wetting phase) at irreducible saturation was displaced by a distinguishable injected aqueous phase. Injected hydrocarbon appeared in the produced fluids immediately after oil breakthrough, yielding behavior similar to the micellar-slug experiments. Even with a favorable viscosity ratio of less than 0.01, the apparent dispersion was huge. However, mixing zones in the wetting-phase displacements were quite normal and similar to those observed for single-phase flow. Nonwetting-phase fronts (injected hydrocarbon displacing resident hydrocarbon) are smeared much more than wetting-phase fronts because the entrance of hydrocarbon into smaller water-filled pore throats is delayed until the capillary entrance pressure is overcome by differences in the flowing oil and water pressure gradients. Oil might not be displaced from the smaller pores until long after oil breakthrough. Nonwetting-phase dispersion, which occurs in many EOR processes, can be expected to be one or two orders of magnitude greater than dispersion measured in singlephase-flow experiments. Entrance of the wetting phase, however, is not delayed; hence, wetting-phase mixing zones are short.

Jones, S.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Some surprises in the transport of miscible fluids in the presence of a second immiscible phase  

SciTech Connect

Displacements were conducted in Berea cores to gain insight into the mechanism of tertiary oil displacement and propagation by a micellar slug. Contrary to expectation, the first-displaced oil was among the first-produced oil, giving the appearance of either viscous fingering or of unusually large dispersion. To eliminate the possibility of unfavorable mobility ratios due to oil-water-surfactant interaction, the authors conducted several runs in which an injected hydrocarbon displaced another hydrocarbon, initially at residual saturation. In other experiments, water (the wetting phase) at irreducible saturation was displaced by a distinguishable injected aqueous phase. Injected hydrocarbon appeared in the produced fluids immediately after oil breakthrough, yielding similar behavior to the micellar slug experiments. Even with a favorable viscosity ratio of less than 0.01, the apparent dispersion was huge. However, mixing zones in the wetting-phase displacements were quite normal, and similar to those observed for single-phase flow. Nonwetting-phase fronts (injected hydrocarbon displacing resident hydrocarbon) are smeared much more than wetting-phase fronts because entrance of hydrocarbon into smaller water-filled pore throats is delayed until the capillary entrance pressure is overcome by differences in the flowing oil and water pressure gradients. Oil may not be displaced from the smaller pores until long after oil breakthrough. Nonwetting-phase dispersion, which occurs in many EOR processes, can be expected to be one or two orders of magnitude greater than dispersion measured in single-phase-flow experiments. Entrance of the wetting phase, however, is not delayed; hence, wetting-phase mixing zones are short.

Jones, S.C.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to characterize the cell shape and tip undercooling and the experimental results are compared with the predictions of the model. From the investigation of cell/dendrite transition, a model is proposed, from which the condition for the onset of the transition can be obtained.

Jing Teng

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Study of CO2 Mobility Control Using Cross-linked Gel Conformance Control and CO2 Viscosifiers in Heterogeneous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 has been widely used as a displacement fluid in both immiscible and miscible displacement processes to obtain tertiary recovery from the field. There are several problems associated with the application of CO2 flooding, especially when there is a significant presence of heterogeneous elements, such as fractures, channels and high permeability streaks within the reservoir. With flooding, CO2 will finger through the target zone while leaving most of the residual/trapped oil untouched. As a result, early gas breakthrough has been a very common problem in CO2-related projects, reducing the overall sweep efficiency of CO2 flooding. This research aims at improving the CO2 flood efficiency using cross-linked gel conformance control and CO2 viscosifier technique. A series of coreflood experiment studies have been performed to investigate the possibility of applying CO2 mobility control techniques. Corresponding simulation works have also been carried out to predict the benefits of applying CO2 mobility control techniques in the field. In the laboratory study, the CO2 coreflood system was integrated with the CT (Computed Tomography)-scanner and obtained real-time coreflood images of the CO2 saturation distributions in the core. This system was applied to the research of both cross-linked polymer gel treatment and CO2 viscosifier study and produced images with sharp phase contrasts. For the gel conformance study, promising results were obtained by applying cross-linked gel to eliminate permeability contrast and diverting CO2 into low permeability regions to obtain incremental oil recovery; also studied were the gel strength in terms of leak-off extent with the aid of CT (Computed Tomography) images. For the CO2 viscosifier research, we tested several potential viscosifier chemicals and found out PVAc (Polyvinylacetate)/toluene combination to be the most promising. The follow-up study clearly demonstrates the superiority of viscosified CO2 over neat CO2 in terms of sweep efficiency. This research serves as a preliminary study in understanding advanced CO2 mobility control techniques and will provide insights to future studies on this topic.

Cai, Shuzong

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Structure and stability of Co(II)-complexes formed by wild-type and metal-ligand substitution mutants of T4 gene 32 protein  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) is a zinc metalloprotein that binds cooperatively and preferentially to single-stranded nucleic acids and functions as a replication and recombination accessory protein. We have previously shown that the ZN(II) coordination by gp32 employs a metal ligand donor set unrelated to any known zinc-finger motif thus far described and is derived from the His64-XI2-Cys77-Xg-Cys87-X2-CYS90 sequence in the ssDNA-binding core domain of the molecule. Crystallographic studies reveal that His64 and Cys77 are derived from two independent p-strands and are relatively more buried from solvent than are Cys87 and Cys9O, which combine to nucleate an (X-helix. In an effort to understand the origin of the stability of the metal complex, we have employed an anaerobic optical spectroscopic, competitive metal binding assay to determine the coordination geometry and association constants (Ka) for the binding of CO(II) to wild-type gp32 and a series of zinc ligand substitution mutants. We find that all non-native metal complexes retain tetrahedral coordination geometry but are greatly destabilized in a manner essentially independent of whether a new protein-derived coordination bond is forfned (e.g., in H64C gp32) or not. Quantitative Co(H) binding isotherms for the His64 mutants reveal that these gp32s form a dimeric CYS4 tetrathiolate intermediate complex of differing affinities at limiting [Co]f; each then rearranges at high [Co]f to form a monomolecular site of the expected geometry and Ka=IXIO4 M-1. C87S and C90A gp32s, in contrast, form a single complex at all [Co]f, consistent with CYS2-His-H20 tetrahedral geometry of Ka=1-2xlo5 M-1. The susceptibility of all mutant metal sites to oxidation by 02 is far greater than the wild-type protein; none appear to be functional ssDNA binding proteins. These studies reveal that the local protein structure greatly limits accommodation of an altered complex in a ligand-specific manner. The implications of this work for de novo design of zinc complexes in proteins will be discussed.

Guo, Juqian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparative activation of estrogen receptor alpha (er alpha) by endocrine disruptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estrogen receptor ? (ER?) is a ligand activated transcription factor. Many widely used synthetic compounds and natural chemicals can activate ER?. The compounds investigated in this study include 17?-estradiol (E2), diethylstilbestrol (DES), antiestrogens ICI 182,780, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, the phytoestrogen resveratrol, and the xenoestrogens bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), endosulfan, kepone, 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1- trichloroethane (HPTE) and 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorobiphenylol-4-ol (HO-PCB-Cl4). With the exception of the antiestrogens, all the compounds induced transactivation in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with wild-type ER? and a construct (pERE3) containing three tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) linked to a luciferase gene. However, these compounds differentially activated C-terminal deletion mutants of ER?. For example, neither E2 nor DES induced transactivation in MCF-7 transfected with ER?(1-537) due to partial deletion of helix 12 of ER?; however, OP, NP, resveratrol, kepone and HPTE induced this ER? mutant, demonstrating that the estrogenic activity of these synthetic compounds do not require activation function 2 (AF-2) of ER?. This study also investigated the effects of xenoestrogens on activation of reporter gene activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with a construct (pSp13) containing three tandem GC-rich Sp binding sites linked to the luciferase gene. In MCF-7 cells, antiestrogen-induced activation of ER?/Sp1 required the zinc finger motifs of ER?, whereas activation by estrogen and some xenoestrogens activation, such as endosulfan, NP and OP required the H12 of ER?. In contrast, xenoestrogens, such as HPTE, BPA, kepone and HO-PCBCl4, significantly induced transactivation of all four ER? deletion mutants tested in this study. Moreover, RNA interference assays demonstrated structuredependent differences in activation of ER?/Sp1, ER?/Sp3 and ER?/Sp4. The in vivo activities of E2, ICI 182,780, BPA and NP were further investigated in a transgenic mouse model containing pSp13 transgene. All the compounds induced luciferase activity in the mouse uterus; however activities observed in the penis and testis of male and stomach of both male and female mice were structure-dependent,. These results demonstrate that various ER ligands differentially activate ER? in breast cancer cells and transgenic mice, and their activities are dependent on ER? variants, promoter-, cell-context and selective use of different Sp proteins, suggesting these structurally diverse compounds are selective ER modulators (SERMs).

Wu, Fei

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Robotic Surveying  

SciTech Connect

ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fracture Detection and Water Sweep Characterization Using Single-well Imaging, Vertical Seismic Profiling and Cross-dipole Methods in Tight and Super-k Zones, Haradh II, Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work was conducted to help understand a premature and irregular water breakthrough which resulted from a waterflooding project in the increment II region of Haradh oilfield in Saudi Arabia using different geophysical methods. Oil wells cannot sustain the targeted oil production rates and they die much sooner than expected when water enters the wells. The study attempted to identify fracture systems and their role in the irregular water sweep. Single-well acoustic migration imaging (SWI), walkaround vertical seismic profiling (VSP) and cross-dipole shear wave measurements were used to detect anisotropy caused by fractures near and far from the borehole. The results from all the different methods were analyzed to understand the possible causes of water fingering in the field and determine the reasons for discrepancies and similarities of results of the different methods. The study was done in wells located in the area of the irregular water encroachment in Haradh II oilfield. Waterflooding was performed, where water was injected in the water injector wells drilled at the flanks of Harahd II toward the oil producer wells. Unexpected water coning was noticed in the west flank of the field. While cross-dipole and SWI measurements of a small-scale clearly identify a fracture oriented N60E in the upper tight zone of the reservoir, the VSP measurements of a large-scale showed a dominating fracture system to the NS direction in the upper highpermeability zone of the same reservoir. These results are consistent with the directions of the three main fracture sets in the field at N130E, N80E and N20E, and the direction of the maximum horizontal stress in the field varies between N50E and N90E. Results suggested that the fracture which is detected by cross-dipole at 2 to 4 ft from the borehole is the same fracture detected by SWI 65 ft away from the borehole. This fracture was described using the SWI as being 110 ft from top to bottom, having an orientation of N60E and having an angle of dip of 12° relative to the vertical borehole axis. The detected fracture is located in the tight zone of the reservoir makes a path for water to enter the well from that zone. On the Other hand, the fractures detected by the large-scale VSP measurements in the NS direction are responsible for the high-permeability in the upper zone of the reservoir.

Aljeshi, Hussain Abdulhadi A.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Genomic Differences Between Highly Fertile and Sub-Fertile Holstein Dairy Heifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infertility in dairy cattle remains a major economic loss to dairy producers. Identifying dairy cattle with superior genetic potential for improved fertility would increase dairy farm profitability. Dairy heifers were classified into two groups based upon services per conception (SPC); those animals with a single SPC were determined to be highly fertile and animals with greater than or equal to 4 SPC were classified as sub-fertile. Whole genome association analysis was performed on 20 individual heifers from each group utilizing a 777K highly density (HD) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip. Genomic data were evaluated utilizing PLINK, a whole genome association analysis toolset, and 570,620 SNP were available for analysis with a total of 39 samples being analyzed. Forty-four SNP were determined to be associated with fertility classification (P <= 0.00001) and were located on Bos taurus chromosome (BTA) 2, 4, 9, 19, and 26. The SNP and ranges between SNP were analyzed using BLAST-Like Alignment Tool (BLAT); SNP were associated with 5 candidate genes for reproduction. The SNP on BTA 2 were located within the region coding for the non-imprinted Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 2 (NIPA2) gene, which is involved in gestational magnesium transport. Also on BTA 2, SNP were identified within the region encoding for cytoplasmic fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) interaction protein 1 (CYFIP1). The CYFIP1 gene is involved with the functionality of FMR1 and has been linked to premature ovarian failure in humans. Additionally, 3 SNP on BTA 9 were located near monofunctional C1-tetrahydrofolate synthase (MTHFD1L), which has been linked to neural tube defects during gestation in humans A difference in allele frequency was observed between the two groups for SNP located on BTA19 in proximity to two genes, zinc finger 18 (ZNF18) and mitogen activated protein kinase 4 (MAP2K4). The ZNF18 motif and MAP2K4 were found to be involved in heart development of the early embryo and associated with toll-like receptors (TLR) involved in gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) signaling, respectively. The involvement of one or all of these genes may further explain reduced fertility in dairy cattle.

Navarrette, Ashley Elizabeth

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Increasing the Viscosity of CO2 to Improve EOR Performance Authors: D. Xing, NETL; R. Erick, NETL and University of Pittsburgh Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering; K. Trickett, J. Eastoe, M. Hollamby, and K.Mutch, Bristol University School of Chemistry; S. Rogers and R. Heenan, ISIS STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, UK; and D. Steytler, University of East Anglia School of Chemical Sciences, Norwich, UK. Venue: May 20, 2009, ISASF-ENSIC 9th International Symposium on Supercritical Fluids, Bordeaux, France, May 18-20, 2009. http://www.issf2009.cnrs.fr/ [external site] Abstract: About 1.5 billion standard cubic feet of CO2 is injected into US oil fields each day, resulting in the recovery of about 200,000 barrels per day of oil, but the low viscosity of CO2 results in viscous fingering and poor volumetric sweep efficiency. If the viscosity of dense CO2 could be increased by a factor of 2-20, much less CO2 would be required to recover the oil. Further, there would be no need for the injection of alternating slugs of water into the reservoir to reduce the relative permeability of the CO2. Researchers have identified two polymeric thickeners for CO2: a fluoroacrylate-styrene copolymer and a vinyl acetate-styrene copolymer. They have also hypothesized that it is possible to increase the viscosity (thicken) dense, high-pressure CO2 via the self-assembly of CO2-soluble surfactants into rod-like micelles. Three semi-fluorinated surfactants have been synthesized in order to test this concept; one with a monovalent cation and a single twin-tail, Na+1((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1, and two with a divalent cation and two twin-tails, Ni+2(((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1)2 and Co+2(((COOCH2C4F8H)2CH2CHSO3)-1)2. Phase behavior results indicate that all three surfactants are soluble to at least 5 wt% in CO2 at 295K and pressures less than 20 MPa. SANS results indicate that only the surfactants with divalent metal ions and two twin tails form cylindrical micelles in CO2. No viscosity enhancement was detected for the surfactant with the monovalent cation. Falling cylinder viscometry results will illustrate the degree of “CO2 thickening” that was achieved by the formation of rod-like micelles at relatively high shear rates. The mobility of the surfactant solution flowing through Berea sandstone was also provided to determine the effectiveness of the thickener at extremely low shear rates characteristic of enhanced oil recovery projects. The performance of the copolymeric and surfactant thickeners will be compared. The strategy for the development of CO2-soluble non-fluorous surfactants capable of forming rod-like micelles will also be presented.

403

Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF/STB. The bubblepoint pressure for live oil samples varied between 1600 psi and 2100 psi. Wax precipitation is one of the most important phenomena in wax deposition and, hence, needs to be modeled. There are various models present in the literature. Won's model, which considers the wax phase as a non-ideal solution, and Pedersen's model, which considers the wax phase as an ideal solution, were compared. Comparison indicated that Pedersen's model gives better results, but the assumption of wax phase as an ideal solution is not realistic. Hence, Won's model was modified to consider different precipitation characteristics of the various constituents in the hydrocarbon fraction. The results obtained from the modified Won's model were compared with existing models, and it was found that predictions from the modified model are encouraging.

Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Interactions of Zinc Thiolate Complexes and Exogenous Metal Species: Investigations of Thiolate Bridging and Metal Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small molecule Zn(II) complexes containing N- and S- donor environments may serve as appropriate models for mimicking Zn protein sites, and thus, their reactions with heavy metal ions such as Pt(II) and W(0) may provide insight into possible adduct formation and zinc displacement. To study such possible interactions between zinc finger proteins and platinum-bound DNA, the ZnN2S2 dimeric complex, N,N?-bis(2- mercaptoethyl)-1,4-diazacycloheptane zinc (II), [Zn-1?]2, has been examined for Znbound thiolate reactivity in the presence of Pt(II) nitrogen ? rich compounds. The reactions yielded Zn/Pt di- and tri- nuclear thiolate-bridged adducts and metalexchanged products, which were initially observed via ESI-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis of reaction solutions, and ultimately verified by comparison to the ESI-MS analysis, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography of directly synthesized complexes. The isolation of Zn-(?-SR)-Pt-bridged [(Zn(bme-dach)Cl)(Pt(dien))]Cl adduct from these studies is, to our knowledge, the first Zn-Pt bimetallic thiolatebridged model demonstrating the interaction between Zn-bound thiolates and Pt(II). Additional derivatives involving Pd(II) and Au(III) have been explored to parallel the experiments executed with Pt(II). The [Zn-1?]2 was then modified by cleavage with Na+[ICH2CO2]- to produce (N- (3-Thiabutyl)-N?-(3-thiapentaneoate)-1,4-diazacycloheptane) zinc(II), Zn-1?-Ac or ZnN2SS?O, and 1,4-diazacycloheptane-1,4-diylbis(3-thiapentanoato) zinc(II), Zn-1?-Ac2 or ZnN2S?2O2, monomeric complexes (where S = thiolate, S? = thioether). The [Zn-1?]2 di- and Zn-1?-Ac mono-thiolato complexes demonstrated reactivity towards labile-ligand tungsten carbonyl species, (THF)W(CO)5 and (pip)2W(CO)4, to yield, respectively, the [(Zn-1?-Cl)W(CO)4]- complex and the [(Zn-1?-Ac)W(CO)5]x coordination polymer. With the aid of CO ligands for IR spectral monitoring, the products were isolated and characterized spectroscopically, as well as by X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. To examine the potential for zinc complexes (or zinc-templated ligands) to possibly serve as a toxic metal remediation agents, Zn-1?-Ac and Zn-1?-Ac2 were reacted with Ni(BF4)2. The formation of Zn/Ni exchanged products confirmed the capability of ?free? Ni(II) to displace Zn(II) within the N-, S-, and O- chelate environment. The Zn/Ni exchanged complexes were analyzed by ESI-MS, UV-visible spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy of the acetate regions, and X-ray crystallography. They serve as foundation molecules for more noxious metal exchange / zinc displacement products.

Almaraz, Elky

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens  

SciTech Connect

The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully functionally characterized. On the basis of prior work, we predicted that cTHAP4 is composed of a heme-binding nitrobindin domain, making THAP4 the only human THAP protein predicted to bind a cofactor. Nitrobindin, a recently characterized protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, is structurally similar and exhibits nitric oxide (NO)-binding properties that resemble the heme-binding nitrophorins. Nitrophorins use a heme moiety to store, transport, and release NO in a pH-specific manner. Although the exact function of nitrobindin is not fully known, the similarities between the well-characterized nitrophorins imply a role in NO transport, sensing, or metabolism. To better elucidate the possible function of THAP4, we solved the hemebound structure of cTHAP4 to a resolution of 1.79 {angstrom}.

Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Characterization and Alteration of Wettability States of Alaskan Reserviors to Improve Oil Recovery Efficiency (including the within-scope expansion based on Cyclic Water Injection - a pulsed waterflood for Enhanced Oil Recovery)  

SciTech Connect

Numerous early reports on experimental works relating to the role of wettability in various aspects of oil recovery have been published. Early examples of laboratory waterfloods show oil recovery increasing with increasing water-wetness. This result is consistent with the intuitive notion that strong wetting preference of the rock for water and associated strong capillary-imbibition forces gives the most efficient oil displacement. This report examines the effect of wettability on waterflooding and gasflooding processes respectively. Waterflood oil recoveries were examined for the dual cases of uniform and non-uniform wetting conditions. Based on the results of the literature review on effect of wettability and oil recovery, coreflooding experiments were designed to examine the effect of changing water chemistry (salinity) on residual oil saturation. Numerous corefloods were conducted on reservoir rock material from representative formations on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The corefloods consisted of injecting water (reservoir water and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water) of different salinities in secondary as well as tertiary mode. Additionally, complete reservoir condition corefloods were also conducted using live oil. In all the tests, wettability indices, residual oil saturation, and oil recovery were measured. All results consistently lead to one conclusion; that is, a decrease in injection water salinity causes a reduction in residual oil saturation and a slight increase in water-wetness, both of which are comparable with literature observations. These observations have an intuitive appeal in that water easily imbibes into the core and displaces oil. Therefore, low-salinity waterfloods have the potential for improved oil recovery in the secondary recovery process, and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water is an attractive source of injection water or a source for diluting the high-salinity reservoir water. As part of the within-scope expansion of this project, cyclic water injection tests using high as well as low salinity were also conducted on several representative ANS core samples. These results indicate that less pore volume of water is required to recover the same amount of oil as compared with continuous water injection. Additionally, in cyclic water injection, oil is produced even during the idle time of water injection. It is understood that the injected brine front spreads/smears through the pores and displaces oil out uniformly rather than viscous fingering. The overall benefits of this project include increased oil production from existing Alaskan reservoirs. This conclusion is based on the performed experiments and results obtained on low-salinity water injection (including ANS lake water), vis-a-vis slightly altering the wetting conditions. Similarly, encouraging cyclic water-injection test results indicate that this method can help achieve residual oil saturation earlier than continuous water injection. If proved in field, this would be of great use, as more oil can be recovered through cyclic water injection for the same amount of water injected.

Abhijit Dandekar; Shirish Patil; Santanu Khataniar

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

Seneca Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Project  

SciTech Connect

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a hybrid energy storage and generation concept that has many potential benefits especially in a location with increasing percentages of intermittent wind energy generation. The objectives of the NYSEG Seneca CAES Project included: for Phase 1, development of a Front End Engineering Design for a 130MW to 210 MW utility-owned facility including capital costs; project financials based on the engineering design and forecasts of energy market revenues; design of the salt cavern to be used for air storage; draft environmental permit filings; and draft NYISO interconnection filing; for Phase 2, objectives included plant construction with a target in-service date of mid-2016; and for Phase 3, objectives included commercial demonstration, testing, and two-years of performance reporting. This Final Report is presented now at the end of Phase 1 because NYSEG has concluded that the economics of the project are not favorable for development in the current economic environment in New York State. The proposed site is located in NYSEG’s service territory in the Town of Reading, New York, at the southern end of Seneca Lake, in New York State’s Finger Lakes region. The landowner of the proposed site is Inergy, a company that owns the salt solution mining facility at this property. Inergy would have developed a new air storage cavern facility to be designed for NYSEG specifically for the Seneca CAES project. A large volume, natural gas storage facility owned and operated by Inergy is also located near this site and would have provided a source of high pressure pipeline quality natural gas for use in the CAES plant. The site has an electrical take-away capability of 210 MW via two NYSEG 115 kV circuits located approximately one half mile from the plant site. Cooling tower make-up water would have been supplied from Seneca Lake. NYSEG’s engineering consultant WorleyParsons Group thoroughly evaluated three CAES designs and concluded that any of the designs would perform acceptably. Their general scope of work included development of detailed project construction schedules, capital cost and cash flow estimates for both CAES cycles, and development of detailed operational data, including fuel and compression energy requirements, to support dispatch modeling for the CAES cycles. The Dispatch Modeling Consultant selected for this project was Customized Energy Solutions (CES). Their general scope of work included development of wholesale electric and gas market price forecasts and development of a dispatch model specific to CAES technologies. Parsons Brinkerhoff Energy Storage Services (PBESS) was retained to develop an air storage cavern and well system design for the CAES project. Their general scope of work included development of a cavern design, solution mining plan, and air production well design, cost, and schedule estimates for the project. Detailed Front End Engineering Design (FEED) during Phase 1 of the project determined that CAES plant capital equipment costs were much greater than the $125.6- million originally estimated by EPRI for the project. The initial air storage cavern Design Basis was increased from a single five million cubic foot capacity cavern to three, five million cubic foot caverns with associated air production wells and piping. The result of this change in storage cavern Design Basis increased project capital costs significantly. In addition, the development time required to complete the three cavern system was estimated at approximately six years. This meant that the CAES plant would initially go into service with only one third of the required storage capacity and would not achieve full capability until after approximately five years of commercial operation. The market price forecasting and dispatch modeling completed by CES indicated that the CAES technologies would operate at only 10 to 20% capacity factors and the resulting overall project economics were not favorable for further development. As a result of all of these factors, the Phase 1 FEED developed an installe

None

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z